Report Overview:
Total Clips (32)
Admissions (1)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Alumni; Theatre and Dance (1)
Athletics (2)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Community Outreach (1)
Higher Education (3)
Hillel (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Music (1)
Office of the Provost (5)
Psychology (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Students (1)
Town-Gown (4)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
Male- and female-majorities at Ohio's public universities 07/08/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Ohio State has the largest share of male students and Kent State has the largest share of females among full-time undergraduates at Ohio's big state universities. Overall: 51 percent of undergraduates...


Alumni (1)
ALONG THE WAY: 'The good side of government' 07/11/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Alumni; Athletics (1)
Flashes of brilliance 07/11/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Alumni; Theatre and Dance (1)
Get Out: Porthouse Theatre, Headwaters Race, Local Hip Hop and 1800's Music 07/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...time to Get Out and enjoy summer in your community and Northeast Ohio while you can, because the snow shovel beckons sooner than you think . 1. Porthouse Theatre : The Sunshine Boys Where/When: Porthouse Theatre at Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Rd., Cuyahoga Falls....


Athletics (2)
Kent State Around the Beat 07/10/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State football is about to see a key benefit to the fundraising and an increased emphasis on the sport during athletic director Joel Nielsen's first...

McKee in position to launch coaching career at KSU (McKee) 07/11/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Business (COB) (1)
Help wanted: Cleveland's high-tech employers are hiring (Williams) 07/09/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...they had some ties to the area, it would be easier to focus on retention rather than attraction. Kristin Williams, a manager who works in placement at Kent State University's College of Business, said working with the smaller companies to develop internships, even for freshmen and sophomores...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Psychiatric Nurses Name Recipients of Annual Awards, Scholarships & Grants 07/09/2011 Advance for Nurses - Online Text Attachment Email

...delivery of mental health services to individuals, families and their communities." Drew is a past president of APNA and an associate professor at Kent State University's School of Nursing, Kent, OH, where she established a successful child and adolescent psychiatric nursing program. Most...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? 07/11/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Community Outreach (1)
The Junction: Where needs meet solutions in Kent (Gosky) 07/09/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...Association, which Turner and Wright helped to organize. By fall, The Junction plans to expand into offering tutoring for local schoolkids through Kent State University service work. Further down the line, a mentoring program, young single mothers training, a business school to help...


Higher Education (3)
Kent State Signs Agreement with Stark State Easing Student Transfers (Lefton) 07/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Administrators at Kent State University and Stark State made it easier Thursday for students to transfer credits and grade status from Stark to Kent. Kent...

Partnership forged between Kent State, Stark Tech (Lefton 07/08/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Two of the stepping stones along life?s journey are a little bit closer today than they were just a few days back. On Thursday afternoon, Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton and Stark State College President John O?Donnell signed an institutional articulation agreement...

Kent State Signs Agreement with Stark State Easing Student Transfers (Lefton) 07/08/2011 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Administrators at Kent State University and Stark State made it easier Thursday for students to transfer credits and grade status from Stark to Kent. Kent...


Hillel (1)
Some agencies see increased allocations from Federation 07/08/2011 Cleveland Jewish News - Online Text Attachment Email

...total $894,874, the same as last year, split among nine agencies and a national consortium of Jewish groups. Among these national agencies, Hillel at Kent State University and the Ohio Valley Hillel Consortium were deemed priorities by the allocations committee and saw notable increases. The...


KSU at Stark (1)
April 1: Spitzer, Albacete to lead tour of Rome, Israel 07/09/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Temple Israel Rabbi Emeritus John Spitzer and M.J. Albacete, executive director of the Canton Museum of Art, June 13-24. The tour is being offered through Walsh University's Jewish/Catholic Studies Institute, where Spitzer is director, in conjunction with Walsh University Global Learning. Albacete...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU, TCTC deal lets students earn hours for degree (Ritter) 07/09/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University and Trumbull Career and Technical Center have announced an articulation agreement between the two schools that will allow...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Residents express frustration over Atwood Lodge decision 07/08/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...“We're not letting this go quietly in the night,” he said. Commissioner Tom Wheaton met with an MWCD board member Wednesday and was also meeting with Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus Dean Gregg Andrews. MWCD officials could not be reached for comment Thursday. In other business,...

Residents express frustration over Atwood Lodge decision 07/08/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...“We're not letting this go quietly in the night,” he said. Commissioner Tom Wheaton met with an MWCD board member Wednesday and was also meeting with Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus Dean Gregg Andrews. MWCD officials could not be reached for comment Thursday. In other business,...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
KSU researchers' work finds greater applications (Palffy-Muhoray, Zheng) 07/09/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Two Kent State University researchers recently found out that solving an abstract geometry problem can yield unexpected benefits. In the 1970s,...


Music (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Kent/Blossom Collaboration 07/11/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Office of the Provost (5)
KSU Provost Robert Frank to leave in 2012 (Frank) 07/09/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

July 09--The No. 2 official at Kent State announced Friday he will leave the university at the end of the next school year. "At age 59, you reassess you priorities, and...

Kent State provost to leave post in 2012 (Frank, Lefton) 07/09/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Provost Robert Frank plans to leave his position at the end of the 2011-12 academic year, in move that may position himself...

Frank Stepping Down as Kent State Provost (Frank, Lefton) 07/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University community starts saying its goodbyes to Kent State Provost Robert Frank, who announced today he will step...

KSU Provost Robert Frank to leave in 2012 (Frank) 07/09/2011 Pharmacy Choice Text Attachment Email

July 09The No. 2 official at Kent State announced Friday he will leave the university at the end of the next school year. "At age 59, you reassess you priorities, and...

KSU Provost Robert Frank to leave in 2012 (Frank) 07/09/2011 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

The No. 2 official at Kent State announced Friday he will leave the university at the end of the next school year. "At age 59, you reassess you priorities, and I've...


Psychology (1)
Habitual reading biases in the allocation of study time. 07/08/2011 BioPortfolio Text Attachment Email

...text. These results indicate that reading habits can bias learners' study decisions and can undermine agenda-based regulation. Psychology Department, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242, USA, rariel@kent.edu. Journal Details Name: Psychonomic bulletin & review ISSN: 1531-5320 ...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Portage among leaders in partnership projects: KSU data shows county tied for third in region (Hoornbeek) 07/11/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...favors to local governments as far as funding is concerned, communities are looking at every idea to save costs, including collaborative partnerships. Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy is trying to assist local governments by compiling a list of 105...


Students (1)
Dr. Greenbee Selling a 'Green' Way of Life in Kent 07/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...than just a product at Dr. Greenbee. You'll get advice on how to use it effectively. Drinkard, who got her bachelor's degree in conservation from Kent State University , is now pursuing a doctoral degree in ecology just a few blocks from her home, which isn't far from her store. ...


Town-Gown (4)
Kent Community Dinner set for July 16 07/09/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...Apollo's Fire, among others, and members of Hu$h Money will accompany on the hammered dulcimer. The event will be held beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Kent State University Campus Parish, the Newman Center, located on Horning Road at Loop Road. Those attending should bring food to share...

OUR VIEW: Signs of progress changing Kent skyline 07/11/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Let's Take A Walk Campus to Kent 07/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Location: Kent State University 500 E Main St, Kent, OH When: September 8, 2011 Time: 11:30am–1:00pm Join Kent students, faculty, staff and community...

VIDEO: 49 Demolitions in Past 3 Years Change Kent's Landscape 07/10/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...city. Those buildings vary from homes to businesses, but those numbers exclude partial demolitions , garage demolitions and buildings razed on the Kent State University campus. In that same time period, fewer buildings have been built to replace those demolished. Some of those buildings...


News Headline: Male- and female-majorities at Ohio's public universities | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Ken Marshall
News OCR Text: Ohio State has the largest share of male students and Kent State has the largest share of females among full-time undergraduates at Ohio's big state universities. Overall: 51 percent of undergraduates at the state schools are females.

View graphics chart at: http://www.cleveland.com/pdgraphics/index.ssf/2011/07/male-_and_female-majorities_at.html

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: 'The good side of government' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Christopher Hook, who graduated from Kent
State University in May with a major in International
Relations and French, has landed what
must seem like a dream job.
Hook is working for USAID, the agency for international
development, that assists countries
around the world in overcoming obstacles to their
becoming prosperous nations in which their citizens
can lead healthy and full lives.
He works in a part of the agency that counsels
hospitals and health-care workers in various aspects
of family planning in some 70 countries.
“It's the good side of government,” he said, “because
our goal is to help people.”
Hook, a member of the Class of 2007 at Roosevelt,
said several people inspired him along the
way. He credits his parents with installing in him
the values of hard work. His father, Steven W.
Hook, is chair of the Political Science Department
at Kent State. His mother, Debra Lynn Hook, is a
nationally syndicated columnist and professional
photographer. Roosevelt teachers Chris Hibbs,
Craig Foreman and Aaron Haido were also major
influences early on, Hook said.
In college, his studies in French enabled him
to attend Parliament sessions in Paris to watch
and analyze the debates over immigration and
the burka, an all-enveloping Muslim religious
garb worn by women that was banned in public
by French authorities in 2010. North African immigration
has resulted in a large population increase
in France.
As a result of this work, Hook graduated with
Honors from Kent State, and his thesis has been
nominated for the Portz Scholar Award by the
Kent State Honors College.
Over the course of his time at Kent State,
Hook did two eye-opening internships. As a college
sophomore, he worked for World Vision International,
a global non-profit based in Geneva,
Switzerland, that fosters the sponsorship of children
in countries of the world.
During his senior year, he held an internship
with the office of Congressman Tim Ryan, who
represents the 17th District.
Seeing the politics of Congress up close, however,
makes being part of the seemingly less political
USAID a relief, Hook said.
“The people here are passionate about helping
other people. They are incredible role models,”
he said.
He added he is impressed with the capability
and intelligence of those who work at USAID.
“They're so well traveled too,” he said.
Though he hopes to travel to other countries
someday, right now, he said, he needs to do a good
job in the offices of USAID in the nation's capital.
He said he is enjoying living in Washington, D.C.,
“an exciting city.”
Hook has a sister enrolled at Kent State and a
brother at Theodore Roosevelt High School.

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News Headline: Flashes of brilliance | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Flashes of brilliance: The NFL recently polled it players to determine the top 100 active players. Kent State University is crowing about the results; three Golden Flashes made the list. Gus Chan, The Plain DealerBrowns wide receiver Josh Cribbs Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison ranked 21st, San Diego Chargers tight end Antonio Gates ranked 22nd (he played basketball, not football, at Kent) and Cleveland Browns wide receiver/returner Josh Cribbs ranked 84th. Kent State had more players on the list than Alabama, Florida and LSU combined and more than every Big Ten school except Michigan.

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News Headline: Get Out: Porthouse Theatre, Headwaters Race, Local Hip Hop and 1800's Music | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Vincent R. Komenda
News OCR Text: The summer is about half way over , but there's still a significant amount of fun things to do before the snow flies again.


Kent Patch is here to provide you with a brief list of choices to pick from this weekend, so you don't waste the warm weather and summer-only opportunities.


It's time to Get Out and enjoy summer in your community and Northeast Ohio while you can, because the snow shovel beckons sooner than you think .


1. Porthouse Theatre : The Sunshine Boys


Where/When: Porthouse Theatre at Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Rd., Cuyahoga Falls.


Tonight , July 8, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. - Opening Night .


Performance runs until July 23.


Why Go: Porthouse Theatre is the summer home for stage productions featuring talented actors working in conjunction with students from Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance. The Sunshine Boys is a Tony Award nominated Neil Simon  comedy that debuted on Broadway in the early 1970's, then became a successful movie with popular actors George Burns and Walter Matthau playing the lead roles. This summer performance at Porthouse welcomes actors Marc Moritz and George Roth in the lead roles.


Pricing: $19 and $36


2. Headwaters Adventure Race


Where/When: Buchert Memorial Park, 4800 E. High St., Mantua.


Saturday, July 9, 8 a.m. to noon.


Why Go: If you're up for an outdoor challenge that takes you through some of the most scenic parts of Portage County, this is the event for you. It features a 2 mile run on the Headwaters Trail, 10 miles of cycling and 5 miles of paddling on the Upper Cuyahoga River . Participate solo or as a team. The race is one of three scheduled summer events as part of the Crooked River Adventure Race Series . It's sponsored by the Portage County Park District and proceeds go to trail maintenance and conservation.


Pricing: $40 per person entrance fee, $25 for anyone 18 or younger. Canoe or kayak rental is extra, and they ask that you get there early because rental equipment is limited.


Go to portageparkdistrict.org for more information and printable registration form.


3. Local Hip Hop: Ryan Houde


Where/When: The Outpost , 4962 S.R. 43, southern Kent.


Tonight, July 8, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.


Why Go: Ryan Houde has been a force in local Hip Hop for over a decade. He's been a performer, producer, promotor and writer who is most noted for his work with Mikrophonx and Mastermind Productions. You may remember him from his days running weekly open Hip Hop nights at the old Club Khameleon, before the city tore it down to put in a new bridge. Houde is currently busy with his band Groovesmith , but he still does a few solo acts here and there.


Pricing: $5 for 21 and over, $7 for 18 to 20 years old.


4. Downtown Gallery Exhibition: Life Force


Where/When: Downtown Gallery , 141 E. Main St., downtown Kent.


Exhibition runs until July 30.


Gallery hours are Wednesday thru Friday, noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Why Go: Kent State graduate Nancy Seibert  presents her intriguing paintings to the public at downtown Kent's foremost gallery. The Life Force exhibition features nine paintings using a vibrant array of colors that draw you in for a wonderful visual experience.


Pricing: Free and open to the public.


5. 36th Annual Music in the Valley


Where/When: Hale Farm and Village, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Peninsula.


Saturday, July 9, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Sunday, July 10, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Why Go: This yearly summer event features a wide range of musicians performing oldtime and folk tunes on instruments like fiddles, lap dulcimers, banjos, acoustic guitars and other traditional musical devices . The music is played throughout the grounds of the living history museum that is Hale Farm and Village . Set in the times of the early American 1800's, the museum features a working farm with animals, historic structures, gardens, glass blowing, blacksmiths and more. Step back in time while the music plays around you.


Pricing: $10 general admission, $5 for children 3 to 12 years old.


6. World Premiere of 25 Hill


Where/When: Akron Civic Theatre , 182 S. Main St., downtown Akron.


Saturday, July 9, 8 p.m.


Why Go: This movie was made in an effort to save the struggling All-American Soap Box Derby in Akron . Actor Corbin Bernsen wrote, directed and stars in the film about a boy who loses his father to the War in Afghanistan while trying to win the Derby. Bernsen found local investors to help fund the movie and bring attention to the plight of the Derby. His efforts have brought new sponsors to the event and 10% of the movie's profits will go to the Derby as well.


Pricing: $25, which includes a special-edition DVD .

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News Headline: Kent State Around the Beat | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State football is about to see a key benefit to the fundraising and an increased emphasis on the sport during athletic director Joel Nielsen's first year on the job.

Fourteen incoming players will report to campus today, including 13 true freshmen.

When those first-year players attend classes on Monday, it will mark the first time KSU freshmen football players have been able to attend summer school.

The 14th player scheduled to report is linebacker C.J. Malauulu, a California native who is a transfer from Palomar Community College and could be an answer at a position of need in 2011.

In being able to afford to send freshmen to summer school, Kent State is catching up with other Mid-American Conference programs.

Obviously, this year's freshmen will have a chance to get ahead academically. But there several other advantages, including the ability to get acclimated to campus life and the workload that comes with being a college athlete.

The newcomers will have their first workout session with new Flashes strength and conditioning coach Doug Davis on Tuesday at 3 p.m. in the KSU field house.

EARLY REVIEWS

Davis is getting rave early reviews during his first summer of work with KSU's players past and present.

From last year's senior class, prospective NFL rookies Brian Lainhart, Cobrani Mixon, Kirk Belgrave and Monte Simmons have all been impressed enough by Davis that they decided to stay in Kent for their offseason workouts until the end of the NFL's lockout. That says quite a bit considering Davis was hired by first-year head coach Darrell Hazell almost two months after that quartet played their final game in a KSU uniform.

Lainhart and Mixon expect to sign free-agent contracts soon after the lockout ends. Both received a great deal of interest from teams during the final rounds of the NFL Draft in April.

CURTIS BACK IN KENT

KSU alum Ben Curtis has returned to Kent. That's Kent as in the county in the southeast of England.

The PGA Tour pro left on Friday afternoon for the UK and the site of his 2003 Open Championship victory at Royal St. George's Golf Club in Sandwich, Kent, England.

He and his wife Candace are trying to recapture some of the magic from 2003 by staying in the same guest house in the tiny seaside town, but this time they have rented out the entire place to serve as home base for a group of 16 friends and family members.

Getting away to the United Kingdom is probably a nice break for the couple after they spent last week moving into their new home in Kent, Ohio.

This week will mark the 14th time Royal St. George's has hosted the Open Championship. Its list of champions include Curtis and such legendary names as J.H. Taylor, Harry Vardon, Walter Hagen, Bobby Locke, Sandy Lyle and Greg Norman.

VARSITY “K” OUTING JULY 27

KSU fans can support the Golden Flashes by entering this year's Golden Flashes Club/Varsity “K” Annual Golf Outing.

The event is set for July 27 at Windmill Lakes Golf Club in Ravenna with morning session at 8 a.m. and an afternoon session at 1 p.m. Cost for the morning session is $125 and the afternoon session is $150.

In addition to giveaways, raffle prizes and other contests, the foursome with the lowest gross score will advance to represent Kent State in the Acura College Alumni Team Challenge at Pinehurst.

For more information, call 330-672-8399 or email alongst1@kent.edu.

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News Headline: McKee in position to launch coaching career at KSU (McKee) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The names of every man who has served as
the Kent State director of basketball operations
over the last decade still grace the east
wall of the M.A.C. Center's
men's basketball office.
It has become a tradition.
Whenever one “DOBO”
leaves his post for another
job, his name plate stays affixed
to the wall outside the
cramped, doorless cubbyhole
he once used as an office.
The next person to man
the position gets his own royal-
blue nameplate stacked on the wall above
his predecessors.
Former Kent State shooting guard Mike
McKee is the Flashes' newest director of basketball
operations, and he hopes seeing his
name positioned above those of Ryan Pedon,
Eric Haut, Matt Logie, Mike Brown and
Jaden Uken is a good omen for his budding
career as a basketball coach.
“It's all right there on the wall,” said McKee,
a 2010 KSU grad who was a graduate assistant
at KSU last season before taking over
as the operations man for first-year head
coach Rob Senderoff on May 8. The hire was
formally announced on Thursday. “Every
single name on that wall has gone from being
a director of basketball operations here
to being a Division I assistant coach somewhere.
That makes me think this is promising.
I know I have to work hard and do everything
that is asked of me. But it seems to me
the director of operations position here has a
chance to eventually move on to be an assistant
coach, and that really excites me.”
Haut made a similar jump from player at
KSU to director of basketball operations in
2005 after spending a graduate-assistant season
at Western Kentucky in 2004. He is back
for his second stint on a Flashes staff after
three years as an assistant coach at Texas
Christian. Pedon, who was Jim Christian's
first director of operations at KSU from
2002-05, served as an assistant under Charlie
Coles at Miami University from 2005-10
before taking a job on Tod Kowalczyk's first
Toledo staff last season.
Logie (KSU operations director in 2006-07)
was an associate head coach at Lehigh before
taking a job as head coach at Whitworth University
in Washington earlier this year. Brown
(KSU operations director in 2007-08) was recently
hired onto former KSU assistant Rob
Murphy's first staff at Eastern Michigan. And
after three years as Geno Ford's director of
basketball operations at KSU, Uken found
his first Division I assistant job on Ford's staff
at Bradley earlier in April.
“Those kind of moves don't happen at just
any old place,” said Uken. “I think there are
a couple reasons why you've seen that job at
Kent State serve as a jumping-off point for
guys to become an assistant coach. For one,
the success Kent State has had makes the
operations job unique. They win, so you see
head coaches moving on to better jobs and
assistant coaches moving on to better jobs.
And if you do a good job in operations, you'll
then have a chance to move up.”
In addition to Christian and Ford moving
on to other mid-major head-coaching jobs at
TCU and Bradley, respectively, that trickleup
theory has seen Murphy and Senderoff go
from positions as assistants at KSU to highmajor
assistant jobs – Murphy at Syracuse
and Senderoff at Indiana. Both are now Mid-
American Conference head coaches.
“The other thing about this job is that you
have to wear a lot of hats as director of operations
at Kent State,” said Uken. “Since
KSU doesn't have a video coordinator position,
you get really involved in all aspects of
coaching and game-planning because you
have to do both the video work as well as all
the other prep work. The head coach and
the assistant coaches get to work with you
in a way other operations guys don't have.
If you are an operations guy at a high major,
you do mostly administrative work.”
McKee spent his year as
a graduate assistant working
closely with Uken and
watching how he booked
all the team's busses, flights
and hotel rooms, and also
how he cut film of games and
practices, helped with gameplanning
and even served as
an academic liaison.
“Operations is a harder job
at Kent State than it is at
other schools, but because
you do so many things it really
prepares you to be an assistant,”
said Uken. “I think
Mike is going to do a great
job. The fact that he played
at Kent State, spent a year
as a graduate assistant, and
he knows the program inside
and out, knows all the
coaches and coach Senderoff,
all of that leads me to believe
he is going to do a fantastic
job.”
If that performance leads
to a job for McKee as a Division
I assistant at Kent State
or another school, it will be
the realization of a dream
conjured only within the last
few years.
“I think I always knew that
I wanted to coach in some
capacity because I love the
game of basketball too much
to just finish my college career
and never be around
it so much,” said McKee, a
Pittsburgh-area native who
has now been in Kent for
seven years, ever since his
redshirt freshman year of
2005-06. “I just didn't know
what level I wanted to coach.
Around my junior and senior
year here at Kent, I really
started to fall in love
with the higher level of basketball.
I had been involved
at a high level of basketball
for five years as a player, and
I wanted to stay at the college
level. I didn't want to go
back to high school.
“I've been really lucky. I always
used to joke with Jaden
last year that I was learning
from the best, and it was
completely true. He was one
of a kind, and I was fortunate
to have that year with him.
I'm eternally gratefully to
coach Ford for allowing me
to come back as a graduate
assistant last year, and I'm
equally as grateful to coach
Ford for hiring me as his first
operations guy. It's a great
opportunity and it has me
really excited.”

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News Headline: Help wanted: Cleveland's high-tech employers are hiring (Williams) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Olivera Perkins, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Plenty of sipping on beverages and noshing on hors d'oeuvres. Plenty of engaging conversation. Plenty of...

Resumes?

Rosetta's recent job fair to fill 70 openings offers a glimpse into how competitive hiring can be in Cleveland's information technology community. The jobs are plentiful, and qualified candidates often are so in demand that companies find themselves having to woo applicants.

The event at Rosetta, a digital marketing agency that focuses on web-based and other options to help clients promote their businesses, also shows how Northeast Ohio's technology sector is emerging into a hub capable of holding on to -- even luring -- these highly sought-after job candidates.

"I hear over and over again, 'I can't find technical talent right now,'" said Brad Nellis, executive director of the North East Ohio Software Association (NEOSA), recounting conversations he has had with owners and hiring managers at area IT companies.

Many of the more than 2,500 IT companies in Northeast Ohio belong to NEOSA, which is part of the Council of Smaller Enterprises. The network's most recent quarterly survey shows that while other business sectors may be debating whether to hire, unsure in which direction the economy is headed, the technology sector isn't ready to take down their Help Wanted signs.

Nellis said pent-up demand from the recession as well as the growth of the mobile apps market are among what keeps technology hiring humming.

In its a first-quarter 2011 survey of its members, NEOSA found that 68 percent of respondents intend to add staff in the next 12 months, up from 58 percent during the fourth quarter of last year.

"Historically, the number of companies with current openings remains very high; in fact, it's the highest it's been in the more than 5 years that we've been doing this survey," Nellis wrote in an email.

A typical job candidate needs at least a four-year degree in computer science, management information systems, engineering or related disciplines, Nellis said.

For many in Greater Cleveland's IT community, the frustration of finding qualified candidates is tempered by the knowledge that Cleveland's tech community is coming of age: positioning itself to compete for -- instead of losing candidates to -- traditional IT hubs like Silicon Valley, New York and Boston.

"We are certainly competing for the same talent," said Mike Gustafson, a partner in Rosetta's technology practice. "...If we are having difficulty finding those resources, that means there is a lot of demand" here and elsewhere.

Cleveland IT community is nowhere near approaching the size of major hubs, but it gives hope to the region on how to remake itself -- or to the overall job market that is still plagued by high unemployment.

John Heaney said he's been involved in the tech community from the early days more than a decade ago, riding through the rise and fall of the Internet bust. He said what has sustained the technology community and helped it to grow is the persistence of local entrepreneurs and the faith that local angel investors and nonprofit organizations have in continuing to fund them.

"There has always been talent here," said Heaney, brand director at SparkBase, a Cleveland IT company that provides the technology to track gift and loyalty programs for small and midsize merchants. "The issue was did the talent stay here?"

As recent as five years ago, the answer was probably "no".

Today things are different. Consider the case of Nayyir Qutubuddin, a Shaker Heights High School and Case Western Reserve University grad, who recently got his master's degree in engineering from Cornell University. Engineers are perhaps the most in demand. He has his choice of working in the traditional IT hubs, but believes Northeast Ohio also provides an option.

"I am lucky that I am able to be a little bit more choosy than another discipline might be able to. But still trying to find the right job is a top priority of mine," he said.

"I grew up in Cleveland," said Qutubuddin. "I have a lot of family ties here. I'd like to stay close to family a couple of more years."

Other signs that Cleveland is coming of age include the recent announcement by the recruiting company Oxford Global Resources that its Beachwood office would expand its services to include placing software and other engineers at local companies. In the press release announcing the expansion, Michael McGowan, president of the California-based company, said: "The Cleveland area is a major technology hub where we have had great success serving our clients' needs for IT consultants."

Nellis said Northeast Ohio's IT community is primarily homegrown. Even its largest employer, Hyland Software in Westlake, which now has more than 1,100 employees, began as a startup. The majority of the local companies range in size from 25 to 200, Nellis said. That doesn't include the other part of the IT community based in area corporations with IT departments.

Regardless of size just about all seem to be hiring.

Hyland held a job fair in March to assist the company in filling 200 openings.

Heaney said SparkBase has tripled in size to 30 employees in the last year. He said the company intends to hire between another two and three dozen employees in the next year.

"There is more talent in town than a lot of people thought," he said. "All the talent we've needed, we've acquired locally -- designers, developers, programmers, customer service people and sales people."

Bonnie Robusky, human resources manager at BrandMuscle in Beachwood, which provides marketing technology services, doesn't have to rely solely on local talent, now that others in the industry have confirmed Northeast Ohio as hub. She said conventional wisdom said that it would be difficult to recruit from outside the area, but in recent years, the company has been able to hire staff from other cities.

"I haven't had to talk anyone into coming to Cleveland," Robusky said. "This is becoming more of a place to come to. Everybody is getting their technology on.

The 135-employee BrandMuscle had hired 26 employees since January, Robusky said. The company, which hired 21 interns, currently has eight openings it is trying to fill.

Interns have played a major role in helping to shape Northeast Ohio into a hub.

Several years ago, NEOSA began an initiative to keep the steady stream of graduates in computer science and related majors at local colleges from fleeing to other areas. The rationale was that since they had some ties to the area, it would be easier to focus on retention rather than attraction.

Kristin Williams, a manager who works in placement at Kent State University's College of Business, said working with the smaller companies to develop internships, even for freshmen and sophomores has been key to keeping these students in the area.

"It is all relationship-building," she said. "It also involves giving employers a chance to voice their concerns and having a say in what our students are learning as well, so that they are relevant as well when they graduate."

But in recent years, more than just local ties are helping to grow Cleveland as a hub. Rosetta offers an example. The New York-based company purchased Brulan, which had offices in Cleveland, in 2008.

Mike Gustafson, the Rosetta partner, said the company had no problem basing about 70 percent of its 300-member technology team here. Cleveland may not have the cachet of some of the major hubs, but Gustafson said Cleveland is getting noted for its affordability and the tendency of employees to not bounce from company to company as much as in other cities.

Since the open house/job fair in June, which about 115 people attended, Rosetta has been steadily interviewing, and preparing to take on new employees.

Kate Clegg, a partner and vice president of marketing, said growth has become a constant in recent years. The company is looking into expanding its downtown office space.

"I have been with the agency seven years," said Clegg. "I used know all the faces. Now everyday there are new faces."

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News Headline: Psychiatric Nurses Name Recipients of Annual Awards, Scholarships & Grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Advance for Nurses - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The American Psychiatric Nurses Association recently named the recipients of its 2011 APNA Annual Awards. The awards "honor individuals who exemplify a superior dedication to and passion for the psychiatric mental health nursing profession." Recipients were nominated by their peers and chosen by a committee of APNA colleagues.

In addition, APNA has announced the winners of it Janssen Student Scholars http://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=3317 awards and the American Psychiatric Nurses Foundation Grant Recipients. http://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3876.

The awards will be presented at the APNA 25th Annual Conference in October.

This year's recipient of the prestigious APNA Psychiatric Nurse of the Year award is Barbara Drew, PhD, APRN, BC. The Psychiatric Nurse of the Year award "recognizes a psychiatric mental health nurse who demonstrates vision, perseverance, dedication, initiative and facilitation in the delivery of mental health services to individuals, families and their communities."

Drew is a past president of APNA and an associate professor at Kent State University's School of Nursing, Kent, OH, where she established a successful child and adolescent psychiatric nursing program. Most recently, she has been heavily involved as Chair of the APNA/ISPN LACE Implementation Task Force, working to create a framework for the implementation of the Consensus Model for Advanced Practice Nursing within psychiatric mental health nursing.

APNA is also honoring Shirley Smoyak, PhD, RN, FAAN, with the Distinguished Service Award.

Smoyak, a professor at Rutgers' College of Nursing and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, is a respected researcher and author in the field of mental health. She is known internationally as an advocate for psychiatric mental health nursing as well as for her pioneering work on the relationship between family systems and the patient with mental illness. A charter member of APNA who has served on its Board of Directors in the past, Smoyak continues to be an active and vocal member in the association.

"Perhaps more than any other living individual, Dr. Smoyak has helped shape, teach and preserve the body of knowledge that is psychiatric nursing. Truly, our profession owes her a debt of gratitude because of her long standing advocacy; she truly represents distinguished service and is deserving of this award," says nominator and mentee Teena McGuiness, PhD, CRNP, FAAN.

APNA further honors the following psychiatric mental health nurses for excellence in practice, education, leadership, and innovation in the field of PMHN:

Award for Excellence in Education

M. Jane Suresky, DNP, PMHCNS-BC

Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University

Cleveland

Award for Innovation - Individual

Michael Terry, DNP, FNP, PMHNP

Hahn School of Nursing & Health Sciences, University of San Diego

San Diego

Award for Excellence in Leadership - Advanced

Lisabeth Johnston, PhD, APRN, CS

Independent Practitioner

West Hartford, CT

Award for Excellence in Practice - APRN

Patricia Cunningham, DNSc, APN PMHNP/CNS-BC, FNP-BC

Memphis, TN

Award for Excellence in Practice - RN-PMH

Marcia Melby, RN-BC, PMH

Community Mental Health Center

Fresno, CA

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News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Sonia Alemagno, who was professor of health policy and management and associate dean for the College of Public Health, and has been the university's interim vice president of research for the past year, was named dean of the College of Public Health.

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News Headline: The Junction: Where needs meet solutions in Kent (Gosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Big plans and ideas are brewing at The Junction, located in Kent's South End at 211 Cherry St.

Paul Meyers, who describes his role as the voice for the community-focused center, said The Junction is “the place where needs and solutions meet.” Through The Junction, Meyers is aiming to offer programs geared to address the needs of its surrounding community with a collaborative and sustainable approach.

But it all has to start somewhere.

The Junction is new on the block, and it's first step has been to reach out to the community and focus on what areas can be addressed and built up.

Wednesdays at noon, The Junction offers a youth summer lunch program for kids up to 18 years old. The Junction also will add a senior lunch on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

“Everything is growing —we're just starting,” Meyers said. “There's so much that can be done. I don't know what all we're gong to do out here, but it's exciting.”

Meyers recently met with several community leaders including councilmen Wayne Wilson and Robin Turner and South End community leader Robert Wright.

Together, they are working to bring back the South End Empowerment Association, which Turner and Wright helped to organize.

By fall, The Junction plans to expand into offering tutoring for local schoolkids through Kent State University service work.

Further down the line, a mentoring program, young single mothers training, a business school to help develop young entrepreneurs, develop a food co-op and teach classes on sustainable home repair and urban farming techniques.

Oh, and it's also a Christian place of worship.

Some of the people behind the scenes at The Junction are the same folks from Our Father's House who helped run The Rock Cafe in downtown Kent.

“When we were downtown Kent with the cafe, we had an open cafe by donation only,” Meyers said. “Anybody could come in, and the idea was that anybody could exchange ideas with no limits. It's not like you had to have any money to come in.”

Although the cafe was lost when the site it occupied was razed for downtown redevelopment, the idea of an outlet for free-flowing ideas towards community aid strengthened.

The Junction will hold similar functions to what The Rock Cafe had on Friday nights.

“A core group said ‘We want to keep this going. We want to keep the church going and we also still have this vision to reach out into the south-end neighborhood and make a difference,'” Meyers said. “That's when the concept came up for The Junction. Since we're a small group and we're all about sustainability and collaboration, let's make this thing a little different.”

Our Father's House holds a Sunday worship service at 11 a.m., but Meyers said the focus of The Junction isn't to thump a Bible — it has to benefit the neighborhood first.

Meyers doesn't want anyone to feel obligated to attend the worship service.

“The goal isn't just to feed people. The goal isn't just to clothe people,” Meyers said. “We're supposed to feed them and clothe them, but the ultimate goal is, like Christ said, ‘Go and make disciples.' That means affecting them in all areas of their life.”

Since January, Meyers has immersed himself in learning the techniques of aquaponics, a mesh of hydroponics and aqua culture.

Aquaponics is incredibly sustainable, he said, and is a way to grow food and raise fish simultaneously.

“There's no dirt,” he said. “Just fish pooping and plants growing.”

In a nutshell, fish live in a water tank and a bio-filter converts their waste into plant food. It's a one-time investment that uses little to no electricity, and can grow food year round.

Meyers boasts that aquaponics uses about 30 percent of the water of an outdoor garden and, unlike hydroponic systems, there is no need to add nutrients or chemicals to the water.

The fruits — and veggies — of Meyers' aquaponics crash course are beginning to show.

In one unit Meyers is growing tomatoes, several breeds lettuce, different basil breeds, green beans, green and jalapeno peppers, cilantro, cabbage, chives, strawberries and cucumbers that are reaching the ceiling.

Later this year, he plans to add on a greenhouse and utilize aquaponics on a larger scale.

Meyers wants to share his recently acquired techniques and knowledge to teach the community how do it themselves.

In August, he'll begin conducting free workshops to show how to build and maintain the units so people can cheaply grow food on their own.

“If you go into the New Testament, this is what a church was, Meyers said. “In my opinion, early in the New Testament, we were involved. We knew our neighbors and we worked together. I think we can get back to that, and I think with our economy and the way stuff is happening now we're going to have to.”

Ann Gosky, senior special assistant at Kent State's office of community service, has been working with Meyers to set up the tutoring program in the fall. She said some of the best community work is possible through nonprofits and faith-based groups.

“People in their own community know the needs of the community better,” she said. “We don't have someone from Washington or Columbus coming in to do a program that may or may not meet our needs.”

Gosky said she's excited about The Junction's initiatives and sees it bringing a benefit to the surrounding community.

“In Kent, it is a community where there are significant needs,” Gosky said. “Someone needs to respond to them and Paul has really stepped up to do just that. He's a person who can build networks to make that happen.”

Meyers acknowledges that solidifying the vision of The Junction is going to be a process, but he is confident that people will jump on board.

“Its sounds schizophrenic sometimes. It's a slow process though,” Meyers said. “Not all these things have come to fruition yet, but it's coming.”

Gosky said she believes The Junction will make a difference.

“What impresses me about Paul is that he has a vision — and it's part of who he is — to make this world a better place,” she said. “He has the passion for helping others and making a difference in the community, and that's what he's doing.”

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News Headline: Kent State Signs Agreement with Stark State Easing Student Transfers (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kent Patch
News OCR Text: Administrators at Kent State University and Stark State made it easier Thursday for students to transfer credits and grade status from Stark to Kent.


Kent State President Lester Lefton and Stark State President John O'Donnell signed an articulation agreement between both schools that guarantees admission to Kent State, a four-year university, for any Stark State student who has completed an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.


The qualifying students will be admitted to Kent State as juniors and can transfer up to 60 credit hours. Based on the number of credits they earned, they will be accepted, admitted and given the same junior class standing and privileges as Kent State students who began their college careers as freshmen at the university. The transfer students can pursue their bachelor's degree at any one of Kent State's eight campuses located throughout Northeast Ohio.


“This is a great collaboration between our two institutions that helps our students,” Lefton said. “The articulation agreement encourages Stark State students to think about obtaining a bachelor's degree from the beginning of their college careers."


"We'll be offering guidance and advising to these students, and this agreement outlines the specific requirements to transfer from Stark State to Kent State," Lefton said. "When Stark State students complete those requirements, they are automatically admitted as Kent State students and afforded junior standing should they decide to continue their studies at Kent State.”

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News Headline: Partnership forged between Kent State, Stark Tech (Lefton | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Erin Pustay
News OCR Text: Two of the stepping stones along life?s journey are a little bit closer today than they were just a few days back. On Thursday afternoon, Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton and Stark State College President John O?Donnell signed an institutional articulation agreement which further strengthens the partnership between the two schools and creates a seamless transition for students pursuing both associate and bachelor degrees. The partnership between Kent State University and Stark State College truly is a natural one, according to Lefton, who pointed to the proximity and missions of the institutions as proof. ?Both of our institutions,? Lefton said, ?which are separated by a driveway ? really about 50 feet ? are committed to ensuring that Ohio has the best-trained people possible to do the jobs of the 21st century.? The articulation agreement signed Thursday is designed to ease the transfer process for students by promoting closer coordination of academic courses and programs offered at both schools. Qualifying Stark State students achieving an associate of arts or associate of science degree with a minimum gradepoint average of 2.0, may be admitted to Kent State and transfer up to 60 credit hours. Upon acceptance, the Stark State graduates will receive junior class standing at Kent State and receive the same privileges as students who began their educational careers at any of the KSU campuses. ?We want to make sure that every student succeeds, defining success in whatever way that individual student may have in mind,? Lefton said. ?We want to be able to accommodate today?s students, many are working full time, have families or may be returning from military (service) ? and want to get back into the business of education.? The key to doing that, according to O?Donnell, involves unlocking multiple doors of opportunity. The partnership between Stark State and Kent State does that, O?Donnell said, specifically by creating affordable educational opportunities. ?One of the major points of emphasis is that students can do this in a very affordable way,? O?Donnell said. According to both O?Donnell and Lefton, students taking advantage of educational opportunities at both schools can obtain an associate degree and a bachelor degree for less than $25,000. ?At a private institution,? Lefton pointed out, ?a student could spent $50,000 a year to achieve a degree. ? We are opening doors for students who, otherwise, may not feel they can attend or afford college.? As the Stark County economy continues to redefine itself in terms of industry and business, O?Donnell noted that the needs of area residents are adapting as well. Students of all ages, abilities and educational backgrounds are seeking higher education opportunities and Stark State and Kent State ? together ? are poised to meet those needs, O?Donnell said. ?The citizens of Stark County realize that an associates degree is a wonderful first step toward strengthening this economy,? O?Donnell said. ?To be able, then, to move on and get a university bachelor degree really strengthens (professional) opportunities in an ever-changing economy.?

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News Headline: Kent State Signs Agreement with Stark State Easing Student Transfers (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name: North Canton Patch
News OCR Text: Administrators at Kent State University and Stark State made it easier Thursday for students to transfer credits and grade status from Stark to Kent.


Kent State President Lester Lefton and Stark State President John O'Donnell signed an articulation agreement between both schools that guarantees guarantees admission to Kent State, a four-year university, for any Stark State student who has completed an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.


The qualifying students will be admitted to Kent State as juniors and can transfer up to 60 credit hours. Based on the number of credits they earned, they will be accepted, admitted and given the same junior class standing and privileges as Kent State students who began their college careers as freshmen at the university. The transfer students can pursue their bachelor's degree at any one of Kent State's eight campuses located throughout Northeast Ohio.


“This is a great collaboration between our two institutions that helps our students,” Lefton said. “The articulation agreement encourages Stark State students to think about obtaining a bachelor's degree from the beginning of their college careers."


"We'll be offering guidance and advising to these students, and this agreement outlines the specific requirements to transfer from Stark State to Kent State," Lefton said. "When Stark State students complete those requirements, they are automatically admitted as Kent State students and afforded junior standing should they decide to continue their studies at Kent State.”

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News Headline: Some agencies see increased allocations from Federation | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Jewish News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After two consecutive years of receiving decreased allocations from the Campaign for Jewish Needs, most local, national and overseas Jewish agencies supported by the Jewish Federation of Cleveland will receive the same amount this fiscal year as they did in fiscal year 2010/11. Some agencies will even see increases.

The Federation board of trustees unanimously approved the allocations recommendations for fiscal year 2011/12 at its board of trustees meeting July 5. The first day of nonprofits' fiscal year was July 1, but at a previous board meeting, Federation voted to extend last year's allocations until this year's could be approved.

Federation's 2011 Campaign for Jewish Needs raised $27,892,629, or $350,098 more than 2010's Campaign and the first increased campaign in three years. Prior to 2008, the campaign had seen steady annual increases for more than a decade.

The “modest growth” of the 2011 campaign, as described in Federation's allocations committee report, enabled the committee to make small strides toward filling gaps in funding left by two years of reduced allocations.

“I'm grateful and I know the agencies are grateful that we're able to turn the spiral around,” said allocations committee chair Mitchell Schneider. “We have a long way to go to climb back to where we were.”

On top of its regular campaign revenue, Federation received a $2,051,249 contribution from United Way Services – a decrease of $52,186 from last year's gift – directed for local human services. Also to assist local health and human services agencies, the Mt. Sinai Health Care Foundation granted an additional $50,000 over its regular annual campaign donation. In 2010, Mt. Sinai had granted Federation $250,000 above its regular gift to help bridge last year's shortfall.

For the third consecutive year, Federation's Endowment Fund took the “extraordinary” step of granting $675,000 to help increase the total pool from which the allocations committee makes its recommendations.

“The goal is to increase campaign and wean (the allocations process) from the Endowment Fund,” Schneider said.

Federation deducts 8.43% of campaign's total earnings, or $2,345,434, to cover its fundraising expenses. That's a slightly decreased percentage from last year but a static dollar amount. Federation still boasts lower fundraising expenses than many comparable efforts, including United Way, the committee noted in its report.

After subtracting those campaign costs and 4.5% of the campaign total ($1,255,168) to account for potentially uncollected debts, the allocations committee had $27,059,276 to disperse directly to nonprofit Jewish education and human-service agencies. That's $82,158 more than last year.

As a first step in the process “to make (agencies) whole again,” the committee made sure all Federation's beneficiary agencies received at least the same as last year, Schneider said. The $82,000 remaining to apply toward increases was given to overseas and local agencies: both categories saw a total increase of more than 3%. The committee opted to keep its overall funding to national Jewish agencies static.

“Cleveland is still a significant contributor to national agencies, but over last few years local and overseas needs were impacted tremendously,” Schneider said, making those a priority over national. “Hopefully campaign will continue to increase, and we'll be able to include national agencies in that.”

Local allocations

Federation earmarked $15,311,822 for its 15 local partner agencies (see chart, p. 13). That total includes United Way funds directed for Bellefaire JCB, Jewish Family Service Association (JFSA), The Mandel Jewish Community Center, and Federation's own programs; as well as the Endowment Fund and Mt. Sinai grants.

Also included are funds donated by several leading families in the community specifically earmarked for the Fund for the Jewish Future, a Jewish education improvement program established 19 years ago by the Commission on Jewish Continuity. This year, families donated $1,413,000 to the fund, an increase of $13,000.

Federation set aside an additional $1,375,015 for the Fund for the Jewish Future from the general campaign total, in what is essentially a matching commitment. That's the same amount as last year's contribution. The funds are distributed through the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland (JECC) for educational needs throughout the local Jewish community.

Most of Federation's partner agencies received the same amount as last year. Notable exceptions included Federation's four partner day schools – The Agnon School, Fuchs Mizrachi School, The Hebrew Academy of Cleveland and Gross Schechter Day School – which all received equal increases of more than $3,000; and the Akiva supplemental high school program, which increased by $1,000.

JFSA was the only human services agency to see an increase; its allocation was $20,400 more than last year. Rather than divvying up small and relatively insignificant increases to many human services agencies, the committee opted to make a single, substantial increase to JFSA, which scored notably higher in the committee's review criteria, Schneider said.

Federation allocated $1,381,115 to fund its own community programs, the same as last year. It also set aside $60,000 to cover agencies' audits, insurance and retirement needs, which is counted as part of the local allocations.

Overseas allocations

Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), the umbrella organization of the Jewish federation system, funds overseas programs in partnership with the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI) and The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC). Cleveland's Federation also supports programs of its own creation in Israel and in St. Petersburg, Russia, through its Overseas Connections Committee. The total allocation to overseas projects through these sources is $10,852,580, an increase of $34,579.

The entirety of the increase went to JFNA. Federation's overseas allocation remains flat at $2,634,757. Those funds are earmarked for six major projects: PACT reading program for Ethiopian immigrants; Havat Hashomer army training program for at-risk youth in Israel; ISHA Israeli Health Advancement for Women; the Jordan Cross-Border Initiative, which encourages community dialogue between Jordanians and Israelis; Bridge to the Future, an Israeli community-building not-for-profit; and Cleveland's partnership with St. Petersburg, Russia.

Federation will give JFNA $8,217,823, of which $6,668,936 is for unrestricted use toward overseas programs (almost an $8,000 increase after two straight years of decreases). Federation has also earmarked $886,187 for a JFNA program that enables local federations to direct funds to specific overseas needs of interest to its community. Cleveland's elective funds will support Partnership 2000 (Cleveland's partnership with Beit She'an, Israel) and camp scholarships for Eastern European Jewish youth. That's an increase of $26,621.

The rest of JFNA's allocation is earmarked for specific programs. The Ethiopian National Project, which assists the integration of Ethiopian immigrants into Israeli society, will receive $320,000, and JDC's program for hunger relief in the former Soviet

Union gets $342,700. Both of those totals are the same as last year.

National allocations

National allocations total $894,874, the same as last year, split among nine agencies and a national consortium of Jewish groups. Among these national agencies, Hillel at Kent State University and the Ohio Valley Hillel Consortium were deemed priorities by the allocations committee and saw notable increases. The American Jewish Committee and the national consortium of other Jewish groups saw slight increases. The Anti-Defamation League and the Jewish Labor Committee saw slight decreases.

Hadassah's allocation was decreased by $10,000; all of its remaining funds are directed toward a youth aliyah village. The International Association of Jewish Vocational Services is no longer receiving an allocation. Its previous allocation was used entirely to pay dues; those dues will now be paid directly by JFSA.

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News Headline: April 1: Spitzer, Albacete to lead tour of Rome, Israel | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Anonymous CantonRep
News OCR Text: An interfaith tour of Rome and Israel will be led by Temple Israel Rabbi Emeritus John Spitzer and M.J. Albacete, executive director of the Canton Museum of Art, June 13-24. The tour is being offered through Walsh University's Jewish/Catholic Studies Institute, where Spitzer is director, in conjunction with Walsh University Global Learning. Albacete also is an adjunct professor of art history and architecture at Kent State University's Stark Campus. The tour will spend four days in Rome and seven in Israel. Visits include the Vatican Museum and the Rome ghetto, the oldest continuous Jewish community in the world. The tour in Israel will focus on first-century life and visits to historical and contemporary sites. The cost is $3,341 per person based on double occupancy, and includes airfare, applicable taxes and a surcharge. For information or to register, contact Diane Rubtchinsky at Ayele Tours at 800-237-1517, or email to: diane@ayelet.com or contact Spitzer at Walsh at 330-499-7090.

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News Headline: KSU, TCTC deal lets students earn hours for degree (Ritter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and Trumbull Career and Technical Center have announced an articulation agreement between the two schools that will allow students who complete the pharmacy-tech program at TCTC to receive 24 semester hours toward the 66 hours needed to earn an associate degree in Allied Health Management Technology at Kent State Trumbull.

The agreement runs through the conclusion of Kent State Trumbull's Spring 2013 semester.

The 24 semester hours would apply only toward the Allied Health Management Technology program. However, once students complete that program, should they choose to pursue the Bachelor of Applied and Technical Studies degree, those 24 semester hours remain.

Kent State Trumbull's Allied Health Management program is designed to prepare students for a career in health-care administration. It builds skills in the areas of business, management and communication skills necessary to become an effective administrator/supervisor.

Employment opportunities for program graduates include nursing-home administrator; hospital department head; administrator for public and private health facilities, including ambulatory clinics and assisted-living facilities; or office manager in physician, dental and other medical offices.

Criteria for those students choosing to participate in this joint venture include:

Completion of a state approved College Tech Prep Program.

Achieving a B or better in the College Tech Prep Program.

Completion of Algebra II (minimum).

Completion of Kent State University admission process within 15 months of High School graduation.

Completion of Kent College Tech Prep Articulated Credit Process.

According to Jim Ritter, director of enrollment management and student services for Kent State Trumbull, the benefits of the program are many and varied.

“A few of the real keys include the motivation it provides participating students to pursue postsecondary education as a result of obtaining college credit while additionally benefitting Northeast Ohio by infusing the job market with graduates who have the skills needed to compete in the 21st-century global job market,” he said.

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News Headline: Residents express frustration over Atwood Lodge decision | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Nancy Schaar
News OCR Text: A pair of Carroll County men shared with commissioners Thursday their frustration with the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District over its decision to raze the Atwood Lake Lodge and Conference Center.

Joe Carlisle and Scott Levengood brought documents to commissioners.

Carlisle said MWCD directors have claimed the money involved was their money and not the taxpayers' money.

“We have acquired letters and emails that tell a different story,” he said.

Carlisle presented documents obtained from the MWCD that show it received two grants from the state, one for $500,000 and one for $250,000. The papers specify the funds were for the renovation of the lodge.

A document dated July 2001 states that the MWCD received $500,000 through House Bill 640 to be used for the renovation of the lodge. With other funding, the total project budget was about $4 million.

Carlisle asked where that $4 million was spent. “How could anyone spend that much money on renovations and have nothing to show for it? Where did it go?”

The papers also show an agreement between the former Muskingum Area Technical College and MWCD. The college agreement states it will permit internships of students to have training at the lodge.

Levengood said that they have checked MWCD and the technical college records, and no trace can be found where any student ever received any training or schooling at Atwood Lodge. The letters date to 2000.

A 2002 letter states “internships in culinary arts, hotel/ motel management, and wildlife and natural resources management” will be provided through the joint-use-agreement.

A second agreement between Muskingum Area Technical College and MWCD dated March 20, 2003, shows receipt of $250,000 through House Bill 675 to be used for the renovation of Atwood Lodge. It stipulates field placement of students, provision for classrooms for students, and a plaque to be placed in a prominent place identifying the district and college relationship. It is to also stipulate that renovation funds have been provided through a state appropriation.

According to Levengood, the agreement was for a period of 15 years. If the agreement was to be terminated, MWCD would have to remit back to the state funds that were distributed.

“MWCD acts like it doesn't owe the taxpayer anything,” Carlisle added. “We have a say in this. They should be held accountable.”

Commissioner Jeff Ohler said that he views the taxpayers as stockholders. “We're not letting this go quietly in the night,” he said.

Commissioner Tom Wheaton met with an MWCD board member Wednesday and was also meeting with Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus Dean Gregg Andrews.

MWCD officials could not be reached for comment Thursday.

In other business, commissioners opened bids for paving projects. Bids received were for sections of County Road 19 and County Road 12. Bids were tabled for review until July 14.

OTHER ACTION

• Approved the dog pound report of 21 impounded, 17 tagged, four redeemed, and one pit bull destroyed by court order. No citations were issued.

• Announced bids will be accepted until 9:30 a.m. Aug. 4 for paving projects that include Sharp Drive and Barrick Street in Sherrodsville, N. Liberty Street in Dellroy, Scranton Avenue in Minerva, Edwards Road in Amsterdam, and Troy and Taylor streets and N. State Street in Kilgore.

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News Headline: Residents express frustration over Atwood Lodge decision | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: Nancy Schaar
News OCR Text: A pair of Carroll County men shared with commissioners Thursday their frustration with the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District over its decision to raze the Atwood Lake Lodge and Conference Center.

Joe Carlisle and Scott Levengood brought documents to commissioners.

Carlisle said MWCD directors have claimed the money involved was their money and not the taxpayers' money.

“We have acquired letters and emails that tell a different story,” he said.

Carlisle presented documents obtained from the MWCD that show it received two grants from the state, one for $500,000 and one for $250,000. The papers specify the funds were for the renovation of the lodge.

A document dated July 2001 states that the MWCD received $500,000 through House Bill 640 to be used for the renovation of the lodge. With other funding, the total project budget was about $4 million.

Carlisle asked where that $4 million was spent. “How could anyone spend that much money on renovations and have nothing to show for it? Where did it go?”

The papers also show an agreement between the former Muskingum Area Technical College and MWCD. The college agreement states it will permit internships of students to have training at the lodge.

Levengood said that they have checked MWCD and the technical college records, and no trace can be found where any student ever received any training or schooling at Atwood Lodge. The letters date to 2000.

A 2002 letter states “internships in culinary arts, hotel/ motel management, and wildlife and natural resources management” will be provided through the joint-use-agreement.

A second agreement between Muskingum Area Technical College and MWCD dated March 20, 2003, shows receipt of $250,000 through House Bill 675 to be used for the renovation of Atwood Lodge. It stipulates field placement of students, provision for classrooms for students, and a plaque to be placed in a prominent place identifying the district and college relationship. It is to also stipulate that renovation funds have been provided through a state appropriation.

According to Levengood, the agreement was for a period of 15 years. If the agreement was to be terminated, MWCD would have to remit back to the state funds that were distributed.

“MWCD acts like it doesn't owe the taxpayer anything,” Carlisle added. “We have a say in this. They should be held accountable.”

Commissioner Jeff Ohler said that he views the taxpayers as stockholders. “We're not letting this go quietly in the night,” he said.

Commissioner Tom Wheaton met with an MWCD board member Wednesday and was also meeting with Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus Dean Gregg Andrews.

MWCD officials could not be reached for comment Thursday.

In other business, commissioners opened bids for paving projects. Bids received were for sections of County Road 19 and County Road 12. Bids were tabled for review until July 14.

OTHER ACTION

• Approved the dog pound report of 21 impounded, 17 tagged, four redeemed, and one pit bull destroyed by court order. No citations were issued.

• Announced bids will be accepted until 9:30 a.m. Aug. 4 for paving projects that include Sharp Drive and Barrick Street in Sherrodsville, N. Liberty Street in Dellroy, Scranton Avenue in Minerva, Edwards Road in Amsterdam, and Troy and Taylor streets and N. State Street in Kilgore.

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News Headline: KSU researchers' work finds greater applications (Palffy-Muhoray, Zheng) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two Kent State University researchers recently found out that solving an abstract geometry problem can yield unexpected benefits.

In the 1970s, then-graduate student Peter Palffy-Muhoray was obsessed with what he thought would be a simple geometry problem — calculating how close you can bring two ellipses together without one being on top of the other. It turned out to be a much more complicated problem than he originally thought, one that dogged him for more than 25 years.

“I went to liquid-crystal conferences and even offered a good bottle of whisky to the theorist who could solve the problem,” said Palffy-Muhoray, now associate director of Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute. “But it turned out nobody succeeded in solving the problem.”

Palffy-Muhoray, who is a professor of chemical physics at Kent State, revisited the problem a few years ago with Xiaoyu Zheng, assistant professor in the university's Department of Mathematical Sciences, and the pair finally cracked the code.

“We solved the problem in two dimensions in 2006 in just a few months, and then tackled the calculations in 3-D,” Zheng said.

The results were published in the journal Physical Review E in 2009, and the duo also shared their findings and the code to do the calculations on a Wiki site.

Zheng and Palffy-Muhoray were recently contacted by David Baker, senior geologist with the Chesapeake Energy Corporation of Oklahoma City, Okla. Baker had read about the research online and contacted the pair to express his delight at the findings and to ask for some help. That led to ongoing communication with Zheng that continued into this year.

“My question, which at first I thought was simple, turned into a discourse with Xiaoyu that solved the problem at hand and led to a solution for another,” Baker said. “Chesapeake Energy is the No. 1 driller of horizontal wells in the world, and to preserve the environment, conserve resources and protect correlative rights, we often drill our wells very close to each other from a single-drill pad.”

Baker imported the code into his system to modify it for his purposes, but Zheng followed up with him to work through any problems. “We have posted the code for people to use freely, but in a situation like this, we want to make sure that it is interpreted correctly,” Zheng said.

According to Baker, solving the “rather abstract problem” helped his company in a significant way.

It turns out that the uncertainly in the position of wellbores are represented by ellipsoids, and knowing how close these can come together without overlapping helps to avoid collisions. “With a horizontal well costing upward of $5 million, it is important that our wells never collide,” Baker said. “What originally began as a study of liquid crystals has now been practically applied to drilling gas wells.”

Palffy-Muhoray said that drilling technology is very sophisticated and drilling specialists can control the direction that the drill head moves forward, but not with 100-percent accuracy. “They need to be certain that the two wells do not come into contact,” he said. “It is most important that oil companies have all the available resources at hand to make sure that accidents don't happen.”

Zheng and Palffy-Muhoray received a surprising number of additional inquiries about their calculations. While most were from academia, there were some other unexpected applications that were explored.

“We were contacted by one person who was interested in using the code to help study pedestrian traffic flow — assuming, I guess, that people are basically shaped like ellipsoids,” Palffy-Muhoray said. “It's surprising and very satisfying to note that liquid crystal-based research can have important applications in completely different areas.”

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Kent/Blossom Collaboration | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Changing with the times
Kent/Blossom, a collaboration between Kent
State, the Cleveland Orchestra and Blossom
Music Center, each summer turns Northeastern
Ohio into an important center for professional
training in the visual and performing arts and offers
the public a gorgeous tapestry of audio and
visual arts at bargain prices. Porthouse, special
programs at Blossom Music Center and Eells
Art Gallery are genuine cultural treasures we're
lucky to have.
One of Blossom's best offerings, if you like classical
music, is the annual Faculty Recital Series
featuring world class musicians who teach during
the Blossom summer program. Wednesday evening
at Ludwig Recital Hall on the KSU campus,
Mark Kosower, principal cellist with the Cleveland
Orchestra, Jung-Min Amy Lee, its associate
concertmaster, and pianist Jee-Won Oh, who appears
regularly in the world's major concert halls,
teamed up on Beethoven's Trio in B flat major.
Music like this requires intricate teamwork and
precision. So accomplished and tuned in to one
another, these three brought their audience to its
feet in appreciation.
Monday evening at 7:30 at Ludwig Hall, the
Miami String Quartet will perform two works by
Beethoven and one by Schubert. Guest artist is
Jerry Wong, who, depending on the music, can
produce fireworks with a Steinway.
Cost is $15. Hard to beat that!

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News Headline: KSU Provost Robert Frank to leave in 2012 (Frank) | Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: July 09--The No. 2 official at Kent State announced Friday he will leave the university at the end of the next school year.

"At age 59, you reassess you priorities, and I've long dreamed of being a college president," Robert Frank told the campus community in an email. "Realistically, I've one career move left, and now's the time to make it."

He did not indicate what his future plans might be in his email. He could not be reached for comment.

In 2009, Frank made $267,800. His current salary was not immediately available.

Frank was one of 26 candidates for the presidency of Florida State University in 2009, but did not make the cut to three finalists.

His strategy at Kent State has been to "move quickly and aggressively with new endeavors,'' he said on his application for the Florida State job that was published on the Internet.

In his email to the campus community, Frank cited accomplishments that included creating a unified School of Graduate Studies, doubling the number of international students and new academic programs that include public health, a School of Digital Sciences and a Center for Ecology and Natural Resource Sustainability.

Frank came to KSU in 2007 as senior vice president of academic affairs and provost, the highest academic post in the eight-campus system.

He was instrumental in KSU developing a College of Public Health, the second in Ohio.

Before coming to Kent State, Frank served for 12 years as dean at the University of Florida in Gainesville, the fourth largest public university nationwide. He oversaw a college of 1,600 students in two locations and a $28.8 million operating budget.

He is a certified clinical psychologist and has been director of UF's Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured, which researches public policy on health care for the poor.

"By planning my departure, the university will have plenty of time to conduct a careful search for a new provost and benefit from a seamless leadership transition next summer," Frank said in his email.

He said President Lester Lefton would appoint a search committee right away.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Kent State provost to leave post in 2012 (Frank, Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Provost Robert Frank plans to leave his position at the end of the 2011-12 academic year, in move that may position himself as a university president.

“At age 59, you tend to reassess your priorities, and I've long dreamed of being a college president,” Frank said in a letter announcing his decision. “Realistically, I've one career move left, and now's the time to make it.”

In his statement, Frank listed KSU's achievements since he took the position in 2007 and addressed the future of the university.

Kent State is on the solid strategic path needed to position us as a nationally prominent public research university,” he said. “We have great faculty and are increasingly attracting high-quality students from around the world while growing our enrollment to historic highs.”

In his final year at KSU Frank said he plans to continue improvements to graduate programs, implement a distance learning strategy and increase research funding and student retention.

Announcing the step down now will allow the university to convene a search committee immediately, he said.

“The Kent State University community is grateful to Dr. Frank for his unwavering leadership and dedication to student success at Kent State,” said KSU President Lester Lefton. “I thank him for his contributions to our excellence agenda and for helping with the transition of his planned departure next summer. We wish him well with his future academic endeavors,” Lefton added.

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News Headline: Frank Stepping Down as Kent State Provost (Frank, Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: The Kent State University community starts saying its goodbyes to Kent State Provost Robert Frank, who announced today he will step down at the end of the 2011-2012 school year.


Frank announced his intentions in a message to the campus community today.


"At age 59, you tend to reassess your priorities, and I've long dreamed of being a college president," Frank said. "Realistically, I've one career move left, and now's the time to make it."


As provost , Frank is responsible for all academic affairs functions of the university. Frank took over as provost in 2007.


Since then, he served as interim dean of the fledgling College of Public Health, led the division of academic affairs, created a unified school of graduate studies and oversaw a doubling in growth of international students. In his announcement, he pointed to other accomplishments, including revamping the university's promotion and tenure policy to emphasize scholarly productivity and helping to establish a School of Digital Sciences and a Center for Ecology and Natural Resource Sustainability.


"By planning my departure, the university will have plenty of time to conduct a careful search for a new provost and benefit from a seamless leadership transition next summer," Frank said.


Kent State President Lester Lefton pointed to Frank's work abroad strengthening the university's presence in countries including China, India and Saudi Arabia.


"Dr. Frank has accomplished much," Lefton said. "The Kent State University community is grateful to Dr. Frank for his unwavering leadership and dedication to student success at Kent State. I thank him for his contributions to our excellence agenda and for helping with the transition of his planned departure next summer. We wish him well with his future academic endeavors."


Frank said the university, led by Lefton, will convene a search committee immediately to find his replacement.


"In the coming transitionary year, my most important goals will be to lead the further improvements to Kent State's graduate programs; boost research funding; implement a distance learning strategy; and direct efforts to increase student retention," Frank said.


Read the full text of Frank's announcement here.

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News Headline: KSU Provost Robert Frank to leave in 2012 (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pharmacy Choice
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 09The No. 2 official at Kent State announced Friday he will leave the university at the end of the next school year.

"At age 59, you reassess you priorities, and I've long dreamed of being a college president," Robert Frank told the campus community in an email. "Realistically, I've one career move left, and now's the time to make it."

He did not indicate what his future plans might be in his email. He could not be reached for comment.

In 2009, Frank made $267,800. His current salary was not immediately available.

Frank was one of 26 candidates for the presidency of Florida State University in 2009, but did not make the cut to three finalists.

His strategy at Kent State has been to "move quickly and aggressively with new endeavors,'' he said on his application for the Florida State job that was published on the Internet.

In his email to the campus community, Frank cited accomplishments that included creating a unified School of Graduate Studies, doubling the number of international students and new academic programs that include public health, a School of Digital Sciences and a Center for Ecology and Natural Resource Sustainability.

Frank came to KSU in 2007 as senior vice president of academic affairs and provost, the highest academic post in the eight-campus system.

He was instrumental in KSU developing a College of Public Health, the second in Ohio.

Before coming to Kent State, Frank served for 12 years as dean at the University of Florida in Gainesville, the fourth largest public university nationwide. He oversaw a college of 1,600 students in two locations and a $28.8 million operating budget.

He is a certified clinical psychologist and has been director of UF's Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured, which researches public policy on health care for the poor.

"By planning my departure, the university will have plenty of time to conduct a careful search for a new provost and benefit from a seamless leadership transition next summer," Frank said in his email.

He said President Lester Lefton would appoint a search committee right away.

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News Headline: KSU Provost Robert Frank to leave in 2012 (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The No. 2 official at Kent State announced Friday he will leave the university at the end of the next school year. "At age 59, you reassess you priorities, and I've long dreamed of being a college president," Robert Frank told the campus community in an email. "Realistically, I've one career move left, and now's the time to make it." He did not indicate what his future plans might be in his email. He could not be reached for comment. In 2009, Frank made $267,800. His current salary was not immediately available. Frank was one of 26 candidates for the presidency of Florida State University in 2009, but did not make the cut to three finalists. switch (VarBucketNo)}

His strategy at Kent State has been to "move quickly and aggressively with new endeavors,'' he said on his application for the Florida State job that was published on the Internet. In his email to the campus community, Frank cited accomplishments that included creating a unified School of Graduate Studies, doubling the number of international students and new academic programs that include public health, a School of Digital Sciences and a Center for Ecology and Natural Resource Sustainability. Frank came to KSU in 2007 as senior vice president of academic affairs and provost, the highest academic post in the eight-campus system. He was instrumental in KSU developing a College of Public Health, the second in Ohio. Before coming to Kent State, Frank served for 12 years as dean at the University of Florida in Gainesville, the fourth largest public university nationwide. He oversaw a college of 1,600 students in two locations and a $28.8 million operating budget. He is a certified clinical psychologist and has been director of UF's Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured, which researches public policy on health care for the poor. "By planning my departure, the university will have plenty of time to conduct a careful search for a new provost and benefit from a seamless leadership transition next summer," Frank said in his email. He said President Lester Lefton would appoint a search committee right away. Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com. To see more of the Akron Beacon Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.ohio.com. Copyright (c) 2011, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. For more information about the content services offered by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services (MCT), visit www.mctinfoservices.com.

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News Headline: Habitual reading biases in the allocation of study time. | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: BioPortfolio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Home » Latest PubMed Articles » Psychonomic bulletin & review » Habitual reading biases in the allocation of study time.

Item order can bias learners' study decisions and undermine the use of more effective allocation strategies, such as allocating study time to items in one's region of proximal learning. In two experiments, we evaluated whether the influence of item order on study decisions reflects habitual responding based on a reading bias. We manipulated the order in which relatively easy, moderately difficult, and difficult items were presented from left to right on a computer screen and examined selection preference as a function of item order and item difficulty. Experiment 1a was conducted with native Arabic readers and in Arabic, and Experiment 1b was conducted with native English readers and in English. Students from both cultures prioritized items for study in the reading order of their native language: Arabic readers selected items for study in a right-to-left fashion, whereas English readers largely selected items from left to right. In Experiment 2, native English readers completed the same task as participants in Experiment 1b, but for some participants, lines of text were rotated upside down to encourage them to read from right to left. Participants who read upside-down text were more likely to first select items on the right side of an array than were participants who studied right-side-up text. These results indicate that reading habits can bias learners' study decisions and can undermine agenda-based regulation.

Psychology Department, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242, USA, rariel@kent.edu.

Journal Details

Name: Psychonomic bulletin & review

ISSN: 1531-5320

MESH Definitions

Genes, Px

DNA sequences that form the coding region for at least three proteins which regulate the expression of HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 1 and HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 2. The proteins are p21(x), p27(rex), and p40(tax). The tax (trans-activator x) and rex (regulator x) genes are part of pX but are in overlapping reading frames. X was the original designation for the sequences or region (at that time of unknown function) in the long open reading frame (lor) which is now called pX.

Dyslexia

A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)

Proportional Hazards Models

Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.

Handbooks

Works consisting of concise reference works in which facts and information pertaining to a certain subject or field are arranged for ready reference and consultation rather than for continuous reading and study.

Cross-sectional Studies

Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.

PubMed Articles 2527 Associated PubMed Articles

In a recent study (Fan, Z., & Harris, J. (2008). Perceived spatial displacement of motion-defined contours in peripheral vision. Vision Research, 48(28), 2793-2804), we demonstrated that virtual conto...

The present study examined how proofreading and reading-for-comprehension instructions influence eye movements during reading. Thirty-seven participants silently read sentences containing compound wor...

Studies with unequal allocation to two or more treatment groups often require a large block size for permuted block allocation. This could present a problem in small studies, multi-center studies, or...

Attentional biases for negative stimuli have been observed in school-age and adolescent children of depressed mothers and may reflect a vulnerability to depression. The direction of these biases and w...

Mindless reading occurs when the eyes continue moving across the page even though the mind is thinking about something unrelated to the text. Despite how commonly it occurs, very little is known about...

Clinical Trials 1334 Associated Clinical Trials

This study offers 90-120 hours of 1:1 training to improve reading skills in adults who have poor reading skills following a stroke. Specifically, this study is designed to improve skill in...

1 % of all pregnancies end in habitual/recurrent abortion. In about half of women with habitual abortions (HAB) hereditary or acquired (antiphospholipid antibodies) thrombophilia are obser...

The first line of defense against reading disabilities is good classroom reading instruction. This study describes how characteristics of students, teachers, and instruction relate to aca...

Adults who sustain brain damage due to stroke, head injury, or traumatic surgery may develop difficulty reading. This study examines the effectiveness of behavior-based programs to improve...

Research has consistently found attentional biases towards negative weight-related stimuli in individuals with eating disorders. It has been suggested that these biases may act as a vulner...

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News Headline: Portage among leaders in partnership projects: KSU data shows county tied for third in region (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With the finalized version of the state budget doing no favors to local governments as far as funding is concerned, communities are looking at every idea to save costs, including collaborative partnerships.

Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy is trying to assist local governments by compiling a list of 105 new collaborative projects being considered in Northeastern Ohio and a follow-up of 142 projects already being implemented.

The data, released during in June, showed Portage County tied for third for the amount of new collaborative projects being considered (nine) and third for projects in place (15) among 16 counties.

“I think Portage County is moving forward in this area,” said John Hornbeek, director of the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy. “County officials and the city of Ravenna have been very involved in (collaborative projects).”

In mid-June, Hornbeek brought a group of Portage and Summit County officials, including Ravenna Mayor Joseph Bica and Brian Kelley, chief information officer for Portage County, together with Ohio Auditor Dave Yost to discuss collaboration.

“I think Kent State and Dr. Hornbeek really caught the auditor's attention,” Bica said. “My sense is that the state is really pushing for collaboration.”

Ravenna is heavily involved in several proposals for cooperation between local governments, including talks to combine Kent, Ravenna and Portage County's health departments and a plan to combine fire service with Ravenna Township, both still in the discussion phase.

The city is also partnering with Ravenna City Schools on a planned large-scale fueling system on Oakwood Street, and extending offers to Ravenna Township and Portage County to use it.

Other collaborative ideas currently being considered in Portage County, according to the center's research, include construction of a Kent-Stow walking path, a Ravenna-Ravenna Township Joint Economic Development District and a Portage County-Ravenna Fire Investigation Team.

Collaborations already in place in the county include the Kent-Franklin Joint Economic Development District, the Garrettsville-Freedom-Nelson Joint Fire District and the Portage County Water Rescue Team.

Bica said Ohio's cuts to local government support in the latest biennial budget, signed into law by Gov. John Kasich Thursday, should spur more joint projects. Ravenna, for example, is expected to lose $130,000 in state support in 2012.

“From my perspective this is a necessity,” Bica said. “Up until this point, everybody had their own turf and wanted to maintain their own turf. I see this as how we'll do business in the future.”

Hornbeek said he didn't see the importance of local collaboration shrinking in the future, even if the economy improves drastically. He said this is especially true concerning attracting new businesses.

“Northeast Ohio is viewed as a whole,” he said. “We're going to be most competitive if we can put forward a positive portrayal of the region as a whole.”

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News Headline: Dr. Greenbee Selling a 'Green' Way of Life in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Maureen Drinkard isn't just selling green products. She's selling a way of life.


Of course you'll find the usual suspects for sale at her new downtown Kent store, Dr. Greenbee . There's rain barrels and make-your-own rain barrel kits, several different methods of compost bins and shelves stocked full of nonchemical-based household cleaners.


But you'll get more than just a product at Dr. Greenbee. You'll get advice on how to use it effectively.


Drinkard, who got her bachelor's degree in conservation from Kent State University , is now pursuing a doctoral degree in ecology just a few blocks from her home, which isn't far from her store.


She moved to Kent in August 2010 for a number of reasons, but one of the most important was the community's passionate involvement in meaningful causes.


"Kent was the only place in Northeast Ohio I would ever consider living," the North Carolina transplant said. "I sort of have a very liberal, free-thinking mindset. And Kent is the only place I've found that tolerates that kind of behavior."


Drinkard said the idea of opening a store packed with environmentally friendly products grew naturally out of her education and a desire to have time in life to do what's important to her — like raise her kids while working part-time teaching at Kent State.


Through her studies, Drinkard realized there is "a real gap" between what people know about how the Earth's natural processes work and what they can do to minimize their effect on the ecosystem.


One example? The store's laundry products.


Dr. Greenbee sells soap nuts, which are the husk from a tree nut that contains a natural soaping agent when the nuts are submerged in warm water. Rather than add laundry detergent, four or five soap nuts tossed into a washing machine will clean four or five loads of laundry. The nuts are all-natural, so they're particularly good for cleaning delicate fabrics and aren't harsh on people with sensitive skin. They're also good for traveling or camping.


The nuts come in a muslin bag, which is biodegradable, and the nuts themselves can be tossed into your compost bin when they're "cashed out," Drinkard said.


"It's really easy to have zero-impact laundry," she said.


If you buy a rain barrel or rain-barrel kit, you'll also get an explanation from Drinkard as to how the barrel pays for itself. Drinkard said the barrel, which is sold for $100 (kits are $33), saves you from turning on the hose and paying for water when you want to wash the car or water the garden. And, the rain water keeps the chemically treated municipal water from spotting cars and covering vegetables with chemicals like fluoride and other additives.


The same goes for compost bins. The store has several options ranging from a worm composter that produces no odor and you can keep inside, small composters for apartments and large, outdoor compost bins.


"If you're a gardener and like to grow your own food, compost is like gold," Drinkard said.


Their biggest seller is the household cleaning products, which they're having a hard time keeping on the shelves. Different types of Charlie's Soap , a vegetable-based, biodegredable cleaner, can clean everything from greasy car engines to furniture and carpets. And like all of Dr. Greenbee's other products, it's made within 500 miles of Kent.


The store, at 223 N. Water St. next to Scribbles Coffee , also offers a number of workshops for everything from making soap and beer to beekeeping.


Drinkard said right now they're testing products to see what sells and what people aren't interested in. Eventually, they'd like to expand the current store or move somewhere larger downtown to include a green home improvement line of products.


"For the average person to be transplanted from their home to an Earthship totally off the grid isn't going to happen. And I don't know that it should," she said. "The whole idea of the store is being organic and healthy."

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News Headline: Kent Community Dinner set for July 16 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Community Dinner, organized by the non-profit All Together Now, Inc., on July 16 will provide the community the chance to get to know each other better through Contra dance, a tradition from colonial times.

Carol Copp, local caller known throughout the Northeastern United States, will call three dances designed especially for beginners. Tina Bergman, who plays with Apollo's Fire, among others, and members of Hu$h Money will accompany on the hammered dulcimer.

The event will be held beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Kent State University Campus Parish, the Newman Center, located on Horning Road at Loop Road.

Those attending should bring food to share to this traditional American potluck. For more information, call 330-678-8760.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Signs of progress changing Kent skyline | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CONTRAST BETWEEN VIBRANT NEW
DOWNTOWN AND OLD HOTEL APPARENT

ONE YEAR AGO, STANDING
at the corner of East Erie and
South DePeyster streets in downtown
Kent, you would see the former site
of Kline & Kavali, the former site of the
Record-Courier, Car Parts Warehouse
and a building that had housed series
of bars.
Today, all of those
buildings are gone.
Acorn Alley II, Ron
Burbick's expansion
of his successful retailoffice
complex, is rising
on one corner. Work is set to start on
another block that will house Ametek
and Davey Tree offices. PARTA's Central
Gateway transit facility is ready to be
built on the site of Car Parts Warehouse,
which was razed last week. Kent State
is moving forward with plans for a hotelconference
center on the former Record-
Courier site.
An entire city block — and more — has
been leveled for redevelopment. Motorists
have become accustomed to navigating
construction zones.
Downtown Kent looks much different
than it did last summer, as many visitors
to the Kent Heritage Festival undoubtedly
noticed. And it's going to continue
to change in the months and years ahead
— for the better.
After more than a generation of talk
about redevelopment and plans for
projects that never materialized, Kent's
turnaround is finally taking place. The
groundwork is being laid for a vibrant new
downtown area. It's exciting to watch the
daily progress.
As the redevelopment effort continues
to take shape and the skyline of Kent is
transformed, it becomes even more obvious
that the towering eyesore that once
was the Hotel Kent must be dealt with.
As beautiful new buildings rise around it,
the contrast between Kent's future and
a blighted element of the past becomes
even more evident. We hope a remedy can
be found soon.

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News Headline: Let's Take A Walk Campus to Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Location: Kent State University
500 E Main St, Kent, OH When:
September 8, 2011
Time: 11:30am–1:00pm
Join Kent students, faculty, staff and community members in a walk/bike ride from the Campus Kiva to the Kent stage. This event is an effort to engage participants in a carbonless activity while showing the connection between the campus community with the City of Kent. Best of all is the free lunch and refreshments provided by M.O.M.S. Office, and a free goodie bag full of coupons from local merchants provided by Main St Kent!
Price: FREE!!

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News Headline: VIDEO: 49 Demolitions in Past 3 Years Change Kent's Landscape | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Demolition has been a popular trend in the city of Kent for the past 31 months.


In almost three years, 49 buildings have been razed or scheduled for a date with the wrecking crew across the city.


Those buildings vary from homes to businesses, but those numbers exclude partial demolitions , garage demolitions and buildings razed on the Kent State University campus.


In that same time period, fewer buildings have been built to replace those demolished. Some of those buildings were demolished to make way for new projects, but some were demolished for being vacant and in disrepair. The end result has been empty lots across the landscape.


But that trend could change as the city looks to replace some of the houses that were demolished as part of a government program, and several redevelopment projects downtown will likely mean more buildings will rise than fall in the coming years.


For the sake of history, Kent Historical Society President Sandy Halem said she would like to see a requirement that owners demolishing a structure must submit a photo of the building before its demolition in order to obtain their demolition permit.

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