Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Economics (1)
Higher Education; Human Resources (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
May 4 (1)
Psychology (3)
Renovation at KSU (2)
Residence Services (1)
Technology Transfer (2)
Theatre and Dance (1)
University Press (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Dobbins receives alumni award from Kent State University 08/14/2011 Southeast Missourian - Online Text Attachment Email

Southeast Missouri State University president Dr. Ken Dobbins has received special recognition from Kent State University in Ohio. Dobbins has been selected as a 2011 Alumni Leadership Award recipient for Kent State University's...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Cleveland studies its new ecosystem of abandoned lots (Schwarz) 08/13/2011 Seattle Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...population may grow by 120 million in the next 40 years, said Terry Schwarz, 47, an Ultra-Ex affiliate who directs the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative at Kent State University. At least a few people, she predicts, will want to live in a temperate central location with an abundant supply of fresh...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Investigators at Kent State University Release New Data on Family Medicine 08/15/2011 NewsRx.com Text Email

...and clinician buy-in, use of the NVS data, and implementation of best practices to communicate with at-risk patients," wrote V.L. Welch and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "Though the time and cost constraints associated with screening for health literacy were...


Economics (1)
Afraid to spend during stock market roller-coaster ride? (Englehardt) 08/12/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...dollars. That's a vicious cycle because we need consumer support. They are the drivers of the global economy.' Lucas Engelhardt, economics professor at the Kent State University Stark Campus, said the slow pace of the economic recovery also could put on a drag on consumer spending. ‘The consensus,...


Higher Education; Human Resources (1)
NOTEBOOK 08/14/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Teaming Up To Build 3-D Nanomaterials 08/12/2011 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...carbon and highly conductive in two directions along the plane of the sheet. Timothy Fisher and Xiulin Ruan, professors of mechanical engineering at Purdue University, will conduct experimental studies and develop predictive models of thermally conductive nanomaterials, and they will also develop...

Ring-like formations in drying DNA drops could affect hybridization studies 08/13/2011 Bio-Medicine Text Attachment Email

...associate Ivan Smalyukh, graduate students Olena Zribi and John Butler, and professor Oleg D. Lavrentovich, director of the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State.


May 4 (1)
KSU May 4 Center gets $300K grant (Davis, Barbato) 08/13/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

The National Endowment for the Humanities has announced a $300,000 grant to Kent State University for its future May 4 Visitors Center. The May 4 Visitors Center was one of 249 humanities projects that will receive...


Psychology (3)
Coke addicts prefer money in hand to snowy future 08/12/2011 HealthCanal.com Text Attachment Email

...Lisa Jackson, addiction treatment clinic coordinator with the UAMS Center for Addiction Research; Bryan A. Jones, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University; and Zeb Kurth-Nelson, postdoctoral associate, and A. David Redish, associate professor, University of Minnesota, Department...

COCAINE ADDICTS PREFER MONEY IN HAND TO SNOWY FUTURE 08/12/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

...Lisa Jackson, addiction treatment clinic coordinator with the UAMS Center for Addiction Research; Bryan A. Jones, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University; and Zeb Kurth-Nelson, postdoctoral associate, and A. David Redish, associate professor, University of Minnesota, Department...

Scientists at Kent State University Publish Research in Language and Communication 08/15/2011 Pain & Central Nervous System Week Text Email

...interest, differential use of retrieval during practice had no significant effect on later performance during test," wrote N.J. Wilkins and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "Results suggest that memory-based processing theories need to include a top-down control...


Renovation at KSU (2)
Regents chief remains in favor of KSU fee plan (Burford) 08/13/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

OUR VIEW: A welcome show of support for Kent State 08/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Residence Services (1)
Full house at KSU, but no plans for more dorms (Neumann, Joseph) 08/13/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's biggest ever freshman class will again push the university's dorms over capacity in the fall. “We call it transitional...


Technology Transfer (2)
Oil out, wind and solar in at advanced energy conference 08/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...sludge into energy at a city facility in the Cuyahoga Valley, and groups behind a proposed offshore wind farm. Sponsors include the city, Summit County, University of Akron, Kent State University, FirstEnergy Foundation, Roetzel & Andress and the chamber. Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781...

INDUSTRIES POWER UP FOR AKRON EXHIBITION: COMPANIES AND GROUPS ARE LINING UP TO ATTEND ADVANCED ENERGY EXPO 08/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...sludge into energy at a city facility in the Cuyahoga Valley, and groups behind a proposed offshore wind farm. Sponsors include the city, Summit County, University of Akron, Kent State University, FirstEnergy Foundation, Roetzel & Andress and the chamber. Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Area entertainment events beginning Aug. 12 08/12/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

DOLLY'S FROM ALLIANCE Terri Kent, who grew up in Alliance, stars as Dolly Levi in the Porthouse Theatre production of the beloved musical ‘Hello, Dolly!' Performances are at 8 p.m. today and Saturday, and 2 and 8 p.m. Sunday at the...


University Press (3)
UT Press is thriving 08/14/2011 Toledo Blade Text Email

...UT Press is experiencing unlikely success, publishing 13,000 books and 28 titles since forming nine years ago. "We're very different from, say, the Kent State University press," said Thomas Barden, general editor at UT Press. "Those are very scholarly works. We from the beginning decided...

PICTURES RECALL DJ'S ROCKIN' ROLE 08/13/2011 New York Daily News Text Email

...early rock 'n' roll radio - will be mesmerized by the new book "1950s Radio in Color: The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards" by Chris Kennedy (Kent State University Press). Edwards was a deejay at WERE in Cleveland from 1953 to 1960. More important for this book, he was a photographer,...

'1950s Radio in Color' recalls Chicago deejay Tommy Edward's rockin' role through photos 08/13/2011 New York Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email

Saturday, August 13th 2011, 4:00 AM Kent State University Press Deejay and photographer Tommy Edwards took the only known picture of Elvis meeting Bill Haley. Anyone who...


News Headline: Dobbins receives alumni award from Kent State University | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Southeast Missourian - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Southeast Missouri State University president Dr. Ken Dobbins has received special recognition from Kent State University in Ohio.
Dobbins has been selected as a 2011 Alumni Leadership Award recipient for Kent State University's College of Education, Health and Human Services second annual Hall of Fame Awards.

According to a news release, Dobbins was selected for his outstanding leadership throughout his educational career.

He received his Ph.D. in higher education from Kent State University in 1987 and serves as chairman for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. He is a past chairman of the Missouri Council on Public Higher Education and a member of the finance committee for the Ohio Valley Conference President's Council.

Dobbins will be presented with the award during Kent State University's homecoming events in October.

© Copyright 2011 Southeast Missourian.

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News Headline: Cleveland studies its new ecosystem of abandoned lots (Schwarz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Seattle Times - Online
Contact Name: MICHAEL TORTORELLO
News OCR Text: Urban horticulturists are trying to document the ecological benefits that vacant lots might provide and to redefine the land, from neighborhood blight to community asset.

One of 20,000 vacant parcels in Cleveland is located on Union Avenue. Urban planners are studying such lots.

CLEVELAND — This city contains 20,000 vacant lots, more or less. Probably more. Every year, demolition crews knock down another 1,000 houses. And the housing market being what it is, few souls are returning.

A vacant lot may be a lot of things: an eyesore, a dump, a symbol of U.S. industrial decline. But one thing it is not is vacant. When we leave a yard behind, the bulk of the biomass does not follow us in a U-Haul. Put another way, a dandelion is unmoved by foreclosure. It lingers where it pleases.

And so, on a recent Monday morning, Garrett Ormiston, 29, was taking an informal census of the vegetation occupying an otherwise empty yard just a few miles east of downtown Cleveland.

"Right here is kind of a mix of plants that probably existed as people's landscaping," said Ormiston, a naturalist with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. "This here looks like somebody's ornamental rose that has just kind of persisted."

The lot, four-tenths of an acre, in size, once comprised four separate parcels.

Ormiston walked along a row of shrubs beneath a power line. The neighborhood birds, he said, apparently made a habit of perching here and depositing seeds (and fertilizer), as birds will.

"Whatever they bring, colonizes," he said. "You can see all of their favorites." There was raspberry, white mulberry, native "riverside" grape, Canada thistle ("a really rotten invasive," he said), a staghorn sumac and a stand of exotic Norway maple.

With a chain saw and a Bobcat, a homeowner could clear this brush in an afternoon. But no homeowner would be coming this afternoon, or this month, or this summer. To be realistic, it's unlikely that anyone will be coming next summer, either.

One abandoned yard is a mess; 20,000 abandoned yards is an ecosystem. At this scale, Cleveland's vacant land begins to look less like a sign of neglect and more like an ecological experiment spread over some 3,600 acres.

As it happens, a team of local scientists has designated this accidental landscape an Urban Long-Term Research Area — that is, Ultra. And having won a $272,000 exploratory award from the National Science Foundation, the researchers call their project Ultra-Ex. There's enough turf here for everybody: Ultra-Ex scientists are studying bird and insect populations, watershed systems, soil nematodes and urban farms.

Along with its sci-fi name, Ultra-Ex advances a forward-looking mission: to document the ecological benefits that vacant lots might provide and to redefine the land, from neighborhood blight to community asset.

Of course, Cleveland has no monopoly on vacant land. Tens of thousands of vacancies blot the residential map in major, or once-major, Great Lakes cities like Youngstown, Ohio; Flint, Mich., and Buffalo. Some 40,000 parcels are empty in Philadelphia. (New York City does not track the number of vacant lots, according to the Department of City Planning, but 8,902 acres, or 5.8 percent, of the city's land was vacant in 2010.) And vacancy creates more vacancy, said Bob Grossmann, 66, the director of Philadelphia Green, a program run by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, which has pioneered the management of urban vacant land. "There's a cost to doing nothing," he said.

'Greening and cleaning'

Originally, cities like Cleveland and Flint (and their surrounding counties) assembled vacant tax-forfeited parcels into "land banks." The idea was for these public entities to guide the resale and redevelopment of the land in a strategic fashion.

But with the economy in a coma, private buyers haven't approached the land banks to draw down deposits, said Joan Nassauer, 59, a professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan.

Local governments have been "left holding many, many, many properties that they would rather not own," she said. "But now they own them, and they've got to manage them."

The plan that the nonprofit Philadelphia Green has implemented in neighborhoods around the city's core is a kind of "greening and cleaning" regime: in TV terms, an extreme makeover. Here, contractors and work crews remove debris, deposit topsoil, plant grass and build a post-and-rail fence. Afterward, they continue to mow the lot.

The nonprofit now maintains 5,200 lots in Philadelphia, at a cost of approximately $800,000 a year.

Planning for the future

Once the city stops mowing (and no one believes Cleveland can mow forever), "the grasses will grow tall," Ormiston said.

"You'll start to get some wildflowers, things like asters," he said. "Some shrubs like viburnums and dogwoods. But eventually, you'll start getting trees pretty early on: things like cottonwoods and sumacs that colonize really quickly, grow quickly and start paving the way for other trees."

Demographers say that the United States population may grow by 120 million in the next 40 years, said Terry Schwarz, 47, an Ultra-Ex affiliate who directs the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative at Kent State University. At least a few people, she predicts, will want to live in a temperate central location with an abundant supply of fresh water.

"What happens is one of two things," she said. "Either we reclaim the older industrial cities and repopulate. Or we're going to be building new cities, probably not too far from here."

In this schema, vacant lots could be the parkland and home sites of tomorrow, if they're managed smartly.

One Ultra-Ex project being led by the Cleveland Botanical Garden involves planting a vacant lot in the Buckeye neighborhood with low-mow fescue, a slow-growing pasture grass, and establishing a vegetative fence.

Down the block is one of six learning farms that the botanical garden runs through its Green Corps program. With three acres under cultivation and 60 teenage workers, the urban farms will grow and sell or give away 15,000 pounds of fresh produce this summer, said the program's director, Geri Unger.

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News Headline: Investigators at Kent State University Release New Data on Family Medicine | Email

News Date: 08/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2011 AUG 15 - () -- "Difficulties in identifying and caring for patients with limited health literacy have prompted interest in clinical screening to assess health literacy (see also ). Little agreement exists, however, on the utility of such screening," scientists in Kent, Ohio report.

"In this case study we explore the business and clinical cases for screening for health literacy using the Newest Vital Sign (NVS), a brief instrument specifically developed for use in primary care settings. Data were collected in 2008 in the Morehouse School of Medicine Department of Family Medicine Primary Care Clinic, where health literacy screening was implemented as part of routine intake procedures within an ongoing quality improvement effort to improve cardiovascular disease and diabetes outcomes. Specifically, we monitored time requirements, administrative and training costs, and clinician utilization associated with the NVS. Results identified only small time and cost constraints associated with implementing NVS screening. Clinical utility was more problematic, however, because refresher trainings were needed to ensure continued staff and clinician buy-in, use of the NVS data, and implementation of best practices to communicate with at-risk patients," wrote V.L. Welch and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Though the time and cost constraints associated with screening for health literacy were small, clinician utilization of this data in decision making and care processes may require further training and/or support. (J Am Board Fam Med."

Welch and colleagues published their study in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine (Time, Costs, and Clinical Utilization of Screening for Health Literacy: A Case Study Using the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) Instrument. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 2011;24(3):281-289).

For more information, contact V.L. Welch, Kent State University, College Public Health, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine is: American Board Family Medicine, 2228 Young Dr., Lexington, KY 40505, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Afraid to spend during stock market roller-coaster ride? (Englehardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Doug Staley
News OCR Text: Bob and Cindy Lunsford aren't letting the Wall Street jitters bother them. The Perry Township couple said they were trying to give the economy a boost Wednesday with the purchase of a 2006 Hyundai Santa Fe on Wednesday at Waikem Auto Hyundai. ‘I'm retired. I have to spend it somewhere,' Bob said. The Lunsfords have been shopping for a replacement for Cindy's 12-year-old Chevrolet Cavalier for several months. The recent stock market roller-coaster ride wasn't enough to dissuade the couple from their plans. ‘We were looking at the price and the fact that it gets low mileage,' Cindy said. Some economists believe the topsy-turvy stock market could make consumers more reluctant to buy big-ticket items such as cars, homes and appliances. WILD RIDE On Wednesday, the Dow Jones industrial average plunged more than 500 points, or 4.6 percent, to 10,720. The drop came one day after the market surged more than 429 points, its 10th highest gain in history and the biggest since March 2009. On Monday, the Dow shed 634.76 points, its worst point decline since 2008, in the first day of trading after Standard & Poor's downgraded the U.S. from its top AAA credit rating to AA+. The market also is adjusting to news from the Federal Reserve, which pledged Tuesday to keep its key interest rate at its record low of nearly zero through the middle of 2013. The central bank also is discussing other tools that could be used to help spark the economy. CONSUMER HESITANCY Larry Million, local Edward Jones financial planner, believes the economic upheaval will cause some consumers to tighten their wallets, which, in turn, will slow the economic recovery. ‘I think they will hold off. It's very much human nature to look at your account value being down and think you are less wealthy,' he said. ‘It's easy to put off new car purchases and a new washer and dryer when your account is down thousands of dollars. That's a vicious cycle because we need consumer support. They are the drivers of the global economy.' Lucas Engelhardt, economics professor at the Kent State University Stark Campus, said the slow pace of the economic recovery also could put on a drag on consumer spending. ‘The consensus, as far as I can tell, is that we're in a very slow recovery. There are fears of a double dip recession but that's largely because the government has to get its spending under control and that tends to have a negative impact on unemployment,' Engelhardt said. Engelhardt said it's unlikely the downgrade in the U.S. credit rating will make it more difficult for consumers to obtain loans, especially in light of the Federal Reserve's decision to keep interest rates low. ‘I don't see things changing. The only way I would see interest rates changing is if we see a great price inflation' Engelhardt said. ‘Right now, we see rising prices in gasoline, but, outside of that, prices aren't rising that fast.' Doug Waikem, co-owner of Waikem Auto, hopes the uncertain financial environment doesn't dampen car sales. ‘We're kind of wondering how it is going to affect things. I think everybody wanted the budget balanced. I'm not so sure it's going to affect us yet but when they get their 401 (k) statements that might rattle them a little bit,' Waikem said. ‘I think it could affect the luxury brands rather than some of the others such as Kia, which is not as affected as the high line models.' Overall, sales have been booming this year at Waikem Auto dealerships, according to Waikem. Compact cars account for most of the sales. ‘We're up 40 percent over last year. It's crazy. It's another record for us. We're having a blast,' he said. Waikem attributed the strong sales to the fact that the dealership has acquired many of the hot-selling franchises, including Subaru, Hyundai and Kia. ‘The stars have aligned for us,' he said. Business has been strong at Home Appliance Co. in Massillon, but sales manager Jack Hogue admits customers are being more cautious with their purchases. ‘They're getting that (appliance) need replaced not so much as that want,' Hogue said. Home Appliance could be losing some sales because more people are staying put and remodeling their current kitchens, rather than buying or building new homes, according to Hogue. Still, Hogue doesn't believe the sluggish economy will have a significant impact on sales because Home Appliance's customer base is well-established. ‘We serve the replacement need,' Hogue said. ‘... People are still looking for value in service.' The Federal Reserve's decision to keep interest rates low should bode well for the housing market, according to Sony Taylor, secretary-treasurer for the Stark County Association of Realtors. ‘With interest rates as low as they've ever been, they can get more house for their money. It's a win-win for the buyers,' Taylor said. ‘I think we will see another good year and a half of sales opportunities with the low rates.' Taylor said the housing market has begun to stabilize in Stark County in the past couple of months with the average sale price increasing from $107,658 in May to $116,248 in June. The number of closed sales jumped from 304 in May to 346 in June, she said. ‘I don't think (economic uncertainty) is going to have that much of an effect. We're business as usual and trying to push it,' Taylor said. MARKET VOLATILITY With several economic factors in play, including the gloomy global economic picture, investors should expect the market to be volatile at least in the short-term, according to Million. ‘There was a lot of euphoria (Tuesday) with the market. Now, (Wednesday morning) it's down a lot. There's going to be volatility just because of all the different things that are going on,' Million said. ‘There is a lot of uncertainty ... That is not necessarily bad but it's uncomfortable.' Regardless of the market's ups and downs, investors should resist the urge to panic and continue to follow the time-honored principles of focusing on high-quality investments, diversifying broadly and be prepared to ride out short-term fluctuations by holding onto investments for the long-term, according to Million. ‘Some people, intuitively, in a volatile market feel like they need to do something. You just have to be prepared to ride out these volatile markets. You can't really hedge about it,' Million said. Investors must learn to be thick-skinned and not allow their emotions to control them, said Chris Sanor, Raymond James financial representative. ‘We knew there was going to be volatility,' Sanor said. ‘We're open to volatility and the ups and downs of the market. We've recouped a lot (in the market) over the last couple of years. It's not going to be a permanent thing.'

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News Headline: NOTEBOOK | Email

News Date: 08/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University was selected as one of the 2011 Great Colleges to Work For by the Chronicle of Higher Education. The program recognizes small groups of colleges, based on their enrollment size, for specific best practices and policies.

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News Headline: Teaming Up To Build 3-D Nanomaterials | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A national team of experts, led by a Case Western Reserve University researcher, has received a multi-million-dollar grant to bring unrivaled qualities found in one- and two-dimensional nanomaterials into three dimensions.

The scientists' goal is to produce new materials for a host of uses, ranging from high-efficiency batteries, ultracapacitors, fuel cells and hydrogen storage devices to lightweight thermal coatings for hypersonic jets, multifunctional materials for aerospace, and more.

The team, from five universities, two government research institutes and a private company, has been awarded a Department of Defense Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative grant totaling more than $7 million over five years.

The grant comes through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. There, Joycelyn Harrison is the program manager, Ajit Roy from the Air Force Research Laboratory leads the technical advisory board.

Recent theoretical studies and computer modeling, carried out by Roy and co-workers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and others elsewhere, have predicted great promise for three-dimensional (3D) pillared carbon nanomaterials, but so far, no one has been able to make them with controlled and repeatable junction properties of this 3-D nanomaterials, said Liming Dai, the Kent Hale Smith professor of macromolecular science and engineering at Case Western Reserve. Dai is also director of the Center of Advanced Science and Engineering for Carbon (CASE4Carbon), and principal investigator on the grant.

"This requires a multi-university effort," he said

Dai's Center in the Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, The Great Lake Energy Institute, and The Institute of Advanced Materials, Case School of Engineering, at Case Western Reserve will develop technology needed to build carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets into nanoporous frameworks that would produce strong electrical and thermal conductivity and other properties in three dimensions.

His team plans to build 3D networks of alternating layers of carbon nanotubes, which are single rolled molecules that conduct strongly but only in one direction, and graphene, which is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon and highly conductive in two directions along the plane of the sheet.

Timothy Fisher and Xiulin Ruan, professors of mechanical engineering at Purdue University, will conduct experimental studies and develop predictive models of thermally conductive nanomaterials, and they will also develop methods of creating and characterizing 3D nanoporous materials.

Nanoporous materials made of boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes and/or nanosheets are far less orderly than the frameworks above and would perform better at high temperatures – such as on the leading wing edge of a jet flying better than five times the speed of sound - and in such applications as thermal dissipation, mechanical and sound damping.

"Both kinds of structures are porous - the density is very low - which is good for aerospace applications," Dai said. "They have huge surface area compared to volume, which is good for energy storage."

Zhenhai Xia, a professor of materials science and engineering at North Texas University, will guide development through extensive multi-scale computer modeling.

Also from Case Western Reserve, Chung-Chiun Liu, the Wallace R. Persons professor of chemical engineering, will characterize the electrochemical properties of the materials and Vikas Prakash, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will characterize mechanical properties and thermal and electrical transport in these nanostructures. He will also explore the use of mechanical strain in tuning electrical and thermal transport in these materials.

Once the basic materials are made, others will hybridize them for custom uses.

Zhong Lin Wang, the Hightower Chair and Regents' professor of materials science and engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and pioneer in piezoelectronics and nanogenerators, will integrate zinc oxide components to produce and characterize structure and property changes triggered by exposure to certain wavelengths of light, mechanical or other stimuli.

Quan Li, Director of Organic Synthesis and Advanced Materials Laboratory at the Liquid Crystal Institute and an adjunct professor in the Chemical Physics Interdisciplinary Program at Kent State University, will tap his lab's expertise in liquid crystals to develop multi-functional capabilities.

Researchers from Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and GrafTech Inc., a private company in Cleveland, will also contribute to the effort.

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News Headline: Ring-like formations in drying DNA drops could affect hybridization studies | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Bio-Medicine
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: he design of arrays in which DNA droplets are sequentially deposited onto a glass surface for hybridization studies, the researchers report.

"Without optimization of the wetting conditions, it is possible to miss all the DNA in the ring stain of a dried droplet, resulting in false negatives," Wong said. "We need to think of strategies to minimize this effect."

The co-authors of the paper are postdoctoral research associate Ivan Smalyukh, graduate students Olena Zribi and John Butler, and professor Oleg D. Lavrentovich, director of the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State.

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News Headline: KSU May 4 Center gets $300K grant (Davis, Barbato) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The National Endowment for the Humanities has announced a $300,000 grant to Kent State University for its future May 4 Visitors Center.

The May 4 Visitors Center was one of 249 humanities projects that will receive support from the independent federal agency. The NEH award to Kent State is one of the largest to a university and is one of only eight in Ohio.

The Kent State project receiving NEH funding is the implementation of a permanent, museum-style exhibit to create a May 4 Visitors Center at Kent State.

On May 4, 1970, members of the Ohio National Guard fired at demonstrators, wounding 13 Kent State students, four of them fatally. Many consider May 4 one turning point in the course of the Vietnam War and the Nixon presidency.

The 10-year legal battle that followed May 4 raised important Constitutional questions and set precedent in the U.S. Supreme Court. The event also led to reform in military policy.

Exhibit content for the May 4 Visitors Center has been developed through consultation with humanities scholars. Members of the public also have contributed ideas and reviewed materials as they have been developed. Visitors will explore the exhibit to better understand the events of that day in history, the times in which they took place and their meaning for citizens today, including the difference that can be made by young people.

“Receiving news of a $300,000 award from the National Endowment for the Humanities was stunning — and better than winning the lottery,” said Laura Davis, who was a freshman at Kent State when the May 4 events occurred and today serves as an English professor and the university's faculty coordinator for May 4 initiatives.

Davis co-authored Kent State's proposal to the NEH with Carole Barbato, both serving as co-principal investigators.

“The NEH award tells us that we've designed an effective and significant experience for visitors,” Davis said. “We have found our voice in telling the story in a way that honors the loss of Allison Krause, Jeff Miller, Bill Schroeder and Sandy Scheuer, and preserves the timeless meaning of May 4 for generations to come. The history of May 4 will continue to tell young people that they can make a difference.”

Barbato, who also was a Kent State student in 1970 and today serves as a communication studies professor for Kent State University at East Liverpool, said the creation of the May 4 Visitors Center is important.

“Those of us associated with preserving this part of our university's history always knew it was an important project,” she said. “The significance of the site and the shootings at Kent State to our nation's history was confirmed last year when the National Park Service accepted our application to place the site on the National Register of Historic Places.

This year, a group of scholars and reviewers from the National Endowment for Humanities echoed that importance.

The May 4 Visitors Center will be in Taylor Hall, adjacent to the May 4 Memorial on the Kent Campus.

The university is working with museum design firm Gallagher & Associates of Silver Spring, Md., to complete content development and design for the permanent exhibit in the May 4 Visitors Center. Gallagher's projects include the new Gettysburg visitor center, the new museum at Woodstock and the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Cleveland.

Final elements of the project include developing the four video displays for the exhibit and working with Gallagher on fabrication and installation of the display.

The university anticipates that the exhibit will open in 2012.

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News Headline: Coke addicts prefer money in hand to snowy future | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: HealthCanal.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ROANOKE, Va. – When a research team asked cocaine addicts to choose, hypothetically, between money now or cocaine of greater value later, "preference was almost exclusively for the money now," said Warren K., Bickel, professor in the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, director of the Advanced Recovery Research Center, and professor of psychology in the College of Science at Virginia Tech. This result is significantly different from previous studies where a subject chooses between some money now or more money later.

Hollywood portrays cocaine addicts as people who will do anything to get their drug and cocaine as the most strongly valued commodity in an addict's life. But research led by Bickel suggests a revision of that view-- cocaine is strongly valued only when it is immediately available. "When it is available later, it is not worth very much," he said.

The finding is good news for developing drug treatment programs based on incentives for delaying drug use, he said.

Warren K. Bickel

Research has demonstrated that addicts whether, smokers, drinkers, gamblers, or overeaters do tend to prefer the near-term reward. Such findings have provided insights into understanding addiction and the challenges for treatments that promise long-range benefits.

But most of the past research has been done with a single commodity such as money. "In real life, important choices for those with addiction depend on making decisions across commodities, such as cigarettes now or money later," said Bickel. His research team examined how the type of commodity and timing of a reward impacted decision making by cocaine addicts. They asked addicts to decide between cocaine now vs. more cocaine later; money now vs. more money later; cocaine now vs. money later; and money now vs. cocaine later.

Participants were 47 cocaine addicts, by criteria of the American Psychiatric Association, who were seeking treatment. They averaged in their early 40s, with 12 years of education, and a median income of $7,000. Each was asked to estimate the number of grams of cocaine worth $1,000 and the experiments were based on that value. The initial amount offered for the immediate choice has half of the full value; the delayed amount was always the full value. If the choice was money now versus cocaine later, the immediate reward was $500 and the future reward was $1,000 worth of cocaine.

When the participant chose one of the options, the immediate value was adjusted in the next trial up or down by half. If the participant chose the immediate reward, its value dropped by half for the next question. If he chose the future reward, its value increased by 50 percent, but delivery was further in the future. Participants made a choice between immediate and delayed rewards for each of seven delay periods one day, one week, one month, six months, one year, five years, and 25 years.

Findings for money now versus money later and cocaine now versus cocaine later replicated previous studies with single commodities. The mixed commodity conditions are novel to this study. In the money now-cocaine later choices, "participants soon became indifferent to future cocaine amounts, preferring immediate money even when the value of the future cocaine was significantly greater. That is, cocaine is discounted more steeply than money," said Bickel.

However, when the immediate reward was the drug and the future reward was money, the decline was less steep. "It took longer for the future money to lose favor compared to a lesser value of cocaine," said Bickel. Discounting rates for cocaine now versus money later were not much different than the single commodity results.

Reflecting on the implications for drug treatment programs, Bickel pointed out, "We showed that a delayed drug is discounted more than when the drug is immediately available, no matter what the other option is. In other words, drug users are less likely to use drugs when the choice to use is presented only as a future outcome rather than an immediately available one. For treatment programs for which abstinence is reinforced immediately and drug consumption is available only after a delay, the incentive to abstain may outweigh future drug consumption."

The research appeared in Psychopharmacology on April 14, online ahead of print publication, in the article, "Single- and Cross-Commodity Discounting Among Cocaine Addicts: The Commodity and Its Temporal Location Determine Discounting Rate," by Bickel, Reid D. Landes, associate professor of biostatistics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS); Darren R. Christensen, research fellow, University of Melbourne, Problem Gambling Research and Treatment Centre; Lisa Jackson, addiction treatment clinic coordinator with the UAMS Center for Addiction Research; Bryan A. Jones, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University; and Zeb Kurth-Nelson, postdoctoral associate, and A. David Redish, associate professor, University of Minnesota, Department of Neuroscience.

Bickel, who joined the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute on Feb. 1, 2011, was formerly director of the UAMS Center for Addiction Research and the Center for the Study of Tobacco Addiction. He is the corresponding author of the journal article. Email him. The joins the basic science, life science, bioinformatics, and engineering strengths of Virginia Tech with the medical practice and medical education experience of Carilion Clinic. Virginia Tech Carilion is located in a new biomedical health sciences campus in Roanoke at 2 Riverside Circle.

Susan Trulove (540) 231-5646 strulove@vt.edu Paula Brewer Byron (540) 526-2027 paulabyron@vt.edu

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News Headline: COCAINE ADDICTS PREFER MONEY IN HAND TO SNOWY FUTURE | Email

News Date: 08/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ROANOKE, Va., Aug. 12 -- Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University issued the following news release:

When a research team asked cocaine addicts to choose, hypothetically, between money now or cocaine of greater value later, "preference was almost exclusively for the money now," said Warren K., Bickel, professor in the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, director of the Advanced Recovery Research Center, and professor of psychology in the College of Science at Virginia Tech.

This result is significantly different from previous studies where a subject chooses between some money now or more money later.

Hollywood portrays cocaine addicts as people who will do anything to get their drug and cocaine as the most strongly valued commodity in an addict's life. But research led by Bickel suggests a revision of that view -- cocaine is strongly valued only when it is immediately available. "When it is available later, it is not worth very much," he said.

The finding is good news for developing drug treatment programs based on incentives for delaying drug use, he said.

Research has demonstrated that addicts - whether, smokers, drinkers, gamblers, or overeaters - do tend to prefer the near-term reward. Such findings have provided insights into understanding addiction and the challenges for treatments that promise long-range benefits.

But most of the past research has been done with a single commodity - such as money. "In real life, important choices for those with addiction depend on making decisions across commodities, such as cigarettes now or money later," said Bickel. His research team examined how the type of commodity and timing of a reward impacted decision making by cocaine addicts. They asked addicts to decide between cocaine now versus more cocaine later; money now versus more money later; cocaine now versus money later; and money now versus cocaine later.

Participants were 47 cocaine addicts, by criteria of the American Psychiatric Association, who were seeking treatment. They averaged in their early 40s, with 12 years of education, and a median income of $7,000. Each was asked to estimate the number of grams of cocaine worth $1,000 and the experiments were based on that value. The initial amount offered for the immediate choice has half of the full value; the delayed amount was always the full value. If the choice was money now versus cocaine later, the immediate reward was $500 and the future reward was $1,000 worth of cocaine.

When the participant chose one of the options, the immediate value was adjusted in the next trial up or down by half. If the participant chose the immediate reward, its value dropped by half for the next question. If he chose the future reward, its value increased by 50 percent, but delivery was further in the future. Participants made a choice between immediate and delayed rewards for each of seven delay periods - one day, one week, one month, six months, one year, five years, and 25 years.

Findings for money now versus money later and cocaine now versus cocaine later replicated previous studies with single commodities. The mixed commodity conditions are novel to this study. In the money now-cocaine later choices, "participants soon became indifferent to future cocaine amounts, preferring immediate money even when the value of the future cocaine was significantly greater. That is, cocaine is discounted more steeply than money," said Bickel.

However, when the immediate reward was the drug and the future reward was money, the decline was less steep. "It took longer for the future money to lose favor compared to a lesser value of cocaine," said Bickel. Discounting rates for cocaine now versus money later were not much different than the single commodity results.

Reflecting on the implications for drug treatment programs, Bickel pointed out, "We showed that a delayed drug is discounted more than when the drug is immediately available, no matter what the other option is. In other words, drug users are less likely to use drugs when the choice to use is presented only as a future outcome rather than an immediately available one. For treatment programs for which abstinence is reinforced immediately and drug consumption is available only after a delay, the incentive to abstain may outweigh future drug consumption."

The research appeared in Psychopharmacology on April 14, online ahead of print publication, in the article, "Single- and Cross-Commodity Discounting Among Cocaine Addicts: The Commodity and Its Temporal Location Determine Discounting Rate," by Bickel, Reid D. Landes, associate professor of biostatistics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS); Darren R. Christensen, research fellow, University of Melbourne, Problem Gambling Research and Treatment Centre; Lisa Jackson, addiction treatment clinic coordinator with the UAMS Center for Addiction Research; Bryan A. Jones, assistant professor of psychology at Kent State University; and Zeb Kurth-Nelson, postdoctoral associate, and A. David Redish, associate professor, University of Minnesota, Department of Neuroscience.

Bickel, who joined the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute on Feb. 1, 2011, was formerly director of the UAMS Center for Addiction Research and the Center for the Study of Tobacco Addiction. He is the corresponding author of the journal article. Email him.

The Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute joins the basic science, life science, bioinformatics, and engineering strengths of Virginia Tech with the medical practice and medical education experience of Carilion Clinic. Virginia Tech Carilion is located in a new biomedical health sciences campus in Roanoke at 2 Riverside Circle. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Scientists at Kent State University Publish Research in Language and Communication | Email

News Date: 08/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pain & Central Nervous System Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2011 AUG 15 - () -- According to the authors of recent research from Kent, Ohio, "Memory-based processing theories of automaticity assume that shifts from algorithmic to retrieval-based processing underlie practice effects on response times (see also ). The current work examined the extent to which individuals can exert control over the involvement of retrieval during skill acquisition and the factors that may influence control."

"In two experiments, participants performed alphabet arithmetic verification in an initial practice session followed by a test session after seven days. Retrieval use during practice was lower for participants instructed to perform the task as accurately as possible than for participants instructed to perform the task as quickly as possible. The presence of novel items also reduced retrieval use. Of secondary interest, differential use of retrieval during practice had no significant effect on later performance during test," wrote N.J. Wilkins and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Results suggest that memory-based processing theories need to include a top-down control mechanism for the involvement of retrieval during skill acquisition, and we discuss ways in which theories may be modified to accommodate the current results."

Wilkins and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Memory and Language (Controlling retrieval during practice: Implications for memory-based theories of automaticity. Journal of Memory and Language, 2011;65(2):208-221).

For additional information, contact N.J. Wilkins, Kent State University, Dept. of Psychology, POB 5190, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Memory and Language is: Academic Press Inc. Elsevier Science, 525 B St., Ste. 1900, San Diego, CA 92101-4495, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Pain & Central Nervous System Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Regents chief remains in favor of KSU fee plan (Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS — Chancellor Jim Petro is reiterating his support for a plan by Kent State University to borrow more than $200 million for a campus-wide improvement project, then pay back the funds through increased student fees.

“I've made it very public that I'm in favor of (it),” Petro told the Record-Courier's Statehouse bureau this week. “I think the plan is important to Kent State University because Kent State has to be competitive. They've got a great plan that I think melds very well with the city's plan — the city of Kent is doing some wonderful upgrading.”

He added, “Their university and the community broadly becomes very, very attractive to students.”

KSU has outlined $250 million in renovations to its main campus, funded through increased student fees, starting at $7 per credit hour and reaching $24 per credit hour in 2017.

The former chancellor, Eric Fingerhut, a Democrat selected for the post by then-Gov. Ted Strickland, blocked the plan last year, saying such projects should be paid for through state capital funds. He also questioned allowing the university to implement the new fee over and above state-allowed tuition increases.

But Petro, who was appointed by Gov. John Kasich, supports the plan and the student fee increase to pay for it and said he will encourage lawmakers to give their approval, too.

“It's got to be done sometimes,” Petro said. “You've got to make a capital investment. If you don't, you're going to lose your competitive edge.”

Bob Burford, a spokesman for KSU, confirmed that the plan was resubmitted to state officials earlier this year. The request will require the approval of the state Controlling Board, which has not yet scheduled a vote on it.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: A welcome show of support for Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has a welcome -- and powerful -- ally in Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro, who has reiterated his support for the university's bid to use student fee hikes to finance $250 million in campus improvements.

"I think the plan is important to Kent State University because Kent State has to be competitive," Petro told R-C Capital Bureau chief Marc Kovac in an interview last week, while noting the impact of the revitalization of downtown Kent on the university community as a whole.

The Lefton administration has proposed $250 million in renovations to Kent State's main campus, with a plan to fund the improvements through increased student fees, starting at $7 per credit hour and reaching $24 per credit hour in 2017.

The plan was stymied when Petro's predecessor, Eric Fingerhut, blocked the financing proposal. He objected to using student fees for capital projects, which traditionally are financed through direct state appropriations.

Fingerhut's opposition ground the plan to a halt, in the process probably costing Kent State money in the long run because of its inability to take advantage of a favorable construction market.

Petro says he supports a student fee increase to pay for the project and said will encourage lawmakers to support it, too. "It's got to be done sometimes," he said. "You've got to make a capital investment. If you don't, you're going to lose your competitive edge."

While we can understand the arguments of those who question imposing an additional burden on students (and their parents) in terms of increased tuition fees, it's also true that students stand to benefit most directly from the improvements being planned. Using student fees to help pay for them does not seem unreasonable in that context.

Kent State, like the city of Kent, appears to be poised for a major turning point. The improvements being proposed could reshape the campus much as those undertaken in the 1950s and 1960s did.

Petro's support for the plan, coupled with support on the part of the Kasich admnistration and the Ohio legislature, will help Kent State proceed with the updates necessary to remain competitive in higher education in Ohio.

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News Headline: Full house at KSU, but no plans for more dorms (Neumann, Joseph) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's biggest ever freshman class will again push the university's dorms over capacity in the fall.

“We call it transitional housing,” said Tom Neumann, KSU's associate vice president for communications and marketing, on the around 100 students who will live in converted lounges and other spaces instead of dorm rooms.

Neumann added the university “expects that number will drop,” after a few weeks or months, after some freshman decide KSU isn't the right fit for them.

Despite the crowded dorms, Neumann said the university has no current plans on the table to either build additional dorms or let sophomores move off campus. KSU has 6,260 beds of student housing this fall according to school records.

KSU has focused on renovating older dormitories instead of building new recently. In the last five years, the school has demolished Terrace Hall and the Small Group dorms.

In the last 10 years, KSU had its highest capacity for housing students in 2004 when the school had 6,816 beds available after the Centennial Court dorms had all opened.

The school hit its 10-year-low in 2008 with 5,938 beds.

Betsy Joseph, residence services director, said the university still sees a great benefit to keeping students on campus for two years, even with many new student housing developments on the horizon.

“In my opinion, the more quality, affordable housing for all in our community, the better,” Joseph said in an e-mail. “But in terms of the university, regardless of the number of housing options in the City of Kent, we still require our students to live on campus their first two years unless they qualify for a commuter exemption.”

Joseph said KSU sees improvement in GPA and retention rates among freshman and sophomores with the on-campus living requirement. She said requests to live on campus are at an all-time high, with 84 percent of freshman requesting to live on campus.

Within the next year, a 596-bed housing complex, the Province at Kent, is expected to open on South Lincoln Street, while a 612-bed complex called University Edge is planned for the current site of the now vacant Sunrise Apartments on Rhodes Road.

An Alabama-based developer has purchased the senior apartment complex Silver Oaks with the intent of renovating it to use as student housing.

Joseph said the idea that KSU is somehow responsible for developments in the private housing market is inaccurate. She said most universities have a one-year requirement for students to live on campus, if they have one at all, making KSU more responsible for student housing than many schools.

Recently, Jim Silver, wrote in a legal document pertaining to a lawsuit over the Province at Kent that lack of student housing for the students of KSU is a “fundamental problem” for the city.

Joseph does not completely agree.

“To me, there are more housing options in Kent than at any other time,” she said. “I think there is a larger issue of quality and affordable housing for all in our Kent community.”

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News Headline: Oil out, wind and solar in at advanced energy conference | Email

News Date: 08/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Byard, Katie
News OCR Text: Aug. 12--The proposed Lake Erie wind farm.

Hundreds of solar panels atop the Akron Metro Transit Center.

A "biodigester" that helps turn Akron's sewage sludge into energy.

Companies and organizations involved in these projects and others in the advanced energy industry will gather and network Sept. 14-15 at a first-of-its-kind confab at the John S. Knight Center in downtown Akron.

Organizers say the time is ripe for the Advanced Energy B2B (business-to-business) Conference & Expo.

They point to high oil prices, concern over dependence on foreign oil and continuing government pressure to lower emissions.

The conference is being organized by NorTech and the Summit County Mayors Association. NorTech is a technology-based economic development group that is promoting growth in regional advanced energy, including energy storage and smart grid distribution of energy.

About 60 exhibitors have signed up so far, with 75 expected to tout their products, technology and services at the event's expo, NorTech Vice President Dave Karpinski said.

"Advanced energy is a major opportunity that is unfolding," Karpinski said.

"We have a strong core of companies already in the industry, and that's a good basis to attract others who are considering doing work in the industry."

Companies include some of the world's leading manufacturers, including Babcock & Wilcox Co., with operations in Barberton.

Conference organizers will work to arrange business-to-business meetings with conference participants that could lead to joint projects.

"We're always amazed at the collaborations that emerge and the excitement as people find partners to work with," Karpinski said.

He said it's not just the small businesses that recognize the value of teaming up.

"The big companies need partners as well," he said. "They have such aggressive growth targets that they've come to the realization that they can't create all the technologies as well."

Exhibitors signed up include big companies, such as Babcock & Wilcox, and tiny outfits such as Polyflow LLC of Akron.

Barberton is home to B&W's Power Generation Group, as well as part of the company's Nuclear Operations Group.

Polyflow is a startup that is working to commercialize its process of converting polymer waste into ingredients for transportation fuel and plastic products.

The city of Akron and the Greater Akron Chamber also plan to exhibit.

Exhibitors will include Third Sun Solar of Athens, Ohio, a designer and installer of solar arrays, including the one atop the Metro Regional Transit Authority transit center on South Broadway. Metro also boasts a Third Solar-installed array atop its primary bus bar at its administrative facility on Kenmore Boulevard. This array, at the time it was installed last year, was one of the largest in the state.

Also exhibiting will be Quasar Energy Group of Cleveland, which is involved with turning Akron's sludge into energy at a city facility in the Cuyahoga Valley, and groups behind a proposed offshore wind farm.

Sponsors include the city, Summit County, University of Akron, Kent State University, FirstEnergy Foundation, Roetzel & Andress and the chamber.

Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781 or kbyard@thebeaconjournal.com

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: INDUSTRIES POWER UP FOR AKRON EXHIBITION: COMPANIES AND GROUPS ARE LINING UP TO ATTEND ADVANCED ENERGY EXPO | Email

News Date: 08/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Byard, Katie
News OCR Text: The proposed Lake Erie wind farm.

Hundreds of solar panels atop the Akron Metro Transit Center.

A "biodigester" that helps turn Akron's sewage sludge into energy.

Companies and organizations involved in these projects and others in the advanced energy industry will gather and network Sept. 14-15 at a first-of-its-kind confab at the John S. Knight Center in downtown Akron.

Organizers say the time is ripe for the Advanced Energy B2B (business-to-business) Conference & Expo.

They point to high oil prices, concern over dependence on foreign oil and continuing government pressure to lower emissions.

The conference is being organized by NorTech and the Summit County Mayors Association. NorTech is a technology-based economic development group that is promoting growth in regional advanced energy, including energy storage and smart grid distribution of energy.

About 60 exhibitors have signed up so far, with 75 expected to tout their products, technology and services at the event's expo, NorTech Vice President Dave Karpinski said.

"Advanced energy is a major opportunity that is unfolding," Karpinski said.

"We have a strong core of companies already in the industry, and that's a good basis to attract others who are considering doing work in the industry."

Companies include some of the world's leading manufacturers, including Babcock & Wilcox Co., with operations in Barberton.

Conference organizers will work to arrange business-to-business meetings with conference participants that could lead to joint projects.

"We're always amazed at the collaborations that emerge and the excitement as people find partners to work with," Karpinski said.

He said it's not just the small businesses that recognize the value of teaming up.

"The big companies need partners as well," he said. "They have such aggressive growth targets that they've come to the realization that they can't create all the technologies as well."

Exhibitors signed up include big companies, such as Babcock & Wilcox, and tiny outfits such as Polyflow LLC of Akron.

Barberton is home to B&W's Power Generation Group, as well as part of the company's Nuclear Operations Group.

Polyflow is a startup that is working to commercialize its process of converting polymer waste into ingredients for transportation fuel and plastic products.

The city of Akron and the Greater Akron Chamber also plan to exhibit.

Exhibitors will include Third Sun Solar of Athens, Ohio, a designer and installer of solar arrays, including the one atop the Metro Regional Transit Authority transit center on South Broadway. Metro also boasts a Third Solar-installed array atop its primary bus bar at its administrative facility on Kenmore Boulevard. This array, at the time it was installed last year, was one of the largest in the state.

Also exhibiting will be Quasar Energy Group of Cleveland, which is involved with turning Akron's sludge into energy at a city facility in the Cuyahoga Valley, and groups behind a proposed offshore wind farm.

Sponsors include the city, Summit County, University of Akron, Kent State University, FirstEnergy Foundation, Roetzel & Andress and the chamber.

Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781 or kbyard@thebeaconjournal.com

Copyright © 2011 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Area entertainment events beginning Aug. 12 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Anonymous CantonRep
News OCR Text: DOLLY'S FROM ALLIANCE Terri Kent, who grew up in Alliance, stars as Dolly Levi in the Porthouse Theatre production of the beloved musical ‘Hello, Dolly!' Performances are at 8 p.m. today and Saturday, and 2 and 8 p.m. Sunday at the open-air theater, located on the grounds of Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls. Tickets, $17 to $33, may be ordered at www.porthousetheatre.com and 330-672-3884. Kent is head of Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance musical theatre program. Secrets, ambition and murder A congressman on the verge of becoming vice president finds himself poised in the cross hairs of an explosive scandal in the drama ‘A Walking Shadow,' opening tonight at the Kathleen Howland Theatre at 324 Cleveland Ave. NW in downtown Canton. Performances run through Aug. 20, at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The cast includes Marilyn Wells, Rufus Malone Jr, Joseph M. Haladey III, Ariel Roberts and Ross Rhodes. The production is directed by Deborah Fezelle, who co-wrote the play with Sherry Yanow. Tickets, $10, may be ordered at 330-451-0924. Evolution at Thirteenth gallery

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News Headline: UT Press is thriving | Email

News Date: 08/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Toledo Blade
Contact Name: Sepanski, Ashley
News OCR Text: Aug. 14--A mash-up of diverse talents and expertise is driving the University of Toledo's effort to publish books designed for general readership instead of the strictly academic material found at other university presses.

In a market that has watched many printers, publishers, and booksellers fold as the demand for printed material declines, UT Press is experiencing unlikely success, publishing 13,000 books and 28 titles since forming nine years ago.

"We're very different from, say, the Kent State University press," said Thomas Barden, general editor at UT Press. "Those are very scholarly works. We from the beginning decided we would be for general readers and focus on northwest Ohio."

An example is The Calling, a book written by Dr. Blair Grubb exploring the complex world of patient-physician relationships. Through Grubb's personal essays and experiences, he discusses his struggles to balance being a good doctor with being a good person.

Land of The Three Miamis is a tale told from an Ohio Iroquois elder to her granddaughter. It chronicles the history of the Iroquois in Toledo through traditional narrative, legend, and Indian myth. All Cool, a book of poems written by world-traveler and "Bohemian hipster" Nick Muska, uses fast beats and rough lines to share his experiences with readers.

The choice to target general readers instead of academic scholars gave the UT Press a slow start, but book by book the press has been growing financially and developing itself into a professional publishing house.

"We're trying to publish intelligent books for general readers," said Joel Lipman, literary editor for the UT Press. "Our arrangement with the university was that the Urban Affairs Center would incubate the press project and we'd use that incubation period to publish several books. We figured it would grow beyond that over a couple years and it did precisely that."

Barden, the founding editor of the press, said he plucked Lipman from the English department to assist with the press when things grew larger than he expected. They co-edit the manuscripts selected for publication.

The collaboration of university colleagues grew with the press as it took on more titles. It started as the Urban Affairs Center Press in 2002, but officially gained independence as the UT Press last year.

Working with a grant from the Urban Affairs Center at UT, Barden's goal to create general-interest titles with a northwest Ohio focus fit with the center's mission. The press is entirely nonprofit -- the authors don't receive a stipend from the titles they publish.

Any money that comes in from the books or private donations is used to finance future publications and pay for marketing. The organization currently has $5,000 in its budget.

Grubb said the choice to publish The Calling without profit was an easy one.

"I could've gone other places to get it [published], but this is our city. This is our place." Grubb said, "...So to some extent, I compiled the book for us, for our uses for our own community."

The earliest books the press published focused on the histories of various ethnic groups in the Toledo area, a theme that continues today. The press' first book, Hungarian American Toledo, was written by Barden and John Ahern. The book that followed was The Irish in Toledo, by Seamus Mettress and Molly Schiever. In 2006 it published Land of The Three Miamis, and just last year it published the award-winning Arab Americans in Toledo.

The press branched out to publish poetry and other books without an ethnic focus, such as The Calling and What A Time It Was, a compilation of interviews with northwest Ohio World War II veterans. What A Time was so successful that a Vietnam War sequel is being produced.

As submissions continued to roll in, Barden put together a board of editors to review manuscripts. Board members include Barden, Schiever, Lipman, Arab Americans in Toledo author Samir Abu-Absi, and UT Provost William McMillen.

An initial book proposal is reviewed and discussed by the board, Barden said, before a full manuscript is requested. If the topic has merit, the board will send the manuscript to third-party experts who read the work and give an opinion on whether it is worth publishing.

Once a book is approved, the publishing process begins. Cover art and design used to be handled by the editors, said Angie Jones, senior manager of client services for the office of marketing at UT.

"The press created a partnership with the university marketing offices so now we lay out all the books," Jones said. "I think we got involved in 2008... we do everything in-house."

The difference in design was noticeable. Land of The Three Miamis had its cover redesigned after a successful first run of sales, giving it a more professional quality.

The price of printing a book varies depending on factors such as the printing company that does the work, paper type and size, and binding options. Printing of The Calling cost about $1.45 per book while From Institutions to Independence cost about $4.29 per copy.

One of the next efforts will be John Rockwood's coffee-table book All Access, The Photography of John Rockwood. Rockwood has been taking photos of famous musicians for years and the book will feature about 200 photos of rock performers and artists who have performed in Toledo.

"I've been overseeing John's project for some time," Lipman said. "We started with about 26,000 photographs and knew we were going to publish a book in the neighborhood of 200 photos. It was an intense editorial collaboration to move from that larger number to a publishable size."

Also in the works to keep the ethnic tradition going is a "Polish in Toledo" book.

The office of marketing is responsible for a new venture with The Calling. The book will be the first to be offered in print and eBook form.

"[Hopefully] we could continue to grow in our present circumstance for another four or five years and be healthy," Lipman said.

"[With bigger publishers] so much stuff is outsourced to India," Grubb said. "Here, this is printed locally. It's something for our community."

Contact Ashley Sepanski at: asepanski@theblade.com or 419-724-6082.

Copyright © 2011 The Blade, Toledo, Ohio

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News Headline: PICTURES RECALL DJ'S ROCKIN' ROLE | Email

News Date: 08/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: New York Daily News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ANYONE WHO loves early rock 'n' roll - and early rock 'n' roll radio - will be mesmerized by the new book "1950s Radio in Color: The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards" by Chris Kennedy (Kent State University Press).

Edwards was a deejay at WERE in Cleveland from 1953 to 1960. More important for this book, he was a photographer, shooting more than 1,700 Ektachrome color slides of artists he interviewed, met or saw onstage.

He seems to have favored pop and country over rhythm-and-blues, but that still left him a rainbow of material that's reproduced here in all its eerie retro-glory.

Edwards also wrote a weekly "T.E. Newsletter" that chatted about what was going on in the music game, from visits by record promoters to hot new hits.

Kennedy cherry-picks photos and newsletter snippets to trace a fascinating seven-year arc across the dawn of rock radio.

Edwards took the music as it came. When Elvis Presley heated up down South, especially among country fans, Edwards helped set up his first live shows in the North, proving he wasn't just a regional starburst.

At one of those shows, in October 1955, Edwards took the only known picture of Elvis meeting Bill Haley. Haley was a full-blown star then, Elvis an ascending one.

As that picture proves, Edwards also wasn't just a guy who took random, haphazard snapshots. He knew photography. Not every picture is a masterpiece, but collectively they tell their tales.

Though R&B is lightly covered, we still see Sam Cooke and a young Chuck Berry. Equally fascinating, though, is the way that artists who made it big show up here next to artists who hardly made it at all.

You'll find Eddie Cochran next to Laura Lee Perkins, Johnny Cash following the Emeralds, a young and depressed-looking Roy Orbison next to Gene Vincent and then Dick Contino, "The Valentino of the Accordion."

You turn one page and there's Henry Fonda or Clark Gable. Another page and there's a young Tina Louise. Then you find Hamish Menzies. Or Fay Morley? Who?

But that's a big part of the beauty. We sometimes forget that early rock 'n' roll, like all pop music, wasn't just Elvis and Chuck and Buddy. It's never just about the stars. It's about the whole field, all the artists with one or two or no hits.

Day to day, that's a deejay's life, too, and Tommy Edwards kept this great diary of that life, which we now get to read.

Kennedy adds his own layer of commentary, some of it heated and sharply opinionated. But in a curious way, his observations almost feel separate from the Edwards material.

As the 1950s wound down, Edwards became disenchanted with a radio business he felt was muzzling personality and creativity. He left radio soon after WERE fired him and ran record stores until he died in 1981.

Kennedy suggests he felt like radio threw him under the bus.

Today, fortunately for us, if not for him, we can just enjoy his ride.

dhinckley@nydailynews.com

Copyright © 2011 Daily News, L.P.

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News Headline: '1950s Radio in Color' recalls Chicago deejay Tommy Edward's rockin' role through photos | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: New York Daily News - Online
Contact Name: David Hinckley
News OCR Text: Saturday, August 13th 2011, 4:00 AM

Kent State University Press

Deejay and photographer Tommy Edwards took the only known picture of Elvis meeting Bill Haley.

Anyone who loves early rock 'n' roll - and early rock 'n' roll radio - will be mesmerized by the new book "1950s Radio in Color: The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards" by Chris Kennedy (Kent State University Press).

Edwards was a deejay at WERE in Cleveland from 1953 to 1960. More important for this book, he was a photographer, shooting more than 1,700 Ektachrome color slides of artists he interviewed, met or saw onstage.

He seems to have favored pop and country over rhythm-and-blues, but that still left him a rainbow of material that's reproduced here in all its eerie retro-glory.

Edwards also wrote a weekly "T.E. Newsletter" that chatted about what was going on in the music game, from visits by record promoters to hot new hits.

Kennedy cherry-picks photos and newsletter snippets to trace a fascinating seven-year arc across the dawn of rock radio.

Edwards took the music as it came. When Elvis Presley heated up down South, especially among country fans, Edwards helped set up his first live shows in the North, proving he wasn't just a regional starburst.

At one of those shows, in October 1955, Edwards took the only known picture of Elvis meeting Bill Haley. Haley was a full-blown star then, Elvis an ascending one.

As that picture proves, Edwards also wasn't just a guy who took random, haphazard snapshots. He knew photography. Not every picture is a masterpiece, but collectively they tell their tales.

Though R&B is lightly covered, we still see Sam Cooke and a young Chuck Berry. Equally fascinating, though, is the way that artists who made it big show up here next to artists who hardly made it at all.

You'll find Eddie Cochran next to Laura Lee Perkins, Johnny Cash following the Emeralds, a young and depressed-looking Roy Orbison next to Gene Vincent and then Dick Contino, "The Valentino of the Accordion."

You turn one page and there's Henry Fonda or Clark Gable. Another page and there's a young Tina Louise. Then you find Hamish Menzies. Or Fay Morley? Who?

But that's a big part of the beauty. We sometimes forget that early rock 'n' roll, like all pop music, wasn't just Elvis and Chuck and Buddy. It's never just about the stars. It's about the whole field, all the artists with one or two or no hits.

Day to day, that's a deejay's life, too, and Tommy Edwards kept this great diary of that life, which we now get to read.

Kennedy adds his own layer of commentary, some of it heated and sharply opinionated. But in a curious way, his observations almost feel separate from the Edwards material.

As the 1950s wound down, Edwards became disenchanted with a radio business he felt was muzzling personality and creativity. He left radio soon after WERE fired him and ran record stores until he died in 1981.

Kennedy suggests he felt like radio threw him under the bus.

Today, fortunately for us, if not for him, we can just enjoy his ride.

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