Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Art; KSU Museum (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Geography (9)
Information Services (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Music (2)
Political Science (1)
Research (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Art; KSU Museum (1)
Art Best Bets -- July 21 07/21/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Entrepreneurship (1)
AU playing host to Entrepreneurship Immersion Week 07/20/2011 Ashland Times-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...with teams of five from Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Hiram College, John Carroll University, Kent State University, Lake Erie College and University of Akron. Teams will develop a business concept for a product or service and compete...


Geography (9)
Keeping your cool: KSU study finds those most at risk from the heat may be doing little to prevent injury (Sheridan) 07/21/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

AUDIO Senior Citizens React To Heat Warnings (Sheridan) 07/21/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Elderly ignore heat warnings -- because they're not old 07/20/2011 MSNBC.com Text Attachment Email

...seniors hear the message but don't think it applies to them — because they don't see themselves as old. That point was underscored in summers past by a Kent State University study of the over-65 crowd in four North American cities. It found that 90 percent of those polled knew about heat warnings...

Over 65 and not worried about heat? You should be (Sheridan) 07/20/2011 CNBC - Online Text Attachment Email

...match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent...

Seniors face heat problems (Sheridan) 07/20/2011 Washington Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...match if he started feeling effects from the heat, “but that hasn't happened.” Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent...

Brain, thirst changes explain why even healthy, active seniors should be careful in heat waves (Sheridan) 07/20/2011 Winnipeg Free Press - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 per cent...

High Pressure, Higher Heat (Sheridan) 07/20/2011 WBEN-AM - Online Text Attachment Email

...match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent...

Brain, thirst changes explain why even healthy, active seniors should be careful in heat waves (Sheridan) 07/20/2011 medbroadcast.com Text Attachment Email

...if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 per cent...

Did you know? 07/20/2011 Gazette-Virginian - Online Text Attachment Email

...facility, our local senior citizens are one of the most vulnerable groups to the heat, and they may be ignoring heat alerts. The reason? A study from Kent State University finds 90 percent of those polled, over the age of 65, were aware of heat warnings but thought the messages were targeted...


Information Services (1)
Cisco Networking Innovation Delivers More Power Over Ethernet to Unparalleled Range of Enterprise Devices (Mahon) 07/20/2011 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...Cisco UPOE is foundational to this architecture to provide resiliency to the trader desk." Ed Mahon, vice president for Information Services and CIO, Kent State University "We are exploring how to maximize our efficiencies in energy utilization, while minimizing the university's overall...


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Council approves ballot proposal legislation 07/20/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...designated for a new camera system in the police department. - agreed to vacate a portion of Union Street between Fourth Street and Church Alley and allow Kent State University to control the property. Plans call for a green space and some additional parking.


KSU at Geauga (1)
Kent State Geauga ... growing with the county (Hoiles) 07/21/2011 News-Herald Text Attachment Email


KSU Museum (1)
From superheroes to Jailhouse Rock: Playhouse Square highlights movies 07/20/2011 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

On Golden Pond Presented in partnership with Kent State Museum Aug. 19 7:30 p.m. Chelsea (Jane Fonda) was never quite as close with her father as she has always wanted. But...


Music (2)
Classical Music 07/21/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent Blossom Music concluding '11 concerts 07/21/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Political Science (1)
A Democratic Egypt: Worker Justice and Civilian Rule (Stacher) 07/20/2011 Sojourners - Online Text Attachment Email

...warfare going on in Egypt right now that I don't even think [the liberal movements] can see,” says Joshua Stacher, a political scientist and Egypt expert at Kent State University. “If middle upper class, urban people in Cairo and Alexandria get some of their demands met, they could care less about...


Research (1)
Kent Asks State for $1.5 Million to Finish RB&W Site Cleanup (Lefton) 07/21/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
OUR VIEW Dominick's upgrade continues momentum 07/21/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Art Best Bets -- July 21 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ART BEST BETS

Kent State Student Art Exhibit — Through Nov. 4 at Margaret Clark Morgan Building lobby, 10 W. Streetsboro St., Hudson. http://www.mcmfdn.org.

Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen — Through Sept. 4 at Kent State University Museum, Rockwell Hall, East Main and South Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or http://www.kent.edu/museum.

Return to Top



News Headline: AU playing host to Entrepreneurship Immersion Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Ashland Times-Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Entrepreneurship Immersion Week, a national award-winning program of the Entrepreneurship Education Consortium, will take place on the Ashland University campus Sunday, Aug. 7 to Friday, Aug. 12.

Entrepreneurship Education Consortium is a "unique" intercollegiate competition involving nine northeast Ohio colleges and universities, Read Wakefield said in a news release.

Wakefield is the director of the Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at AU and president of Entrepreneurship Education Consortium Inc.

The AU team will participate with teams of five from Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Hiram College, John Carroll University, Kent State University, Lake Erie College and University of Akron.

Teams will develop a business concept for a product or service and compete for cash prizes of up to $2,500 before a panel of distinguished judges from the northeast Ohio entrepreneurial ecosystem, Wakefield said in the release.

Additional funding is available to student teams, which could allow them to actually start the business concept developed during the week, according to the release.

The AU team that will compete will include Jerry Arko, a senior management and marketing major from Chardon; Theresa Bradley, a junior accounting and information systems major from Loudonville; Morgan Kanzig, a junior marketing major from Lucas; Hallie Mast, a senior history major from Baltic; and Lindsey VanSparrentak, a junior hospitality management major from Amherst.

Return to Top



News Headline: Keeping your cool: KSU study finds those most at risk from the heat may be doing little to prevent injury (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Many of those most at risk to the current heat wave in Portage County may not be doing anything about it.
According to a study by a Kent State University professor, while almost 90 percent of people over 65 polled were aware of heat warnings during excessively hot days, only 45 percent changed their routines.
Temperatures remained in the 90s Wednesday, and Portage County will be under an excessive heat watch until this afternoon, with the heat index expected to reach up to 110 degrees.
Scott Sheridan, the associate professor of geography at KSU who conducted the study, said many older individuals think they are in good enough health to avoid precautions in hot weather.
“It seemed like a lot of people were just happy to call themselves independent and didn't want to put themselves in that (vulnerable) category,” Sheridan said.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people over 65 are more likely to succumb to heat related illness for multiple reasons. Universally, as people age their bodies do not adjust as well to changes in temperature.
The elderly are also more likely to have a medical condition or be on medication that could impair temperature regulation in the body.
Sheridan said one way to impart the importance of precautions on high heat days is to change the perception of who is vulnerable. He said material produced with warnings about the heat or tips to stay cool often feature pictures of elderly individuals who “look awful” or “like they're going to die.”
Excessive heat can be dangerous to anyone.
“There's nothing magical about 65,” Sheridan said. “Once you get past middle age, every age block is more vulnerable than the last.”
Rose Ferraro, director of nursing of the Portage County Health Department, suggests everyone should avoid the heat as much as possible.
“If you are going to spend time outdoors, try to limit your activities to morning and evening hours,” she said. People should stay in the shade whenever possible and make sure to drink plenty of fluids.
“It is best to drink water or sports beverages and avoid sugary drinks and alcohol during times when in the heat,” Ferraro said.
Seniors who do not have air conditioning at home can come to the Portage County Senior Center in Ravenna, said Dee Lynn, director of the center. The center is located in the Resources on Oakwood Campus at 705 Oakwood St.
“We are open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays and anyone is welcome to come,” Lynn said.
She also advised seniors should check on their elderly friends and neighbors during the hot weather.
“If you know seniors who need to get out of the heat, come on down. A lot of seniors have health problems” that are aggravated by the heat, she said.
Sheridan said some major cities, including Chicago and Philadelphia, have extensive plans and procedures for heat emergencies, but many do not.
“In Northeastern Ohio, most of the smaller communities probably wouldn't have the resources to do very much,” Sheridan said.

Return to Top



News Headline: AUDIO Senior Citizens React To Heat Warnings (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study shows there are a lot of senior citizens who do not pay much mind to heat advisories.

This study was conducted by Dr. Scott Sheridan, a professor of geography at Kent State University.
"My study tells me that the majority of senior citizens actually know when there are heat warnings and when some of the authorities urge them to take caution, but only about half of them actually do take any precautions to deal with the heat," he explains.

LISTEN to Dr. Sheridan discuss the findings of his study - click on link
http://www.akronnewsnow.com/news/itemdetail.asp?ID=46443§ion=news&subsection=localnews

Dr. Sheridan adds that most of the senior citizens in the study say they do not feel they are part of the elderly group who are the most vulnerable.
"A lot of people felt that it wasn't the job of anyone else to tell them if they were going to be vulnerable to the heat," he says. "It was up to them to decide whether they were too hot or not."

Dr. Sheridan says more than 100 people die from heat-related conditions each year and that these temperatures can lead to heart attacks and respiratory problems, among other health problems.

Everyone of all ages is urged to keep as cool as possible during this excessive heat, but it is especially important that children and the elderly stay as healthy and hydrated as possible.

Return to Top



News Headline: Elderly ignore heat warnings -- because they're not old | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: MSNBC.com
Contact Name: Linda Carroll
News OCR Text: As the nation wilts during an especially brutal summer, warnings have gone out to the elderly to try to stay cool. The problem is, many seniors hear the message but don't think it applies to them — because they don't see themselves as old.

That point was underscored in summers past by a Kent State University study of the over-65 crowd in four North American cities. It found that 90 percent of those polled knew about heat warnings for the elderly, but only 15 percent took them personally.

And it's just as true this year for Jack Chapman.

“I don't consider myself elderly,” says the 73-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C. “I'm very health-conscious. I stay active walking and swimming. I try to maintain a good diet and I take supplements.”

As for the heat warnings, Chapman says, “I don't pay a lot of attention to them. I use common sense, but if I want to do something outside, I do it.”

Deciding who counts as elderly is a tricky business. The United States Older Americans Act, for instance, targets people aged 60 and older, but it's a rare 60-year-old who considers himself or herself elderly.

Younger adults, too, call 60 the start of old age, but baby boomers are pushing that number back, according to the Associated Press-LifeGoesStrong.compoll. The median age they cite is 70. And a quarter of boomers insist you're not old until you're 80.

But no matter how you define elderly, or how healthy a senior is, high temperatures can be deadly, experts say. That's because our bodies lose the ability to deal with heat as we age.

From the time we're born until age 25 to 30, all our organ systems are growing and developing, explains, Dr. Neil Resnick, a professor and chief of geriatric medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Then at age 30 every body part starts to decline at a rate of about 1 percent per year.

“The good news is that when we're developing we end up with four to six times more capacity in every organ than we need,” Resnick says. “So if we lose half of that capacity, we've still got two to three times more than we need.”

Unless it's really hot.

Aging requires adaptations

In extreme heat, blood is redirected to the skin to help cool us down. To make up for that, the body needs to make more blood so that the heart, brain and other organs will get enough. But that takes a lot of water, which may be in short supply when a person has been sweating a lot.

Older people may not even realize that they need more water because the sense of thirst diminishes with age so people don't always know they're dehydrating. Making matters worse, older kidneys aren't as good at keeping fluids in the system.

Add to that the host of medications taken by seniors — some of which can impair sweating and the heart's ability to pump harder in response to these heat-related demands — and it's a recipe for disaster on days when the mercury skyrockets.

“The bottom line,” Resnick says, “ is that older people have less of a physical reserve to count on when they're challenged by high temperatures."

Older folks who think they're as tough as they were in younger days should think again.

If you're exercising hard on a hot day, you might dehydrate so much that you end up with too little blood flow to essential organs — like the brain and heart. Worst case scenario, Resnick says, is “you could go into a coma if your brain isn't getting enough blood supply or you could have a heart attack or kidney failure if those organs don't get enough blood.”

The consequences can be dire even if you're not working out hard, says Peter Ross, chief executive and co-founder of Senior Helpers, a company that provides in-home care for seniors.

That's the group that called new attention to a 2006 Kent State University study of more than 900 people aged 65 and older in six Northern American cities: Dayton, Ohio; Phoenix, Ariz.; Philadelphia, Penn., and Toronto, Canada.

Seniors who dehydrate enough to get dizzy run the risk of falling and breaking bones, Ross explains.

Ross's company has designed a program, called Heat Helpers, to educate the elderly. Seniors are advised to limit strenuous activities on hot days to stay cool and to pay extra attention to getting enough to drink.

“You have to understand that as you age, your body is changing,” Ross says. “And you have to listen to your body.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Over 65 and not worried about heat? You should be (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: CNBC - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHICAGO - This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them — because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront — even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, canceled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination — and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect — a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

___

AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner can be reached at http://www..com/LindseyTanner .

Return to Top



News Headline: Seniors face heat problems (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Washington Times - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: CHICAGO — This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year - more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them - because they don't think they're “old.”

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront, even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures such as those hitting the Midwest this week.

“I don't pay too much attention to those” warnings, he said. “I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me.”

Mr. Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, “but that hasn't happened.”

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

“People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them,” he said. “People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category.”

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as “elderly.” But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center, explains it, “Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are.”

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 percent to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dr. Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dr. Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling “bad” and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Return to Top



News Headline: Brain, thirst changes explain why even healthy, active seniors should be careful in heat waves (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Winnipeg Free Press - Online, The
Contact Name: Lindsey Tanner
News OCR Text: | Last Modified: 07/19/2011 7:06 PM

Indiana Walton, 82, of Grand Rapids, cools herself on the front porch of her Jefferson St SE in Grand Rapids, Mich. home while her daughter, Tamara, drinks a cold soda pop, Tuesday, July 19, 2011. (AP Photo/The Grand Rapids Press, Rex Larsen)

CHICAGO - This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 per cent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them — because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront — even in oppressive 90-degree (32.22-Celsius) temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 per cent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 per cent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 per cent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, cancelled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination — and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect — a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

Online:

Centres for Disease Control and Prevention: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/elderlyheat.asp

American Geriatrics Society: http://www.healthinaging.org/public_education/hot_weather_tips.php

AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/LindseyTanner .

Return to Top



News Headline: High Pressure, Higher Heat (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: WBEN-AM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Officially, at least at the airport, we've only had one 90 degree day in the last three years, believe it or not... so it is kind of cyclical, but we are in a very warm pattern this summer, that's for sure,"

- Meterologist Steve McLaughlin, National Weather Service, Buffalo

For millions of people enduring this week's extreme heat and humidity, it feels like they're living in a pressure cooker.

TODAY: High 90, Clear & Humid | TOMORROW: High 94, An early thunderstorm | FRIDAY: High 90 | SATURDAY: High 88

If you think Wednesday is just too darn hot, chances are you are not going to be impressed with Thursday.

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for Thursday morning through Thursday afternoon, calling for temps close to 100 degrees, with a heat index that will make it feel even worse--- like 110 or so.

"That's something that we haven't put out around here in years," says National Weather Service Meterologist Steve McLaughlin.

"That goes to show you how unusual this heat and humidity will be, " McLaughlin says.

Rochester and Genesee Valley could see temperatures reach 100 degrees, McLaughlin says. Niagara and Orleans Counties may also peak near there.

Closer to Lake Erie, and south of Buffalo, the temps will remain in the upper 90s tomorrow, and be slightly cooler today.

But the combined heat & humidity - what it feels like-- will

make for a heat index of 100 near Lake Erie, and East of Lake Ontario to between 105 and 110 in the Genesee Valley.

The Forecast: Steve McLaughlin,Meterologist, National Weather Service.

--Roofer Gerald Rott, Wm. C Rott & Sons

--Bob Geary, Butcher, Tops Markets

Elsewhere: Jayme Monicelli, KMBZ, Kansas City

" Sometimes I have to change shirts in the middle of the day or middle of the afternoon and get a dry one."

-- Sweet corn grower Ron Deardorff of Adel, Iowa,

Much of the United States is trapped under a heat "dome" caused by a huge area of high pressure that's compressing hot, moist air beneath it, leading to miserable temperatures in the mid-90s to low 100s and heat-index levels well above 100 degrees.

The oppressive conditions extend from the northern Plains states to Texas and from Nebraska to the Ohio Valley. And they're expanding eastward.

"When a high pressure system develops in the upper atmosphere, the air below it sinks and compresses because there's more weight on top, causing temperatures in the lower atmosphere to heat up, said Eli Jacks, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Silver Springs, Md.

The dome of high pressure also pushes the jet stream and its drier, cooler air, farther north - it's now well into Canada - while hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico circulates clockwise around the dome, traveling farther inland than normal.

Combined with generally clear skies and the sun's higher summertime angle, "it gets really hot," Jacks said.

That also explains why temperatures in, say, North Dakota this week aren't all that different from temperatures in Houston, he said.

The big difference is that people in Houston are accustomed to hot weather, while those in the north are not.

"In places where the highest temperature you ever expect is in the 80s and you're at 102, there are big health concerns," because fewer people have air conditioning or fans, Jacks said. "Heat is the No. 1 killer out of all weather hazards."

What's more, because of the humidity, even nighttime brings little relief.

"It's been 100 degrees at 11 o'clock, lately, at night," said Curtis Mark, who was servicing air conditioners Tuesday at the Greer County Courthouse in Mangum, Okla., where the temperature was 106 degrees at noon. "Stay indoors is about all I do."

Thunderstorms can develop around the perimeter of the dome - called the "ring of fire" - bringing temporary relief to some areas, said Kevin Birk, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Illinois. But this dome is so large that the heat rebuilds quickly, Birk said.

While heat domes aren't uncommon, this one is unusual because of its size and duration. It began three days ago and may last seven to 10 days in some locations. And it's moving eastward, with temperatures expected to reach 100 degrees in Washington by Thursday.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration records show that the United States broke 25 local high records for the date on Monday, including 103 degrees in both Edgemont S.D., and Victoria, Texas.

On Tuesday, it was 102 in Manhattan, Kan., and Valentine, Neb. The mercury rose to 100 in Joplin, Mo., and Rockford, Ill. - which tied that city's record for the date set in 1930. And in some cities it will be even hotter Wednesday: Chicago reached 93 degrees Tuesday, with 97 forecast for Wednesday.

But relief is on the way. Cooler air should begin moving into the Plains states this weekend, as a strong pool of air from the jet stream begins to push hot air out of the way in the Dakotas and into Minnesota before making its way east. By Monday, temperatures will drop into the mid-80s in the north, while they still could be sweltering in the East, he said.

"This is really an exceptional event, I think it's fair to say ... in terms of scope and duration," he said.

Extended Hours At Buffalo Pools

Mayor Byron Brown has announced extended hours for the city's pools and splash pads.

Brown announced pools would expand hours Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 10:00a.m.–8:00p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

READ MORE

Elderly Especially At Risk

(AP) This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine.

So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year - more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them - because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront - even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, canceled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination - and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect - a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

From the US CDC

Heat Stroke

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body's temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

Signs and Symptoms of Heat Stroke

Warning signs vary but may include the following:

An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F)

Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)

Rapid, strong pulse

Throbbing headache

Dizziness

Nausea

Heat Exhaustion

Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids.

Signs and Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

Warning signs vary but may include the following:

Heavy sweating

Paleness

Muscle Cramps

Tiredness

Weakness

Dizziness

Headache

Nausea or vomiting

Fainting

Skin: may be cool and moist

Pulse rate: fast and weak

Breathing: fast and shallow

What You Can Do to Protect Yourself

You can follow these prevention tips to protect yourself from heat-related stress:

Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages. (If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask him how much you should drink when the weather is hot. Also, avoid extremely cold liquids because they can cause cramps.)

Rest.

Take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath.

If possible, seek an air-conditioned environment. (If you don't have air conditioning, consider visiting an air-conditioned shopping mall or public library to cool off.)

Wear lightweight clothing.

If possible, remain indoors in the heat of the day.

Do not engage in strenuous activities.

What You Can Do to Help Protect Elderly Relatives and Neighbors

If you have elderly relatives or neighbors, you can help them protect themselves from heat-related stress:

Visit older adults at risk at least twice a day and watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

Encourage them to increase their fluid intake by drinking cool, nonalcoholic beverages regardless of their activity level.

Warning: If their doctor generally limits the amount of fluid they drink or they are on water pills, they will need to ask their doctor how much they should drink while the weather is hot.

Take them to air-conditioned locations if they have transportation problems.

What You Can Do for Someone With Heat Stress

If you see any signs of severe heat stress, you may be dealing with a life-threatening emergency. Have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the affected person. Do the following:

Get the person to a shady area.

Cool the person rapidly, using whatever methods you can. For example, immerse the person in a tub of cool water; place the person in a cool shower; spray the person with cool water from a garden hose; sponge the person with cool water; or if the humidity is low, wrap the person in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously.

Monitor body temperature and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101°–102°F

If emergency medical personnel are delayed, call the hospital emergency room for further instructions.

Do not give the person alcohol to drink.

Get medical assistance as soon as possible.

Heat Stress in the Elderly

Elderly people (that is, people aged 65 years and older) are more prone to heat stress than younger people for several reasons:

Elderly people do not adjust as well as young people to sudden changes in temperature.

They are more likely to have a chronic medical condition that changes normal body responses to heat.

They are more likely to take prescription medicines that impair the body's ability to regulate its temperature or that inhibit perspiration.

Return to Top



News Headline: Brain, thirst changes explain why even healthy, active seniors should be careful in heat waves (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: medbroadcast.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHICAGO - This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 per cent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them — because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront — even in oppressive 90-degree (32.22-Celsius) temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 per cent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 per cent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 per cent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, cancelled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination — and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect — a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

___

Online:

Centres for Disease Control and Prevention: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/elderlyheat.asp

American Geriatrics Society: http://www.healthinaging.org/public_education/hot_weather_tips.php

___

AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/LindseyTanner .

Did you find what you were looking for on our website? Please let us know.

Return to Top



News Headline: Did you know? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gazette-Virginian - Online
Contact Name: Paula I. Bryant
News OCR Text: Written by Paula I. Bryant

This year, July has five Fridays, five Saturdays and five Sundays. Did you know?

It's hot.

• Every year since 1998, more people die from extreme heat in the U.S. than from floods, tornadoes and hurricanes, combined.

w Heat waves are often called the “silent epidemic” or the “invisible natural disaster.”

• Unlike natural disasters that have wreaked visible, violent havoc this summer, heat waves often strike victims within the confines of their homes.

• To top it off, the American Medical Student Association finds that the general public perceives heat waves as uncomfortable and inconvenient instead of life threatening.

This is just a friendly reminder to check on elderly loved ones, friends and neighbors who may fall victim to the extreme heat.

According to information provided by Stacey Hilton of Senior Helpers, an organization who connects professional caregivers with seniors who wish to live at home as opposed to a nursing or assisted living facility, our local senior citizens are one of the most vulnerable groups to the heat, and they may be ignoring heat alerts.

The reason?

A study from Kent State University finds 90 percent of those polled, over the age of 65, were aware of heat warnings but thought the messages were targeted toward “older Americans,” a group they ironically don't think they belong in.

That's why Senior Helpers, one of the largest in-home care providers for seniors in the nation, has launched a local program called “Heat Helpers;” caregivers who regularly check-in on seniors and make sure they're properly taking care of themselves so they don't make heat headlines.

Senior Helpers provides the following reminder for people to check on senior citizens during this deadly heat wave that is melting most of the country, and they offer the following tips:

• Stay well hydrated: Caregivers remind seniors to drink water throughout the course of the day, even if they're not particularly thirsty. As adults continue to age, the amount of water retained by the body decreases substantially.

• Maintain a cool environment: Caregivers close blinds and curtains keeping the house cool, even in triple digit temperatures. Caregivers also have battery operated/hand-held fans readily available to keep their seniors comfortable. Most seniors are budget-conscious, so it's important for caregivers to be sure the AC is set to a proper, cool level, and it's working. Caregivers also can be responsible to check filters once a month.

• Stay in air conditioning in the afternoon: The hottest part of the day is from 3 to 5 p.m. Caregivers provide inside activities like playing cards, going to movies or the mall to keep seniors active inside to avoid spending time outside during the most dangerous hours of the day.

• Eat plenty, but eat light: Caregivers prepare light food because heavy foods, like meat and cheese, tend to make the body work harder to digest, using more water and generating more body heat.

• Follow new sunscreen guidelines: Caregivers are well versed on the FDA's newly released guidelines about sun protection.

Seniors are more prone to sunburn because their bodies have less water. Caregivers educate seniors about these new regulations such as there's no such thing as “sweat proof” or “water proof” sunscreen or that you must re-apply sunscreen every two hours for it to work effectively.

• Copies of health care information: In the event of an emergency, caregivers can have copies of senior's prescriptions, health insurance card and phone numbers of health care providers on-hand.

Even if your elderly loved ones say they're staying safe in the heat, it's always a good idea to have someone check up on them.

For more information on Senior Helpers, visit www.seniorhelpers.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Cisco Networking Innovation Delivers More Power Over Ethernet to Unparalleled Range of Enterprise Devices (Mahon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Furthering its leadership in networking, Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) today announced the industry's first 60-watt Power over Ethernet capability for one of the most widely deployed enterprise class switches in the industry, the Cisco® Catalyst® 4500E Switch. Powering communications and IT devices via Ethernet cables instead of a main electricity supply can reduce power consumption during times when devices are not being used. This can help lower the total cost of IT operations and contribute to organizational corporate sustainability targets.

Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet (UPOE) can offer twice the power per port of products from competing switch vendors -- providing both power and network access to a greater range of devices through a single standard Ethernet cable.

Additionally, Cisco announced that Samsung zero client desktop virtualization devices and BT IP turrets have integrated Cisco UPOE technology into their devices to allow customers the immediate advantage of using their existing Cisco network to power these solutions.

Highlights:

Cisco UPOE expands the market for Power Over Ethernet (PoE):

By using Cisco's new UPOE linecard and UPOE splitter, any device requiring up to 60-watt power can now be powered by Cisco's Catalyst 4500E Switches. This includes Cisco IP phones, personal telepresence systems, compact switches and wireless access points.

Cisco has been a leader in delivering PoE since 2000 when it introduced 7-watt inline power over Ethernet for powering Cisco IP Phones. Now with UPOE, Cisco is again expanding the power of the network and is working with IEEE and many third-party device manufacturers to standardize UPOE in all of their next-generation, network-enabled devices.

Today, Cisco has worked very closely with the following partners to integrate Cisco UPOE on their devices for easier deployment:

Samsung NC220, the industry's first integrated zero client display, which negates the need for a separate virtual desktop client and wall adapter for powering the desktop components.

BT's Netrix turret, used in financial trading room floors, can now derive its power from the same Ethernet cable that provides its connection to the Cisco-powered network.

Also Cisco has tested many devices that can now, through a UPOE splitter, be powered by the Catalyst 4500E switches, including Oracle Sun Ray Clients, which are highly secure, easy to manage, lower power consumption thin client devices that are used for displaying server-hosted virtual desktops.

Utilizing the Network for Power Resiliency

New lower-powered networked devices are becoming more popular among enterprises to save energy. According to a February 2010 report from Global Industry Analysts, the global thin client market is predicted to reach 14.36 million units in sales by 2015. These networked devices need resilient and efficient power.

The Cisco Catalyst 4500E with Universal Power Over Ethernet provides this resiliency and high availability thanks to its hardware redundancy in power supplies and fans. Customers save money by consolidating backup power infrastructure into the wiring closet.

Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet can be combined with Cisco EnergyWise to extend the capability of energy administration and policy setting beyond the traditional PoE devices via simplified network and power cabling infrastructures. By simplifying network infrastructures and reducing power consumption, enterprises can lower the total cost of ownership of IT while improving corporate sustainability.

Specifications and Availability

Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet is available now with a new linecard on the Catalyst 4500E. Up to 120 UPOE ports can be supported in a single Catalyst 4500E chassis. Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet utilizes standard Cat 5e or higher cabling and RJ45 connectors to enable an easier deployment of this solution within existing infrastructures.

In September 2011, Cisco will ship a Universal Power Over Ethernet splitter, which will allow connections to additional third-party devices with a standard DC output.

Cisco is also offering pretested, validated configurations for devices from Cisco and many partners to ease deployments. Published solution briefs for five vertical markets and popular enterprise applications with validated designs are available to help enable faster deployment.

Cisco is offering free developer support to any networked endpoint device manufacturer who is interested in harnessing the benefits of UPOE in their future design specifications.

Supporting Quotes for Cisco UPOE:

Rob Soderbery, senior vice president, Ethernet Switching Technology Group, Cisco

"Cisco has a long history of driving new innovations in networking that help our customers transform how they work, live, play and learn. Cisco continues its networking innovation with UPOE, by doubling the power delivered over the Ethernet network cable. And when combined with EnergyWise, Cisco provides a powerful network that gives IT managers more control in the delivery of power to a wider range of networked devices to help them save energy across their enterprise."

Jeong Hwan Kim, senior vice president, Samsung Electronics

"Samsung is excited to introduce the industry's first virtual desktop monitor powered by Cisco UPOE. This solution delivers a green workspace, while reducing cost and complexity."

Wim Coekaerts, senior vice president of Linux and Virtualization Engineering, Oracle

"Oracle desktop virtualization products help customers securely access their applications from anywhere they work, whether it's a conference room, hospital room, clinical office or public kiosk, while minimizing cost and complexity. With Cisco UPOE technology, it is now easier than ever to deploy ultra low powered Sun Ray Client devices in nearly any setting without the clutter from power cords."

Andy Nicholson, president, Global Banking & Financial Markets, BT

"Cisco and British Telecom are working with our customers to deliver the next-generation trading floor architecture with leading security, availability, and manageability. Cisco UPOE is foundational to this architecture to provide resiliency to the trader desk."

Ed Mahon, vice president for Information Services and CIO, Kent State University

"We are exploring how to maximize our efficiencies in energy utilization, while minimizing the university's overall energy costs. Because of this, we are looking to deploy the new Cisco Unified Communications network powered by Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet which will provide us with the most comprehensive support for the power requirements of the wide range of client devices we manage. The Cisco Catalyst 4500E Series offers scalability and brings value to our organization, as we can take advantage of the benefits of lower energy costs with Cisco EnergyWise. With this functionality, we can add high-bandwidth trunks where and when needed, and still meet our energy-reduction goals."

Neehar Pathare, AVP IT, Financial Technologies (India) Limited

"As a global leader in offering IP technology and domain expertise to create and operate technology-centric, next-generation financial markets for multi-asset class spanning across the pre-trade, trade and post-trade transaction lifecycle, Financial Technologies is looking forward to evaluating Cisco's Universal Power Over Ethernet solution to bring network power resiliency and comprehensive power management to our virtual desktop and trading floor deployments. This will also help us to power the new breed of video devices such as personal telepresence. Cisco's UPOE will enable an 'always-on' infrastructure for our organization."

Bryan Huang, vice president, Perfect World

"As one of China's leading Internet gaming developers and providers, Perfect World requires a high performance, highly secure, green and intelligent network to meet customer demand. We have standardized on Cisco Catalyst 4500E because it delivers on all these requirements. The workspace environment of Perfect World is experiencing tremendous growth in the number of PoE devices. Cisco Catalyst 4500 PoE+ technology provides compelling PoE+ port density and reliable network power. Moreover, the new Cisco UPOE technology on this platform will greatly simplify our virtual desktop and personal video conferencing deployments. Together with Cisco EnergyWise, UPOE can help us achieve our energy efficiency and green workspace goals."

Supporting Resources:

Learn more: Cisco.com/go/upoe

Blog: Cisco Universal Power Over Ethernet

Download Cisco UPOE White Paper

Watch Cisco UPOE: Universal, Resilient, Efficient

Download Cisco UPOE At-A-Glance

Download Solution Brief: Desktop Virtualization Solution with Samsung VDI Monitor

Download Solution Brief: Trading Floor Solution with British Telecom

Tags / Keywords:

Cisco, Power Over Ethernet, switching, Catalyst, Energywise, Samsung, BT, POE, UPOE, PoE+, Catalyst 4500E, virtual desktops, IP turrets, Oracle Sun Ray Clients

RSS Feed for Cisco: http://newsroom.cisco.com/dlls/rss.html

About Cisco

Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) is the worldwide leader in networking that transforms how people connect, communicate and collaborate. Information about Cisco can be found at http://www.cisco.com. For ongoing news, please go to http://newsroom.cisco.com.

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco's trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company.

Return to Top



News Headline: Council approves ballot proposal legislation | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - The East Liverpool City Council passed several matters during a special session Monday night.

City leaders took the steps necessary to put an electricity opt-out aggregation program proposal on the November ballot.

Council voted 7-0 and passed ordinance 36 to prepare for the ballot question.

With its passage, the city of East Liverpool would be given the authority to negotiate on behalf of the community to procure an electric generation supplier that would provide the greatest savings to city customers.

Council also passed legislation to enter into a master agreement with FirstEnergy if voters approve the idea.

City council has the authority to place the program on the ballot since the Ohio Legislature has enacted electric deregulation.

Under the program, legislative authorities can buy electricity for a community as a group and negotiate the terms, conditions and price of the electric supply on the group's behalf.

According to the proposal, the program would offer guaranteed savings for all eligible residential and commercial rate codes. The agreement proposal, in this case with FirstEnergy, would be for nine years and in line with proposals in other communities.

After an initial term of three years, the agreement would continue for one or two more three-year renewal terms automatically unless either party provides written notification that it wants to terminate the contract.

The FirstEnergy plan uses a "Percent off Pricing" method, and under the city's aggregation program, the price paid for electric supply will be lower than the generation charge from Ohio Power, according to proposal documents. Each month, customers would pay less for their electric supply than if they were not in the city's aggregation program.

As an incentive, the city would earn $10 per meter if a customer opted-in to the program. The same $10 payment per meter would come during the two renewal periods as well.

A residential customer would get a 3 percent discount off the applicable Price to Compare for each unique customer. The customer is guaranteed to save 3 percent off what they would have traditionally paid Ohio Power for its electric generation. A resident's utility company would not change, but the energy provider would, if the matter passes in November and a customer agrees to enter into the plan.

Voters will decide to approve or deny the overall proposal on election day.

Even if the plan is passed, city residents and electric customers can individually opt-out of the program.

If the ballot initiative is approved, 80 percent of customers typically switch to the new plan, according to information provided by FirstEnergy. If so, the city could see roughly $32,000 in revenue with the $10 per meter incentive offered by FirstEnergy.

The program will mostly benefit residential or small business customers since larger businesses usually deal independently for electricity rates.

In other business, the East Liverpool City Council:

- accepted a $1,000 donation from Elks Lodge No. 258 designated for a new camera system in the police department.

- agreed to vacate a portion of Union Street between Fourth Street and Church Alley and allow Kent State University to control the property. Plans call for a green space and some additional parking.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Geauga ... growing with the county (Hoiles) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University system is comprised of seven regional campus, one of which is located on 87 acres in Geauga County's Burton Township.

The school, 30 miles east of Cleveland, was founded in 1964 and is the sole institution of higher learning in the county.

Because Geauga County is “on the grow” in terms of population, the campus is readying itself for future students.

Enrollment growth over the last three years has nearly doubled the size of the student body, according to a university spokesperson. Enrollment for fall semester 2008 was 1,458 and by spring semester 2011 had grown to 2,499. Currently, the enrollment for the upcoming 2011 fall semester is running about 18 percent ahead of last year.

Please click on link for audio:
http://news-herald.com/articles/2011/07/20/news/doc4e272d1203bc0528036167.txt?viewmode=default

We are offering employable degree programs to meet the challenge of people who come here wanting to prepare for a local job,” said Thomas Holies, director of enrollment management and student services for Kent State University at Geauga Campus and the Academic Center in Twinsburg. “With the demand increasing for meaningful programs and what students want in light of what jobs are out there, Geauga advisors enjoy the opportunity to assist students in finding the right career and college major fit. Working one-on-one with students is what motivates us.”

Academic advising plays a key role in helping students make sound educational and career plans based on their interests, abilities and academic programs. Advisors help students choose the most suitable major and direct them to the classes and prerequisites they need, as well as guide them toward additional resources.

“Our average class size is 14 or 15. Our maximum class size is 30,” Holies said. “We are on the verge of bringing many new four-year degree programs to our regional campus as part of Kent State President Lester Lefton's vision. There are opportunities for students to come here and complete bachelor's degrees in business administration, general studies, technical and applied studies, English, and others. Previous undergraduate course work has no expiration date.”

A new degree in middle childhood education allows students to complete their bachelor's degree at the Geauga Campus.

It's one of the newest and most popular programs and prepares future middle school teachers with concentrations in science, math, social studies, or English, the spokesperson said.

A rise in amount of individuals seeking education for employment in the health care industry is being addressed through two nursing programs — the associate degree in nursing in Twinsburg and the bachelor of science in nursing, in Burton. Additional degrees are currently being designed.

KSU Geauga also offers a progression of pre-college certificate programs that build on one another, with the purpose of preparing adults for college and entry-level employment. Basic academic, computer, and work-readiness skills are emphasized. The dedicated Geauga Campus staff and faculty all focus on one direction, helping the students reach their career goals, evidenced by the campus mission statement:

Kent State University at Geauga and Regional Academic Center is committed to providing a superior education for a diverse student population in a creative learning environment while preparing students to participate fully in society. Kent State University at Geauga and the Academic Center serve as the educational, business, and cultural center of our community.”

In order to fulfill this mission the university offers opportunities such as hosting a drunk-driving simulation event to which local high schools and the community are invited to participate.

Another project benefitting the community had business class students working with the Chardon Tomorrow organization. A partnership with the group is planned to continue.

Earth Day was celebrated as several local agencies joined the campus in promoting green initiatives through related activities. The Kent State at Geauga GAIA Society presented demonstrations in newspaper recycling and the making of pine cone bird feeders.

A tree planting ceremony to recognize the donation of a fir tree by Running Deer Tree Farm in Montville Township also took place.

Looking ahead, The Ohio Humanities Council will bring a museum quality exhibit created by the Smithsonian Institution to the Geauga Campus in August.

The New Harmonies tour examines the origins of various genres of roots music. The campus will host the exhibit in conjunction with the Raccoon County Music Festival taking place Aug. 13 at the Geauga County Historical Society in Burton Township. Several programs are planned to complement the exhibit.

Return to Top



News Headline: From superheroes to Jailhouse Rock: Playhouse Square highlights movies | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On Golden Pond

Presented in partnership with Kent State Museum

Aug. 19

7:30 p.m.

Chelsea (Jane Fonda) was never quite as close with her father as she has always wanted. But when she drops her fiancé's stepson off with her parents (Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn, both who won Oscars for their performances) for a couple of weeks, she returns married and discovers her new stepson has bonded with her father in a way she never could. Special thanks to James Harris and Kent state Museum. 1981 USA 109 minutes PG Directed by Mark Rydell

Return to Top



News Headline: Classical Music | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLASSICAL MUSIC

Cleveland Institute of Music's Lunch and Listen Recital — Noon Thursday, Mixon Hall, Cleveland Institute of Music, 11021 East Blvd, Cleveland. 216-791-5000 or http://www.cim.edu.

Kent/Blossom Music Festival Chamber Player Series — 7:30 p.m. Friday, Ludwig Recital Hall, Kent State University Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent. Program: Mozart, Horn Quartet, K. 407; Poulenc, Trio, Op. 43; Berwald, Septet in B-flat major; Shostakovich, Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57; and Faure, Piano Quartet in C minor, Op. 15. Free. 330-672-3609.

Kent/Blossom Music Festival Chamber Player Series — 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Ludwig Recital Hall, Kent State University Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent. Program: Quantz, Trio for Two Flutes, Bassoon and Continuo; Moszkowski, Suite for Two Violins and Piano, Op. 71; Haydn, Octet in F major, H. 2/F7; Shostakovich, String Octet, Op. 11; Prokofiev, Oboe Quintet, Op. 39; and Dohnanyi, Piano Sextet in C major, Op. 37. Free. 330-672-3609.

Cleveland Orchestra — 8 p.m. Saturday, Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. Featuring David Afkham, conductor; and Jon Kimura Parker, piano. Program: Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 3; and Shostakovich, Symphony No. 10. Lawn, $19. Pavilion, $27, $32 and $43. 216-231-7463 or http://www.clevelandorchestra.com.

Kent/Blossom Music Festival Chamber Player Series — 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Ludwig Recital Hall, Kent State University Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent. Program: Mozart, Oboe Quartet, K. 370; Foote, Nocturne and Scherzo for Flute and String Quartet; Glazunov, Cello Quintet, Op. 39; Rochberg, To the Dark Wood for Woodwind Quintet; and Brahms, Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34. Free. 330-672-3609.

Cleveland Orchestra — 7 p.m. Sunday, Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. Featuring Hans Graf, conductor; and Jeffrey Kahane, piano. Program: Ravel, La Valse ; Mozart, Piano Concerto No. 25 in C major, K. 503; J. Strauss Jr., Overture to Die Fledermaus; and J. Strauss Sr., Radetzky March. Lawn, $19. Pavilion $27, $32 and $43. 216-231-7463 or http://www.clevelandorchestra.com.

2011 Gourmet Matinee Luncheon — Noon Wednesday, Knight Grove at Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. Featuring Bassoon Harmony. $35. Tickets: Liz Hugh, 330-840-8429.

Kent/Blossom Music Festival Presents Soul del Sol! An Evening of Latin-Inspired Music — 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Ludwig Recital Hall, Kent State University Music and Speech Center, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent. Featuring Cleveland Orchestra Piano Trio; Joela Jones, piano and accordion; Peter Otto, violin; Richerd Weiss, cello; Frank Rosenwein and Danna Sundet, oboe; Barrick Stees, bassoon; Emma Shook, violin; Stanley Konopka, violin; Scott Haigh, double bass; Donna Lee, piano; and Ted Rounds, percussion. $15; $5, students. 330-672-3609.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent Blossom Music concluding '11 concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Blossom Music
Festival will hold its final
concert in its 2011 Faculty
Concert Series at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
“Soul …del sol!” is an evening
of Argentine, Spanish
& Latin-inspired Musicalligraphics
by Astor Piazzolla,
Joachín Turina, and two
world premieres by northeast
Ohio composer Margi
Griebling-Haigh.
The concert takes place
in the Ludwig Recital Hall,
Music and Speech Center,
1325 Theatre Drive, Kent
State University. Tickets are
available at the door for $15
adults and $5 students, by
cash or check. Reservations
are not accepted
All proceeds benefit the
Kent/Blossom Music Festival,
celebrating its 43rd season
in partnership with The
Cleveland Orchestra.
The program will begin
with Peter Otto, violin; Richard
Weiss, cello; Joela Jones,
piano performing Círculo:
Fantasía para piano, violín
y violoncello, Op. 91 (1936)
by Joachín Turina (1882–
1949).
Continuing will be the
dynamic sounds of Frank
Rosenwein & Danna Sundet,
solo oboe; Barrick Stees,
solo bassoon; Peter
Otto & Emma Shook, violin;
Stanley Konopka, viola;
Richard Weiss, cello; Scott
Haigh, bass. They will perform
the world premiere of
Margi Griebling-Haigh's Sinfonia
Concertante (2010)
The second world premiere
will be performed
by Joela Jones, accordion;
Danna Sundet, oboe; Peter
Otto, violin; Stanley Konopka,
viola; Richard Weiss,
cello; Scott Haigh, bass; Ted
Rounds, dumbek and tambourine;
Donna Lee, piano.
The piece, titled “Alegrías”
was composed by Griebling-
Haigh and had been commissioned
in honor of local
philanthropist and arts supporter,
James D. Ireland III.
Finally, Joela Jones, accordion;
Peter Otto & Emma
Shook, violin; Stanley Konopka,
viola; Richard Weiss,
cello perform a mix of tango,
jazz and classical in the Astor
Paizzolla pieces Milonga
del Angel” and Libertango
from Five Tango Sensations
for Bandoneón (accordion)
and String Quartet.

Return to Top



News Headline: A Democratic Egypt: Worker Justice and Civilian Rule (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Sojourners - Online
Contact Name: Jake Olzen
News OCR Text: The God's Politics blog seeks to run a variety of opinions on important issues of faith, politics, and culture. Unlike pieces by Jim Wallis and Sojourners staff, other opinions expressed on this blog do not necessarily represent the position of Sojourners.

Verse & Voice

Justice for the Poor

+Get the Verse &

The latest news on Budget Cuts, Same-Sex Marriage, Immigration, Global Warming, Libya, Yemen, Afghan Girls Education, Gaza, Zimbabwe, Ivory Coast, South Africa, and Select Op-Eds.

+Get the Daily

Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good

Christian Century Blogs

Christianity Today Liveblog

Christians for Biblical Equality

Diana Butler Bass

The Evangelical Outpost

Faith & Leadership

Faith in Public Life

Friends of Justice

From the Pews in the Back

Gathering in Light

Gifted for Leadership

God is Not Elsewhere

The Green Mama

Life and Faith

The Missional Mom

More Than Serving Tea

New York Faith & Justice

Next Gener.Asian Church

Prof. Rah's Blog

Real Live Preacher

Red Letter Christians

Revolution in Jesusland

Salter McNeil & Associates

Talk to Action

Young Anabaptist Radicals by Jake Olzen 07-20-2011

After months of good-faith reforms and patience, the drama is back in Egypt's Tahrir Square as protesters are preparing for a potential showdown with the state's military rule. The movement, among other things, is demanding an end to military rule — a more radical call that reflects both the frustration with the status quo and the hope for a better way.

Two weeks ago, at the “Day of Persistence,” Egypt saw its largest resurgence of public protest since former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in February. The nation-wide protests show Egyptians camping out in Cairo's Tahrir Square, staging sit-ins and blocking traffic in Alexandria, and threatening to shut down Suez's tunnel access to Sinai. So why are the people confronting — albeit nonviolently — an interim government that has promised elections and a new constitution? A glance at the collective demands drafted in Tahrir Square make clear that the movement's demands — both political and economic — have not progressed much under the military rule of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces.

The political demands involve fair, civilian trials for the hundreds of #Jan25 supporters who are imprisoned and/or sentenced by military courts post-Mubarak. Related is the demand for accountability for police-sponsored murders of activists, indictments of the Mubarak regime's leadership, and the replacement of current key political leaders with civilians. Less politically-oriented — but garnering more attention despite its lack of specificity — is the demand for economic reform. Central to the importance of new economic policy, no doubt, are Egypt's vibrant labor unions that have found themselves under increased scrutiny and criticism by government officials and members of the Egyptian liberal class. The Mubarak regime lost its grasp when a general strike swept across Egypt. Egyptian workers were celebrated for their part in the movement to topple Mubarak. But now Egypt's workers are catching heat from some compatriots for their continued protests that demand economic justice and workers' rights, as explained in this news article:

“There is total class warfare going on in Egypt right now that I don't even think [the liberal movements] can see,” says Joshua Stacher, a political scientist and Egypt expert at Kent State University. “If middle upper class, urban people in Cairo and Alexandria get some of their demands met, they could care less about minimum wage, or the fact that the healthcare system is complete crap,” he says of the competing array of post-revolutionary demands. “The dominant discourse that's coming out on TV is that it's not the right time to protest for these things. Like ‘You shouldn't have a living wage right now, you're being greedy.

There is little debate that Egyptian workers — both organized and unorganized — wield tremendous power for the political and economic future of the country. The Christian Science Monitor reports that:

The labor movement, at a time of populist economic anger and, could become one of the most influential forces during this critical period of transition in Egypt. ‘The labor force is the only social force acting on a daily basis,' says activist and journalist Hossam al-Hamalawy. “You can bomb Tahrir Square if you want to, but if there's a general strike, what can you do?”

Such a perspective highlights the importance of the mainstream workforce to join in nonviolent social change. While the history of nonviolent social movement has been politically successful in bringing down dictators, throwing out occupiers, and gaining political rights, the struggle for economic justice has been one where nonviolent action has lagged behind — particularly after a revolutionary victory. It is clear that there remain class divisions in Egypt — splitting the country into those who demand political reform as the urgent need while disregarding those who see the prescient reality of low (and in some cases no) pay and high unemployment suffered by the poor and the working class as fundamental to a New Egypt. Jadaliyya‘s Hesham Sallam, in his article “Striking Back at Egyptian Workers,” offers an in-depth look at the different narratives playing out in this struggle between the workers and Egypt's political elite and interim government. Workers, activists, organizers, and bloggers have clearly defined the movement for a people's Egypt to not be over, but it remains uncertain how their demands and desires will materialize into a constructive paradigm of new economic policies, laws, and social welfare programs when the political process itself remains tenuous at best.

[This article appears courtesy of the Waging Nonviolence blog.]

Jake Olzen is a member of the Kairos Chicago community and a graduate student at Loyola University in Chicago.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent Asks State for $1.5 Million to Finish RB&W Site Cleanup (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City applies for Clean Ohio Funds that, if awarded, would lead to transfer of the property into city ownership for $1

Kent is asking the state for $1.5 million to finish the cleanup of the former RB&W property at 800 Mogadore Road.

The city has applied for a Clean Ohio Fund Brownfield Revitalization grant totaling $1,498,310 to address what is believed to be the cause of underground contaminants leaching into groundwater and now surface water at the 17.7-acre property.

The bulk of the grant, as much as $925,000, will pay to examine and fix a leaching point in an underground containment system covering about 2 acres at the southern end of the site.

The application, posted Monday at the Kent Free Library, will be on file for 45 days to receive public comment and follows a vote from Kent City Council earlier this month to apply for the grant money. If the grant is awarded, receipt of the money will trigger a transfer of the property from owner Thomas & Betts Corp., of Memphis, TN, to the city for $1.

After the public comment period, a public meeting will be held at the library on Sept. 7 at 6 p.m. to review the application and any comments received.

In the application, the city explains its goal for the property: to redevelop it as part of the Atlantic and Great Western Discovery Park. According to the application, the grant money will help complete the site cleanup and ready the property for inclusion in the proposed technology park.

By preparing the former RB&W property for redevelopment, the land "will provide another integral piece of Kent's overall revitalization stratgey in the next five years," the application states.

The plan, according to the city's application, is to use the property to "try and continue job creation efforts" with Kent State University and the Kent Regional Business Alliance.

The Clean Ohio Fund application earned the support of Kent State President Lester Lefton, who submitted a letter as part of the application supporting the plan.

In the letter, Lefton points to the university's role in establishing several technology start-up firms in the Kent area including Kent Displays, Crystal Diagnostics and AlphaMicron, which is located in the university-owned Centennial Research Park — all efforts that were done in conjunction with the city and the KRBA.

"Since Centennial Research Park is currently operating at full capacity, we are encouraged about the prospect of adding another 17-plus-acre site for future expansion of entrepreneurial initiatives," Lefton wrote. "We strongly support the addition of this important parcel of land to the (technology park) effort and enhancing the overall connection with downtown Kent, our campus and the greater (Northeast) Ohio region."

Return to Top



News Headline: OUR VIEW Dominick's upgrade continues momentum | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: FACELIFT FOR FRANKLIN AVE. FIRM IS
LATEST DOWNTOWN KENT IMPROVEMENT

THE NEW FACADE AT DOMInick's
is such an improvement it
has Kent's Franklin Avenue in its
entirety looking better.
As part of a collection
of late 19th Century
buildings predominant
on the street,
Dominick's, always a
popular bar and restaurant,
figuratively speaking has joined
the party.
Allan Orshan, active in real estate, with
the assistance of Architect David Summers,
came up with the design that was
implemented by E&G Construction, a
company that gained its sterling reputation
by its involvement in upgrading the
attractive Medina Square decades ago.
The Mandalari family members, owners
of Dominick's, through their business
paid for the work, which was sponsored
by Ron Burbick of the Burbick Foundation,
who singularly in recent years has
had more to do with the renewal of downtown
Kent than anyone.
The “Franklin Avenue Look” is a piece
of the total puzzle, with other establishments
such as Ray's Place and the Pufferbelly
Ltd. drawing on the historic charm
of that neighborhood.
Nearby and to the east, Mr. Burbick is
closing in on the completion of Acorn Alley
II, an attractive expansion of the Phoenix
Project that has done so much for East
Main. It will bring in restaurants and offices
and face to the south the Haymaker
Block ,where Fairmount Properties says it
will soon break ground for an office complex
that will house divisions of the Davey
Tree Expert Co. and Ametek.
Further east, on DePeyster Street, PARTA
is busy clearing land for its three-deck,
multi-modal transportation and retail
center. It will soon be joined by activity
across Erie Street as construction of the
new hotel and conference center, jointly
sponsored by the Kent State University
Foundation and the Pizzuti Co., gets
under way.
Still further east, progress continues
with the Esplanade, the pedestrian walkway
that will attractively link the KSU
campus with the downtown area, giving
students and staff an easy way to take
advantage of businesses and services the
downtown offers.
Not to be overlooked are the big improvements
along the Cuyahoga River
with Heritage Park and River Edge Park,
years in the making that now feature a
kayaking stand at Tannery Park and soon
will be better connected by the Portage
Hike and Bike Trail as it passes through
Kent, linking it with Summit County to
the west and Ravenna and eventually
points east.
It's an exciting time. The improvement
of Dominick's, a long-standing and venerable
player on Franklin Avenue and in the
downtown area, is one more part of a series
of investments that will make downtown
Kent a more interesting college town
and a destination point for those seeking
a nice small town that is fun, an urban
venue in which to spend leisure time and
conduct business.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus