Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Anthropology (2)
Athletics (2)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Geography (1)
Higher Education (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Mathematical Science (1)
Psychology (1)
Students (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Theatre and Dance (2)
Town-Gown (2)
University Libraries (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Anthropology (2)
Scientists at Kent State University Publish Research in Neurons (Raghanti) 08/01/2011 Mental Health Weekly Digest Text Email

...neurons in humans were included within the 95% confidence intervals for the prediction generated from nonhuman data," wrote M.A. Raghanti and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "While differences in the cholinergic system exist among primate species, such...

Scientists at Kent State University Publish Research in Neurons (Raghanti) 08/01/2011 NewsRx.com Text Email

...neurons in humans were included within the 95% confidence intervals for the prediction generated from nonhuman data," wrote M.A. Raghanti and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "While differences in the cholinergic system exist among primate species, such...


Athletics (2)
KSU football coach set for chamber lunch 08/01/2011 Record-Courier Text Email

Former KSU Cornerback Signs Contract With Browns: Plain Dealer 07/29/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The Plain Dealer reports former Kent State University cornerback Usama Young has reached a contract agreement with the Cleveland Browns. The plan is to make Young the starting...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Recent report reviews health of Summit County residents 07/31/2011 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

A new health report conducted by Kent State University reviews the health of Northeast Ohio residents which included statistics from 16 counties. The goal of the report...


Geography (1)
Over 65 and not worried about heat? You should be (Sheridan) 07/31/2011 Baxter Bulletin - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened." Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent...


Higher Education (1)
KSU makes list of 'Great Colleges to Work For' (Booth, Walker) 07/30/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has been selected as one of the 2011 “Great Colleges to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education, the nation's No....


KSU at Stark (1)
Weather grounds balloons, but Foodfest goes on 07/30/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...high or aloft winds. So, what may have seemed like a perfect evening for flying to a throng of hopeful spectators surrounding the take-off field at Kent State University's Stark campus — wasn't. The official word came shortly before 7 p.m. Canceled. None of the 65 balloons that were...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
SEA recognizes area businesses and facilities 07/30/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...21st anniversary, the SEA recognized: • Linn-Hert Geib Family Center, Dover • New Family Dollar, New Philadelphia • The Employment Source • Kent State Performing Art Center • St. Joseph Family Life Center • Dollar General, North Dover • First United Methodist Church, New...


Mathematical Science (1)
KSU Math Emporium is About More Than Just Numbers (Tonge) 07/30/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is making a big investment in student success, as well as increasing freshman retention rates, by completely revamping...


Psychology (1)
Business Brief (Neal-Barnett) 08/01/2011 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

KSU associate professor receives humanitarian award Angela Neal-Barnett, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, was awarded the 2011 Harold K. Stubbs Humanitarian Award recognizing her important work in...


Students (1)
Kent Time Bank Continues Speedy Growth 07/29/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...organization and merchant members are Kent Social Services , Habitat for Humanity of Portage County , Haymaker Farmer's Market , Kent Natural Foods Co-Op , the Kent State University Graduate Student Council and the Biological Sciences Student Council, Tires & More Kent and FJ Kluth Art Gallery . ...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Kilgour-Dowdy launches new book at NALIS 08/01/2011 Trinidad and Tobago's Newsday Text Attachment Email

...the experiences of Black women involved in education from adult basic literacy to higher education. Artful Stories, as described in the Foreword by Kent State University Professor William Kist, debunks the myth of art being a special skill, and artists being “special” people outside of our...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Get Out: Porthouse Theatre: Hello Dolly! 07/29/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...currently have the freedom to enjoy your family, community and Northeast Ohio. So Get Out while you still can , and have a good time in the process. Porthouse Theatre: Hello, Dolly! Where/When: Porthouse Theatre, Blossom Music Center grounds, 1145 W. Steels Corners Rd., Cuyahoga Falls....

Katherine Burke & Fred Sternfeld: Scottish Dialect 7/29/11 07/29/2011 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Department of Theatre and Dance Professor Katherine Burke teaches us how to speak with a Scottish dialect to promote the...


Town-Gown (2)
KSU to purchase South Willow Street property 08/01/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Columbus -- The state Controlling Board has signed off on a request from Kent State University to purchase a South Willow Street property. KSU will pay Barbara Hartz a total of $210,000 for a single-family home and...

Around Ohio: KSU to purchase property 07/31/2011 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

KSU to purchase property Columbus -- The state Controlling Board has signed off on a request from Kent State University to purchase a South Willow Street property in Kent. KSU will pay Barbara Hartz a total of $210,000 for a single-family...


University Libraries (2)
Video: Carney Finds Niche Moving Libraries 07/29/2011 Business Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Today's "3 Minutes With" video, T.J. Carney takes viewers to a huge project at Kent State University, where his family's Carney McNicholas Co. is moving more than 725,000 books and journals. The company's story was featured...

Carney-McNicholas Moves by the Book 07/29/2011 Business Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...took an interest in this line of work." One staff member is Dennis Cleland, project manager at a relocation effort under way at the main campus of Kent State University. Carney-McNicholas is consolidating the university's math, chemistry and physics libraries on the fifth and sixth floors of...


News Headline: Scientists at Kent State University Publish Research in Neurons (Raghanti) | Email

News Date: 08/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Mental Health Weekly Digest
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to the authors of recent research from Kent, Ohio, "Long projection axons from the Ch4 cell group of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) provide cholinergic innervation to the neurons of the cerebral cortex. This cortical cholinergic innervation has been implicated in behavioral and cognitive functions, including learning and memory."

"Recent evidence revealed differences among primate species in the pattern of cholinergic innervation specific to the prefrontal cortex. While macaques displayed denser cholinergic innervation in layers I and II relative to layers V and VI, in chimpanzees and humans, layers V and VI were as heavily innervated as the supragranular layers. Furthermore, clusters of cholinergic axons were observed within the prefrontal cortex of both humans and chimpanzees to the exclusion of macaque monkeys, and were most commonly seen in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the Ch4 cell group was modified during evolution of anthropoid primates as a possible correlate of these changes in cortical cholinergic innervation. We used stereologic methods to estimate the total number of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive magnocellular neurons within the nbM of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of the Ch4 cell group with neocortical volume and brain mass. Results showed that total nbM neuron numbers hyposcale relative to both neocortical volume and brain mass. Notably, the total number of nbM neurons in humans were included within the 95% confidence intervals for the prediction generated from nonhuman data," wrote M.A. Raghanti and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "While differences in the cholinergic system exist among primate species, such changes appear to involve mostly axon collateral terminations within the neocortex and, with the exception of the relatively small group of cholinergic cells of the subputaminal subdivision of the nbM at the anterointermediate and rostrolateral levels, are not accompanied by a significant extra-allometric increase in the overall number of subcortical neurons that provide that innervation. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO."

Raghanti and colleagues published their study in Neuroscience (Comparative Analysis Of The Nucleus Basalis Of Meynert Among Primates. Neuroscience, 2011;184():1-15).

For additional information, contact M.A. Raghanti, Kent State University, Dept. of Anthropol, 750 Hilltop Dr., 226 Lowry Hall, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the journal Neuroscience is: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd., the Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England.

Copyright © 2011 Mental Health Weekly Digest via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Scientists at Kent State University Publish Research in Neurons (Raghanti) | Email

News Date: 08/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to the authors of recent research from Kent, Ohio, "Long projection axons from the Ch4 cell group of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) provide cholinergic innervation to the neurons of the cerebral cortex. This cortical cholinergic innervation has been implicated in behavioral and cognitive functions, including learning and memory."

"Recent evidence revealed differences among primate species in the pattern of cholinergic innervation specific to the prefrontal cortex. While macaques displayed denser cholinergic innervation in layers I and II relative to layers V and VI, in chimpanzees and humans, layers V and VI were as heavily innervated as the supragranular layers. Furthermore, clusters of cholinergic axons were observed within the prefrontal cortex of both humans and chimpanzees to the exclusion of macaque monkeys, and were most commonly seen in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the Ch4 cell group was modified during evolution of anthropoid primates as a possible correlate of these changes in cortical cholinergic innervation. We used stereologic methods to estimate the total number of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive magnocellular neurons within the nbM of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of the Ch4 cell group with neocortical volume and brain mass. Results showed that total nbM neuron numbers hyposcale relative to both neocortical volume and brain mass. Notably, the total number of nbM neurons in humans were included within the 95% confidence intervals for the prediction generated from nonhuman data," wrote M.A. Raghanti and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "While differences in the cholinergic system exist among primate species, such changes appear to involve mostly axon collateral terminations within the neocortex and, with the exception of the relatively small group of cholinergic cells of the subputaminal subdivision of the nbM at the anterointermediate and rostrolateral levels, are not accompanied by a significant extra-allometric increase in the overall number of subcortical neurons that provide that innervation. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO."

Raghanti and colleagues published their study in Neuroscience (Comparative Analysis Of The Nucleus Basalis Of Meynert Among Primates. Neuroscience, 2011;184():1-15).

For additional information, contact M.A. Raghanti, Kent State University, Dept. of Anthropol, 750 Hilltop Dr., 226 Lowry Hall, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the journal Neuroscience is: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd., the Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England.

Copyright © 2011 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: KSU football coach set for chamber lunch | Email

News Date: 08/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU Head
Football Coach
Darrell Hazell
will be the
guest speaker
at the Kent
Area Chamber
of Commerce
luncheon Aug. 4
at Water Street
Tavern/Cajun Dave's. Networking
starts at 11:30 am. Lunch and program
to follow at noon.
The cost is $15 for KACC members
and $20 guests and potential
members. Walk-ins will
be charged $5 extra and noshows
will be invoiced. Reservations
are due Tuesday. Call 330-
673-9855, or RSVP via email to
gina@kentbiz.com.

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News Headline: Former KSU Cornerback Signs Contract With Browns: Plain Dealer | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Megan Rozsa
News OCR Text: The Plain Dealer reports former Kent State University cornerback Usama Young has reached a contract agreement with the Cleveland Browns. The plan is to make Young the starting free safety.


Young was a four-year starter for KSU and played with Josh Cribbs for three years.

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News Headline: Recent report reviews health of Summit County residents | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Tanisha Herrin
News OCR Text: A new health report conducted by Kent State University reviews the health of Northeast Ohio residents which included statistics from 16 counties.

The goal of the report is to identify problems that area health and social service agencies can work together with citizens of the community to develop solutions to help improve the quality of life for residents throughout the region.

The Center for Community Solutions sponsored the study and their goal includes identifying community issues, analyzing data and make recommendations so that residents can make improvements.

The report explored 10 areas that were also compared on a national and state scale with categories including teen births, prenatal care rates, behavioral health, disabilities, health insurance coverage and more.

Data from the report showed 362 per 100,000 Summit County residents have had the STD chlamydia compared to 573 per 100,000 Cuyahoga County residents.

Nearly 38 per 1,000 females in Summit County are teen mothers compared to 18 per 1,000 in Medina and 20 per 1,000 in Portage Counties.

The full report can be viewed at the Center for Community Solution's website.

Source:

New report gauges health of Northeast Ohio residents – Akron Beacon Journal/Ohio.com

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News Headline: Over 65 and not worried about heat? You should be (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Baxter Bulletin - Online, The
Contact Name: LINDSEY TANNER
News OCR Text: Don Worden, 79, poses with his tennis racket outside his home in Chicago. Healthy, active seniors enduring this week's heat wave without any trouble are reminded that they need more water to keep the blood flowing and are far more at risk of dehydration and heat stroke. / Charles Rex Arbogast/The Associated Press

CHICAGO — This week's heat wave may be uncomfortable, but you're healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you're over 65? Think again. Feeling good doesn't mean you're safe.

There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water than a younger one. Older brains can't sense temperature changes as well, and they don't recognize thirst as easily.

Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more than any other type of weather.

One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown many people over 65 don't think the warnings apply to them — because they don't think they're "old."

Don Worden is 79 and an avid tennis buff who prefers playing doubles on outdoor courts along Chicago's lakefront — even in oppressive 90-degree temperatures like those hitting the Midwest this week.

"I don't pay too much attention to those" warnings, Worden said. "I stay in pretty good shape, and I don't feel they apply to me."

Worden said he drinks a lot of water and would stop a match if he started feeling effects from the heat, "but that hasn't happened."

Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65 view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.

"People well into their 70s would say old people should watch out but not them," he said. "People just didn't want to be thought of in that same category."

Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medicine that age who shun being thought of as "elderly." But those heat warnings apply to them, too.

As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of Chicago Medical Center explains it, "Any older adult has less reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just because their overall body water goes down with age no matter how healthy you are."

The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for people in their 80s, Dale said.

Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as people age, so the body doesn't get the same signals to drink water in hot weather, and older people often don't feel thirsty even when they need to replenish, Dale said.

They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration, such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling "bad" and think they're getting sick, he said.

Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the nation's midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many places to nearly 120 degrees.

In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent dozens of people to hospitals, canceled outdoor sporting events and caused sporadic power outages.

In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert themselves, don't drink enough water or are frail and don't get out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Heat exhaustion can cause muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. It can be treated at home, by drinking water, getting into an air-conditioned room or sitting in front of a fan and misting the body with cool water.

But affected people should be monitored for mental changes and to make sure their temperature does not rise above 102 because the condition can quickly lead to heat stroke. A medical emergency, heat stroke involves temperatures of 104 or higher and can cause seizures, loss of consciousness and death.

Medicines many older people take also may make them more vulnerable to the heat. These include diuretics for high blood pressure, which increase urination — and make it more important to drink plenty of water, Dale said.

Some types of drugs can interfere with sweating and raise body temperature, including some medicines for insomnia, nausea, prostate conditions, Parkinson's disease and even Benadryl. Many list "dry mouth" as a side effect — a tip-off to drink more water, Zich said.

There aren't specific guidelines on how much water older people should drink in a heat wave.

Dale said he generally tells his older patients to drink a quart of water throughout the day, and to drink even if they don't feel thirsty.

Doctors also advise older patients to avoid alcohol and coffee during extreme heat because they can cause the body to lose fluid and contribute to dehydration.

Online:

» Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/elderlyheat.asp

» American Geriatrics Society: http://www. healthinaging.org/public-education/hot-weather-tips.php

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News Headline: KSU makes list of 'Great Colleges to Work For' (Booth, Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has been selected as one of the 2011 “Great Colleges to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education, the nation's No. 1 source of news and information about colleges and universities.

The Chronicle's “Great Colleges to Work For” program recognizes small groups of colleges, based on their enrollment size, for specific best practices and policies. This is the second time that Kent State has made the prestigious list in its four-year history.

The Chronicle released its results as part of the publication's fourth annual report on The Academic Workplace. The results are based on a survey of nearly 44,000 employees at 310 colleges and universities.

Kent State employees rated the institution highly enough to be recognized in the Compensation and Benefits category for large universities with 10,000 or more students. The university was last honored on the “Great Colleges to Work For” list in 2009.

Kent State has received many honors and recognitions this past year, including being named among the top 200 universities in the world and growing our enrollment to now rank as Ohio's second-largest public university,” said Stephane Booth, Kent State's associate provost for quality initiatives and curriculum. “What is particularly special about this achievement is that it is based on the feedback of our faculty and staff. As members of the Kent State community, we take great pride in our institution and have a shared commitment to excellence, demonstrating ‘Excellence in Action' every day.”

The survey results are based on a two-part assessment process: an institutional audit that captured demographics and workplace policies from each institution and a survey administered to faculty, administrators and professional support staff. The primary factor in deciding whether an institution received recognition was the employee feedback.

“Employees are the university's most valuable resource,” said Willis Walker, Kent State vice president for human resources. “It is gratifying to be recognized by our faculty and staff, and The Chronicle, in the Compensation and Benefits category.”

He adds that the compensation package faculty and staff receive is more than just the dollar amount in their paycheck.

“It also includes health benefits, the tuition waiver, an employee-assistance program and other resources that are a significant part of each employee's total compensation,” Walker said.

Jeffrey J. Selingo, editor of The Chronicle, said that colleges are realizing they need to do more to attract quality employees.

“The ‘Great Colleges to Work For' survey is meant to help both employers and potential employees by giving them vital information about workplaces,” he said.

“Great Colleges to Work For” is one of the largest and most-respected workplace-recognition programs in the country. For more information and to view all the results of the survey, visit The Chronicle's website at http://chronicle.com/academicworkplace. The survey results also were published in The Chronicle's The Academic Workplace special report as part of its July 29 issue.

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News Headline: Weather grounds balloons, but Foodfest goes on | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Tim Botos
News OCR Text: Caroline Denny eats her french fries right out of the bucket at the Jackson Belden Foodfest Friday.

JACKSON TWP. —

Those giant hot air balloons are perhaps the most delicate flower of all aircraft.

They don't do well in rain. Thunderstorms are even worse. Even weather that's too hot can be a problem. Don't forget low- and ground-level wind. Not to mention high or aloft winds.

So, what may have seemed like a perfect evening for flying to a throng of hopeful spectators surrounding the take-off field at Kent State University's Stark campus — wasn't. The official word came shortly before 7 p.m.

Canceled.

None of the 65 balloons that were to launch from, or land in the field, got off the ground Friday, the opening day of the Balloon Classic Invitational and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks. However, the Night Glow lighting of balloons did go on as planned at 9:30 p.m.

As for flights? They'll try again today.

Launches are planned for 6:30 tonight, then again at 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Pilots of competition balloons are competing for $11,000 in prize money. And noncompetitive pilots have $3,000 on the line.

Even in ideal weather conditions, pilots have only a general idea of where they will land. The problem Friday night was strong winds pushing southeast. It would have likely sent most noncompetitive balloons to a landing somewhere in the downtown or southeast section of Canton.

“Not a good place to land,” field announcer Bill Smith explained.

From above, a pilot's view would resemble a cobweb of high-tension electrical lines. Organizers determined it was simply too risky, given the event's 25-year history of no serious injuries, despite some past landing mishaps.

The announcement sent some of the thousands shuffling toward the exits. But most stuck around, many moving up the hill to the outdoor track for the Food Fest and the music of The Wild West Band, then Outlaw.

Perhaps a back-handed blessing to vendors, who offered carnival-style eats, such as fries, hot dogs, ribs, lemonade, ice cream, sausage sandwiches, gyros and funnel cake. And for Aunt Lula, also known as Harriet (Harula) Robinson, who offered homemade Greek Baklava and Koulourakia pastry.

She learned the recipes from her family. She lives on Frank Road NW, across the street from the event. She was running the track one day and spoke with an event volunteer. She was curious. Until now, she has only done farmers' markets, but nothing on this scale. Days later, she committed to a booth. Then, she and her help whipped up 3,000 Koulourakias and 1,500 Baklava.

“I'd never, ever made more than 50 at a time,” she said with a sigh.

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TICKET INFORMATION

Admission to the ribs burnoff is free. Parking at the fairgrounds is free until 4 p.m., $5 after 4 p.m.

Standing-room admission to the grandstand concerts is free. No folding chairs are permitted on the track.

Reserved grandstand seating is $9. Tickets can be purchased by calling 330-458-2088, or in person at the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce at 222 Market Ave. N in downtown Canton; hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

Tickets will go on sale the day of each show at 11 a.m. on the north side of the grandstand. Cash or check only.

HOF schedule

Thursday

Concert and fireworks, 6 p.m., downtown Canton (Cornerstone Square)

Friday

Jackson-Belden Food Fest, 4 to

11:30 p.m., Kent State Stark Campus/ Stark State College, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

Balloon Classic Invitational, 5:30 p.m., Kent State Stark Campus/ Stark State College, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

July 30

Balloon Classic Invitational, 6 a.m., Kent State Stark Campus/ Stark State College, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

Jackson-Belden Food Fest and Fireworks, 4 to 11:30 p.m., Kent State Stark Campus/ Stark State College, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

Balloon Classic Invitational, 5:30 p.m., Kent State Stark Campus/ Stark State College, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

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News Headline: SEA recognizes area businesses and facilities | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Society for Equal Access this week recognized several public places in Tuscarawas County for their efforts in providing access to disabled.

The Americans with Disabilities Act, passed in 1990, is a civil rights law that guarantees equal opportunities for individuals who have a disability. It includes, but is not limited to, places of public accommodation. It promotes the full inclusion of people with disabilities.

In observance of the ADA's 21st anniversary, the SEA recognized:

• Linn-Hert Geib Family Center, Dover

• New Family Dollar, New Philadelphia

• The Employment Source

Kent State Performing Art Center

• St. Joseph Family Life Center

• Dollar General, North Dover

• First United Methodist Church, New Philadelphia

SEA is committed to keeping the promise of equality and continuing to improve the quality of life for people with disabilities.

The Americans with Disabilities Act has been instrumental in changing public attitudes and facilitates greater inclusion of persons with disabilities in today's society.

For more information about the ADA, go to www.ada.gov or call SEA at 330-343-9292.

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News Headline: KSU Math Emporium is About More Than Just Numbers (Tonge) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kasha Legeza
News OCR Text: Kent State University is making a big investment in student success, as well as increasing freshman retention rates, by completely revamping the way basic math courses are taught.


The second floor of the university library is in the midst of a $1 million renovation project that is turning former storage space into a 250-computer, state-of-the-art learning center dubbed the Math Emporium .


Andrew Tonge, chair of the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Kent State, said students whose individual assessments show a need for basic math instruction will be introduced this fall to ALEKS – an artificially intelligent computer learning system.


Tonge said the adaptive program allows students to choose their own pathways through various math topics at their own pace while constantly assessing their progress.


“Our students have not been succeeding as well as we'd like in elementary math courses,” he said. “(With ALEKS), students will be learning all the materials they need to learn – not what the instructors think they need to learn.”


The ALEKS software was chosen over other models, Tonge said, because it has proven to be the most effective mathematics software on the market that adapts to individual student needs.


“Evidence from other universities shows that when teaching in this type of format, students do much better … You get at least 25 percent more students moving forward rather than getting stuck in elementary (math) courses, then dropping out, which is what we don't want them to do,” he explained.


The 11,000-square-foot math emporium will be the new campus “classroom” for students whose placement assessments show a need for Basic Algebra I-IV courses, formerly called core math.


“These are the courses that students should have learned sufficiently in high school to succeed in college courses,” Tonge said. “We need to get them up to speed. There's a strong correlation between success in first math courses and retention at Kent State.”


Instead of reporting to the math building for classes this fall, students enrolled in any of the four basic algebra courses will attend “class” in the Math Emporium, which will be staffed at all times with teaching faculty, graduate students and peer coaches.


Tonge said instructors will be able to continually monitor student progress through the ALEKS software, as it provides statistics on everything from what a student is currently working on to how much time they've devoted to various topics. Faculty will be proactive in providing individualized help to those who need it.


Students in the basic algebra classes benefit from interacting with both the software and the instructional team in the Math Emporium. “They're classes that provide one-on-one interaction,” he said.


The emporium will be staffed from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and noon to 8 p.m. Sundays.


Tonge said another advantage of Kent State using the ALEKS model is that the software is web-based. “Students will be able to actually do work 24 hours a day, seven days a week, wherever they are,” he said.


The Math Emporium renovation project should be finished by Aug. 15, then computers and furniture will be moved in and set up for the start of classes Aug. 29. A dedication event is planned for 4 p.m. Sept. 13.


Click on this link to find more information, including a video, about the new Math Emporium at Kent State. Click on this link to try out the ALEKS student module for free.

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News Headline: Business Brief (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU associate professor receives humanitarian award

Angela Neal-Barnett, an associate professor in Kent State University's Department of Psychology, was awarded the 2011 Harold K. Stubbs Humanitarian Award recognizing her important work in the study of anxiety disorders among African-Americans.

Neal-Barnett was honored at the 21st Annual Judge Harold K. Stubbs Awards Banquet March 11 at the Hilton Inn West in Fairlawn. More than 300 guests attended the event.

Neal-Barnett is a nationally recognized expert in the area of anxiety disorders among African-Americans. Her work has focused on fears and social anxiety in African-American children, as well as sister circles for panic disorder and stress in African-American adults. A workshop presenter and speaker, she is the author of "Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman's Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, Panic and Fear."

Neal-Barnett founded and became CEO of Rise Sally Rise Inc., a company dedicated to helping women overcome anxiety and fear from a psychological, spiritual and black perspective. Her work has been featured on national media, including CNN, NPR and BET.

"I was shocked and humbled when I heard about this honor," Neal-Barnett said. "Judge Stubbs was such a man of honor and integrity. The point of everything we do is to try and make a difference in the emotional well-being of African-Americans, and to be recognized for the work is truly incredible."

Neal-Barnett earned a bachelor's from Mount Union College in Alliance, and both her master's and doctoral degrees from DePaul University in Chicago. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical research at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic.

Neal-Barnett has taught at Kent State for more than 20 years. Her research is supported by the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Mental Health, the Kent State University Foundation and the Ohio Commission on Minority Health. Neal-Barnett, who resides in Tallmadge, is listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Women, Who's Who in Medicine and Health Care and Outstanding Americans.

Sponsored by the St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church of Akron, the Harold K. Stubbs Humanitarian Award recognizes those who have made contributions in areas such as social action, government, business, medicine and law. The awards program honors Stubbs, a former Akron Municipal Court judge and Kent State alumnus. Stubbs was actively involved with the church, which since his death has annually recognized individuals for their community service with this award.

For more information on Neal-Barnett, visit www.personal.kent.edu/~aneal/amnbhp.html.>

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News Headline: Kent Time Bank Continues Speedy Growth | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kasha Legeza
News OCR Text: The Kent Community Time Bank has grown by leaps and bounds during the past six months, doubling its membership, establishing a governing board and getting its Ohio non-profit certificate of incorporation.


Abby Greer, program director and coordinator, said she is excited about the many growth-related changes under way in the organization she co-founded in March 2010 with now-former Kent resident Dr. Verdena Lee.


Time banking is a system of exchanging services within a community without the exchange of money. The social change movement values all members' contributions equally – whether that member is a leaf raker or a physician.


The TimeBanks USA website offers this simple explanation: For every hour you spend doing something for someone in your time bank community, you earn one time dollar. Then you have a time dollar to spend on having someone do something for you.


Since its inception, Kent time bank members have exchanged 4,313 hours of service. That represents a lot of massages given, dogs walked, pies baked, windows washed and foreign language lessons taught (and that's just a handful of the myriad services offered).


Organizers celebrated when the group hit the 100-member mark in mid-January, then cheered again two months later when the Unitarian Universalist Church of Kent became the time bank's first major organization member .


Since January, the member roster has more than doubled to 221, 15 of which are organizations, groups and merchants. Greer said there are also 30 applicants awaiting activation of their accounts.


Among the new organization and merchant members are Kent Social Services , Habitat for Humanity of Portage County , Haymaker Farmer's Market , Kent Natural Foods Co-Op , the Kent State University Graduate Student Council and the Biological Sciences Student Council, Tires & More Kent and FJ Kluth Art Gallery .


The time bank's growth spurt has prompted Greer to “hire” Kristina Spaude as a coordinator (their efforts are compensated in time dollars) and to establish a board of directors comprised of “people who all have really unique visions for the time bank,” she explained.


Greer also has upped the time bank's emphasis on education – from holding monthly informational meetings for prospective and new members to hosting a seminar and attending a national time banking conference.


“Our new procedure is to strongly urge people to come to monthly informational meetings where we give presentations about time banking,” Greer said. “So instead of trying to learn about time banking during the monthly potluck, which is the social-networking aspect of the time bank, people can get all their questions answered during the meetings.”


Last week, the Kent organization hosted a visit from Stephanie Rearick, founder and coordinator of likely the largest time bank in the country, the 1,800-member Dane County Time Bank in Madison, WI.


A three-hour afternoon seminar and dinner featuring Rearick was attended by 40 participants, including time bank coordinators from Medina, Akron and Youngstown, as well as one person interested in starting a time bank in southern Ohio. Rearick also gave an evening talk to about 35 time bank members about her experiences.


Greer will further enhance her own time banking education when she attends the four-day TimeBanks USA National Conference next week in Providence, RI.


“It's so exciting that I'm going. They have so many workshops that deal with everything from the nuts and bolts of time banking to a project that involves worldwide participation,” Greer said. “What I want to bring home from this are ideas that will speak to the needs in our community right now.”


Even the Kent time bank's online identity is getting a facelift. A new website is being designed for time dollars by one of the time bank's newer members, a web designer.


Greer said the public website will include a calendar of events, a blog, an FAQ section, the history of the time bank, its bylaws and pdf versions of handouts. The Community Weaver software that represents the time bank's actual time exchange area will be embedded in the new website for members to log into.


The Kent time bank's next public event will be the monthly potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 5 at Roy Smith Shelter House at Fred Fuller Park .

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News Headline: Kilgour-Dowdy launches new book at NALIS | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Trinidad and Tobago's Newsday
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Celebrated Trinidad-born arts practitioner and educator Joanne Kilgour-Dowdy will launch her latest book Artful Stories: The Teacher, the Student and the Muse on Friday August 5, at NALIS in Port-of-Spain.

The book is an exploration of the role of the artist as teacher and relationship that evolves between the teacher and the student in the creation of new work, whether it is lighting design, drama, dance, or music.

Kilgour-Dowdy left Trinidad in the 80s to study drama at the Boston Conservatory of Music, Dance, and Drama with the support of Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott and then moved on to the Julliard School in New York. She continued her formal performance career which is carefully and poignantly documented in her photo autobiography “In the Public Eye”, which she also launched in Trinidad in 2010.

Professor Dowdy believes that she “must come to Trinidad to share every new book. Just like we introduce our new children to their family at home, I must bring my labours of love to my home island so people can meet their new relatives.”

In addition to a love for the stage, Kilgour-Dowdy also has research interests in women and literacy, drama in education and video technology and qualitative research instruction. She has published her findings of the experiences of Black women involved in education from adult basic literacy to higher education.

Artful Stories, as described in the Foreword by Kent State University Professor William Kist, debunks the myth of art being a special skill, and artists being “special” people outside of our formal learning systems.

“Blood, sweat and tears of the teachers and students are evident in this book — this is not playtime. When one practices for five hours a day to master an intricate piece of choreography, or sweats through a couple of shirts labouring over the composing of just the right 500 words, one has a right to say what ‘work' is.”

Next Friday's launch takes place at 6.30 pm in the Audio Visual Room of the National Library of Trinidad and Tobago.

For more information on Dr. Kilgour-Dowdy's work go to her website http://jkdowdy.com.

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News Headline: Get Out: Porthouse Theatre: Hello Dolly! | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Vincent R. Komenda
News OCR Text: The weekend is upon us and Kent Patch is here to provide you with choices to help get away from the realities of life .

Even in the midst of searing heat, evictions, foreclosure, potential financial meltdowns, multiple wars and rapid global change, you currently have the freedom to enjoy your family, community and Northeast Ohio.

So Get Out while you still can , and have a good time in the process.

Porthouse Theatre: Hello, Dolly!

Where/When: Porthouse Theatre, Blossom Music Center grounds, 1145 W. Steels Corners Rd., Cuyahoga Falls.

Tonight, July 29, 8 p.m.

Saturday, July 30, 8 p.m.

Sunday, July 31, 2 p.m.

Performances run until August 14.

Why Go: This stage show is based on the play The Matchmaker by Thornton Wilder, it's setting is New York at the turn of the 20th century.  See the humorous twists and turns of a matchmaker in action. Porthouse works in conjunction with the Kent State University School of Theater and Dance. 

Pricing: General admission $25 and $33, students $17 and $20

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News Headline: Katherine Burke & Fred Sternfeld: Scottish Dialect 7/29/11 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Department of Theatre and Dance Professor Katherine Burke teaches us how to speak with a Scottish dialect to promote the show The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and Fred Sternfeld gives us show dates and times.

http://www.wkyc.com/video/1086250533001/0/Katherine-Burke--Fred-Sternfeld-Scottish-Dialect-72911 http://bcdownload.gannett.edgesuite.net/wkyc/34306114001/34306114001_1086345371001_th-1086336104001.jpg?pubId=34306114001 Katherine Burke & Fred Sternfeld: Scottish Dialect 7/29/11 Kent State University Department of Theatre and Dance Professor Katherine Burke teaches us how to speak with a Scottish dialect to promote the show The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and Fred Sternfeld gives us show dates and times. goodcompanygood companyWKYCShowsentertainmentjoe cronauer 03:39

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News Headline: KSU to purchase South Willow Street property | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/01/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Columbus -- The state Controlling Board has signed off on a request from Kent State University to purchase a South Willow Street property. KSU will pay Barbara Hartz a total of $210,000 for a single-family home and 0.233-acre lot at 205 S. Willow St. The purchase price was in line with appraisals, which set the value based on comparable properties in the vicinity that are being used as student housing. KSU plans to use the property as part of its efforts to extend the University Esplanade -- pedestrian and bicycle pathways that link the university to the downtown business district.

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News Headline: Around Ohio: KSU to purchase property | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU to purchase property

Columbus -- The state Controlling Board has signed off on a request from Kent State University to purchase a South Willow Street property in Kent.

KSU will pay Barbara Hartz a total of $210,000 for a single-family home and 0.233-acre lot at 205 S. Willow St.

The purchase price was in line with appraisals, which set the value based on comparable properties in the vicinity that are being used as student housing.

KSU plans to use the property as part of its efforts to extend the University Esplanade -- pedestrian and bicycle pathways that link the university to the downtown business district.

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News Headline: Video: Carney Finds Niche Moving Libraries | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Today's "3 Minutes With" video, T.J. Carney takes viewers to a huge project at Kent State University, where his family's Carney McNicholas Co. is moving more than 725,000 books and journals. The company's story was featured in the midJuly edition of The Business Journal.

To view video, click on this link: http://business-journal.com/video-carney-finds-niche-moving-libraries-p19673-1.htm
Portion of broadcast about KSU Library begins at approx. 8:35 in video.

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News Headline: Carney-McNicholas Moves by the Book | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AUSTINTOWN, Ohio -- For much of the year, the future and preservation of huge repositories of knowledge -- which include rare manuscripts that date back centuries -- is in the hands of Carney-McNicholas Inc. of Austintown.

The moving company has built a strong business by packing, moving and unpacking extensive libraries, something that requires years of skill, training and experience.

"We've been movers since 1906," says company President Thomas J. (T.J.) Carney. "And, libraries have always had to move. But we discovered there were expanded opportunities when we started doing more moves around the Cleveland area."

Carney says the company has long relocated small municipal libraries. Then in 2003, Carney-McNicholas tackled one of its largest projects to date, and that opened the floodgates to a new line of business that few firms in the country do successfully.

That year, Carney-McNicholas was awarded a contract to relocate the law library of the Ohio Supreme Court and its 600,000 weighty volumes of legal records. "That was going to be the biggest challenge to date," he recalls.

To organize the move, Carney hired a specialist with 25 years' experience in the library-relocation industry. "This project had components of moving that we hadn't been exposed to previously," the president says. Once the relocation was finished, Carney says the company took stock of what it learned, and assessed just what skills and expertise would be needed to win future business.

Carney says the commercial-services market has become more price competitive and that it's important to bring value to every project.

"We started shopping around nationwide to see if we could become competitive," Carney says. "We entered the market strong, and then identified those on our staff who took an interest in this line of work."

One staff member is Dennis Cleland, project manager at a relocation effort under way at the main campus of Kent State University. Carney-McNicholas is consolidating the university's math, chemistry and physics libraries on the fifth and sixth floors of KSU's main library, a task that involves the relocation of more than 725,000 books and journals.

"This move is more complex than it is large," Cleland says. "But it's definitely a challenge because of the different variables."

Moving a library, Cleland says, is far more intricate than loading and unloading books. "It's a giant math problem," he explains.

First, planners must measure each shelf and calculate how many books are to fit in the new space. "We want to know in inches how many books need to be transported. Then, we calculate how much labor we'll require, the number of carts used and trucks," Carney says.

As the job at Kent State progresses, Carney-McNicholas is simultaneously finishing a library-relocation project at the University of Denver. "Matt Hagan, our project manager in Denver, showed a real talent for the math component of this job, measured it, and submitted a strong technical proposal," Carney says.

The key is hiring people who take a special interest in this kind of work, and those in a position to represent the next generation within the company. Carney's daughter, Anna, is among the staff working on the Kent State project.

"It's great to have an interesting project," Carney says. "Moving a library really has all those things. The bid process, writing the technical proposal and the challenges of getting it moved and protecting the shelf order of those books getting relocated seems to really get the interest of people in our company."

Once the company demonstrated its logistical and technical prowess in relocating large libraries, the jobs came easier. "After that, it was by invitation only," Carney adds, noting that library relocation has evolved into a highly specialized field, one where a mere handful of companies across the country are capable of taking on such projects.

"Some local movers could move a small municipal library," he says, noting that most moving companies are fairly small, family-owned businesses and they lack the capability of a move that would take up to two or three months. "The competition in this market is set between serious and knowledgeable library movers," Carney notes.

Last year, for example, the company completed one of its most impressive projects -- the relocation of the restored Thompson Memorial Library at Ohio State University. The project involved relocating 1.5 million books and other items from all over Columbus. Earlier this year, the company completed a large relocation project for the St. Louis Public Library. And more recently, Carney-McNicholas finished moving the Penrose Library at the University of Denver. "That involved more than one million items," he says.

Despite the trend toward digitization of records and manuscripts, Carney says, faculty and students are often attracted to universities because of the extent and nature of their library collections. "This stuff is all here for a purpose," he says, pointing to a stack of bound mathematics journals. "Even though there is a tremendous movement toward the digitization of information," he relates, "books are still the only known long-term way to store knowledge."

The company has relocated archives and rare books collections that date back centuries. "Illuminated manuscripts are often parts of library collections and are used for scholarly research, especially religious studies," Carney says.

Handling such collections takes time and care, and these moves generally take longer to complete than relocating shelves of books. "It's a lot slower, and the collections are typically placed in boxes, not on carts," Carney says. Each rare book must be placed in its own acid-free cover; movers generally wear gloves and masks to prevent oils from the skin contaminating the pages of the books.

"I'd love to write a book about some of the things we've seen," Cleland says. "We typically move anywhere between 15 to 30 libraries a year."

Of that number, about three of them are large-scale university projects and the rest are projects that involve small municipal libraries, Carney says. The company bids on 10 or so big projects a year and usually lands roughly three or four. "We get don't really like them to be going on," he comments.

On average, it takes four full-time employees at Carney-McNicholas to relocate a library and, depending on the size of the project, could add up to 20 or 30 more temporary positions. "We try to hire university students if it's a university library move," he says, "and if it's a municipal library, we try to go through temp agencies."

Aside from relocating vast libraries to new buildings, universities are also moving some of their rarely or little-used materials offsite to conserve storage space and save money. "The cost of maintaining this kind of space is getting higher, and the collections are getting larger," Carney says.

About 20 years ago, universities started to store volumes offsite in climate-controlled warehouses. "The idea is to get hundreds of thousands of low- circulation material offsite," he says, while volumes in higher demand remain accessible on the shelves.

Still, Carney says, even those books stored offsite are likely to be consulted by scholars doing research. "There might be some retrieval issues," he says, but barcode technology enables libraries to quickly locate a volume anywhere, and can have that book or journal delivered back to the library from the offsite location when necessary.

Kent State, for example is taking a large chunk of its low-circulation material and, under the direction of another vendor, moving it to a storage area near Cleveland. "They deliver books here every day," Carney explains, "and then take other books back to storage."

Other universities use high-density storage sites on campus or near campus, so retrieval times are cut considerably, he says.

"It's a fascinating, interesting field," Carney says. "Libraries aren't going away. If you value information, libraries are the place to go, and they serve more people."

EDITOR'S NOTE: This story first appeared in the MidJuly edition of The Business Journal.

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