Report Overview:
Total Clips (25)
Athletics (3)
College of Business (COB) (3)
College of Communication and Information (CCI) (2)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Economics (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Geography (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Living in Kent (1)
Music (1)
Students (1)
Town-Gown (2)
Tuition (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (3)
Nick Saban greets Kent State players volunteering at Habitat for Humanity houses in Holt 07/25/2011 ai.com Text Attachment Email

Hot Corner: Kent State, Alabama show human spirit 07/25/2011 ai.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State players come to T-Town for tornado clean up 07/25/2011 Capstone Report.com Text Attachment Email


College of Business (COB) (3)
OURVIEW: Heisler will be missed, excelled in KSU roles 07/25/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

My Town: Kent State Young Business Scholars (Sinclair) 07/22/2011 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Local high school juniors and seniors will get a unique look at college life during Kent State University's first Young Business Scholars Summer Program. The young students will participate in the camp from July 24 to 29 on...

My Town: Kent State Young Business Scholars 07/25/2011 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email


College of Communication and Information (CCI) (2)
Do You Know Who Is #Following You? (Kramer) 07/23/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...people or organizations you follow and then decide to follow you,” explained Jennifer Kramer, director of public relations and marketing communications at Kent State University's College of Communication and Information. If you are uncomfortable with a follower, the option to "un-follow"...

Do You Know Who Is #Following You? (Kramer) 07/23/2011 Stow Patch Text Attachment Email

...people or organizations you follow and then decide to follow you,” explained Jennifer Kramer, director of public relations and marketing communications at Kent State University's College of Communication and Information. If you are uncomfortable with a follower, the option to "un-follow"...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Mobile Technology & Nursing Education, Practice (Yoost) 07/22/2011 Advance for Nurses - Online Text Attachment Email

...answer questions and care for simulated and standardized patients. It is also accomplished through student development of care plans and concept maps. At Kent State University College of Nursing, undergraduates use seven mobile references to develop conceptual care maps on clinical patients. The...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Regional health forum set at KSU 07/25/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...here's your chance. The status of health conditions in Northeast Ohio, a regional forum, is scheduled for Tuesday morning at the Kiva Auditorium at the Kent State University Student Center. Free and open to the public, the forum will present data from each of the 16 Northeast Ohio counties....


Economics (1)
Report: Recession hit Portage businesses hard (Reynolds) 07/24/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...through college and farmers from its categories. That means about half the county's employment and six of the county's top ten employers starting with Kent State University, the county's single largest employer, are not counted in the survey. Nor are state, county or local governments or local...


Entrepreneurship (1)
Entrepreneurship topic of program 07/22/2011 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...five students each from Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Hiram College, John Carroll University, Kent State University, Lake Erie College and University of Akron. During the week, teams will develop a business concept for a product or...


Geography (2)
If you're a senior, you should be worried about the heat (Sheridan) 07/25/2011 Press of Atlantic City Text Attachment Email

Elderly often ignore heat warnings, study finds (Sheridan) 07/22/2011 USA Today Text Attachment Email

...match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Celebrations: July 23, 2011 07/25/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Sculptor creates seating art (King) 07/23/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

Installs ensemble at Kent Trumbull CHAMPION - David Colbert knew that creating an outdoor sculptural seating ensemble outside the Technology Building at Kent State University at Trumbull would be a good fit for him. Colbert, a Connecticut-based sculptor, started preparing his proposal before...


KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
MWCD votes to suspend razing of Atwood Lodge 07/22/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...The board voted to offer to donate the facility to a governmental body under terms to continue its operations, specifically mentioning Carroll County, Kent State University at Tuscarawas or the Ohio Department of Natural Resources as possible recipients. If no governing body wants to take...

Ventriloquist schedules show at Performing Arts Center (Morelli) 07/25/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

Master ventriloquist Kevin Johnson. NEW PHILADELPHIA — Ventriloquist Kevin Johnson will perform at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 1 p.m. Aug. 2. His comedic performance, “Tongue-in-Check, So to Speak,” incorporates puppets Matilda,...

Demolition Of Carroll Co. Resort Suspended 07/22/2011 WTOV-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...change in ownership could lead to a successful operation at the lodge. MWCD officials said they would be in contact with several agencies, including Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, and prepare a letter to formally detail the offer to donate...


Living in Kent (1)
Silver Oaks seniors get walking papers in Kent (Vincent) 07/24/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
Baroque ensemble to go all over map for its 20th season 07/23/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...in "Mediterranean Nights." The orchestra will present its semistaged production of "The Magic Flute" in March at Severance Hall, Oberlin College and Kent State University, as well as two 45-minute glimpses into the opera for children at KSU and the Cleveland Museum of Art. Sorrell and...


Students (1)
College Notes - July 24 07/24/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Memorial walk to honor KSU student The Tau Kappa Epsilon Chapter of Kent State University and the family and friends of Alexander Stebbins are organizing a memorial walk-a-thon at Hudson Springs Park on Sept. 24 from...


Town-Gown (2)
Silver Oaks Sold; Residents Given Eviction Notices (Neumann) 07/22/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...the property. Capstone did not respond to an interview request from Kent Patch. The complex, on about 13 acres off Horning Road, is bordered by the Kent State University campus to the west across Loop Road. It's home to dozens of senior residents. Beckett said her neighbors were hearing...

Kent Opens Cooling Centers if Needed 07/22/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...in Kent, including: The pool at Theodore Roosevelt High School has an open swim from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. today. Click here for admission rates . Kent State University's Student Recreation and Wellness Center also offers a leisure pool and a lap pool that is open to the public. Click here...


Tuition (1)
SSU Board OKs tuition hike 07/22/2011 Portsmouth Daily Times - Online Text Attachment Email

During a special meeting of the Shawnee State University Board of Trustees last week, the Executive Committee approved a 2012 fiscal year budget, which includes an increase in undergraduate...


News Headline: Nick Saban greets Kent State players volunteering at Habitat for Humanity houses in Holt | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: ai.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TUSCALOOSA, Alabama -- The Kent State football team won't step on the field against Alabama until the first weekend of September, but this week four players made the trip to Tuscaloosa to lend a hand in helping families recover from the April 27 storms.

On Friday, Golden Flashes players Spencer Keith, Ishmaa'ily Kitchen, Lee Stalker and Jacquise Terry volunteered at Habitat for Humanity houses in Holt alongside Tide players D.J. Fluker, Nico Johnson, John Fulton, Vinnie Sunseri and Caleb Castille, as well as student volunteers from the University of Alabama and Auburn University.

"With us opening against Alabama, and Coach Saban and his wife Terry both being Kent State grads, it made sense," Alan Ashby, Kent State's assistant athletic director for communications, said about the visit. "We're excited to be here and help out in any small way we can."

The American Red Cross arranged the itinerary for the group, including the opportunity to volunteer at the Habitat houses in Holt.

Kent State running back Jacquise Terry, a native of Phenix City, said the trip gave him a "first-person perspective" of the damage from the storms.

"Once I heard about the opportunity to come back down to my home state and help a family out - tornado victims - I was eager to come down here and help out," Terry said.

Habitat for Humanity Tuscaloosa executive director Bob Johnson said that it's an important part of the experience for people to set aside their differences on a Habitat site.

"In this case, we've got these guys that will square off together on September 3, so we can even unite Kent State and the University of Alabama players, because the real purpose of being in there is to serve this family that lost everything in the storms," Johnson said.

Near the end of the work day, Alabama head coach Nick Saban arrived to greet the visitors from Kent State and thank the volunteers for their efforts.

"Our goal is to rebuild this community," Saban told volunteers. "You're certainly going to restore the quality of life of someone [who was affected by the April storms]."

When asked about the participation of volunteers from Auburn, he said, "I love it. I've been trying to bring us together and the rivalry is not personal."

"The rivalry doesn't have to be personal when it comes to people."

Dana Dowling, the soon-to-be owner of one of the Habitat houses on 5th Avenue, agreed when asked about the volunteers.

"The Alabama and Auburn people - you could only tell them by their shirts," she said. "All of these people just care. They don't care who it is. They just want to help."

Dowling, who was once at her "wits' end" after the April 27 tornado destroyed her house in Holt, said her new home should be ready on Sept. 1 - two days before the Crimson Tide's season opener against the Golden Flashes in Tuscaloosa.

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News Headline: Hot Corner: Kent State, Alabama show human spirit | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: ai.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TUSCALOOSA, Alabama - Alabama has become a beacon of hope in tornado-ravaged portions of Tuscaloosa for more than simply sharing residence in this cozy little college town.

The university sits just steps north of where an April 27 tornado swept its killer swath of destruction.

It was close enough for an Alabama videographer to capture heart-pounding footage as it churned past Coleman Coliseum and DCH Hospital blending homes and businesses into timber on its way to pummel Alberta City, Holt and beyond.

A few months have passed, and the Tide has been very visible in its efforts to help recovery, particularly in the Holt area. The 2011 football media guide shows images of players volunteering, and just Friday players from Kent State - a team Alabama will face in its home opener Sept. 3 - worked with Tide players to help rebuild parts of a home.

There's something intimate about actually donating your time and your muscle to lift people from despair, whether its dragging a rake or hammering some nails. Residents in these areas undoubtedly view these football players differently than before the storm when they simply saw them from the stands in Bryant-Denny Stadium or on a television screen making tackles or touchdowns.

While it's human nature to want to pin the hopes and ultimately successes of Alabama's football season to the overall healing from April 27, this team could lose every game and it would not matter to those touched by Tide players and coaches.

There's no greater victory than the human spirit.

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News Headline: Kent State players come to T-Town for tornado clean up | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Capstone Report.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Friday, members of the Kent State University football team were spotted in Tuscaloosa providing disaster relief and construction efforts on a Habitat for Humanity work site. Read the account from the Kent State athletic site here.

Jacquise Terry, Lee Stalker, Ishmaa'ily Kitchen and Spencer Keith made the 774 mile, 13+ hour journey to work alongside DJ Fluker, Vinnie Sunseri, John Fulton and others in the rebuilding effort.

Crimson Tide head coach Nick Saban stopped off on the way home from SEC Media Days to greet the players and offer words of encouragement. Both he and wife Terry Saban are Kent State graduates.

Work will continue on these and other sites in the area all weekend.

Six Saturdays from today the Golden Flashes will be fighting for their lives against a hungry Alabama Crimson Tide football team on the turf of Bryant-Denny Stadium. But this weekend they are fighting for what's right, and that deserves a little recognition.

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News Headline: OURVIEW: Heisler will be missed, excelled in KSU roles | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BUSINESS DEAN'S LEADERSHIP AND
SENSE OF COMMUNITY MAJOR ASSETS

ROBERT “YANK” HEISLER'S DEcision
to retire as dean of the College
of Business Administration
at Kent State University creates a major
void that will not be easy to fill.
An excellent administrator,
he quickly
earned the praise of
faculty members at the
college, where more
than 30 years ago he
earned a Masters in Business Administration
degree. Having had loads of experience
in running large organizations in the
banking world where he successfully spent
his first career, Heisler was able to utilize
the tools he picked up there to move the
College of Business forward, strengthening
its aura of professionalism.
He energized the college, his own success
in the business world lending it the
self-confidence that comes when a person
has accomplished a sufficient amount
that he no longer has to boast about who
he is and where he's been. He was decisive,
not leaving things to fester, and
those who worked in the college appreciated
that, too.
Almost as important during his years
at Kent State, where he first served as a
special administrative assistant to both
President Lester Lefton and his predecessor,
Carol Cartwright, Heisler brought
with him a familiarity with the greater
Cleveland area that he picked up during
his decades in banking. He was wellqualified
to advise KSU presidents, networking
for them to further the goals of
the university.
For Kent and Portage County in general,
he also brought a local perspective, having
grown up in Ravenna where he was a
standout student and athlete at Ravenna
High School, which led to his admission
to prestigious Harvard University, where
he obtained his bachelor's degree with
honors. As such he has been a wonderful
ambassador for the local scene, helping
to form linkages between Kent State, the
city of Kent and Portage County, where
most recently he has been serving on the
Portage County Business Development
Council.
Having gone hard at it for so many decades,
we can understand Heisler's desire
to slow down a bit and “smell the roses.”
We hold out hope for some form of involvement
on his part. For instance, he'd make
a wonderful Kent State University trustee
should the state of Ohio and its governor
be so sensibly predisposed and he could
perform ably in that role without having
to meet the daily call of duty.
We certainly appreciate Heisler's many
contributions to Kent State and his efforts
to strengthen the local and regional
community of Northeastern Ohio to make
them better places to live and work.

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News Headline: My Town: Kent State Young Business Scholars (Sinclair) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jacque Jovic Web Producer
News OCR Text: Local high school juniors and seniors will get a unique look at college life during Kent State University's first Young Business Scholars Summer Program. The young students will participate in the camp from July 24 to 29 on the Kent Campus.

Kent's College of Business Administration will host 25 outstanding students on campus for five days, allowing them to study several areas of business including accounting, business management, computer information systems, economics, entrepreneurship, finance and marketing.

“It is a great opportunity for high school students,” said Elizabeth Sinclair, assistant dean of Kent State's College of Business Administration. “They pay only $50 and get to stay, be fed, learn and play on our campus for one week.”

Students will also have the chance to win a $1,000 scholarship to Kent State during a team competition. They will work to develop a business plan for a restaurant and present their work before a panel of judges. Each member of the winning team will win $1,000 to apply to tuition if they study business at Kent State.

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News Headline: My Town: Kent State Young Business Scholars | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio— Local high school juniors and seniors will get a unique look at college life during Kent State University's first Young Business Scholars Summer Program. The young students will participate in the camp from July 24 to 29 on the Kent Campus.
Kent's College of Business Administration will host 25 outstanding students on campus for five days, allowing them to study several areas of business including accounting, business management, computer information systems, economics, entrepreneurship, finance and marketing.

“It is a great opportunity for high school students,” said Elizabeth Sinclair, assistant dean of Kent State's College of Business Administration. “They pay only $50 and get to stay, be fed, learn and play on our campus for one week.”

Students will also have the chance to win a $1,000 scholarship to Kent State during a team competition. They will work to develop a business plan for a restaurant and present their work before a panel of judges. Each member of the winning team will win $1,000 to apply to tuition if they study business at Kent State.

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News Headline: Do You Know Who Is #Following You? (Kramer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Jacquie Mazziotta
News OCR Text: Late one dark Saturday night as my friends and I were making our way toward our car on the west bank of the flats, I felt the uneasy presence we were being followed. Without trying to draw attention I subtly scoped out the situation and confirmed my suspicion. I calmly encouraged my gal pals not to panic but rather to stick together and pick up the pace. Needless to say, my dearest friend immediately screamed and ran for her life. At that point there was no point in trying to be coy any longer, so we all followed suit.


The point in sharing this story is that at one time we could identify, or at least see the stranger following us. "With the world of social media today, many of us have gained lots of “followers” — some who we recognize and some we don't. There are the red flags signaling those we may want to try to escape, while some fly under the radar just keeping up with what you're posting.


I'm not a frequent tweeter, but I find it can be entertaining and a good way to keep up with current news, interests and friends. I'll sometimes tweet about what activity the day held, and occasionally I'll get a response or a re-tweet from someone who found it interesting. My audience isn't huge, so I can easily keep an eye on who's following me – most of the time. I have observed that depending on the topic, a sudden shift in followers will appear and may disappear – here today, gone tomorrow kind of effect.


For example, I tweeted about a yoga class I had taken and soon found a hemp-related Twitter handle following me as well as a grass roots eco-conscious clothing company and a green peace organization. What would they find interesting about my yoga class? Obviously, they have a stake in what's happening in that demographic which makes my random tweet of interest to their industry.


The same goes for politics. I began following a political candidate and was notified of a “unique” Twitter handle following me. Of course I read the bio for this anonymous person and found I wanted to escape this stranger. I could delete them, but I decided to wait it out. After all, I am in complete control of what I share.


A computer allows these “creepers” anonymity, while social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter allow them access to our personal information by friending or following us. Some might concur this same activity equates to stalking.


Interestingly enough, stalking or not, there is a Twitter etiquette. If someone follows you, you in turn, are supposed to follow them. So if you decide to ignore the guidelines for those socially networking, that's completely up to you.


“The number one reason people whom you don't know follow you is because you have a common follower of theirs. You pop up in their stream of people they may know, and they may look at your profile and see similar interests. They may follow three or four people or organizations you follow and then decide to follow you,” explained Jennifer Kramer, director of public relations and marketing communications at Kent State University's College of Communication and Information.


If you are uncomfortable with a follower, the option to "un-follow" you is available on Twitter by deleting them from your list. Check into your settings and you can determine who has access to follow you. The same goes for Facebook; you have the option to "un-friend" anyone you choose.


According to Kramer, Facebook recently made internal changes to their system which requires users to adjust their account settings to make it a secure location. Prior to this when a user opened the site that meant your account wasn't secure. Someone could hack or geo-locate you. If you're not familiar with the new settings, here's what you can do:


Log into your Facebook account and click on account then account settings. Then click on manage privacy options, then customize privacy. Customize your privacy settings the way you want them. Your satisfied comfort level is the key for all social media sites.


“It doesn't have to be alarming; it's all very controllable,” said Kramer. “It's supposed to be in good fun and a way for you to stay connected with friends, family and colleagues. It's a way for people to communicate and it's a way for people to consume news. You want them to be engaged in social media, but it's also your responsibility to protect yourself.”


Here are a few obvious suggestions to keep the creepers at bay and protect your privacy.

Check your account settings on the social media sites you use. Stay current on updates and security updates
Don't post personal information in advance of a planned activity which allows followers to know where you are going to be at a particular date/time
Don't tweet that you're going on vacation for a specific time period allowing the followers to know your house will likely be unattended
If you don't want to be identified, choose a Twitter handle that doesn't reflect your personal information.
Keep in mind the topic on which you may be tweeting – if you wouldn't want your neighbor to read out about it, forgo the post and keep it to yourself
Check cell phone settings to make sure the extra security gps measure is set. If you need help, stop in your provider's retail store and ask for assistance

Follow Stow Patch on Facebook and Twitter , we won't think it's creepy.

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News Headline: Do You Know Who Is #Following You? (Kramer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Patch
Contact Name: Jacquie Mazziotta
News OCR Text: Late one dark Saturday night as my friends and I were making our way toward our car on the west bank of the flats, I felt the uneasy presence we were being followed. Without trying to draw attention I subtly scoped out the situation and confirmed my suspicion. I calmly encouraged my gal pals not to panic but rather to stick together and pick up the pace. Needless to say, my dearest friend immediately screamed and ran for her life. At that point there was no point in trying to be coy any longer, so we all followed suit.


The point in sharing this story is that at one time we could identify, or at least see the stranger following us. "With the world of social media today, many of us have gained lots of “followers” — some who we recognize and some we don't. There are the red flags signaling those we may want to try to escape, while some fly under the radar just keeping up with what you're posting.


I'm not a frequent tweeter, but I find it can be entertaining and a good way to keep up with current news, interests and friends. I'll sometimes tweet about what activity the day held, and occasionally I'll get a response or a re-tweet from someone who found it interesting. My audience isn't huge, so I can easily keep an eye on who's following me – most of the time. I have observed that depending on the topic, a sudden shift in followers will appear and may disappear – here today, gone tomorrow kind of effect.


For example, I tweeted about a yoga class I had taken and soon found a hemp-related Twitter handle following me as well as a grass roots eco-conscious clothing company and a green peace organization. What would they find interesting about my yoga class? Obviously, they have a stake in what's happening in that demographic which makes my random tweet of interest to their industry.


The same goes for politics. I began following a political candidate and was notified of a “unique” Twitter handle following me. Of course I read the bio for this anonymous person and found I wanted to escape this stranger. I could delete them, but I decided to wait it out. After all, I am in complete control of what I share.


A computer allows these “creepers” anonymity, while social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter allow them access to our personal information by friending or following us. Some might concur this same activity equates to stalking.


Interestingly enough, stalking or not, there is a Twitter etiquette. If someone follows you, you in turn, are supposed to follow them. So if you decide to ignore the guidelines for those socially networking, that's completely up to you.


“The number one reason people whom you don't know follow you is because you have a common follower of theirs. You pop up in their stream of people they may know, and they may look at your profile and see similar interests. They may follow three or four people or organizations you follow and then decide to follow you,” explained Jennifer Kramer, director of public relations and marketing communications at Kent State University's College of Communication and Information.


If you are uncomfortable with a follower, the option to "un-follow" you is available on Twitter by deleting them from your list. Check into your settings and you can determine who has access to follow you. The same goes for Facebook; you have the option to "un-friend" anyone you choose.


According to Kramer, Facebook recently made internal changes to their system which requires users to adjust their account settings to make it a secure location. Prior to this when a user opened the site that meant your account wasn't secure. Someone could hack or geo-locate you. If you're not familiar with the new settings, here's what you can do:


Log into your Facebook account and click on account then account settings. Then click on manage privacy options, then customize privacy. Customize your privacy settings the way you want them. Your satisfied comfort level is the key for all social media sites.


“It doesn't have to be alarming; it's all very controllable,” said Kramer. “It's supposed to be in good fun and a way for you to stay connected with friends, family and colleagues. It's a way for people to communicate and it's a way for people to consume news. You want them to be engaged in social media, but it's also your responsibility to protect yourself.”


Here are a few obvious suggestions to keep the creepers at bay and protect your privacy.

Check your account settings on the social media sites you use. Stay current on updates and security updates
Don't post personal information in advance of a planned activity which allows followers to know where you are going to be at a particular date/time
Don't tweet that you're going on vacation for a specific time period allowing the followers to know your house will likely be unattended
If you don't want to be identified, choose a Twitter handle that doesn't reflect your personal information.
Keep in mind the topic on which you may be tweeting – if you wouldn't want your neighbor to read out about it, forgo the post and keep it to yourself
Check cell phone settings to make sure the extra security gps measure is set. If you need help, stop in your provider's retail store and ask for assistance

Follow Stow Patch on Facebook and Twitter , we won't think it's creepy.

Return to Top



News Headline: Mobile Technology & Nursing Education, Practice (Yoost) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Advance for Nurses - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Mobile technology for nurses has changed the face of nursing education and clinical practice. During the past decade, colleges of nursing have responded to the call of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) and American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to increase patient safety through nursing informatics and technology. By utilizing mobile resources for nursing education in the classroom, lab and clinical venues, students develop enhanced skills in critical thinking and clinical decision making. Integrating handheld mobile technology into nursing curricula allows nursing students and faculty to provide safer patient care based on current best practices. Reference software applications are now available for download onto smart phones of all types including BlackBerry, iPhone and Android as well personal digital assistant devices such as the iTouch.

A significant number of nursing references are available at a nursing student's fingertips in the classroom, lab and point-of-care. They provide students with instant access to best practice information that can be applied in both simulated and clinical practice settings. Many mobile resources are based on evidence-based practice findings, include illustrations for the multi-modal learner and are updated more frequently than their printed counterparts. Due to the depth and breadth of information readily available on mobile devices, students can be more actively engaged in learning in the classroom and clinical laboratory setting through case study work, concept and conceptual care map development and clinical pathway or care plan work that in the past was limited by lack of textbook availability.

Patient Safety

Patient safety is by far the most essential reason for the integration of mobile technology into nursing curricula and practice. Early IOM reports called for all healthcare direct care providers to have immediate access to electronic references. The most recent IOM report,

The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, emphasizes that nurses use technology resources that "require skills in analysis and synthesis to improve the quality and effectiveness of care." This underscores the need for mobile technology to be fully integrated at all levels of nursing education from associate degree to doctoral practice.

Barbara Yoost, MSN, RN, CNS, CNE

The most obvious use of mobile technology in nursing education and practice is in preventing medication errors. Nurses are often the final step in the administration process to prevent a medication error. Mobile technology provides nursing students and nurses with instant access to safe dose, compatibility, and pharmacokinetic information essential for safe medication administration. Instead of hunting for a medication reference book or calling the pharmacist to verify dosage or correct medication, nursing students and their faculty, and professional nurses now have resources to make safe decisions with up-to-date mobile references at their fingertips.

Care Planning

Mobile software resources help nursing students to be more prepared for clinical assignments and to provide comprehensive nursing care. As students are progressing through their coursework, it is impossible for them to have all of the knowledge of an experienced nurse. Yet even beginning students are expected to provide care similar to that of experienced professional nurses from their first day on a clinical unit.

Related Content

Informatics Blog

Using mobile references in the classroom and lab enhances the ability of students to analyze and synthesize critical information and apply it to simulated patient care scenarios. This is done through high fidelity simulation scenarios and case studies that require students to use assessment, nursing diagnosis, laboratory and diagnostic testing and drug references to answer questions and care for simulated and standardized patients. It is also accomplished through student development of care plans and concept maps. At Kent State University College of Nursing, undergraduates use seven mobile references to develop conceptual care maps on clinical patients. The conceptual care map integrates the pedagogies of concept maps and care plans for enhanced student learning. Concept maps and conceptual care maps are similar to diagnostic algorithms. Each is a diagram that identifies relationships among ideas, assisting students to synthesize patient data. Students "map out" their patient assessment data, history, medications, lab values and treatments prior to documenting the reasons for each medication and lab value deviation and developing a patient-centered plan of care.

In the clinical setting, acute or community based, mobile technology allows students to look up medical diagnoses quickly, become familiar with underlying pathophysiology, identify potential patient needs and assessment requirements, develop patient-centered goals, implement appropriate interventions and evaluate patient outcomes. Due to rapid patient discharge and the use of a variety of outpatient facilities for clinical education, the days when nursing faculty would give students their patient assignments the night before clinical are gone. Mobile technology allows student nurses to prepare rapidly for patient care at the beginning of each shift within the clinical setting. Nursing faculty report a significant increase in student knowledge and preparation prior to care when they utilize point-of-care resources.

Requiring students to turn off Internet access while in the clinical setting prevents them from receiving phone calls, accessing email or texting during clinical experiences. These types of restrictions enhance compliance with hospital regulations that prohibit the use of personal cell phones on nursing units. Mentoring students in the proper use of mobile references in the clinical setting minimizes abuse and demonstrates its value as an educational and practice resource.

Patient Education

Patient education is perhaps one of the most challenging aspects of practice for students new to the nursing role. Resources available via mobile technology enhance the ability of students to provide current evidence-based practice information to their patients in the clinical setting. Some handheld references include specific suggestions for patient education based on medical diagnoses. Mobile resources provide step-by-step instructions and photos on hundreds of procedures for students to use prior to or during patient education.

Mobile Advantages

While the advantage of instant, current information available via mobile devices is fairly obvious, unique features make them an even greater educational tool. Features such as the ability to simultaneously search all software and link from one software reference to another enhance the ability of students to connect, analyze and synthesize disease and patient information. The search function provides research capability across references, while linkages connect one source to another. Simultaneous searching allows nursing students to type in a term on their mobile device and obtain a list of locations in which that term appears. Linking features connect related information among references. For instance, when a student is reading about heart failure and sees that digoxin is a drug of choice, the student can hit the link to look up information on digoxin in a drug reference and then hit another link to obtain safe digoxin blood levels from a diagnostic test reference. These features support a more rapid and deeper understanding by students of the multi-faceted nature of patient care.

Curriculum Integration

Integrating mobile technology into nursing curricula is much easier now than it was even 2 years ago. A majority of college students own mobile technology such as an iTouch or smart phone, reducing the initial hardware cost. Software from leading providers is available for every platform including tablets such as the iPad. Software references are significantly less expensive than textbooks and if the software is required for coursework, financial aid typically will cover costs. Confidentiality agreements are overcoming barriers in facilities that have been reluctant to allow mobile technology due to potential privacy concerns. The vital role of mobile technology in patient safety can no longer be ignored.

Nursing faculty can choose from hundreds of references and decide what best fits the needs of their specific student population and course. A special website can be set up unique to a college of nursing to simplify student purchase of required software, often with a significant savings for bundled resources. Free trials for faculty and expert training and tutorials for both students and faculty are available through online and phone 24/7 support.

The goal of nursing curricula is to educate future nurses to provide safe, patient centered care based on scientific evidence. Mobile technology is an essential 21st century part of achieving that goal.

Barbara Yoost is the Fundamentals Level and Honors Program Coordinator at Kent State University College of Nursing in Kent, OH. Yoost has taught in associate, diploma and baccalaureate nursing programs over the past 30 years and is a recipient of the Excellence in Nursing Education Award from Sigma Theta Tau International, Delta Xi Chapter. She is also a faculty advisor and consultant to Skyscape.com, Inc., a company that provides mobile apps for medical professionals.

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News Headline: Regional health forum set at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >
For those interested to know more about the health conditions of not only Portage County, but the entire Western Reserve, here's your chance.

The status of health conditions in Northeast Ohio, a regional forum, is scheduled for Tuesday morning at the Kiva Auditorium at the Kent State University Student Center. Free and open to the public, the forum will present data from each of the 16 Northeast Ohio counties.

Sponsored by the Kent State College of Public Health and The Center for Community Solutions, a Cleveland area nonprofit, the forum opens at 8:30 a.m. and concludes at 11:30 a.m.

Those attending will learn how Northeast Ohio and its counties compare with others in the state and regions throughout the United States.

Ten indicators of health will be used to make the comparisons.

Advance registration is requested and can be made by calling 216-781-2944, ext. 357 or going to www.communitysolutions.com/health_conditions_in_northeast_ohio_a_regional_forum/.>

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News Headline: Report: Recession hit Portage businesses hard (Reynolds) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The recession may be officially over, but like most of the country, Portage County is slow to recover.

The recession saw the county's jobless rate peak at 11.7 percent in February 2010, and the number of businesses in Portage County drop about 7.7 percent from 3,218 establishments in 2007 to 2,970 in 2009 according to a recent U.S. Census Bureau report.

In the seven-county Northeast Ohio region, Portage had the highest losses in employees and business establishments, and the second highest loss in annual payroll from 2007 through 2009.

“The number of jobs and businesses lost should be of concern to all of us who live, work or do business in Portage County. These numbers certainly support the need for us to increase our efforts regarding business development in Portage County,” said Stephen Colecchi, chairman of the Portage Development Board.

Colecchi said the board needs to focus its efforts in working with existing businesses on retention and expansion as well as getting more involved in business attraction.

“We do need to be realistic since we are competing with every other county and state and many other countries on business attraction but there are many valuable assets in Portage County and we need to leverage those assets. Business retention, expansion and attraction are the main reasons that the Portage Development Board was formed and our success will be measured in large part on the number of jobs that we can help create. Job creation is the primary focus of the Portage Development Board,” he said.

The Census's County Business Patterns measures changes in business and employment but excludes government, public education through college and farmers from its categories.

That means about half the county's employment and six of the county's top ten employers starting with Kent State University, the county's single largest employer, are not counted in the survey. Nor are state, county or local governments or local public schools.

Dr. C. Lockwood Reynolds, a Kent State University economist, said the number of businesses that declined was “all over the place,” with no apparent pattern to the size.

Portage businesses with fewer than 50 workers dropped by about 9 percent. Typically, it is smaller businesses that can't weather a bad economy. Because of the crisis in the financial sector, smaller firms found it very difficult to get loans, Reynolds said.

Reynolds said construction was particularly hard hit.

“Construction employment is down from 2006 to 2009 by about 35 percent or so,” he said. That is due to the collapse of the housing industry, which has not begun to recover.

“We're not seeing much of an uptick in housing consistently to say that sector is going to improve,” Reynolds said, but “there have been signs of overall recovery.”

He said another county sector that got hit fairly hard was retail trade, which was down by about 12 percent.

Numbers from the Bureau's County Business Patterns study showed private employment in the county declined from 44,319 in 2007 to 41,425 in 2009 which is the last full year in the study.

Annual payroll also dropped by 8.9 percent from $1.49 billion to $1.365 billion in the same period.

Manufacturing, which is also a large part of Portage business, has seen a recent uptick in Ohio, he said.

But the signs of business recovery have not been accompanied by rising employment, Reynolds said.

“Firms have been trying to respond to demand by squeezing more performance from current workers. They are not willing to commit to new workers, that's why we're seeing the lag” in employment, Reynolds said.

Reynolds said he sees some change for the better but no dramatic growth on the horizon.

“We've seen some improvements already in the private sector. But it is only likely to get worse in the public sector,” Reynolds said.

That's because Ohio's county and local governments are just beginning to deal with the cuts in the state budget.

“With passage of the state budget we now see what the cuts are, and the departments on the receiving end of them haven't decided yet how they're going to handle them,” Reynolds said.

Taxpayers could see more cuts to services and programs, he said.

“There are going to have to be decisions on what services will be cut and not,” he said.

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News Headline: Entrepreneurship topic of program | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ASHLAND -- Two area students will take part in Entrepreneurship Immersion Week, a national program of the Entrepreneurship Education Consortium,from Aug. 7 to 12 at Ashland University.

Morgan Kanzig, a junior marketing major from Lucas, and Theresa Bradley, a junior accounting and information systems major from Loudonville, will join three other AU students and compete with teams of five students each from Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Hiram College, John Carroll University, Kent State University, Lake Erie College and University of Akron.

During the week, teams will develop a business concept for a product or service and compete for cash prizes of up to $2,500 before a panel of northeast Ohio entrepreneurs. Funding from The Burton D. Morgan Foundation and others is available to student teams, which could allow them to implement the business concept developed during the week.

The purpose of the EEC is to provide practical, experiential and theoretical education to students in Northeast Ohio to prepare them to become entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs, create new ventures and jobs and build wealth for the region.

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News Headline: If you're a senior, you should be worried about the heat (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Press of Atlantic City
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHICAGO - The current heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're older than 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year - more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people older than 65 don't think the warnings apply to them - because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront - even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures such those hitting the Midwest.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people older than 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

In such hot conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination - and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect - a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

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News Headline: Elderly often ignore heat warnings, study finds (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: USA Today
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an under-appreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them — because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront — even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, canceled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination — and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect — a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

———

Online:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/elderlyheat.asp

American Geriatrics Society: http://www.healthinaging.org/public—education/hot—weather—tips.php

———

AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/LindseyTanner .

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News Headline: Celebrations: July 23, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University senior Frank Yonkof of Seville received a Google scholarship and will go to Boston this fall with 19 other students for the 2011 Online News Association conference. Yonkof is a newspaper journalism major and is editor of KentWired.com.

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News Headline: Sculptor creates seating art (King) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: VIRGINIA SHANK
News OCR Text: Installs ensemble at Kent Trumbull

CHAMPION - David Colbert knew that creating an outdoor sculptural seating ensemble outside the Technology Building at Kent State University at Trumbull would be a good fit for him.

Colbert, a Connecticut-based sculptor, started preparing his proposal before he knew whether he had been named a finalist for the work.

"Typically you hope to be a finalist, and from there you hope you get the job," he said. "I started working on the project before I even knew whether I was a finalist. That's how much I wanted it and how much I felt like it was a job made for me. I really wanted this opportunity."

Recently, Colbert, with the assistance of master mason John LaPorta, also of Connecticut, spent two days at the local KSU campus installing the sculpture - inverted polished stainless steel tetrahedrons sculpted into tables, each with three seats, that glimmer in the sunlight. The work, "Tetra," is being provided by Percent of the Arts through the Ohio Arts Council.

The area features a gravel surround and perimeter trees.

Robb King, a KSU spokesman, said the campus plans to hold a formal dedication ceremony this fall.

The sculpture's installation resulted from legislation passed in 1990 by the Ohio Legislature that established the Ohio Percent for Arts Program, King said.

The law provides funding for the acquisition, commissioning and installation of works of art for certain new or renovated public buildings. Whenever the legislature appropriates more than $4 million for a public building, the law requires 1 percent of the total appropriation to be allocated for artwork.

Those projects have brought public art into many cities and small communities around Ohio, according to King.

The Ohio Arts Council administers the state's Percent for Art Program.

Colbert answered a call for proposals that was put out in 2009 by the OAC on the university's behalf. His work was chosen in May 2010 by a joint search committee of individuals from the Trumbull and Kent campuses as well as advisors from the OAC.

Colbert has made a career as an artist, working as a sculptor and a sculptor's assistant.

"I've actually been thinking about this idea, for this type of project, for about five years," he said. "My work is very geometric and I like the the idea of people being outside. They wanted something that would work with the architecture of the (Technology Building), which is very geometrical and actually compliments what I do. I think what I do compliments the building nicely."

Colbert said having the opportunity to work on a project that fits an artist's personality, style and genre is rare.

"It just doesn't happen that often," said. "So when it does, you give it everything you have and take the most that you can from the experience. The thought of students and other people enjoying this area, being outside, relaxing and eating lunch, that's a nice thought. You combine art and function. That's what I really like about it. It's a really good feeling to have about your work."

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News Headline: MWCD votes to suspend razing of Atwood Lodge | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: GateHouse Media, Inc
News OCR Text: Protesters lined along the street near the Dellroy Community Center Friday morning before a meeting of the Muskingum Conservancy District Board of Directors. The Board decided to suspend the razing of the Atwood Lake Resort and Conference Center.

The Atwood Lake Resort and Conference Center and surrounding property has been spared ... for now.

The Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District Board of Directors voted this morning to suspend action on razing the lodge and surrounding buildings and the sale of its contents at a meeting at the Dellroy Community Center.

The meeting was attended by 170 residents who spent more than two hours commenting on the board's earlier decision to raze the lodge.

The board voted to offer to donate the facility to a governmental body under terms to continue its operations, specifically mentioning Carroll County, Kent State University at Tuscarawas or the Ohio Department of Natural Resources as possible recipients.

If no governing body wants to take responsibility of the property, it will then be offered for sale at a price to be determined by the MWCD Board of Directors and its appraisers.

If a buyer is not found, a public auction will be held. If no deal is made at an auction, the board at that point will consider its remaining options, which could include razing Atwood Lodge.

The board was also to take a vote on a $15.5 million oil and gas lease to Gulfport Energy for 6,485 acres on Clendening Lake.

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News Headline: Ventriloquist schedules show at Performing Arts Center (Morelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: GateHouse Media, Inc
News OCR Text: Master ventriloquist Kevin Johnson.

NEW PHILADELPHIA —

Ventriloquist Kevin Johnson will perform at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 1 p.m. Aug. 2.

His comedic performance, “Tongue-in-Check, So to Speak,” incorporates puppets Matilda, Clyde and Harley.

“This wonderful afternoon matinee will be fun for the whole family,” said Mike Morelli, general manager of the Performing Arts Center.

“Kevin Johnson gives his puppets so much character that you think they are really talking. It's an impressive and funny performance that appeals to audiences of all ages.”

The performance is co-sponsored by Allied Machine and Engineering Corp.

Johnson is known for his 2006 appearance on NBC's “America's Got Talent” and his 2007 performance on “The Late Show With David Letterman.”

He is performing at Busch Gardens Tampa after recently finishing a nine-year run at Legoland California Theme Park in San Diego, where he performed 8,824 shows.

He received the Best Male Performer Award in 2004 and 2006 from the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions.

Tickets range in price from $19 to $28 and can be purchased in person at the Performing Arts Center box office, by calling 330-308-6400 or at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Dr. NE. The box office is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

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News Headline: Demolition Of Carroll Co. Resort Suspended | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: WTOV-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CARROLL COUNTY, Ohio -- A large crowd of protesters against the demolition of a Carroll County resort lodge may have saved the building.

Members of the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District agreed Friday to suspend the resort's demolition at this time, according to a news release by the MWCD. The meeting was attended by more than 170 people who told board members during a three-hour public comment period that a change in ownership could lead to a successful operation at the lodge.

MWCD officials said they would be in contact with several agencies, including Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, and prepare a letter to formally detail the offer to donate the resort to another government agency.

The board also agreed that if a new owner is not found, it will put the lodge up for sale. If there is no buyer, the board would then arrange an auction of the facility. If there was no successful bidder at auction, then the MWCD would plan to have the building demolished and work on developing a new recreational facility at the property.

Previous Stories:

July 22, 2011: Decision To Demolish Carroll Co. Resort Brings Protests

July 5, 2011: Resort Closure Has Residents, Business Owners Speaking Out

July 1, 2011: Vote Decides Fate Of Carroll Co. Resort Lodge

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News Headline: Silver Oaks seniors get walking papers in Kent (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some 250 senior citizen residents of Silver Oaks Place in Kent have been given until Oct. 1 to find someplace else to live.

Residents started getting notice on Thursday that the property owner, Tell Real Estate Trust, has agreed to sell the 13-acre apartment complex by the end of this year to an affiliate of Capstone Development Corp., a student housing developer.

Kent State University quashed rumors the university was involved in the sale.

“The university did not purchase Silver Oaks, nor does it have any intention to do so,” said KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent.

The July 20 letter to tenants noted that Capstone Development Corp. will cover the current tenants' moving expenses from Silver Oaks Place to any location within 40 miles.

By law, a landlord has to give a 30-day notice to month-to-month renters. Capstone and Silver Oaks Place extended the notice an extra 30 days.

Another notice by property manager Dianna S. Getz said Capstone was not going to maintain the 22-building complex as an age 55 and over community and was going to make “substantial renovations requiring the relocation of existing tenants.”

Gary Locke, director of Community Development for Kent, said he was unaware of any changes at the apartment complex, which is located east the Kent State University campus at Loop and Horning roads.

Locke said the area is zoned R-4 (Multi-Family Residential) and rooming houses are conditionally permited. “Conditionally permitted uses have to go through the planning permission,” he said.

Bob Parrish, who said he's lived in the retirement community for several years, said residents had heard rumors about possible changes through the summer, but the announcement still came as a surprise for many.

“They weren't taking new tenants and they were saying they were remodeling. We knew something was in the air,” he said.

Some people have been residents for years, Parrish said. “I'm worried that some of the older ones are too fragile to handle” the stress, he said.

Sue Swanson also expressed concern for her elderly neighbors. Swanson, who moved in last November, said at 61 she is one of the youngest residents. Her mother, who is 82, has been there for 19 years.

Swanson said Silver Oaks Place “has been a wonderful place to live.”

“I thought it was a good place to move,” Swanson said. “This came out of nowhere and no one said a word. My mother is in total shock. She has good friends here. When my parents moved here 19 years ago, my father said ‘We'll never move again, I'll go out feet first.' And, bless his heart, he did.”

Starting Monday, Swanson said, she and her husband will start looking for housing for themselves and her mother.

A property manager at another senior living facility in Kent said she was already getting calls and visits from Silver Oaks Place residents Friday morning.

“It's heartbreaking to hear them on the phone or have them come in. They're all teary-eyed,” she said. She also expressed concern for the short time allowed for seniors to move and lack of available housing.

“We just don't have the resources in this area to accommodate that number of people at one time. Where are they going to go?” she said. “They deserve better than this. They've been good residents.”

Silver Oaks Place was constructed in the late 1960s. It was occupied by students and families prior to becoming a 55-and-over housing complex.

According to its website, Capstone Development Corp. is the division within Capstone Companies focused on the development of student housing communities, both on and off campus.

The firm's collective student housing development reflects more than $3 billion in project costs with more than 60,000 beds and 121 projects across the U.S.

Its on-campus developments on 58 campuses totaling more than 36,500 beds in 77 projects and off-campus developments totaling more than 21,900 beds in 41 projects. It also has three campus-affiliated developments totaling more than 2,000 beds in three projects.

Rich Perkowski, 63, said his roots are generations deep in the city.

“I've been a Kent resident all my life, except for four years in the Navy. I really don't want to leave Kent,” he said. He's been at Silver Oaks Place for five years. He was upset with the short notice residents have to find another place to live.

“People lived here for 30 years; it's just like they're putting us out on the street. And it's all for student housing. They've got enough student housing in Kent,” he said.

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News Headline: Baroque ensemble to go all over map for its 20th season | Email

News Date: 07/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Rosenberg, Donald
News OCR Text: Apollo's Fire

What: Music director Jeannette Sorrell and the Cleveland Baroque Orchestra will present their 20th season at various locations in Northeast Ohio, North America and Europe.

Tickets: $37-$297, subscriptions (on sale Monday); $20-$100, single tickets (available Monday, Sept. 12). Go to

apollosfire.org or call

1-800-314-2535.

The 20th season of Apollo's Fire, the Cleveland Baroque Orchestra, will be the most productive in the ensemble's history, including two major tours, semistaged performances of Mozart's "The Magic Flute" and a series of recording releases.

Led by music director Jeannette Sorrell, the orchestra will make an 11-concert tour of North America and Europe in November and a spring tour with stops in New Mexico, Arizona and Michigan.

On the way to Europe this fall, Sorrell and the ensemble will team with French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky for performances in Los Angeles and Berkeley, Calif.; Toronto; Boston; and Ann Arbor, Mich. They will follow up with concerts in Bordeaux and Metz, France; Madrid, Spain; and Lisbon, Portugal.

The orchestra opens its 2011-12 subscription series in October with four local performances of "Love and Rage: Opera Fireworks by Handel & Vivaldi" featuring male soprano Michael Maniaci.

The December series will include the world premiere of a Sorrell re-creation, "Sacrum Mysterium" (Sacred Mystery: A Celtic Christmas), with soprano Meredith Hall, dancer Steve Player, Ensemble La Nef of Montreal and Apollo's Singers.

In January, Apollo's Fire will take part in Oberlin College's new Rubin Institute for Music Criticism, led by New Yorker critic Alex Ross. The orchestra also will perform the program, "Earth Wind & Fire," at nonsubscription concerts in Cleveland Heights and Rocky River.

Sorrell will be harpsichord soloist during February's program, "The Intimate Bach," which will include solo performances by violinist Olivier Brault and cellist Rene Schiffer. The March program, another nonsubscription event, will feature soprano Nell Snaidas and dancer Player in "Mediterranean Nights."

The orchestra will present its semistaged production of "The Magic Flute" in March at Severance Hall, Oberlin College and Kent State University, as well as two 45-minute glimpses into the opera for children at KSU and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Sorrell and company will end the season with six local performances of Bach's Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 3-6. One of these concerts will mark the ensemble's debut at the Breen Center for the Performing Arts at St. Ignatius High School.

Two Apollo's Fire recordings on the British label Avie will be released during the season – performances of Vivaldi concertos and a 2010 CD/DVD of Handel's "Messiah." A third disc, Handel's "Coronation Anthems," will be available in spring.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: drosenberg@plaind.com, 216-999-4269

Apollo's Fire has wide-ranging schedule for 20th season

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: College Notes - July 24 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Memorial walk to honor KSU student

The Tau Kappa Epsilon Chapter of Kent State University and the family and friends of Alexander Stebbins are organizing a memorial walk-a-thon at Hudson Springs Park on Sept. 24 from noon to 3 p.m. Alex, a Stow and Hudson resident; 2008 Hudson High School graduate; enthusiastic member of the HHS Swing Marching Band, Wind Ensemble and Jazz 1 Percussion Ensemble; Kent State University student and brother of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, died in December 2010 at the age of 21.

Groups are pledging to walk collectively 21 miles each around Hudson Springs to benefit The Alexander Stebbins Music Scholarship Fund. For more information email twentyonemi4alex@aol.com, call 216-268-9359 or visit the event's Facebook page at 21 Miles for Alex Stebbins.

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News Headline: Silver Oaks Sold; Residents Given Eviction Notices (Neumann) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Residents of the 55-and-older Silver Oaks Place retirement community were given a 60-day notice Thursday to move out of the apartment complex.

Shirley Beckett, a 12-year resident of Silver Oaks, said most of the residents were notified in a letter sent out Thursday. But not everyone got the letter.

"A lot of people are upset and scared, me for one," she said.

Management at Silver Oaks did not return calls for comment from Kent Patch Friday.

Shirley said the letter indicated Capstone Building Corp. — a rental management firm in Birmingham, AL — is buying the property. Capstone did not respond to an interview request from Kent Patch.

The complex, on about 13 acres off Horning Road, is bordered by the Kent State University campus to the west across Loop Road. It's home to dozens of senior residents.

Beckett said her neighbors were hearing that Capstone planned to turn the complex into student housing to serve Kent State, which is expecting a record freshman class this fall and had to close admissions for the semester.

Tom Neumann, associate vice president for communications and marketing at Kent State, said the university is not involved in the sale of the retirement complex.

"The university has not bought that property and we have no intention of buying that property," Neumann said.

Regardless of intent, the end result is dozens of Kent's senior citizens will be displaced by September. The letter indicates residents have 30 days to leave but will be given another 30 days if necessary.

"There's all these senior citizens that are going to have to relocate in the next two months, which is not really fair for those people," said Don Beckett , Shirley Beckett's son.

Don Beckett, a Kent firefighter, said he knows from serving people there on ambulance calls that many don't have family in the area, and that makes moving even more difficult.

"It's going to be really hard for those people to relocate … and there's not enough senior citizen complexes in the area for these people,” he said.

In September, Shirley Beckett will turn 73. She's not excited about the prospect of moving and has no idea where she'll go. "None whatsoever," she said. Her son, who is battling cancer and will be forced to go on disability retirement, is trying to sell his house to move into a more affordable apartment.

"We've got people in here up in their nineties and up in their eighties, and it's not going to be easy for these people when they find out about it, because a lot of them don't even know it yet," she said. "They've hurt a lot of older people, that's all I can say. I just hope we all can find somewhere to go."

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News Headline: Kent Opens Cooling Centers if Needed | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Kent residents appeared to have braved Thursday's 90-plus degree temperatures and the excessive heat warning from the National Weather Service with ease.


Kent doesn't have any public buildings officially dedicated as cooling centers for residents without air conditioning in times of high temperatures. But the city does have a plan in place to open air-conditioned municipal buildings to residents when things get unbearable.


Kent Health Commissioner John Ferlito said the city doesn't start that contingency plan for cooling centers unless they get a high volume of 911 calls from people distressed by the heat.


"What we're doing is we're monitoring our calls, our ambulance calls that the fire department handles," Ferlito said. "If we see an increase in people who need relief, then we have a contingency plan to open some of the city buildings with air conditioning to let people stay there.


"But right now we haven't had any people call to say they're in distress," Ferlito said late Thursday afternoon. "But we're ready to do that if needed."


Kent Fire Capt. John Tosko said, as of 7:30 p.m. Thursday, the department hadn't had a single call for heat stroke or other heat-related illnesses.


Though cooling centers aren't open, there are several options to beat the heat in Kent, including:

The pool at Theodore Roosevelt High School has an open swim from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. today. Click here for admission rates .
Kent State University's Student Recreation and Wellness Center also offers a leisure pool and a lap pool that is open to the public. Click here for admission rates and information .
Public buildings with air conditioning include: the Kent Free Library ; Kent State University Museum ; and the Kent Recreation Center
Click here for other stay-cool tips in Kent .

Today's high temperature is forecast to reach 93 degrees Fahrenheit. An excessive heat warning in place for most of the day Thursday expired at 9 p.m. Thursday night.

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News Headline: SSU Board OKs tuition hike | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Portsmouth Daily Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: During a special meeting of the Shawnee State University Board of Trustees last week, the Executive Committee approved a 2012 fiscal year budget, which includes an increase in undergraduate tuition of less than 3.5 percent, beginning fall 2011 semester.

“With the State's budget that was finalized on June 30, public universities were authorized to increase their tuition rates to help manage cuts in funding,” said Dr. Rita Rice Morris, SSU president. “In the new State budget, the two primary funding sources for Shawnee State University were reduced by more than 10 percent.”

Morris said the university is working to keep tuition low and, in the last several months and years, has reduced expenses and implemented ways to operate more efficiently while protecting student services and programs.

“The recommendation to raise tuition as part of this year's budget was done so after much thought and consideration,” she said. “We have tried to balance the needs of the university to ensure a high-quality education for our students with our efforts to keep costs down for our students and their families.

Affordability remains a priority for us at Shawnee State University, as it does for our parents and students, and we are continuing to work to keep tuition low.”

According to a report published by the U.S. Department of Education, using data from 2008-09, Shawnee offers the second lowest net cost among Ohio universities at $16,851; the lowest is Kent State University ($16,431). The DOE report also listed Shawnee State University as No. 22 on a list of the 32 most costly four-year public universities in the United States.

The net prices reported are the cost of associated fees, books, and annual tuitions for in-state, full-time students, after scholarships and grant aid. The national average net price for a public, four-year or more college is $10,747.

Last fall, Shawnee State University saw record-breaking enrollment of nearly 4,600 students from nearly every county in the state and preliminary indicators look good for this coming fall.

RYAN SCOTT OTTNEY can be reached at (740) 353-3101, ext. 235, or rottney@ heartlandpublications.com.

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