Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Athletics (2)
Biological Sciences (2)
Blossom Music (2)
College of Business (COB) (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geography (4)
Information Services (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Music (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (2)
Kent State players lend area a hand (Ashby) 07/20/2011 Tuscaloosa News, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State players to volunteer in Tuscaloosa 07/19/2011 BamaOnLine.com Text Attachment Email

Soon after returning from SEC Media Days in Hoover Friday, UA coach Nick Saban (right) is scheduled to meet with a few Kent State players volunteering for Tuscaloosa's tornado recovery efforts.


Biological Sciences (2)
Editorial: Vital resource 07/20/2011 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...Bob Taft and George V. Voinovich; past directors of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and Ohio Department of Natural Resources; scientists from Ohio State University, Kent State University and the Nature Conservancy; and several officials of other Great Lakes states. The bill's proposed...

A test of leadership (Heath) 07/20/2011 Toledo Blade - Online Text Attachment Email

...have no impact on the lake. They claim that the bill is a job-creator. But Great Lakes expert Bob Heath, an emeritus professor of biological sciences at Kent State University, in testimony last month before the state Senate called it a "job-killing, economy-parching bill that Ohio can't afford...


Blossom Music (2)
'Regal Sounds of Winds' set tonight 07/20/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Let's Put on a Show 07/19/2011 Cincinnati Citybeat - Online Text Attachment Email

My teenaged and college summers were dominated by swimming pools (I was a lifeguard) and theater. I grew up in northeast Ohio where summer theater was...


College of Business (COB) (1)
KENT STATE PRESENTS ITS FIRST YOUNG BUSINESS SCHOLARS SUMMER PROGRAM (Sinclair) 07/19/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, July 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University will hold the 2011 Young Business Scholars Summer...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
KSU MAKING A NEW SPLASH WITH THE CHOICE OF THE POP IT WILL SERVE ON CAMPUS. 07/19/2011 NewsChannel 5 at 11 PM - WEWS-TV Text Email

AND KENT STATE UNIVERSITY MAKING A NEW SPLASH WITH THE CHOICE OF THE POP IT WILL SERVE ON CAMPUS. BEGINNING WITH THE FALL SEMESTER, PEPSI WILL...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Jo-Ann Stores Establishes KSU Scholarship (Campbell) 07/20/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email


Geography (4)
Elderly downplay dangers of heat (Sheridan) 07/19/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...100 by Thursday, but those who should take heed probably won't. This means you -- if you're age 65 and up. An associate professor of geography at Kent State says older people try to rationalize that they're not part of one of the most vulnerable groups --the elderly -- when it comes to...

Big brouhaha over obscure Medicare board (Sheridan) 07/19/2011 WXVT-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent...

Brain, thirst changes explain why even healthy, active seniors should be careful in heat waves (Sheridan) 07/19/2011 Yahoo! Canada Text Attachment Email

...if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 per cent...

Over 65 and not worried about heat? You should be (Sheridan) 07/20/2011 Google News Text Attachment Email


Information Services (1)
Cisco Networking Innovation Delivers More Power Over Ethernet to Unparalleled Range of Enterprise Devices (Mahon) 07/19/2011 MarketWatch Text Attachment Email

...Cisco UPOE is foundational to this architecture to provide resiliency to the trader desk." Ed Mahon, vice president for Information Services and CIO, Kent State University "We are exploring how to maximize our efficiencies in energy utilization, while minimizing the university's overall energy...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Media ethics topic of KSU workshop 07/20/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Council approves ballot proposal legislation 07/20/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...designated for a new camera system in the police department. - agreed to vacate a portion of Union Street between Fourth Street and Church Alley and allow Kent State University to control the property. Plans call for a green space and some additional parking.


KSU Museum (1)
From superheroes to Jailhouse Rock: Playhouse Square highlights movies 07/20/2011 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

On Golden Pond Presented in partnership with Kent State Museum Aug. 19 7:30 p.m. Chelsea (Jane Fonda) was never quite as close with her father as she has always wanted. But when...


Music (1)
Piano students to perform at Laurel Lake 07/20/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...festival performance by gifted young pianists from around the world July 21 at 7 p.m. The pianists are participants of the sixth annual Piano Institute at Kent State University. The concert is free and open to the public at 200 Laurel Lake Drive in Hudson. Sponsored by The Piano Division at...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
County among Northeast Ohio partnership leaders (Hoornbeek) 07/20/2011 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...the state budget doing no favors to local governments, communities are looking at every idea to save costs, including collaborative partnerships. Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy is trying to assist local governments by compiling a list of 105...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
5 Things: Tips to Beat the Heat 07/20/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State players lend area a hand (Ashby) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tuscaloosa News, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TUSCALOOSA

At the very moment three University of Alabama football players will be representing the Crimson Tide at Southeastern Conference Media Days in Hoover on Friday, four from the Crimson Tide's season-opening opponent, Kent State, will be representing a much different cause.

Kent State players Spencer Keith, Ishmaa'ily Kitchen, Lee Stalker and Jacquise Terry will arrive in Tuscaloosa on Thursday night on a two-day mission to volunteer aid for the city's tornado recovery efforts. They will spend much of the day volunteering on a project for Habitat for Humanity. According to KSU Assistant Athletic Director for Communications Alan Ashby, the Golden Flashes compliance office took necessary steps to ensure that the mission trip could be made without violating any NCAA rules.

Whatever level of physical strength Habitat for Humanity requires, the Golden Flashes should be able to handle it. Kitchen and Stalker both play on Kent State's defensive line and weigh 305 and 255 pounds, respectively, and Keith is a 215-pound quarterback.

Terry, a KSU running back, is a native of Phenix City and a first-team academic All-American.

Habitat for Humanity is working with the Nick's Kids Fund, founded by UA coach Nick Saban and his wife, Terry, on the project that will help a family in Holt that was displaced by the April 27 tornado. Students from both UA and Auburn, including some UA student-athletes, plan to help with the project as well.

The foursome is also scheduled to meet with Saban, himself a KSU grad, on Friday afternoon. Earlier in the day, Saban will be in Hoover at Media Days along with UA standouts Trent Richardson, Mark Barron and Dont'a Hightower.

Saturday morning, the Kent State players are scheduled to hold a football clinic at Holt High School for kids from the Rosedale Court area that were displaced by the storm that destroyed much of Tuscaloosa.

Alabama opens the 2011 season playing host to Kent State on Sept. 3.

Reach Chase Goodbread at chase.goodbread@tuscaloosanews.com or at 205-722-0196.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State players to volunteer in Tuscaloosa | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: BamaOnLine.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Soon after returning from SEC Media Days in Hoover Friday, UA coach Nick Saban (right) is scheduled to meet with a few Kent State players volunteering for Tuscaloosa's tornado recovery efforts.

Return to Top



News Headline: Editorial: Vital resource | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Governor's action keeps Ohio's Great Lake great

Gov. John Kasich was right to use his first veto to reject an ill-considered bill that might have endangered one of Ohio's greatest natural resources: Lake Erie and the rivers and streams that flow into it.

By requiring no permit or scientific review before massive water withdrawals, even from vulnerable tributaries, House Bill 231 would have made Ohio an outlier, with water-protection standards below those of every other Great Lakes state or Canadian province.

Of course Lake Erie's waters should be available to job-creating Ohio businesses and industries; opponents of the bill don't dispute that. But allowing excessive withdrawals, with no scientific review of how they would affect the water, is a reckless misuse of a precious resource. Kasich clearly places the highest priority on enabling businesses to thrive in Ohio; his rejection of the bill indicates how egregiously lopsided this bill is.

The governor was under considerable pressure from proponents and did not buckle.

Consider the comments of sponsor Lynn R. Wachtmann, R-Napoleon, who sniped at Kasich, "I think he's tired of getting beat up and thought he'd screw the business community and look popular." Consider also that Wachtmann is president of a bottled-water company, an obvious conflict that should loom large whenever he talks about what's best for Lake Erie.

The bill, along with Senate Bill 170, is supposed to fulfill Ohio's obligation as a signer of the Great Lakes Compact, an agreement ratified by the Great Lakes states and provinces in 2007 and 2008 and signed into federal law by President George W. Bush in 2008. But the legislation falls well short of what the states agreed to. For example, it doesn't require major water users to develop sound conservation procedures, and it uses no science to determine how large of a withdrawal should require a permit.

Where the bill does require an assessment of the potential impact of a withdrawal, it considers only the impact on the Great Lakes basin as a whole, not the effect on individual streams. Theoretically, a withdrawal could drain a stream dry and not be in violation with the law if it didn't cause a big enough drop in the lake's water level.

Kasich was encouraged to oppose the bill by environmental and conservation organizations; former Republican Govs. Bob Taft and George V. Voinovich; past directors of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and Ohio Department of Natural Resources; scientists from Ohio State University, Kent State University and the Nature Conservancy; and several officials of other Great Lakes states.

The bill's proposed thresholds at which a permit would be required were far higher than those of any other state or province: 5 million gallons per day from the lake, 2 million gallons per day from most tributaries and 300,000 gallons per day from small streams of high quality.

The Great Lakes are a treasure shared by many users; surface waters are connected, and misuse of any part of a system affects all users. In addition to protecting Lake Erie for Ohioans' use, Ohio should be a good neighbor and responsible member of the Great Lakes community. Lake Erie, as the shallowest of the lakes, is most vulnerable to overuse.

Under terms of the compact, Ohio must have a water-management law in place by 2013. Lawmakers should go back to the drawing board and, this time, craft a bill that balances the interests of businesses and industry with reasonable safeguards for the lake.

Return to Top



News Headline: A test of leadership (Heath) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Toledo Blade - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Gov. John Kasich put policy above politics last week when he told the Republican-led General Assembly that it should take another look at a bill that would have opened the floodgates for businesses to draw excessive amounts of unregulated water from Lake Erie. GOP lawmakers would be wise to heed his advice rather than blindly seek to override the governor's first veto.

The bill Mr. Kasich rejected would have allowed individual businesses in Ohio to withdraw up to 5 million gallons of water a day from Lake Erie, 2 million gallons a day from other sources within the lake's watershed, and 300,000 gallons a day from streams designated as high quality -- all without regulation. Ohio would have had the weakest protections of any of the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces that make up the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact.

The bill, which was rammed through the General Assembly almost exclusively along party lines, was too much -- even for the governor, who said Ohio has to move "at the speed of business." Mr. Kasich said the legislation "lacks clear standards for conservation and withdrawals and does not allow for sufficient evaluation and monitoring of withdrawals or usage."

He is not alone in his estimation. Former Gov. Bob Taft called the bill in its current form "death by a thousand straws" for the lake. Retired U.S. Sen. George Voinovich said the withdrawal thresholds established by the bill are "arbitrary" and not based on science. New York's Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder -- a Republican -- urged Mr. Kasich to veto the bill.

GOP lawmakers argue that Lake Erie is so large that foreseeable water withdrawals will have no impact on the lake. They claim that the bill is a job-creator. But Great Lakes expert Bob Heath, an emeritus professor of biological sciences at Kent State University, in testimony last month before the state Senate called it a "job-killing, economy-parching bill that Ohio can't afford to pass."

Stung by their governor's first veto, Republican legislators lashed out at Mr. Kasich. The bill's sponsor, Lynn Wachtmann (R., Napoleon), who owns a water bottling company that draws from the Lake Erie watershed, accused Mr. Kasich of pandering to the media and a lack of leadership.

"I didn't know the Ohio governor worked for the governors of New York and Michigan," Mr. Wachtmann said. "If we thought he worked for Ohio, we're mistaken."

Republicans may have enough votes to override Mr. Kasich's veto, but that would be unwise. Instead, they should bow to the governor's desire to strengthen the bill's conservation and monitoring provisions, which speaks to genuine concerns about protecting Ohio's most important resource.

It's easy to oppose your enemies. The test of true leadership is the willingness to say no to your friends. In this instance, Mr. Kasich passed the test.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Regal Sounds of Winds' set tonight | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 2011 Professional
Concert Series continues at
7:30 tonight with the “Regal
Sounds of Winds” at Ludwig
Recital Hall, Kent State
University Music and Speech
Center, 1325 Theatre Drive,
Kent. The concert features
Frank Rosenwein, principal
oboe; Daniel McKelway,
assistant principal clarinet,
Barrick Stees, assistant principal
bassoon, and Richard
King, principal horn, all of
the Cleveland Orchestra; and
Randall Fusco, piano. Music
includes Mozart, Piano Quintet;
Griebling-Haigh, Sonata
for Horn & Piano (world
premiere) and Romans des
Rois; and Beethoven, Piano
Quintet.
The series will continue at
7:30 p.m. July 27 with “Soul
... del sol! An Evening of Latin-
Inspired Music” featuring
the Cleveland Orchestra Piano
Trio of Joela Jones, piano,
Peter Otto, violin, and
Richard Weiss, cello; Frank
Rosenwein and Danna Sundet,
oboe; Barrick Stees,
bassoon; Joela Jones, accordion;
Emma Shook, violin;
Stanley Konopka, viola;
Scott Haigh, double bass;
Donna Lee, piano; and Ted
Rounds, percussion. Music
will include Turina, Piano
Trio; Griebling-Haigh, Sinfonia
Concertante (world premiere)
and Alegrías (world
premiere); and Piazzolla,
Milonga del Angel, Libertango,
and selections from
Five Tango Sensations.
The cost is $15 for general
admission and $5 for students.
For more information,
call the concert hotline at
330-672-3609 or visit http://
dept.kent.edu/blossom/
html_concert/faculty.htm.
Since the inception of Blossom
Music Center in 1968,
the Musical Arts Association
has partnered with Kent
State University and its College
of the Arts to develop
Blossom as a complete environment
for the arts.
Each summer, Kent/Blossom
combines performance
with education and joins
working professionals with
students to teach, explore
and produce music. This re-
lationship between a premier
performing ensemble and
a public university has also
served as a model for other
collaborations.
Founded in 1968 by George
Szell and Louis Lane, the
Kent/Blossom Music Festival
has welcomed more than
2,200 young artists. The program
has propelled hundreds
of young musicians into the
ranks of major orchestras,
opera companies and conservatory
facilities throughout
the United States and
around the globe.
The Kent/Blossom Music
program brings music
students from all over the
world to study alongside
members of the Cleveland
Orchestra for five weeks. Students
develop professional
skills through personal
study and classes with visiting
master artists, members
of the Cleveland Orchestra
and KSU faculty.
A focus on major works
of the chamber music repertoire
is augmented by
studies in orchestral repertoire
and techniques and
solo master classes. Participants
also attend open rehearsals
and concerts of the
Cleveland Orchestra. The
program features a professional
concert series as well
as 13 free concerts featuring
the Kent/Blossom Chamber
Players. Undergraduate/
graduate credit is available,
and scholarships are provided
to many participants.
The 2011 Chamber Players
Series II features three
more events. All concerts
are free and in Ludwig Recital
Hall unless otherwise
noted. The next event will be
held at 7:30 p.m. Friday and
features Mozart, Horn Quartet
K. 407; Poulenc, Trio, Op.
43; Berwald, Septet in B-flat
major; Shostakovich, Piano
Quintet in G minor, Op. 57;
and Faure, Piano Quartet in
C minor, Op. 15.
At 2:30 p.m. Saturday, the
event will feature Quantz,
Trio for Two Flutes, Bassoon
and Continuo; Moszkowski,
Suite for Two Violins and
Piano, Op. 71; Haydn, Octet
in F major, H. 2/F7; Shostakovich,
String Octet, Op. 11
(Prelude and Scherzo); Prokofiev,
Oboe Quintet, Op. 39;
and Dohnanyi, Piano Sextet
in C major, Op. 37.
On Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
the series features Mozart,
Oboe Quartet, K. 370; Foote,
Nocturne and Scherzo for
Flute and String Quartet;
Glazunov, Cello Quintet, Op.
39; Rochberg, “To the Dark
Wood” for Woodwind Quintet;
and Brahms, Piano Quintet
in F minor, Op. 34.

Return to Top



News Headline: Let's Put on a Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cincinnati Citybeat - Online
Contact Name: Rick Pender
News OCR Text: My teenaged and college summers were dominated by swimming pools (I was a lifeguard) and theater. I grew up in northeast Ohio where summer theater was easy to find, from productions featuring TV and movie stars by Kenley Players in Warren to classical plays at the Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival in Lakewood. I enjoyed shows at one of the earliest “tent” theaters, Musicarnival in Warrensville Heights. I saw musicals at Cain Park's amphitheater in Cleveland Heights and Rabbit Run Theatre, a barn in Madison. Porthouse Theater, operated by Kent State University at Blossom Music Center, offered shows, and even in my hometown of Chardon, the Geauga Lyric Theatre Guild kept busy in the summer, with productions of South Pacific and The Pajama Game.

But there were precious few opportunities for kids with a passion for theater to get involved. A group of my friends pulled together our own company in the summer of 1970 and staged an old-time melodrama, Ten Nights in a Barroom, working late evenings when we could get away from summer jobs. But we went back to our respective colleges in the fall, graduated in a year or two and went our separate ways.

I'm put in mind of this every summer when I hear that Cincinnati Young People's Theatre (CYPT) is mounting another production. With this summer's Crazy for You (lots of tunes by George Gershwin from July 29 to August 7), CYPT marks its 30th year of involving area teens in theater. Back in 1982, founder Tim Perrino checked in with a dozen area high schools proposing to involve teens in a summer theater program. He hoped to bring together kids from various parts of the city and work together to put on a show or two. The 1982 season started with 16 kids who performed a collection of one-act plays (Perrino called it “What I Did on Summer Vacation”) at Dunham Recreation Center. Before long, Perrino's band of kids, grown to 26, moved to the Westwood Town Hall where they produced The Man Who Came to Dinner. Even more ambitiously, in 1983, with 40 participants, they staged West Side Story.

Since the early 1990s, Perrino has focused on one ambitious musical every summer and, since 2002, CYPT's home has been at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. Last year they produced the “student edition” of Les Misérables. That took a cast of 75 kids with another 25 working backstage and serving on crews to build sets, make costumes and such. Over the course of 30 years, CYPT has presented 53 productions (about 350 performances) and — most remarkably — involved more than 2,000 kids. Dozens of CYPT alumni today are working professionals in the performing arts, and many more are avid theatergoers.

Crazy for You is the story of a wealthy playboy in the 1930s who dreams of a career in tap dancing despite the resistance of his proper mother and jealous fiancée. Perrino has selected 80 performers for this show (115 auditioned), representing nearly 40 area schools. It's quite amazing to see this many kids having a ball onstage. I'll be in attendance, and I hope you check it out, too. Tickets are affordable; call 513-241-6550 and get a few for yourself. While you're there, wish Perrino and his troops a happy anniversary. They've earned it.

CONTACT RICK PENDER: rpender@citybeat.com

Return to Top



News Headline: KENT STATE PRESENTS ITS FIRST YOUNG BUSINESS SCHOLARS SUMMER PROGRAM (Sinclair) | Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, July 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University will hold the 2011 Young Business Scholars Summer Program on July 24 to 29 on the Kent Campus. The business-focused camp for high school juniors and seniors is presented by university's College of Business Administration.

The top 25 applicants to the Young Business Scholars Program will stay on campus for five days and learn about business and experience college life.

Students will study different areas of business, including accounting, business management, computer information systems, economics, entrepreneurship, finance and marketing. Students will gain hands-on experience through their application of classroom learning.

"It is a great opportunity for high school students," said Elizabeth Sinclair, assistant dean of Kent State's College of Business Administration. "They pay only $50 and get to stay, be fed, learn and play on our campus for one week."

Participants will attend lectures by Kent State faculty representing all functional areas of business and will work in teams and compete in developing a business plan for a restaurant. A panel of judges will determine the winning presentation, and each member of the winning team will get $1,000 toward tuition if they attend Kent State to study business.

Students are coming from many different area high schools including Kent, Stow, Hudson, Hoban, Cuyahoga Falls and Nordonia.

"We're very pleased that we reached our capacity for this first-time program," Sinclair added. "We'll examine the evaluations from this year as we move forward with plans to offer this wonderful opportunity for high school students next year."

For more information on the Kent State's College of Business Administration, visit www.kent.edu/business. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU MAKING A NEW SPLASH WITH THE CHOICE OF THE POP IT WILL SERVE ON CAMPUS. | Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsChannel 5 at 11 PM - WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AND KENT STATE UNIVERSITY MAKING A NEW SPLASH WITH THE CHOICE OF THE POP IT WILL SERVE ON CAMPUS. BEGINNING WITH THE FALL SEMESTER, PEPSI WILL BE THE OFFICIAL PROVIDER. COCA-COLA HAD BEEN THE DRINK OF CHOICE FOR THE PAST 10 YEARS ON CAMPUS.

Return to Top



News Headline: Jo-Ann Stores Establishes KSU Scholarship (Campbell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores, the leading fabric and craft specialty retailer in America, is sponsoring a $25,000 scholarship fund with The Fashion School at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio.

This fund will support an annual $5,000 scholarship over a period of five years.

Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores is a longtime donor and supporter of the Fashion School at Kent State.

The fund is called the Jo-Ann Stores, Inc. First Generation Scholarship for Fashion Design and Merchandising. One of the requirements for the recipients of these scholarships is that the student must be a first generation college student with neither parent having completed a four-year college degree.

"This scholarship is a great next step in the relationship between Kent State and Jo-Ann," said J.R. Campbell, Director of The Fashion School at Kent State University. "We are always thinking about ways to attract new students into the Fashion School, and this scholarship helps achieve this goal with its significant financial contribution. It supports the growth of The Fashion School and the future of our students."

Scholarship recipients will be selected based upon academic achievement and involvement in activities relating to fabrics, crafts or sewing. In addition, recipients must have a minimum grade point average of 3.50. All applicants must also write a statement as to why they are applying for this scholarship and what it means to them to be one of the first members of their family to commit to graduating with a four-year degree. In this statement, applicants are also asked to address specific examples of how they performed as a leader among their sewing or crafting social group.

"This is a wonderful opportunity for young people who love fashion design and merchandising to get the financial support they need to achieve their lifelong dreams," said Margaret Skinner, Director of Corporate Communications for Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores.

The scholarship may be applied to various costs associated with attending Kent State. The Director of the Fashion School at Kent State University in conjunction with the Kent State University Foundation and Kent State's Office of Institutional Advancement will be responsible for administering the fund.

Return to Top



News Headline: Elderly downplay dangers of heat (Sheridan) | Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: July 19--The heat index could inch past 100 by Thursday, but those who should take heed probably won't.

This means you -- if you're age 65 and up.

An associate professor of geography at Kent State says older people try to rationalize that they're not part of one of the most vulnerable groups --the elderly -- when it comes to steamy, stuffy, suffocating heat.

"People know that heat is dangerous, but they always say the most vulnerable group is people older than them," said Akron resident Scott Sheridan, who studies the impact of weather.

Sheridan's 2006 research on the effect of heat on older people is getting renewed life as a heat wave floods the West and Midwest this week.

By Thursday, Northeast Ohio's temperature will be 93 to 95 and the heat index will be "considerably over 100," said meteorologist Mark Adams of the National Weather Service at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

The index is a measure of air temperature and relative humidity as a gauge of what people really perceive when they can't sweat away heat.

The Weather Service would activate a rare heat advisory if the heat index rises to 100 to 104 and an even rarer heat warning if it tops 105.

That kind of heat is especially dangerous to the ill, the young and the elderly -- the last the focus of Sheridan's work at KSU.

"Studies suggest that 65 is an important break point," he said. "People's chance of dying in a heat event is much greater from there on up."

His work found that older people believe they can figure out if they are vulnerable and don't need to listen to advice from others-- drink plenty of water and stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., for example.

Their remedy was to avoid the outdoors at all costs, even if that meant staying in a home or building without air conditioning. "That could be just as bad or worse," Sheridan said.

Every year, heat claims about 250 lives statewide, but some of those deaths may have occurred anyway at the end of the heat wave. Environmental stress pushed them along a little.

Sheridan is trying to quantify that now via a grant from the state of New York. His work will be completed this summer.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: Big brouhaha over obscure Medicare board (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: WXVT-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO (AP) - This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year - more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them - because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront - even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, canceled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination - and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect - a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/elderlyheat.asp

American Geriatrics Society: http://www.healthinaging.org/public_education/hot_weather_tips.php

AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/LindseyTanner .

Return to Top



News Headline: Brain, thirst changes explain why even healthy, active seniors should be careful in heat waves (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Canada
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHICAGO - This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 per cent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them — because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront — even in oppressive 90-degree (32.22-Celsius) temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 per cent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 per cent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 per cent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, cancelled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination — and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect — a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

___

Online:

Centres for Disease Control and Prevention: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/elderlyheat.asp

American Geriatrics Society: http://www.healthinaging.org/public_education/hot_weather_tips.php

___

AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/LindseyTanner .

Return to Top



News Headline: Over 65 and not worried about heat? You should be (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Google News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHICAGO (AP) — This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an under-appreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them — because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront — even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, canceled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination — and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect — a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

On the Net:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/elderlyheat.asp
American Geriatrics Society: http://www.healthinaging.org/public_education/hot_weather_tips.php
Copyright © 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Return to Top



News Headline: Cisco Networking Innovation Delivers More Power Over Ethernet to Unparalleled Range of Enterprise Devices (Mahon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: MarketWatch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SAN JOSE, CA, Jul 18, 2011 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) -- Furthering its leadership in networking, Cisco /quotes/zigman/20039/quotes/nls/csco CSCO +1.13% today announced the industry's first 60-watt Power over Ethernet capability for one of the most widely deployed enterprise class switch in the industry, the Cisco(R) Catalyst(R) 4500E Switch. Powering communications and IT devices via Ethernet cables instead of a main electricity supply can reduce power consumption during times when devices are not being used. This can help lower the total cost of IT operations and contribute to organizational corporate sustainability targets.

Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet (UPOE) can offer twice the power per port of products from competing switch vendors -- providing both power and network access to a greater range of devices through a single standard Ethernet cable.

Additionally, Cisco announced that Samsung zero client desktop virtualization devices and BT IP turrets have integrated Cisco UPOE technology into their devices to allow customers the immediate advantage of using their existing Cisco network to power these solutions.

Highlights:

Cisco UPOE expands the market for Power Over Ethernet (PoE):

Utilizing the Network for Power Resiliency

Specifications and Availability

Supporting Quotes for Cisco UPOE:

Rob Soderbery, senior vice president, Ethernet Switching Technology Group, Cisco "Cisco has a long history of driving new innovations in networking that help our customers transform how they work, live, play and learn. Cisco continues its networking innovation with UPOE, by doubling the power delivered over the Ethernet network cable. And when combined with EnergyWise, Cisco provides a powerful network that gives IT managers more control in the delivery of power to a wider range of networked devices to help them save energy across their enterprise."

Jeong Hwan Kim, senior vice president, Samsung Electronics "Samsung is excited to introduce the industry's first virtual desktop monitor powered by Cisco UPOE. This solution delivers a green workspace, while reducing cost and complexity."

Wim Coekaerts, senior vice president of Linux and Virtualization Engineering, Oracle "Oracle desktop virtualization products help customers securely access their applications from anywhere they work, whether it's a conference room, hospital room, clinical office or public kiosk, while minimizing cost and complexity. With Cisco UPOE technology, it is now easier than ever to deploy ultra low powered Sun Ray Client devices in nearly any setting without the clutter from power cords."

Andy Nicholson, president, Global Banking & Financial Markets, BT

"Cisco and British Telecom are working with our customers to deliver the next-generation trading floor architecture with leading security, availability, and manageability. Cisco UPOE is foundational to this architecture to provide resiliency to the trader desk."

Ed Mahon, vice president for Information Services and CIO, Kent State University "We are exploring how to maximize our efficiencies in energy utilization, while minimizing the university's overall energy costs. Because of this, we are looking to deploy the new Cisco Unified Communications network powered by Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet which will provide us with the most comprehensive support for the power requirements of the wide range of client devices we manage. The Cisco Catalyst 4500E Series offers scalability and brings value to our organization, as we can take advantage of the benefits of lower energy costs with Cisco EnergyWise. With this functionality, we can add high-bandwidth trunks where and when needed, and still meet our energy-reduction goals."

Neehar Pathare, AVP IT, Financial Technologies (India) Limited "As a global leader in offering IP technology and domain expertise to create and operate technology-centric, next-generation financial markets for multi-asset class spanning across the pre-trade, trade and post-trade transaction lifecycle, Financial Technologies is looking forward to evaluating Cisco's Universal Power Over Ethernet solution to bring network power resiliency and comprehensive power management to our virtual desktop and trading floor deployments. This will also help us to power the new breed of video devices such as personal telepresence. Cisco's UPOE will enable an 'always-on' infrastructure for our organization."

Bryan Huang, vice president, Perfect World "As one of China's leading Internet gaming developers and providers, Perfect World requires a high performance, highly secure, green and intelligent network to meet customer demand. We have standardized on Cisco Catalyst 4500E because it delivers on all these requirements. The workspace environment of Perfect World is experiencing tremendous growth in the number of PoE devices. Cisco Catalyst 4500 PoE+ technology provides compelling PoE+ port density and reliable network power. Moreover, the new Cisco UPOE technology on this platform will greatly simplify our virtual desktop and personal video conferencing deployments. Together with Cisco EnergyWise, UPOE can help us achieve our energy efficiency and green workspace goals."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoX27opJao4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RASdhbNdFQU

Supporting Resources:

Tags / Keywords: Cisco, Power Over Ethernet, switching, Catalyst, Energywise, Samsung, BT, POE, UPOE, PoE+, Catalyst 4500E, virtual desktops, IP turrets, Oracle Sun Ray Clients

RSS Feed for Cisco: http://newsroom.cisco.com/dlls/rss.html

About Cisco Cisco /quotes/zigman/20039/quotes/nls/csco CSCO +1.13% is the worldwide leader in networking that transforms how people connect, communicate and collaborate. Information about Cisco can be found at http://www.cisco.com . For ongoing news, please go to http://newsroom.cisco.com .

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco's trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks . Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company.

Embedded Video Available: http://www2.marketwire.com/mw/frame_mw?attachid=1674518

Embedded Video Available: http://www2.marketwire.com/mw/frame_mw?attachid=1674522

Image Available: http://www2.marketwire.com/mw/frame_mw?attachid=1674502

SOURCE: Cisco

Copyright 2011 Marketwire, Inc., All rights reserved.

Return to Top



News Headline: Media ethics topic of KSU workshop | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sports journalists and ethics
professionals will discuss
the “Foul Play” happening
in athletics at the collegiate
and professional levels at the
Poynter Kent State Media
Ethics Workshop at KSU.
The conference will take
place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sept. 15 in Franklin Hall's
FirstEnergy Auditorium,
550 Hilltop Drive, Kent. The
cost is $25 for media and
public relations professionals,
$20 for educators and
free for students. For details
and registration, visit mediaethics.
jmc.kent.edu/2011.

Return to Top



News Headline: Council approves ballot proposal legislation | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - The East Liverpool City Council passed several matters during a special session Monday night.

City leaders took the steps necessary to put an electricity opt-out aggregation program proposal on the November ballot.

Council voted 7-0 and passed ordinance 36 to prepare for the ballot question.

With its passage, the city of East Liverpool would be given the authority to negotiate on behalf of the community to procure an electric generation supplier that would provide the greatest savings to city customers.

Council also passed legislation to enter into a master agreement with FirstEnergy if voters approve the idea.

City council has the authority to place the program on the ballot since the Ohio Legislature has enacted electric deregulation.

Under the program, legislative authorities can buy electricity for a community as a group and negotiate the terms, conditions and price of the electric supply on the group's behalf.

According to the proposal, the program would offer guaranteed savings for all eligible residential and commercial rate codes. The agreement proposal, in this case with FirstEnergy, would be for nine years and in line with proposals in other communities.

After an initial term of three years, the agreement would continue for one or two more three-year renewal terms automatically unless either party provides written notification that it wants to terminate the contract.

The FirstEnergy plan uses a "Percent off Pricing" method, and under the city's aggregation program, the price paid for electric supply will be lower than the generation charge from Ohio Power, according to proposal documents. Each month, customers would pay less for their electric supply than if they were not in the city's aggregation program.

As an incentive, the city would earn $10 per meter if a customer opted-in to the program. The same $10 payment per meter would come during the two renewal periods as well.

A residential customer would get a 3 percent discount off the applicable Price to Compare for each unique customer. The customer is guaranteed to save 3 percent off what they would have traditionally paid Ohio Power for its electric generation. A resident's utility company would not change, but the energy provider would, if the matter passes in November and a customer agrees to enter into the plan.

Voters will decide to approve or deny the overall proposal on election day.

Even if the plan is passed, city residents and electric customers can individually opt-out of the program.

If the ballot initiative is approved, 80 percent of customers typically switch to the new plan, according to information provided by FirstEnergy. If so, the city could see roughly $32,000 in revenue with the $10 per meter incentive offered by FirstEnergy.

The program will mostly benefit residential or small business customers since larger businesses usually deal independently for electricity rates.

In other business, the East Liverpool City Council:

- accepted a $1,000 donation from Elks Lodge No. 258 designated for a new camera system in the police department.

- agreed to vacate a portion of Union Street between Fourth Street and Church Alley and allow Kent State University to control the property. Plans call for a green space and some additional parking.

Return to Top



News Headline: From superheroes to Jailhouse Rock: Playhouse Square highlights movies | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On Golden Pond
Presented in partnership with Kent State Museum
Aug. 19
7:30 p.m.

Chelsea (Jane Fonda) was never quite as close with her father as she has always wanted. But when she drops her fiancé's stepson off with her parents (Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn, both who won Oscars for their performances) for a couple of weeks, she returns married and discovers her new stepson has bonded with her father in a way she never could. Special thanks to James Harris and Kent state Museum. 1981 USA 109 minutes PG Directed by Mark Rydell

Return to Top



News Headline: Piano students to perform at Laurel Lake | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Laurel Lake Retirement Community will host a festival performance by gifted young pianists from around the world July 21 at 7 p.m. The pianists are participants of the sixth annual Piano Institute at Kent State University. The concert is free and open to the public at 200 Laurel Lake Drive in Hudson.

Sponsored by The Piano Division at Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music, the July 17-27 Piano Institute is a highly intensive festival for talented piano students in grades seven through 12, offering a unique combination of lessons, master classes and performance opportunities.

Students from all over the nation converge on the campus of Kent State University for 11 days of inspiration, learning and application.

The July 21 performance is an important part of the students' preparation for their gala concert at Severance Hall's Reinberger Chamber Hall in Cleveland.

To inquire about scheduling a performance date at Laurel Lake, call Susan Busko at 330-655-1411.

Return to Top



News Headline: County among Northeast Ohio partnership leaders (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With the finalized version of the state budget doing no favors to local governments, communities are looking at every idea to save costs, including collaborative partnerships.

Kent State University's Center for Public Administration and Public Policy is trying to assist local governments by compiling a list of 105 new collaborative projects being considered in Northeast Ohio and followup of 142 projects albeing implemented.

The data, released during in June, showed Portage County tied for third for the amount of new collaborative projects being considered (nine) and third for projects in place (15) among 16 counties.

"I think Portage County is moving forward in this area," said John Hornbeek, director of the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy.

In June, Hornbeek brought a group of Portage and Summit County officials, including Ravenna Mayor Joseph Bica and Brian Kelley, county chief information officer, together with Ohio Auditor Dave Yost to discuss collaboration.

"I think Kent State and Dr. Hornbeek really caught the auditor's attention," Bica said.

Ravenna is heavily involved in several proposals for cooperation between local governments, including talks to combine Kent, Ravenna and Portage County's health districts and to combine fire service with Ravenna Township.

THE CITY also is partnering with Ravenna schools on a planned large-scale fueling system on Oakwood Street, and extending offers to Ravenna Township and Portage County to use it.

Other collaborative ideas currently being considered in Portage County, according to the center's research, include construction of a Kent-Stow walking path, a Ravenna-Ravenna Township Joint Economic Development District and a Portage County-Ravenna Fire Investigation Team.

Collaborations already in place include the Kent-Franklin Joint Economic Development District, the Garrettsville-Freedom-Nelson Joint Fire District and the Portage County Water Rescue Team.

Bica said Ohio's cuts to local government support in the latest budget, signed into law by Gov. John Kasich, should spur more joint projects.

"From my perspective this is a necessity," Bica said. "Up until this point, everybody wanted to maintain their own turf. I see this as how we'll do business in the future."

Hornbeek said he didn't see the importance of local collaboration shrinking in the future, even if the economy improves drastically.

Return to Top



News Headline: 5 Things: Tips to Beat the Heat | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent residents without air conditioning can cool down creatively around the city

Editor's Note: This story originally ran in May, but in light of this week's forecast heatwave — Thursday's forecast high is 95 degrees Fahrenheit — we thought readers would appreciate a re-print of these stay-cool tips.

There are lots of ways to stay cool around Kent. Here are five tips for beating the heat today and throughout the summer.

Read a book. The Kent Free Library is air conditioned, and for those who don't have the luxury of keeping their house or apartment below 72 degrees Fahrenheit, the library can be a welcome respite — especially for seniors — and it's free.
Cool down in the pool at the Kent State Recreation and Wellness Center. The natatorium is open from 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. today, and the leisure pool opens at noon. Non-members can use the pool for $10 a day with photo ID. In addition, the center offers special deals for seniors. The SilverSneakers Fitness Program offers a free membership to the rec center for anyone Medicare eligible with a qualifying secondary insurer. To find out if they are eligible, interested members can log on to www.silversneakers.com. And seniors who don't qualify for SilverSneakers can still get a 10 percent discount on a membership with their Golden Buckeye card.
Speaking of pools, the pool at Theodore Roosevelt High School is open Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 7:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. and on Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Click here for admission rates.
Lower your core temperature with a tasty treat from ice cream shops like the Arctic Squirrel, Katie's Korner Ice Cream, Stoddard's Frozen Custards, Dairy Queen, or try a root beer float at A&W.
On Saturdays, take a trip on the Cuyahoga River with Crooked River Adventures.
Got a tip for staying cool in Kent? Help us beat the heat by sharing your ideas in the comments

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus