Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
Admissions; Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Anthropology (1)
Athletics (1)
Biological Sciences (2)
International Affairs (Office of); Modern and Classical Language (MCLS); Student (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Mathematics (1)
Music (1)
Psychology (1)
Research (1)
University Press (1)
WKSU-FM (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions; Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Planning to go to a local college? Apply now, officials say (Dellavecchia) 07/05/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Anthropology (1)
Homo Sapiens, Meet Your New Astounding Family (Lovejoy) 07/03/2011 Discover Text Attachment Email

...experiment in evolution—reflexively assuming we are the crown of creation. Certainly we are rare and strange: As biological anthropologist Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University says, “The chances that a creature like us will ever happen again are so small that I can't even measure them.” But...


Athletics (1)
ESPN could come calling for Kent State-West Virginia basketball game (Senderoff) 07/05/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Biological Sciences (2)
Lake Erie water-use bill draws foes, even within GOP 07/05/2011 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

..."high quality" streams. Ohio would have the most-generous water-use regulation of any state in the compact. Scientists from Ohio State University, Kent State University and the Nature Conservancy testified that "uncontrolled withdrawals" could result in more harmful algal blooms, damage...

Lake Norman water clarity, quality to be tested 07/01/2011 Denver Weekly - Online Text Attachment Email

...nutrients and invasive species. So to start learning more about water quality, he's gotten involved in the Secchi Dip-In project. A group of professors at Kent State University started the project in 1994, which involves dipping a circular black and white disk on a rope into the water to check...


International Affairs (Office of); Modern and Classical Language (MCLS); Student (1)
KSU student's hard work getting awards helps fund year abroad (Koby) 07/05/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


KSU at Trumbull (1)
(SPORT TV) It will cost more to attend Kent State University's Trumbull Campus. 07/01/2011 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV Text Email

...Division Street and Martin Luther King Boulevard. There's no word on the names or conditions of the victims. (SPORT TV) It will cost more to attend Kent State University's Trumbull Campus. KSU is raising tuition three and a half percent this fall. That's the maximum allowed by the state....


Liquid Crystal Institute; Mathematics (1)
Kent State researchers solve geometry problem that assists drilling industry (Palffy-Muhoray, Zheng) 07/02/2011 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Two Kent State University researchers recently found out that solving an abstract geometry problem can yield unexpected benefits. In the 1970s,...


Music (1)
'A Toast to Blossom' Blossom Women's Committee holds fundraiser 07/03/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...with Sherry and Dave Joy as co-hosts. Music was provided for the 220 guests in attendance by violinist Yang Zeng, a student in the School of Music at Kent State University; the KSU Flash in the Pan Steel Band, directed by Tyler Rounds, who performed Caribbean and South American tunes; and...


Psychology (1)
Testing improves memory 07/04/2011 CPI Financial Text Email

"We've known for over 100 years that testing is good for memory," says Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn. Psychologists have proven in a myriad of experiments that 'retrieval practice'—correctly...


Research (1)
Kent State professors snag $7 million to expand company 07/05/2011 justjobs.com Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
Lakewood author's book wins award 07/01/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...his book "Meet Me on Lake Erie, Dearie!: Cleveland's Great Lakes Exposition, 1936-1937." The former Cleveland teacher's book was recently published by Kent State University Press. This was Vacha's fourth book on local history. Vacha is regional coordinator for the National History Day in Ohio...


WKSU-FM (1)
WKSU staffers win AP broadcasting awards 07/05/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Planning to go to a local college? Apply now, officials say (Dellavecchia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Enrolling in one of the area's public universities or community colleges at the last minute may no longer be an option at some campuses.

Last month, for the first time since 2002, strong interest from potential students led Kent State University to stop accepting new freshmen applications for its main campus for fall semester.

While Cleveland State University will accept all applications almost up to the first day of fall classes and University of Akron students can apply until Aug. 1, officials say numbers are up and classes are filling fast.

Students have to be in their seats on the first day of class at Cuyahoga Community College and Lakeland Community College, which have eliminated a policy allowing enrollments through the first week of school.

Lorain County Community College will allow students to register through the first week of class provided they have not missed more than one class, a spokeswoman said. But it is considering changing the policy to require registration before classes begin.

Officials attribute the rise in applications to the ease with which students can apply online to multiple colleges. But while KSU officials predict a record number of freshmen when school begins, others aren't so sure the applications will translate into enrolled students.

KSU's freshmen applications were up 22.6 percent, or 3,358, by June 20 compared to last year, said Nancy DellaVecchia, director of admissions. The university capped applications at around 18,200, a record , and expects about 4,200 to enroll, she said.

Freshmen who haven't yet applied can enroll at the university's seven regional campuses this fall or at the main campus spring semester, she said.

Although KSU hasn't set a limit on total enrollment at the main campus, "We may see that after this fall," she said. "Discussions are happening."

The University of Akron will not limit applications because many of its students, especially adults entering college for the first time, decide late in the summer to attend, said William Kraus, associate vice president of strategic enrollment.

"That is a very important population to us," he said.

The number of applications between fall 2005 until now have risen 63 percent, Kraus said. But any one-year surge does not necessarily mean more students.

"There is an influx of online applications and probably more shopping going on," he said. "That's where the challenge remains. You have to get the yield from the applications."

UA has about 14,000 applications for first -year freshmen - up about 2 percent from last year, he said. It will offer admission to about 11,000. Last year, the university enrolled 4,796 freshmen, compared to 3,395 in 2005.

Cleveland State University has about 4,800 freshmen applications, up 12 percent from last year, said Heike Heinrich, director of undergraduate admissions. It enrolled 1,245 freshmen last year.

She said CSU is seeing more applications from people in Cuyahoga County suburbs, from students interested in living on campus and from those who qualify for a program that provides a $3,000 annual scholarship to incoming freshmen who have a 3.0 grade-point average in high school and an ACT score of at least 23.

"We are going to continue admitting," she said. "The more the merrier."

Like CSU, area community colleges have no firm idea how many students will enroll until shortly before classes begin.

"We are trying to push it forward a little bit and get the message out to enroll," said Pete Ross, vice president of enrollment management at Tri-C. "It's hard to tell how we're doing now because we get between 25 percent and 30 percent of students from the first of August on."

Tri-C's decision to no longer allow students to register during the first week of the academic session -- perhaps missing the first day or two of classes -- is aimed at increasing student success and clamping down on procrastinators.

"It is more for retention and student success to have them there the first day," Ross said. "It makes them a better student."

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News Headline: Homo Sapiens, Meet Your New Astounding Family (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Discover
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A single, unforgettable image comes to mind when we ponder human origins: a crouching ape slowly standing and morphing into a tall, erect human male poised to conquer every bit of habitable land on this planet. We walk this earth—we, this unparalleled experiment in evolution—reflexively assuming we are the crown of creation. Certainly we are rare and strange: As biological anthropologist Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University says, “The chances that a creature like us will ever happen again are so small that I can't even measure them.”

But that ascent-of-man picture is looking as dated as the flat earth. A series of scientific and technological breakthroughs have altered much of our fundamental understanding of human evolution. In the new view, the path to Homo sapiens was amazingly dilatory and indirect. Along the way, our planet witnessed many variations on the human form, multiple migrations out of Africa, interspecies trysts, and extinctions that ultimately wiped out all hominid species except one. “Human evolution used to seem simple and linear,” says paleoanthropologist William Jungers of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. “Now, you look at almost any time slice and you see diversity. We may be special and we may be lucky, but we're far from the only human experiment.”

Unexpected fossil finds keep showing us an ever-expanding variety of human and prehuman species. Probably the most stunning of these recent discoveries is Ardipithecus ramidus, an ancestor who displayed a fantastical mosaic of ape and human traits. A. ramidus apparently climbed trees but also walked upright some 4.4 million years ago—more than half a million years before the long-accepted origin of bipedalism.

As anthropologists use all the latest tools—genomics, computer analysis, and increasingly sophisticated imaging—to extract deep secrets from the latest fossil finds, they are replacing the “ascent of man” with a captivating new picture of the human family. It edges us decisively closer to understanding not only where we came from but also what made us so much more successful than other, superficially similar primates. “Our relatives, the gorillas and chimpanzees, are still living in the forest in a little piece of West Africa,” Lovejoy says, “and orangutans have survived on two islands in Southeast Asia, but we have evolved rapidly and are everywhere.”

Why, after so many human experiments, are we the only ones left standing?...

Image: Ardipithecus ramidus, Ardi. Courtesy of Wikipedia/T. Michael Keesey

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News Headline: ESPN could come calling for Kent State-West Virginia basketball game (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State could return to this year's ESPN 24 Hours of College Basketball marathon to tip off the 2011-12 season.

The network has approached KSU and West Virginia University about the possibility of moving their season opener in Morgantown from Nov. 14 to 15, allowing it to fit into the 24-hour, 17-game schedule.

Last year, the Golden Flashes hosted Robert Morris in an 8 a.m. game at the M.A.C. Center. KSU won the 62-59 thriller in the first of 10 games broadcast by the ESPN family of networks during the 2010-11 season.

“It was great to be part of that tip-off marathon last year and we are hoping it can work out so that we can do it again, especially considering it will be the first game of the season for us,” said Rob Senderoff, who will be making his debut as Kent State's first-year head coach when the Flashes visit the Mountaineers on either Nov. 14 or 15. “It's still up to ESPN. I'm not exactly sure if it will happen or not, but we are hopeful.”

POPE INJURED

Tulsa transfer Bryson Pope is wearing a cast after fracturing his left wrist during an open gym last week at the M.A.C. Center.

The 6-foot-6 guard will be out for 6-to-8 weeks.

Pope, who is right-handed, will sit out the 2011-12 season under NCAA transfer rules.

LOOKING AHEAD: 2012-13

KSU is already working on its schedule for the 2012-13 men's basketball season.

Every season, the Flashes look for at least one road game against a big-name opponent. Often, those games have been broadcast by one of the ESPN networks. In recent years, KSU has played at Duke, North Carolina, Kansas and Florida.

One of the teams the Flashes have talked to for 2012-13 is Memphis.

KSU already has home games against Temple and Drexel set for that season.

BACK ON THE ROAD

Kent State's entire coaching staff will be on the road from July 6-to-15 for the first recruiting period of an important month.

The Flashes are believed to be looking for a point guard and two big men for their 2012 recruiting class. With Justin Greene and Justin Manns set to graduate after the coming year, KSU is believed t be in the market for a junior-college center who can step in and play right away and one high-school center to groom for the future.

With plenty of talent expected to return for 2012-13, it's unlikely Senderoff will turn the center position over to a true freshman. The Flashes have found success in the past when they've gone with youth at the center position. Nate Gerwig was a true-freshman starter when KSU won 30 games and advanced to the Elite Eight of the NCAA tournament in 2002.

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News Headline: Lake Erie water-use bill draws foes, even within GOP | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name: Alan Johnson
News OCR Text: Legislation about to be signed by Gov. John Kasich regarding the amount of water that can be legally drained from Lake Erie was supposed to bring the state into compliance with the Great Lakes Compact.

But there is disagreement about whether it will achieve that goal.

Opponents say Ohio will be in violation of the Great Lakes Compact, a federal law, as soon as Kasich signs the bill. "Not only does the legislation violate the compact, but Ohio now will have the weakest thresholds for water withdrawals in the region. Lake Erie and all the other Great Lakes deserve better," said Marc Smith of the National Wildlife Federation.

Nonsense, said state Rep. Lynn Wachtmann, R-Napoleon, the sponsor of House Bill 231. He accused environmental advocates who spoke out against the legislation - as did former Govs. Bob Taft and George V. Voinovich - of "fearmongering" and spreading "misinformation."

"Environmental organizations have long wanted to use the compact as a tool to create rigid withdrawal programs that would apply not only to Lake Erie, but also to small, individual stream segments," Wachtmann wrote in a memo to Senate members before a 25-8 vote last week. "That is not the intent of the compact."

Kasich is expected to sign the bill in the next two weeks, a spokesman said.

Sam Speck, a former Republican state legislator and director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources from 1999 to 2006, said the legislation violates several sections of the Great Lakes Compact. The compact became federal law when signed by then-President George W. Bush in 2008.

In a letter to Senate members, Speck cited sections of the compact approved in 2005 by Ohio, seven other states and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec that the Ohio law would violate. He said it:

• Fails to assess effects on watersheds of tributaries and streams and the cumulative effect on the lake and groundwater.

• Does not measure all "physical, chemical and biological impacts" on the lake.

• Includes no "scientifically measurable way" of gauging withdrawals and consumption.

• Permits the user, not the state, to determine what, if any, optional water-conservation measures to use.

• Does not use a scientific method in setting threshold levels that trigger a water-use permit.

• Undercuts the "reasonable use" criteria for handling water-withdrawal requests. In other words, a request is "reasonable" unless a court says it's not.

The bill would require permits only for operations that tap more than 5 million gallons of water a day from Lake Erie, more than 2 million from rivers or groundwater, or more than 300,000 from designated "high quality" streams. Ohio would have the most-generous water-use regulation of any state in the compact.

Scientists from Ohio State University, Kent State University and the Nature Conservancy testified that "uncontrolled withdrawals" could result in more harmful algal blooms, damage to the habitat of sport fish, and potential loss of recreational opportunities on Lake Erie.

Wachtmann said an advisory board that met for two years found "no scientific assessment tool" to gauge effects, individually or cumulatively. He said the legislation requires an assessment of the impact on the lake and watersheds every five years.

Further, Wachtmann said state law should trump the compact.

ajohnson@dispatch.com

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News Headline: Lake Norman water clarity, quality to be tested | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Denver Weekly - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: byJosh Carpenter

Rising seventh-grader Alex Lambert drops a Secchi disk into Lake Norman to help test the water's clarity. Courtesy of David Merryman

DENVER – David Merryman says his job as Catawba Riverkeeper involves getting people out on Lake Norman and surrounding bodies of water to enjoy them.

In recent years, though, he says that's become a much tougher task.

“We've got to start collecting information about the water so we can learn to make better decisions about it,” Merryman said.

Merryman said local bodies of water are polluted with sediments, nutrients and invasive species. So to start learning more about water quality, he's gotten involved in the Secchi Dip-In project.

A group of professors at Kent State University started the project in 1994, which involves dipping a circular black and white disk on a rope into the water to check the clarity.

“It's really an environmental citizen monitoring project in the Midwest and it exploded,” Merryman said. “Unfortunately, it didn't explode into our region until now. We took the initiative to get our volunteers involved and get other citizens active with it.”

When the initiative started at Kent State, more than 800 volunteer citizens over six states in the Midwest participated, and Merryman hopes he can get the same result out of the Carolinas.

Merryman said the disk measures water clarity by how far below the water surface a person can see it, which, in turn, shows how much algae is in the water.

“That's really important because that directly dictates what can live in the water and what kind of fish species we can have,” Merryman said. “For our area in particular, it shows how polluted the water is by nutrients and run off.”

Because it's so easy to operate, Merryman said practically anyone can use it to collect valuable information.

The only things a volunteer might need, aside from the disk, are a measuring tape and something to show the location they're measuring, such a a GPS.

Rusty Rozzelle, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services' Water Quality Program Manager, said that Lake Norman has had some pollution problems in recent years, but is relatively clean considering its size.

“Lake Norman is very clear for a lake in the piedmont of the Carolinas and the Secchi dips are usually several meters deep, indicating very clear water,” Rozzelle said.

Merryman has two primary reasons for bringing the project to the Catawba River lakes. The first: citizen involvement and becoming more educated about the water.

“The second reason is so we can actually do some monitoring and look at the trends in our water quality to see what's happening and how we compare to other parts of the state and other parts of the country,” he said.

Merryman said the water in the Catawba River lakes has always been polluted, but that level has increased significantly over recent years.

“The region has just grown so fast and put so much pressure on our river and its watershed,” Merryman said. “Furthermore, the need or the pressure to continue to use its (the river's) water to create energy from the coal plants and the nuclear stations.”

Merryman says he's always looking for more volunteers.

“I've got this large group of volunteers on all these lakes and this is just a great opportunity for them to collect data and add it to a larger, nationwide set of information,” Merryman said.

In the end, Rozzelle thinks the Secchi Dip-In project's results will show the purity of Lake Norman's waters.

“Lake Norman is a large body of water and sometimes acts as a sink,” Rozzelle said. “The water quality has degraded very minimally over time, though, and it's one of the cleaner lakes in the Catawba River system.”

Those interested in volunteering can borrow an 8-inch Secchi disk by calling the Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation at 704-679-9494.

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News Headline: KSU student's hard work getting awards helps fund year abroad (Koby) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Junior starts early applying for aid, wins 8 awards for Germany

When Jessica Miller decided to spend a year studying in Germany, she knew she had to come up with a way to pay for it.

So she devoted her freshman year at Kent State applying for grants and scholarships and winning eight awards totaling $16,000 to make her dream come true.

Now she is wrapping up a year of study at the 600-year-old University of Leipzig in the former East Germany and will return to Kent State this fall as a junior.

“It is pretty amazing what she was able to do,” said her adviser Geoffrey Koby, an associate professor of German translation at KSU. “It's more than I've ever had a student do.”

Many students cobble together grants, scholarships, work-study programs and loans to pay for their educations. That can be expensive enough.

But for students like Jessica who want to become proficient translators of a written foreign language in business, law, medicine and science, travel isn't an option but a necessity, said Koby. The KSU department offers undergraduate programs in German, Spanish, French and Russian and is the largest of its kind nationwide.

But coming up with money to pave the way for overseas' study can be no easy thing, said Jim Miller, president of the National Association of College Admission Counseling and coordinator of institutional research at the University of Wisconsin-Superior. He is not related to Jessica.

While the nonprofit College Board website indicates that 2,300 sources of college funding provide nearly $3 billion in aid each year, much of it is earmarked to special niches of students or is so competitive that students face “extraordinarily high odds'' in getting the money, he said.

“I've talked to students who applied for 100 scholarships and didn't get any,” he said.

Jessica made it her job to look for grants — which usually are need-based — and scholarships ­— which are merit-based — at the national and local levels almost as soon as her feet hit the Kent State campus in fall 2009. “I'm really into planning,” she said.

She knew what she was getting into: She'd already visited Germany twice while in high school, spoke some German, loves to travel and had a firm career goal in mind — to work for the U.S. State Department or a foreign embassy.

So she studied how other students paid their way, went online to hunt for awards and applied for just about anything that came her way.

Fortunately, different programs had different deadlines throughout the year. She lost count of how many awards she applied for, but estimates the total at “easily” more than 20.

But it paid off when she landed a National SMART Grant and Academic Competitive Grant from the U.S. Department of Education; a Fiedler-BorgWarner Scholarship and Honors Scholarship from Kent State and a $570-a-month scholarship from the University of Leipzig, among others.

The financial aid paid for 11 months of school, lodging, food, books and even portions of some vacations, although Jessica has chipped in $5,000 along the way.

Even better, none of it has to be paid back.

Along the way, she's improved her fluency in German from about 70 percent when she landed at Leipzig to complete fluency today.

“Start early,” she advised students who have similar goals. “I never stopped trying to make it happen.”

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News Headline: (SPORT TV) It will cost more to attend Kent State University's Trumbull Campus. | Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: 21 News at 6 PM - WFMJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (WALL) The Casey Anthony murder case could go to the jury by Sunday. The judge called a recess this morning to allow Anthony's defense team to take depositions from prosecution witnesses. Today, prosecutors made their rebuttal case and questioned a lawyer from the company that employed Anthony's mother. Anthony is charged with first-degree murder in the 2008death of her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee. If convicted, she couldface the death penalty. (WALLL) The Anthony trial has captivated the entire country for weeks. 21 News Reporter Talia Hagler spoke with local attorneys and the community about the trial and Anthony's guilt or innocence. During opening statements the defense dropped a bomb shell by claiming 2 year old Caylee Anthony drowned in the family swimming pool a month before she was reported missing and Casey's father covered it up. They also claimed Casey was sexually abused as a child by her father and brother and she hid her child's death just like she hid the abuse. But the defense never showed the jury evidence of either of those claims. Attorney Dave Betras believes it was a mistake to bring up issues they couldn't back up. 10:19:45 IF I DIDN'T THINK I COULD PROVE THE SEXUAL ABUSE I WOULDN'T HAVE GONE THERE. 10:19:57INSTEAD OF JUST THROWING EVERYTHING UP THERE PICK ONE OR TWO POINTS YOU REALLY CAN HONE IN ON TO TRY TO CREATE THAT REASONABLE DOUBT. People I spoke with today say they have no doubt about Casey's guilt. 15:24:54 FOR SURE GUILTY. 15:31:32I THINK SHE'S GUILTY. 15:31:08 SHE'S A BIG LIAR. YOU CAN'T BELIEVE ANYTHING THAT COMES OUT OF HER MOUTH. 15:25:41I DON'T KNOW HOW YOU CAN SIT THERE IF YOU DID NOT KILL YOUR CHILD AND JUST BE LIKE, SO SHE'S DEFINITELY GUILTY. Casey Anthony will not take the stand in her own defense. Betras believes that's a good idea. Former Trumbull County Assistant Prosecutor Sean O'Brien agrees. He says prosecutors would love a chance to question Anthony on the stand. But even without her testimony O'Brien believes the prosecution is doing a good BEEN PRETTY GOOD AT LAYING DOWN THE FOUNDATION WHICH IS IMPORTANT IN ANY CRIMINAL CASE. The case could go to the jury as early as this weekend. With More Local News, I'm Talia Hagler. (SPORTV) Ambulances rush to the scene of a morning crash in Youngstown. A car and SUV were damaged in the accident at Division Street and Martin Luther King Boulevard. There's no word on the names or conditions of the victims. (SPORT TV) It will cost more to attend Kent State University's Trumbull Campus. KSU is raising tuition three and a half percent this fall. That's the maximum allowed by the state. University officials say the increase amounts to an increase of 89 dollars per semester. What better way to celebrate the season than to have a parade. Children taking part in the Trumbull Art Gallery's Summerfest program sported colorful outfits inspired by artists. The parade ended at Courthouse Square where the children enjoyed games, demonstrations and free ice cream. (SPORTTV) It's once again time for the scurviest crew of cutthroats in the history of Mercer County to set sail. The annual Small Ships Review is underway at this hour in Sharon. A fleet of leaky, home made water craft pass in review along the Shenango River vying for trophies and prizes. Tonight's party is capped by a fireworks display at 10:15 (MARK ADLIBS TEASE)SOUND UP (MARK AD LIB)(MARK TOSS BACK)Coming up on Healthy Living In Our Valley, a man in motion with a mission.

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News Headline: Kent State researchers solve geometry problem that assists drilling industry (Palffy-Muhoray, Zheng) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two Kent State University researchers recently found out that solving an abstract geometry problem can yield unexpected benefits.

In the 1970s, then-graduate student Peter Palffy-Muhoray was obsessed with what he thought would be a simple geometry problem - calculating how close you can bring two ellipses together without one being on top of the other. It turned out to be much more complicated than he originally thought and dogged Palffy-Muhoray for more than 25 years.

“I went to liquid crystal conferences and even offered a good bottle of whisky to the theorist who could solve the problem,” said Palffy-Muhoray, now associate director of Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute. “But it turned out nobody succeeded in solving the problem.”

Palffy-Muhoray, who is a professor of chemical physics at Kent State, revisited the problem a few years ago with Xiaoyu Zheng, assistant professor in the university's Department of Mathematical Sciences, and the pair finally cracked the code.

“We solved the problem in two dimensions in 2006 in just a few months, and then tackled the calculations in 3-D,” Zheng said. The results were published in the respected journal Physical Review E in 2009, and the duo also shared their findings and the code to do the calculations on a Wiki site.

Zheng and Palffy-Muhoray were recently contacted by David Baker, senior geologist with the Chesapeake Energy Corporation of Oklahoma City, Okla. Baker had read about the research online and contacted the pair to express his delight at the findings and to ask for some help.

That led to ongoing communication with Zheng that continued into this year.

“My question, which at first I thought was simple, turned into a discourse with Xiaoyu that solved the problem at hand and led to a solution for another,” Baker said. “Chesapeake Energy is the number one driller of horizontal wells in the world, and to preserve the environment, conserve resources and protect correlative rights, we often drill our wells very close to each other from a single drill pad.”

Baker imported the code into his system to modify it, but Zheng followed up with him to work through any problems.

“We have posted the code for people to use freely, but in a situation like this, we want to make sure that it is interpreted correctly,” Zheng said.

According to Baker, solving the “rather abstract problem” helped his company in a significant way.

It turns out that the uncertainly in the position of wellbores are represented by ellipsoids and knowing how close these can come together without overlapping helps to avoid collisions.

“With a horizontal well costing upwards of $5 million, it is important that our wells never collide,” Baker said. “What originally began as a study of liquid crystals has now been practically applied to drilling gas wells.”

“Drilling technology is very sophisticated now and drilling specialists can control the direction that the drill head moves forward, but not with 100 percent accuracy,” Palffy-Muhoray said. “They need to be certain that the two wells do not come into contact. It is most important that oil companies have all the available resources at hand to make sure that accidents don't happen.”

Zheng and Palffy-Muhoray received a surprising number of additional inquiries about their calculations. While most were from academia, there were some other unexpected applications that were explored.

“We were contacted by one person who was interested in using the code to help study pedestrian traffic flow assuming, I guess, that people are basically shaped like ellipsoids,”

Palffy-Muhoray said. “It's surprising and very satisfying to note that liquid crystal-based research can have important applications in completely different areas.”

For more information on Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, visit www.lci.kent.edu.

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News Headline: 'A Toast to Blossom' Blossom Women's Committee holds fundraiser | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Chapter of Blossom Women's Committee hosted its recent fundraiser, "A Toast to Blossom," at the Kent home of Janet and David Dix, with Sherry and Dave Joy as co-hosts.

Music was provided for the 220 guests in attendance by violinist Yang Zeng, a student in the School of Music at Kent State University; the KSU Flash in the Pan Steel Band, directed by Tyler Rounds, who performed Caribbean and South American tunes; and Jack Hurd on keyboards.

Appetizers for the event were prepared by Mary Wright, chairman, with Christine Bhargava, Saundra Kennedy and others assisting.

A special highlight was the awarding of donated door prizes at the close of festivities. A painting by Jance Lentz-Hatch went to Chuck Conaway and the winner of a series ticket to 2011 Gourmet Matinees at Blossom Music Center was Laing Kennedy. The prize of two tickets to The Cleveland Orchestra at Severance Hall went to Sue Hetrick, while two tickets to The Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom Music Center was awarded to Jan Ryan. Dee Seaholts won the KSU Entertainment Basket, which included four tickets to Porthouse Theater. Jan Westerman was awarded the "Toast to Blossom" wine basket.

Contributing sponsors were, at concert level, Jack and Elsie Joy and Dr. Emmajane Yoho; principal level, All-A-Board Travel, Allen Aircraft Products, Inc., Huntington Bank, Wright Heating, Maryalice and Gordon Seaholts, and Germaine Williams; orchestra level, Brimfield Insurance Group, Center for Healthy Aging, Christley, Herington and Pierce, Dalton's Furniture, Don Joseph Toyota/Scion, Fuller Design Group-Architects, Merrill Lynch, Omnova Solutions, Inc., Portage Community Bank, James and Sylvia Armstrong, T.N. and Christine Bhargava, Bill and Barbara Cox, Bob and Jan Egdell, John and Lois Enlow, Janet Fencl, Fred and Dr. Janet Gissendaner, Davina J. Gosnell, Helen and Stanford Gregory, Ken and Nena Hankins, Mack and Sue Hassler, John and Suzanne Hetrick, Dave and Sherry Joy, Gordon and Carole Keller, Teri Monteith, Dave and Kathy Pangallo, Ann Polichene, George and Jane Preston Rose, Tamara K. Rynearson and Dr. Richard C. Rynearson, Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D, Dr. Randall and Susan Smith, Dr. Robert and Carolyn Tener, George and Patricia Waliga, Dr. and Mrs. James Waugh, and other contributors.

TIMOTHY SAINTE-HILAIRE/RECORD-COURIER PHOTOS

Janet Dix, left, welcomes Sonja Melton and her husband, Austin Melton.

Jim Knauf chats with one of the more than 200 guests at the "A Toast to Blossom" fundraiser.

From left are Ron and Melissa Habowski and Jane and Mike Hornyak.

Chatting at the annual fundraiser are, from left, Germaine Williams, and Elsie and Jack Joy.

Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State Museum, speaks with Bobbie Ewbank.

Jance Lentz-Hatch, left, and Alice Mast.

Pianist Jack Hurd.

From left are Liz Davey, Jane Kemp and Dr. Emmajane Yoho.

John Crawford and Denise Seachrist.

More than 220 people were in attendance at the "A Toast to Blossom" fundraiser held recently at the Kent home of Janet and David Dix.

Helen Tremaine Gregory, Gordon Seaholts and Maryalice Seaholts look over the silent auction items.

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News Headline: Testing improves memory | Email

News Date: 07/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: CPI Financial
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "We've known for over 100 years that testing is good for memory," says Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn. Psychologists have proven in a myriad of experiments that 'retrieval practice'—correctly producing a studied item—increases the likelihood that you'll get it right the next time. "But we didn't know why."

In the past, many researchers have believed that testing is good for memory, but only for the exact thing you are trying to remember: so-called 'target memory.' If you're asked to recall the Lithuanian equivalent of an English word, say, you will get good at remembering the Lithuanian, but you won't necessarily remember the English. Vaughn wondered whether practice testing might boost other types of memory too.

It does. This is the finding of a study he conducted with Kent State psychologist Katherine A. Rawson, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Says Vaughn, "With retrieval practice, everything gets substantially better."

That 'everything' includes target memory; 'cue memory,' for the stimulus (the Lithuanian) that evinces the target; and 'associative memory,' of the relationship between things—in this case, the word pair.

To pinpoint which of these components was improving the researchers conducted two slightly different experiments, one involving 131 undergraduates and the other, 69. In both preparation sessions, English-Lithuanian word pairs were displayed on a computer screen one by one, each for 10 seconds of study.

After studying the list, the participants underwent retrieval trials: A Lithuanian word appeared and they had to type the English equivalent within eight seconds. If the answer was correct, the word went to the end of the list to be asked again. If wrong, the participant got to restudy it. Each item was pre-assigned a 'criterion level' from one to five—the number of times it needed to be correctly recalled during practice. Once that level was reached, the word was dropped from practice.

Participants then returned—two days later in Experiment 1, seven in Experiment 2—and completed tests recruiting different types of memory. First, they performed one of four recall tests, plus trials including recognising words they had or had not studied and picking out correct word pairings among incorrect ones. To eliminate the potentially enhancing effect of a prior recall test—and get a 'pure' assessment of recognition of cues, targets, and associations—the second experiment eliminated the preceding recall tests.

The experiments yielded the same results: Items with higher 'criterion levels'—which had been correctly retrieved more times during practice—exhibited better performance on tests of all three kinds of memory: cue, target, and associative.

Vaughn stresses that it isn't just testing, but successful testing—getting the answer right—that makes the difference in memory performance later on. He also admits the study leaves much to be discovered. "We know that repeated retrieval is good for memory. Testing is a modifier of memory. But we still don't know how that works. We don't understand the mechanism."

Copyright 2011 CPI Financial. All rights reserved. Provided by an company

Copyright © 2011 CPI Financial. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: Kent State professors snag $7 million to expand company | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: justjobs.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Displays, a company founded by Kent State professors that produces a modern-day chalkboard called Boogie Boards, said today it has received $7 million in financing.

The capital, which includes $2 million in state loans and private investments, will be used to increase production of Boogie Boards and pad the company roster.

Kent Displays said it expects to hire 40 people to staff a second assembly line planned for the Boogie Boards.

The innovative Boogie Board allows users to write and erase messages on a screen the size of a sheet of paper.

“The Boogie Board LCD Writing Tablet is the first product of its kind in the world,” said Joel Domino, Kent Displays President and CFO. “It has created a new product segment – eWriters – that we expect will experience consumer acceptance and market growth similar to eReader products, another form of electronic paper. Both of these product segments offer significant advantages over their traditional paper counterparts in functionality and environmental-friendliness. Advanced materials like our Reflex LCDs have made these new product segments possible. This new funding will help us build on our leading position in the eWriter market as we expand our line of Boogie Board tablets and increase production capabilities. These products will further propel eWriters into the mainstream, decreasing the environmental impact of traditional paper use and helping us achieve our growth goals.”

Although one might expect the Board is directly competing with Apple's iPad, that's not so, according to a company spokesman.

Cleveland.com reports that Boogie Boards cost $40-$60, depending on size, and are meant as a replacement for notepads and paper, not computers.

Company spokesman Kevin Oswald said he expects the orders to increase substantially once the company schedules an upgraded version for release. Orders have been coming in at a healthy pace so far, and Oswald reports the plant is running three shifts a day.

Oswald told Cleveland.com that people interested in applying for the jobs at Kent Displays can go to the company's website at www.kentdisplays.com/company/jobs.html.

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News Headline: Lakewood author's book wins award | Email

News Date: 07/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HONORED

Author John Vacha of Lakewood won a bronze medal for Best Regional Non-Fiction in the Independent Publisher Book Awards 2011. He won for his book "Meet Me on Lake Erie, Dearie!: Cleveland's Great Lakes Exposition, 1936-1937." The former Cleveland teacher's book was recently published by Kent State University Press. This was Vacha's fourth book on local history. Vacha is regional coordinator for the National History Day in Ohio contest.

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: WKSU staffers win AP broadcasting awards | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/05/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WKSU staffers recently
were honored with 10 Ohio
AP Broadcasters Awards, including
Best News Operation
and Best Anchor.
WKSU competed in the
Large Market division with
other commercial and noncommercial
radio operations
in major Ohio media markets,
including Cleveland, Columbus,
Cincinnati, and the
Ohio News Network.
The WKSU newsroom
was named Best News Operation
based on the body
of work created primarily by
News Director M.L. Schultze
and six reporters stationed
at the WKSU Broadcast
Center in Kent and news
bureaus in Cleveland, Akron
and at the Cultural Center for
the Arts in Canton. The station
reaches 22 Northeastern
Ohio counties and parts
of Western Pennsylvania over
five towers and two repeater
transmitters, as well as
broadcasting online and over
smart phone apps for iPhone
and Android systems.
The full newsroom staff
contributed to the first-place
award-winning effort for Best
Continuing Coverage for their
reporting on the 40th anniversary
of the shootings at Kent
State University. By drawing
on WKSU's own sound archive
and expanding the coverage
of annual observances,
the station provided listeners
with a variety of general news
and long-form features on an
event that has become a watershed
for a generation.
WKSU's Amanda Rabinowitz
was recognized as
Best Anchor for her work
on WKSU's weekday broadcasts
of NPR's Morning Edition.
Along with her hosting
duties, Rabinowitz is also a
reporter and her story on the
Amish newspaper The Budget
took home the OAPB
Award for Best Feature.
Schultze put on her reporter's
hat to capture a
first-place award for Best
Use of Sound for her story
on a competition for the men
and women who sell cars and
other vehicles at auction.
Reporter/Producer Kevin
Niedermier earned a firstplace
award for his profile of
disgraced Cleveland politician
Jimmy Dimora in the
Best Breaking News category.
Niedermier quickly turned
around this in-depth profile
as soon as Dimora was
led away by investigators
and emphasizes the former
Cuyahoga County commissioner's
great fall, as a public
official and as a man with a
reputation of looking out for
the “little guy.”
Second-place awards went
to reporter/producer Vivian
Goodman for “Mean Kids,”
her documentary on bullying
in local schools, and her
coverage of The Cleveland
Orchestra's tour to Asia and
to reporter/producer Tim
Rudell for “Stealth Neighbors,”
a look at coyotes in
suburban Northeast Ohio, in
the Best Enterprise Reporting
category. Chuck Poulton,
WKSU's IT director, Web developer
Joe Linstrum and designer
Renee Volchko were
recognized with a secondplace
award for their work on
the WKSU website.

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