Report Overview:
Total Clips (31)
Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Athletics (2)
Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
Board of Trustees (2)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services; Upward Bound (1)
Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Geography (3)
Geology (3)
Higher Education (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
KSU History (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Student Success; Town-Gown (1)
Students (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Town-Gown (2)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Art, School of (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S SCHOOL OF ART DOWNTOWN GALLERY PRESENTS IMPRINT 08/26/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Aug. 26 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Kent State University School of Art Galleries is pleased to announce...


Alumni; Athletics (1)
VIDEO: Josh Cribbs Interview 08/27/2011 Stack - Online Text Attachment Email

Josh Cribbs Takes His Talents to Ohio Share: Description: A prized high school recruit in Washington, D.C., Josh Cribbs discovered the path to...


Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Coffee awarded Centennial Alumni Award 08/28/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT- Donald Coffee, of Hudson, was selected as the 2011 Centennial Alumni Award recipient for Kent State University's College of Education, Health and Human Services Second Annual Hall of Fame Awards. Coffee, who was born and raised...


Athletics (2)
"PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge" expands rivalry between Akron and Kent State athletics (Nielsen) 08/29/2011 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Best Deal in Football? Score Some Major College Tickets (Carr) 08/29/2011 Daily Finance.com Text Attachment Email


Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
KSU Flashes in classes Monday (Hazell, Nielsen) 08/29/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees (2)
Candidates vie for Akron City Council (Hardy) 08/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...residents' concerns, which she has heard a lot about going door to door. Hardy, 27, an Akron school board member for six years and special assistant to the Kent State University Board of Trustees, also wants to improve communication with voters by being reachable by phone, email, Facebook and Twitter....

Marsh appointed to Kent State Board of Trustees 08/26/2011 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Gov. John Kasich has appointed Richard H. Marsh of Akron to serve on the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Marsh's term is from July 27 through May 16, 2020. Kent State's Board is composed of 11 members...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Warren Acquires 5-Acre 'Game Changer' Site 08/26/2011 Business Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...developers. Iannucci said that the city has attempted to acquire the property for six years, based on the recommendations of a design study completed by Kent State University that called the land "perhaps the most important site for new development downtown." The site is attractive for a...


College of Business (COB) (1)
Kent State University names interim dean of College of Business Administration 08/26/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

9:11 am, August 26, 2011 Kathryn S. Wilson, an economics professor at Kent State University, has been named interim dean of the university's College of Business Administration. Kent State said Dr....


College of Education, Health and Human Services; Upward Bound (1)
KSU to get $1 million to attract students to math, science 08/29/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Job help, networking events: Business calendar 08/27/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's Center for Corporate and Professional Development, Breakfast Briefing: 8 to 10:30 a.m. at Kent State's Cleveland Urban...


Geography (3)
Longer, hotter heat waves in store for California (Sheridan) 08/26/2011 YubaNet Text Attachment Email

...and the proportion of Californians 65 and older is expected to continue growing at unprecedented rates well into the 21st century. Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University geographer who led the study, said the analysis is the first to include demographic factors in predicting changes in California's...

State: Death toll to rise from warming 08/26/2011 Orange County Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...differences in climate effects for the two regions also is a likely factor. The report, by Kalkstein and lead author Scott Sheridan, a geographer at Kent State University , used two climate models, three socio-economic scenarios and multiple projections of population levels to make a range...

Environment News Service (ENS) (Sheridan) 08/29/2011 Environment News Service - Online Text Attachment Email

...and the proportion of Californians 65 and older is expected to continue growing at unprecedented rates well into the 21st century. Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University geographer who led the study, and co-principal investigator Laurence Kalkstein of University of Miami, say the analysis...


Geology (3)
Virginia earthquake felt by Ohio residents, too (Palmer, Burford) 08/28/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...Silver Lake officials said they did not receive any reports of damage in connection with the earthquake. Dr. Donald Palmer, a geology professor at Kent State University, said it is not unusual for waves to be felt many miles from the center of an earthquake. The waves, he said, start at...

Virginia earthquake shakes up Ohio, too (Palmer, Burford) 08/28/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...Ohio, as many residents turned to each other shortly before 2 p.m. on Aug. 23 and asked, "Did you feel that?" Dr. Donald Palmer, a geology professor at Kent State University, said it is not unusual for waves to be felt many miles from the center of an earthquake. The waves, he said, start at...

Virginia earthquake shakes up Ohio; locals report feeling tremors (Palmer, Burford) 08/28/2011 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...Ohio, as many residents turned to each other shortly before 2 p.m. on Aug. 23 and asked, "Did you feel that?" Dr. Donald Palmer, a geology professor at Kent State University, said it is not unusual for waves to be felt many miles from the center of an earthquake. The waves, he said, start at...


Higher Education (1)
State's higher education plan prompts concerns about YSU 08/27/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...education, Eric Fingerhut, rolled out the University System of Ohio several years ago, we gave our support because there was a clear understanding of how Youngstown State University would fit into the scheme, and what was expected of YSU and the community at large to meet the goals established by the...


KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Valley counting on high-tech jobs for future 08/27/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...royalties from oil and gas wells, the county could benefit from spin-off businesses created by oil and gas production, Abbuhl said. He noted that both Kent State Tuscarawas and Buckeye Career Center in New Philadelphia are working on programs to train workers for the industry. Eadon said...

Programs aim to reverse tech job shortage 08/28/2011 Bucyrus Telegraph-Forum - Online Text Attachment Email

...Coshocton County Career Center. People enrolled in the IT Tech Prep Electronics program can take advantage of dual-enrollment, dual-credit options through the Kent State University-Tuscarawas School of Engineering Technology. The classes include exact or similar content to their college counterparts,...

Programs aim to reverse tech job shortage 08/28/2011 Coshocton Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...Coshocton County Career Center. People enrolled in the IT Tech Prep Electronics program can take advantage of dual-enrollment, dual-credit options through the Kent State University-Tuscarawas School of Engineering Technology. The classes include exact or similar content to their college counterparts,...


KSU History (1)
PORTAGE PATHWAYS: Space crunch had KSU scrambling 75 years ago 08/28/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The fastest growing university in the nation was expecting another record-breaking enrollment as the start of the school year neared in 1936. Kent State, which had achieved university status a year earlier, was expecting 1,800 students to report for classes. That would be 600 more...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
WIPO ASSIGNS PATENT TO KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "FAST-SWITCHING SURFACE-STABILIZED LIQUID CRYSTAL CELLS" (AMERICAN INVENTORS) 08/29/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

...Publication No. WO/2011/102892 was published on Aug. 25. Title of the invention: "FAST-SWITCHING SURFACE-STABILIZED LIQUID CRYSTAL CELLS." Applicants: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (US). Inventors: Liang-Chy Chien (US), Volodymyr Borshch (US) and Jeoung-Yeon Hwang (US). According to the abstract...


Renovation at KSU (1)
Lawmakers still leery of Kent plan to finance fix (Lefton) 08/29/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Student Success; Town-Gown (1)
New KSU students discover Kent (Crawford) 08/28/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

They say first impressions are the most important and the longest to last. If that is true, then the incoming freshmen at Kent State University got the red carpet treatment during this year's Discover Downtown event Saturday thanks to the collaborative efforts of...


Students (1)
One pair of shoes for a year - Fashion design meets social justice 08/28/2011 Wilmington News Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

Three hundred sixty five days. One pair of shoes. That is the project Rita Yoder, a 2008 Wilmington High School graduate, has begun with fellow Kent State students Adrienne Langan and Casey Sandala to raise awareness and donations for children in need of shoes. Yoder and Langan each...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Kids books offer understanding 08/28/2011 Toledo Blade - Online Text Attachment Email

...monthly reviews of books for young people written by four area teachers of children's literature. Today's are by Alexa Sandmann, professor of literacy at Kent State University. Winners of the Robert F. Sibert Medal and the Schneider Family Book awards are announced each January at the annual...


Town-Gown (2)
History Will Judge Kent's Redevelopment Efforts 08/26/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

It's easy to say that Kent's redevelopment will have a hugely positive effect on the city and Kent State University . After all, that's the goal. To improve both by strengthening physical and political connections between both...

VIDEO: Kent State Students 'Discover Downtown' 08/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Classes start Monday at Kent State University , so Saturday students got a chance to see all that downtown Kent has to offer. As part of the university's " Welcome...


University Press (1)
BOOK REVIEW: Rock's birth relived through '1950s Radio in Color' 08/28/2011 Wicked Local West Bridgewater Text Attachment Email

...was invented in 1956? In Cleveland? As far-fetched as either of those suggestions may sound, they're borne out – in a way – by “1950s Radio in Color” (Kent State University Press), Christopher Kennedy's collection of “The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards.” Edwards, a pioneering...


News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S SCHOOL OF ART DOWNTOWN GALLERY PRESENTS IMPRINT | Email

News Date: 08/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Aug. 26 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Kent State University School of Art Galleries is pleased to announce an exhibition of sculpture by Kent State alumnus Eric England, Imprint. The Imprint exhibition opens on Aug. 31 and runs through Sept. 24 at the Downtown Gallery. A reception will be held on Thursday, Sept. 1, from 5 -7 p.m.

Eric England SculptureEric England received a B.F.A. in sculpture from Kent State in 1987. He has been teaching art at Howland High School in Warren, Ohio, since 2002. England's current body of work, which he refers to as Talismans, combines comic book superheroes with ancient African carvings and American Indian totems to explore the human struggle between the body's physical limitations and the mind's infinite imagination.

The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery is located at 141 East Main St. in Kent. Gallery hours are Wednesday - Friday 12 - 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. For additional information, please visit http://art.kent.edu or contact the Downtown Gallery at 330-676-1549. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: VIDEO: Josh Cribbs Interview | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stack - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Josh Cribbs Takes His Talents to Ohio

Share:

Description: A prized high school recruit in Washington, D.C., Josh Cribbs discovered the path to excellence at Kent State University. In the first episode of this featured series, the Cleveland Browns superstar shares his reasons for choosing Kent.

To watch several videos click here: http://stacktv.stack.com/Football/Josh-Cribbs-Interview/Josh-Cribbs-Takes-His-Talents-to-Ohio.html

Return to Top



News Headline: Coffee awarded Centennial Alumni Award | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT- Donald Coffee, of Hudson, was selected as the 2011 Centennial Alumni Award recipient for Kent State University's College of Education, Health and Human Services Second Annual Hall of Fame Awards.

Coffee, who was born and raised on a small farm during the Great Depression in Butler Township in Columbiana County, received a bachelor's degree in education in 1955 and a master's degree in administration in 1958 from Kent State.

Upon graduation, he worked for Miller School Middle School in Akron and Greely School in Winnetka, Ill., in the 1950s as a teacher. In the 1960s, he accepted a principal position at Crestwood School District in Mantua, and later worked for East Cleveland School District and Shaker Heights City School District as a principal.

Upon retirement in 1991, Coffee worked at the International Institute of Akron to help new immigrants complete their documentation for citizenship. He is president of NuVu Travel Inc., which promotes experiences between cultures for education and understanding. The company has established school relationships for teachers and students for visits and exchanges in the United States and China.

He received the National Distinguished Principal Award by the U.S. Department of Education in 1986 and the Shaker Emeritus Educator Award in 2009 for his continued support and involvement in education following retirement.

Currently, he serves as president of the Shaker Heights Retired Educators' Association, which provides informational services for retirees and arranges for meetings for continuing social contact of former colleagues.

In 2007, Coffee traveled to China to help conduct professional development for 700 teachers of English in the Hunan Provence for the Department of Education in Changsha. His interest in Chinese culture started as a child when his mother corresponded with some former college classmates who were missionaries in China in the 1940s.

He is married to Xiao Ying, a former teacher of English in Qinghai, China, and has two children, a stepson and five grandchildren. He attends Akron Chinese Christian Church and Christ Community Chapel in Hudson and is a member of the Cleveland Hiking Club.

Coffee knew at a young age that he would become a teacher. "In eighth grade I had a teacher, Mr. Woodall, the first male teacher I had ever had, who had just returned from World War II. He often would ask me to help the younger students and those who were having trouble. He felt I was able to assist them in their learning, and one day he said, 'Don, you should consider teaching as a career.' Immediately, I felt that it was the right choice of a career for me."

As part of Kent State University's 2011 Homecoming festivities, the College of EHHS will honor Coffee and six other distinguished alumni, including Dr. Kenneth Dobbins (Alumni Leadership Award), Dr. Thomas Fagan (Distinguished Alumni Award), Dr. Geeta Verma (Recent Alumni Award), Dr. Janette Habashi (International Alumni Award), Dr. Gerald H. Read (Distinguished Service to EHHS), and Shalva Tabatadze (Diversity Alumni Award).

The awards ceremony will take place from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the KSU Student Center Ballroom. For ticket information contact Hope Bradley at 330-672-2008 or hbradle2@kent.edu

Return to Top



News Headline: "PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge" expands rivalry between Akron and Kent State athletics (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron, Ohio — The athletics departments at The University of Akron (UA) and Kent State University (KSU) today announced participation in a new competition called “The PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge,” which further expands an intercollegiate athletics rivalry dating back more than a half-century between the two schools.

The PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge is based on a time-honored competition for an historic wooden wagon wheel trophy awarded originally in 1945 to the winner of the annual Akron-Kent State football game. For the 2011-12 academic year, the PNC-sponsored rivalry will broaden the competition to include 15 NCAA varsity sports, with victories in each sport adding one point to the challenge standings. (See qualifying sports, page 3).

Fans can learn more about the rivalry and follow the results and standings via www.PNCWagonWheelChallenge.com .

“PNC's new athletic challenge will spark more excitement in a broad range of sports between these rival schools,” said Kevin O. Thompson, PNC regional president for Akron, Canton and Wooster. “By showcasing the talents of student-athletes, we will further engage alumni and the community to support our schools.”

In keeping with tradition, the annual winner of the football contest will gain possession of the historic wooden Wagon Wheel trophy, while the school that accumulates the most total points in all varsity matchups for that academic year will receive an overall series trophy.

“The Akron-Kent State rivalry is a regional event and this partnership will help expand it to more sports and likewise more fans,” Akron director of athletics Tom Wistrcill said. “We're excited to have PNC serve as sponsor of what is one of the more unique rivalries in college athletics. As members of the Mid-American Conference, the results of our competitions against one another are already very important, but the Wagon Wheel Challenge will increase the level of bragging rights around the community.”

According to legend, the “Wagon Wheel” trophy traces its beginnings to the spring of 1870 when Akron industrialist John R. Buchtel set out for the town of Kent in search of a site to establish a college. In the muddy Ohio fields, however, his wagon became bogged down in the area where Kent State University is currently located. When horses pulled the wagon, a wheel came loose and became buried until it was discovered in 1902 during the construction of a pipeline along the Western Reserve Trail.

The wheel eventually fell into the possession of Dr. Raymond Manchester, who as the Kent State Dean of Men in 1945, suggested the local historic artifact be offered as the trophy to the winner of the annual Akron-Kent State football game. Through the 2010 game, Kent State leads the series 20–19–1 in Wagon Wheel games. Dating to 1923, Akron leads the all-time series on the gridiron, 30-21-2.

The PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge matchup begins Oct. 8 when the UA Zips and the KSU Golden Flashes meet in women's volleyball at Akron's James A. Rhodes Arena.

Other fall competition includes an Oct. 21 women's soccer game at Kent State's Zoeller Field; the men's and women's MAC cross country championships on Oct. 29 (hosted by Ball State in Muncie, Ind.); a Nov. 11 volleyball match at KSU; and a Nov. 12 football game at UA's InfoCision Stadium – Summa Field.

“College athletics is built on strong rivalries, and we're fortunate to have one of the closest in the country with Akron,” Kent State director of athletics Joel Nielsen said. “We're very appreciative of PNC's support of the Wagon Wheel Challenge – this model has worked very well with other schools and it can only help grow this rivalry and make it even stronger.”

IMG College, the sponsorship and multi-media rights holder for both Akron and Kent State athletics negotiated the PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge, and terms of the agreement will not be made public.

The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (www.pnc.com) is one of the nation's largest diversified financial services organizations providing retail and business banking; residential mortgage banking; specialized services for corporations and government entities, including corporate banking, real estate finance and asset-based lending; wealth management and asset management. Follow @PNCNews on Twitter for breaking news, updates and announcements from PNC.

PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge - Rules and Qualifying Sports:

Each of the fifteen (15) sports will be worth one (1) point. For a school to be the winner of The PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge, it must accumulate at least eight (8) points.
The point is awarded to the team that wins the season series in the head-to-head competition.
If the teams play head-to-head once in a given season (e.g. football), then the school that wins will receive the point.
All regular season games count toward the season series tally (including if non-conference games are played) with the school that wins more games (e.g., winning two of three in softball) receiving the point. If teams split the regular season matchups (e.g., in basketball), then each team receives a one-half (½) point for that sport.
For men's and women's cross country, golf and indoor/outdoor track and field, one point is awarded to whichever school finishes higher in the MAC Championship for each of those sports. (For these sports, no other competitions – in-season or post-season – will count toward the series).
MAC and/or NCAA Tournament games can count toward determining the season series winner (e.g., the schools split the two regular season meetings in basketball and then plays in the MAC Tournament, whichever school wins that game is awarded the point).
In the event of a 15-sports season tie, the school that won the trophy the
previous year will retain possession. (If there is a tie in the first year, then the
schools will share the trophy).

2011-12 Akron-Kent State Matchups (chronological):

Women's Volleyball - All head-to-head matches (Oct. 8 and Nov. 11)
Women's Soccer - All head-to-head matches (Oct. 21)
Men's Cross Country - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (Oct. 29)
Women's Cross Country - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (Oct. 29)
Football - Head-to-Head (Nov. 12)
Women's Basketball - All head-to-head matches (Jan. 14 and Feb. 25)
Men's Basketball - All head-to-head matches (Jan. 21 and March 3)
Men's Indoor Track and Field - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (Feb. 24-25)
Women's Indoor Track and Field - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (Feb. 24-25)
Women's Golf - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (April 27-29)
Men's Golf - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (May 4-6)
Men's Outdoor Track and Field - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (May 10-12)
Men's Outdoor Track and Field - MAC Championship Result (highest finish) (May 10-12)
Baseball - All head-to-head matches (TBA)
Softball - All head-to-head matches (TBA)

Copyright 2011 The Suburbanite. Some rights reserved

Return to Top



News Headline: The Best Deal in Football? Score Some Major College Tickets (Carr) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Finance.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Maybe the labor fight between the NFL's billionaire owners and millionaire players left a bad taste in your mouth. Maybe the league's average ticket price of $76 is just too much. But whatever the reason, you feel you deserve a deal on football. How about major college football? Your Sundays will be free and your wallet will want to say rah-rah!

Season tickets for some schools in the NCAA's top tier, the Football Championship Subdivision, cost the same as dinner for two at a coffee shop. The big-time college season starts Thursday (Sept. 1), so you'll get an extra week's jump on the pros, too.

Kent State charges as little as $30 for an entire season of six home games, plus parking. To put that into perspective, the average New England Patriots fan pays $117.84 for one ticket to one game, according to CNNMoney.com. Western Kentucky also charges a mere $30, followed by New Mexico State and Florida International at $44 and Eastern Michigan at $45, according to Rivals.com. They are the recession-tackling darlings of the 120 FCS teams.

Granted, Kent State isn't exactly a gridiron juggernaut. Despite playing in the relatively weak Midwestern Athletic Conference, they've finished with 5 wins and 7 losses two seasons running. But the Golden Flashes still play at the same official level as college football's elite, and we're betting that they're a lot nicer than that naughty University of Miami.

"I don't think a lot of our season ticket holders realize how pricey other schools are," Kent State ticket manager Joe Carr told DailyFinance.

The northeastern Ohio university likes to point out that its in-state and conference rival, Akron, charges three times as much for season tickets, and Akron won just one game last year. Kent State's marketing often targets local street fairs to get the word out about its ticket value, Carr said. The strategy seems to be working: The school more than doubled its season-ticket base from 600 in 2009 to 1,350 in 2011.

"Our goal is to make affordable family prices, but on the same level, if we had a better record, I'm sure we could sell more tickets," Carr said.

At the other end of the gridiron spectrum, Ohio State receives a nation-high minimum $2,107 for season tickets (including donation), according to Rivals.com. The Buckeyes were followed by Notre Dame ($1,740), Wisconsin ($1,294), Michigan ($925) and Auburn ($665).

However, a DailyFinance StubHub search revealed that you can get a single season of Ohio State tickets, without owning them in perpetuity, for $660. A single season of Notre Dame was available for $1,100.

What's Notre Dame done lately anyway? Go Kent State!

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU Flashes in classes Monday (Hazell, Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Despite a challenging away opener against the
Alabama Crimson Tide in Tuscaloosa this Saturday,
Flashes Head Coach Darrell Hazell will not
hold practice tomorrow, the first day of classes
at Kent State University.
Coach Hazell has told his team they'd better
be in the classroom Monday.
“These young men are students and I want
them to know that attending classes is important,”
Coach Hazell said. The coach did add he's
scheduled a brief practice today and then will resume
full blown practices Tuesday.
It was an impressive nod to academics, the
coach making his remarks at last Thursday's Kent
Area Chamber of Commerce Scholarship Luncheon
held under a tent at the south end of Kent
State's football stadium. His purposeful tone reminded
me of Gary Waters, the coach who in the
late 1990s and early 2000s, lifted the Kent State
basketball program up several notches.
The luncheon itself was a classy event, its net
proceeds going to the Chamber's scholarship program
for Roosevelt High School students.
Cooked up by Tom Kleinlein, executive associate
athletic director, and Lori Wemhoff, executive
director of the Chamber, the luncheon let guests
watch the Flashes practice up close and on the
field before retiring to the tent to dine.
Guests were seated at tables for eight. Sponsored
tables each included one member of the
coaching staff that Coach Hazell has assembled.
It was a nice way for those in business in the
area and the Flashes to mix it up and get to know
one another.
Coach Hazell spoke of his team as a family
whose members look out for one another.
His salute to the classroom was supported by
KSU Athletic Director Joel Nielsen, who noted
that the grade-point average of all students involved
in intercollegiate athletics is higher than
the grade-point average of the overall KSU student
body.
Combine that with last year's women's gymnastics
team reaching the national finals, Dustin
Kilgore's winning a national wrestling title, plus
KSU having won since 1994 five men's Mid-American
all-sports Reese trophies and seven women's
Mid-American all-sports Jacoby trophies and one
cannot help but appreciate the solid intercollegiate
athletics program Kent State has.
Nielsen gave plenty of credit to his predecessor,
Laing Kennedy, who retired a year and a half
ago after 16 years as athletic director, but the current
athletic director sounds just as determined
to keep standards high.
What a great start to the upcoming season that
begins Saturday with the contest against the
always highly ranked Alabama Crimson Tide, a
team coached by KSU alumnus Nick Saban, who
played for the Flashes when Don James and the
“James Gang” had those great teams in the early
1970s and the Flashes regularly drew more than
20,000 spectators

Return to Top



News Headline: Candidates vie for Akron City Council (Hardy) | Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Warsmith, Stephanie
News OCR Text: Aug. 28--Four people have represented Akron's Ward 8 on City Council in the past three years.

Bob Keith stepped down in January 2009 to become council clerk and was replaced by Raymond Cox, who lost to Sandra Kurt in the November election. Kurt resigned in March of this year to take a seat on Summit County Council. Phil Montgomery then agreed to serve as a place holder to let the voters decide whom they want as their next council person.

The three Democrats vying for the seat in the Sept. 13 primary promise to bring stability to a seat that has lacked it. They include two candidates with familiar names -- Akron school board member James Hardy and Marilyn Keith, wife of Bob Keith -- and Ed Muse, a longtime Akron attorney who is the former law partner of Summit County Executive Russ Pry.

"I don't have any aspirations to move on," Muse said. "I'd stay there until they kicked me out."

Ward 8 is one of four Akron wards with contested council races in the primary, a number down significantly from 2009, when all 10 ward seats had competition. The wards with competition this year -- 2, 6, 7 and 8 -- each have interesting matchups but for different reasons. The winners of the primaries will face a second round of competition in the Nov. 8 general election.

All of the primaries are on the Democratic side of the ballot.

Races in Wards 1, 9 and 10 will be decided in November without contested primaries. Council members for Wards 3, 4 and 5 face no competition in either election.

Ward 2

Voters in Ward 2 might feel a sense of deja vu when they see the ballot this year.

They have the same lineup as 2009, with Dominic Basile again challenging Councilman Bruce Kilby.

Basile, who came within 47 votes of unseating Kilby in their first bout, is hoping to emerge victorious in the rematch. Basile, Summit County's deputy fiscal officer, said he's running for the same reasons as in 2009: Residents aren't happy with the service they're getting from Kilby.

"They are not getting returned phone calls," said Basile, 34, who has worked for the county for 16 years. "They are not getting any types of services ... It's just been bad."

He criticized Kilby for not filing an objection with the state to the recently approved plan to open another topless club in the Brittain Road/Tallmadge Avenue area.

"It wasn't done," Basile said. "It just sailed on through."

Basile thinks his public service would be valuable, as would his ability to work with people. He said he would have meetings for different sectors of the community, like retirees, and would put out an annual or semiannual report.

Kilby, 60, who has represented the ward for 6› years and previously served in Ward 10, said voters don't need to make a change to get the service they want.

"I pride myself on returning phone calls," said Kilby, who doesn't have a second job. "I tell everyone, 'I'll try.' "

Kilby said he was aware of the plans for the topless club. He said he checked with the prosecutor and found out the owner had no criminal record, which meant the state would have no reason to deny the license.

"I didn't object because there was nothing to object to," he said, adding that he has helped get other clubs closed in the ward.

Kilby said he's a councilman who will "stand up for the people." He pointed to two recent times he helped residents fight plans for multifamily developments near Vane and Sorin avenues.

"I helped protect the neighborhood," he said. "I'm not taking all the credit. I'm proud of how the people banded together."

Ward 6

The Ward 6 race could be called a battle of the Bobs.

In fact, first-time candidate Bob Hoch calls himself "the other Bob" on the campaign trail, tipping his hat to Councilman Bob Otterman, who has 41 years of public service at the city, county and state level.

"I can't say anything bad about Bob," said Hoch, 61, a retired manager for Acme. "He's been around a long time. He's worked for the 6th Ward residents."

Still, Hoch thinks he would bring "a new energy" to the job and "look at things differently." He said his biggest concerns are maintaining the needed levels of police, fire and other services and addressing Akron's debt.

"We don't want it to get out of control," he said.

Both the Bobs have lifelong ties to Ellet and attend the same church.

Otterman, though, who returned in 2009 to serving Ward 6, where he got his political start, said he doesn't know Hoch well and hasn't seen him at many community events. He sees his years of political experience, including as a state representative and at-large councilman, as an asset. He also said he is retired and able to devote his attention solely to the needs of the ward.

"I like it," said Otterman, 79. "I enjoy working with people."

As chairman of the Health Committee last year, Otterman required that a meeting be held every week until the concerns of Akron Health Department workers over the merger with the Summit County Health District were answered. He said he thought the employees, particularly the nurses, "needed someone out front" on the issue.

Ward 7

Two community activists are challenging Councilwoman Tina Merlitti, whom they say hasn't been responsive enough to the needs of the ward.

Merlitti's opponents are Donnie Kammer, a Realtor who started the Firestone Park Neighborhood Watch, and Mayceo Smith II, pastor of the City of Joy Life Enrichment Center, 906 E. Tallmadge Ave., and a business consultant for AT&T. He also started a Unity in the Community event, the second being held Saturday.

"I want to make sure I'm at every single meeting and am more visible in the community," said Kammer, 36. He said he has "a proven record of helping residents" and would quit his real-estate job if elected.

Similarly, Smith, 32, said he would stop working for AT&T if he won the seat. He said he decided to run after a friend of his brother was robbed.

"I think we need people willing to do the dirty work -- to go out and be in contact with people, more than in the campaign season," he said.

Smith said residents have complained about not getting calls back from Merlitti or being told to call the city's 311 information line.

Merlitti, 45, who has been on council since 2006, said she always asks residents who call her whether they have already called the 311 line, so that she can get the service request number and find out what has been done.

"I'm just asking if they've called, so I can make sure we're not duplicating things," said Merlitti, who is Summit County Executive Russ Pry's executive assistant.

Merlitti, who is council's vice president and chairs the Budget and Finance Committee, as well as serving on numerous other boards, thinks she's quite visible in the community.

"I feel like my experience is what puts me ahead of my opponents," she said. "I have the connections and know how to access those."

David Reymann, who has run for council numerous times, dropped out of the Ward 7 race after Merlitti filed a complaint against him that is pending with the Ohio Elections Commission. The Summit County elections board will post notices that he has withdrawn at polling sites and add them to absentee voters' envelopes.

Ward 8

The three candidates applied when the seat opened up earlier this year. They hope whoever is elected will stop the revolving door.

"I believe we are losing our footing on council and its focus," said Keith, a longtime Akron teacher who helped her husband when he served on council. She also leads the Northwest Akron Block Watch Association.

"We are at a tipping point," she said.

If elected, Keith, 58, a second-grade teacher at Case Elementary, said she would retire at the end of the coming school year to devote her time to council. She said she wants to be accessible to address residents' concerns, which she has heard a lot about going door to door.

Hardy, 27, an Akron school board member for six years and special assistant to the Kent State University Board of Trustees, also wants to improve communication with voters by being reachable by phone, email, Facebook and Twitter. He said he would hold monthly meetings and office hours in different parts of the ward.

"Through social media and office hours, I would be available anytime they need me," he said.

Muse, 47, an attorney for 22 years, has served as village solicitor for local communities like Peninsula, drafting legislation and advising local government officials.

"In terms of dealing with it on a firsthand basis, that's something the other candidates don't have," said Muse, who pointed out he would be the only attorney on council.

Stephanie Warsmith can be reached at 330-996-3705 or swarsmith@thebeaconjournal.com.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: Marsh appointed to Kent State Board of Trustees | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Gov. John Kasich has appointed Richard H. Marsh of Akron to serve on the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Marsh's term is from July 27 through May 16, 2020.

Kent State's Board is composed of 11 members who are appointed by the governor of the state of Ohio, with the advice and consent of the state senate. Trustees, with the exception of two student trustees, are appointed to nine-year terms of office.

Marsh served as senior vice president and chief financial officer of FirstEnergy Corp. He retired from FirstEnergy in July 2009 after 29 years with the company. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst and also holds a Certificate in Management Accounting.

He currently serves as chair of the Summa Health System Board of Directors. In addition, Marsh serves as a board member of the Kent State University Foundation and chairs the Distribution Committee of the Sisler McFawn Foundation. He received a Bachelor of Arts from Kent State, as well as a Master of Arts and Master of Business Administration from the University of Akron.

Marsh replaces Andrew Banks, chairman and CEO of Mid-America Consulting Group, who completed his term in May.

The Board of Trustees is the governing body of Kent State.

Return to Top



News Headline: Warren Acquires 5-Acre 'Game Changer' Site | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WARREN, Ohio -- Warren Redevelopment and Planning Corp.'s acquisition of nearly five acres along the Mahoning River could be a "game changer" for development downtown, officials said Thursday.

Mayor Michael O'Brien, safety director Doug Franklin, and Anthony Iannucci, WRAP executive director, held a news conference to announced that WRAP, which acts as the development agency for downtown, paid $375,000 for 4.9 acres where the former Martin Chevrolet dealership once operated.

"This acquisition is the beginning of future development along West Market Street," O'Brien said. The land consists of 22 parcels on what is known as "the peninsula," a pocket of land on the north and south sides of West Market Street bordered by the river.

The land is vacant, O'Brien said, noting that the buildings that housed the dealership were razed years ago. "This particular site has an enormous and tremendous amount of potential," he said.

The goal is to clear the land, remove fencing and then introduce several measures that could facilitate development in this part of the city paid for with private dollars, Iannucci said.

Among those measures are the completion of a feasibility study, extension of downtown design guidelines to this area, creation of a new zoning overlay, extension of the Community Reinvestment Area, and seeking proposals from potential private developers.

Iannucci said that the city has attempted to acquire the property for six years, based on the recommendations of a design study completed by Kent State University that called the land "perhaps the most important site for new development downtown."

The site is attractive for a mixed-use development that could include townhouses, condominiums, office space, entertainment and small retail shops, Iannucci said. "It's a game changer when you talk about development downtown," he said. "It's a blank slate. What can go on there is just about anything."

He added that the area, which overlooks the Mahoning River, provides a great view of the amphitheater and Perkins Park on the other side.

Iannucci said that the city was concerned that the property would be sold off piecemeal to several buyers, thus preventing a cohesive development strategy for the site. "It was just too big of a parcel to let go," he commented.

The executive director of WRAP said that incentives and controls could be in place within a year, and requests for proposals could be out soon thereafter. Iannucci also said that the city is interested in acquiring other nearby parcels.

A Phase I environmental study was completed at the expense of the owner, as was demolition of the buildings, O'Brien said. The city will pay Paul Martin Inc. $375,000 in installments of $75,000 a year at 0% interest, he reported. The money would come from community development block grants.

O'Brien expressed confidence that a developer will come on board, citing WRAP's recent acquisition of two vacant landmark downtown buildings now being redeveloped by private entities.

National Fire Repair purchased the former Showcase Books building on Courthouse Square and plans to invest $600,000 to renovate the structure. More recently, the Chesler Group acquired the building next door where the Raymond J. Wean Foundation pledged to invest $2.5 million in renovations and will set up its new offices.

Franklin, poised to take office in January as the next mayor, said that he shares the vision of O'Brien and Iannucci. "There's been a lot of hard work put into this," he said, "so I'm very happy we've sealed this deal today. I think it means a lot for the future of downtown Warren."

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State University names interim dean of College of Business Administration | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 9:11 am, August 26, 2011

Kathryn S. Wilson, an economics professor at Kent State University, has been named interim dean of the university's College of Business Administration.

Kent State said Dr. Wilson's appointment is effective Oct. 1 for approximately one year or until a permanent dean is in place.

Dr. Wilson, who received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, has been a faculty member at Kent State since 1996. Her research focuses on issues related to poverty and inequality, with publications on social mobility, educational attainment, school financing, disability and teen pregnancy.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU to get $1 million to attract students to math, science | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will receive a $1 million grant to help attract students into teaching high school science and math education.

The grant, awarded by the National Science Foundation, will help fund KSU's Robert Noyce Scholars Program, which is part of the federal STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) program meant to aid America's long-term job creation efforts.

“In order to create the jobs of tomorrow, we must make a strong commitment to science and math education for our children,” said U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, who helped secure the grant. “Investing in STEM education now ensures that a whole new generation of Americans will be prepared to lead the world in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Ultimately, these investments are all about helping America remain a leader in innovation and ensuring our children are positioned for success, and Kent State University is helping to lead the way.”

KSU's Noyce Scholars Program trains students to become qualified teachers of high school mathematics and science through completion of the Master of Arts in Teaching initial licensure program. The program attracts freshmen and sophomores to education through the summer Upward Bound program. Juniors and seniors are offered internships in programs that conduct research on secondary school student learning in science and math.

The program also provides full scholarships for about 50 recently graduated STEM majors and returning STEM professionals to engage in an intensive graduate program qualifying them as teachers of secondary science and mathematics.

Beyond the training of teachers, the program impacts an area with a severe shortage of STEM educators.

Return to Top



News Headline: Job help, networking events: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Center for Corporate and Professional Development, Breakfast Briefing: 8 to 10:30 a.m. at Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Suite 200, 1309 Euclid Ave. in Cleveland's PlayhouseSquare District. Free. To register, go to tinyurl.com/3r5o7ej or call 330-672-8698.

Return to Top



News Headline: Longer, hotter heat waves in store for California (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: YubaNet
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: State's aging population raises projected heat-related deaths

SACRAMENTO August 26, 2011 - California can expect more frequent and more dangerous heat waves in the coming decades, the result of global warming and the state's aging population, according to a new climate-modeling study commissioned by the California Air Resources Board.

Researchers using a new, more comprehensive weather-modeling method found that the incidence of prolonged hot spells – those lasting 10 or more days – could rise by a factor of two to ten by the 2090s, depending on the region.

"Along with reducing our climate-warming emissions, we need to prepare for longer and hotter heat waves," Board Chairman Mary Nichols said. "Raising public awareness of the risks and having safety nets such as community cooling centers can greatly reduce those risks.

Currently, an average of about 500 elderly people die from excessive heat each year in the nine major urban areas studied: Fresno, Los Angeles, Oakland, Santa Ana, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco and San Jose. By the 2090s, the death toll within this population group could rise more than nine-fold – to a range of roughly 4,700 to 8,800 – depending on the climate scenario, according to the study.

A warmer climate plays a role, but as much as 75 percent of the projected increase in potential heat-related mortality is attributed to demographics. The elderly are particularly vulnerable to extreme heat, and the proportion of Californians 65 and older is expected to continue growing at unprecedented rates well into the 21st century.

Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University geographer who led the study, said the analysis is the first to include demographic factors in predicting changes in California's heat-related deaths. Also, the projections are based on stronger climate modeling techniques than those he used in a 2006 preliminary analysis for the ARB. The latest model, for example, accounts for a fuller suite of weather conditions that affect how the human body responds to heat -- cloud cover, dew point, wind speed, among other variables – making it a better predictor of potential heat-related deaths.

The researchers recommend that California take preventative actions, such as setting up extreme heat warning system at weather forecast stations statewide and a heat-health task force in every major city to coordinate and update safety plans.

The study is available at: http://www.arb.ca.gov/newsrel/2011/HeatImpa.pdf

Return to Top



News Headline: State: Death toll to rise from warming | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Orange County Register - Online
Contact Name: Pat Brennan, science, environment editor
News OCR Text: Average global temperatures in 2010 tied 2005 for the warmest year since records began in 1880. Redder areas show temperatures above the 20th century average, bluer below, and white nearly the same. Courtesy NOAA.

A warming climate and an aging population will bring a rise in heat-related deaths over coming decades in California, a new, state-sponsored study says, with heat waves rising in dangerousness as well as frequency.

Heat spells lasting 10 days or more could rise two to 10 times by 2090, the study's estimates show, while the number of heat-related deaths among people 65 and older could rise by nine times — between 3,526 and 8,800 for the nine urban areas studied, up from an average of 500 today.

“The frequency of heat waves is expected to go up, and it could be rather dramatic,” said Laurence Kalkstein, a co-author of the study at the University of Miami who studies how climate affects plants, animals and humans in a field known as bioclimatology.

The increases in heat-related deaths are among the highest for Orange and San Diego counties and lowest for Oakland and San Francisco, the projections show.

Much of that can be attributed to greater population growth in the south, although differences in climate effects for the two regions also is a likely factor.

The report, by Kalkstein and lead author Scott Sheridan, a geographer at Kent State University , used two climate models, three socio-economic scenarios and multiple projections of population levels to make a range of estimates.

The range is meant to account for uncertainties in the rate of globalization, control of greenhouse gas emissions and technological changes, among other factors.

It even attempts to estimate how heat-related death rates could differ depending on whether Californians become more acclimated to the heat or not.

Under a medium-population-growth scenario, for example, yearly deaths in the nine urban areas studied could range from 3,526 to 7,371 by the 2090s if people are better able to acclimatize; if they're not, the range goes up to 4,684 to 8,757.

The increase is substantial even if Orange County residents get used to a warmer climate: from 27 deaths per year in the 20th century to 294 to 602 at century's end.

The scientists also estimated heat-related deaths with no increase in population, which still yielded a significant rise for all nine regions — between 1,074 and 2,051.

They used detailed computer models of climate and weather patterns, as well as historical weather data, to make the estimates; the study will eventually be published in a scientific journal, Kalkstein said.

But the multiple ranges reflect unknowns in both future climate effects and how people will deal with them.

“We have to surmise that the climate is going to change as these models indicate,” he said. “That is not certain. But if it does, then there are clearly going to be more heat-related deaths.”

The researchers recommended putting a heat warning system into place in California, along with task forces in each major city to coordinate safety plans.

The California Air Resources Board commissioned the $191,553 study to better understand potential climate effects, and help guide creation of new air-quality measures, said spokesman Dimitri Stanich.

“It will encourage more public education on how to protect yourself from heat exposure, and to encourage a better outreach system,” he said.

Latest posts: is a post from: OC Science

Return to Top



News Headline: Environment News Service (ENS) (Sheridan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Environment News Service - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: California Warned to Prepare for Hotter, More Deadly Heat Waves SACRAMENTO, California, August 28, 2011 (ENS) - California will be subject to more frequent and more dangerous heat waves that will kill thousands of elderly people each year, finds a new climate-modeling study commissioned by the California Air Resources Board.

As a result of global climate change and the state's aging population, researchers using a new, more comprehensive weather-modeling method found that hot spells lasting 10 or more days could rise 10-fold by the 2090s.

Sunset in Tustin, California, August 22, 2011 (Photo by Altus)

"Along with reducing our climate-warming emissions, we need to prepare for longer and hotter heat waves," said Board Chairman Mary Nichols. "Raising public awareness of the risks and having safety nets such as community cooling centers can greatly reduce those risks."

Currently, an average of 500 elderly people die from excessive heat each year in the nine major urban areas studied: Fresno, Los Angeles, Oakland, Santa Ana, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco and San Jose.

By the 2090s, the death toll within this population group could rise to a range of roughly 4,700 to 8,800, depending on the climate scenario, according to the study.

A warmer climate plays a role, but as much as 75 percent of the projected increase in potential heat-related mortality is attributed to demographics.

The elderly are particularly vulnerable to extreme heat, and the proportion of Californians 65 and older is expected to continue growing at unprecedented rates well into the 21st century.

Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University geographer who led the study, and co-principal investigator Laurence Kalkstein of University of Miami, say the analysis is the first to include demographic factors in predicting changes in California's heat-related deaths.

Senior couple on a San Diego beach (Photo credit unknown)

Also, the projections are based on stronger climate modeling techniques than those Sheridan used in a 2006 preliminary analysis for the Air Resources Board.

The latest model accounts for a fuller suite of weather conditions that affect how the human body responds to heat - cloud cover, dew point and wind speed, among other variables - making it a better predictor of potential heat-related deaths.

"The public is generally under-educated about the dangers of extreme heat and heat waves," say the researchers. "Because of this, many of the most vulnerable people are unaware of the risks associated with excessive heat events or of the proper steps to take to reduce their risk to heat exposure, and are uninformed about the locally funded assistance that is available to them, such as cooling shelters or water trucks."

The impacts of heat on human health actually transcend the climate change issue, as heat is already the major weather-related killer in the United States," the researchers say, pointing out that many communities around the country already have sophisticated heat mitigation plans in place.

These include public education and increased interaction between stakeholders, politicians, and the local National Weather Service office.

"We strongly recommend that systems like these are developed for every weather forecast office in California, irrespective of the impacts of climate change," say Sheridan and Kalkstein.

The researchers recommend that California set up extreme heat warning system at weather forecast stations statewide and organize a heat-health task force in every major city to coordinate and update safety plans. Click

here to read the full study, "A Spatial Synoptic Classification Approach to Projected Heat Vulnerability in California Under Future Climate Change Scenarios."

Return to Top



News Headline: Virginia earthquake felt by Ohio residents, too (Palmer, Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: reports

An earthquake in Virginia reached as far away as Northeast Ohio, as many residents turned to each other shortly before 2 p.m. on Aug. 23 and asked, "Did you feel that?"

"Our dispatch center had around 15 calls come in regarding the earthquake," said Mark J. Rehs, communications manager for the city of Cuyahoga Falls. "The dispatchers working noticed the train monitor (40 inch LCD screen on a pedestal) shake a bit. I heard what I thought was a truck pulling into the top bay of the Fire Station, but I assumed it was just that until I realized we actually had a tremor."

Both Cuyahoga Falls and Silver Lake officials said they did not receive any reports of damage in connection with the earthquake.

Dr. Donald Palmer, a geology professor at Kent State University, said it is not unusual for waves to be felt many miles from the center of an earthquake. The waves, he said, start at the epicenter of an earthquake and radiate outward.

"It's kind of like when a pebble is thrown into a pond and you see the waves radiate out," he said. "Effectively, what you're getting is the vibrations as they radiate out from the center of the quake."

Madge Fitak of the Ohio Geological Survey said vibrations from the 5.9-magnitude Virginia earthquake were felt up and down the East Coast.

FirstEnergy Corp. spokeswoman Jennifer Young said there had been no reports of problems at the state's three nuclear power plants, but ground movement was felt at the Perry nuclear plant near Cleveland and a walkthrough was being conducted.

Kent State University Spokesman Bob Burford said parts of the Kent campus library and White Hall were evacuated.

"I've been on campus 20 years and I can't remember anything like this happening," he said.

In Cleveland, the Indians and Seattle Mariners were in the first game of a double header when the press box above home plate and the third-base line moved left and right and some fans headed toward the exits. Play was not interrupted at Progressive Field, and the Indians reported no structural damage.

"I thought it was the wind. I know the stadium is made to move, but I didn't know what was moving it," said fan Tim. "A lot of people got up and were like 'We're out of here.'"

Return to Top



News Headline: Virginia earthquake shakes up Ohio, too (Palmer, Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: reports

An earthquake in Virginia reached as far away as Northeast Ohio, as many residents turned to each other shortly before 2 p.m. on Aug. 23 and asked, "Did you feel that?"

Dr. Donald Palmer, a geology professor at Kent State University, said it is not unusual for waves to be felt many miles from the center of an earthquake. The waves, he said, start at the epicenter of an earthquake and radiate outward.

"It's kind of like when a pebble is thrown into a pond and you see the waves radiate out," he said. "Effectively, what you're getting is the vibrations as they radiate out from the center of the quake."

Madge Fitak of the Ohio Geological Survey said vibrations from the 5.9-magnitude Virginia earthquake were felt up and down the East Coast.

In Hudson, several people called the police station to report the tremors, but no damage was reported, according to a police spokesperson. Callers said they thought they were supposed to call the police to notify them, but police remind residents they don't have to unless there's a problem.

City offices received several calls but no reports of damage, according to Hudson Communication Manager Jody Roberts. One company reported items were knocked from shelves, and another reported a swaying chandelier.

The tremor was felt at Town Hall, but not by all in the building, according to Roberts.

"Some people felt it and others, just across the room, did not," she said.

Roberts said she was parking her vehicle at Town Hall at the time of the earthquake when the car started shaking.

"I thought someone was playing a trick on me by shaking the back of [the car], but no one was there," she said. "Then when I went inside all the people from upstairs had come downstairs because of the shaking. That's when I found out it was an earthquake."

Joe Daltorio, pastor of the River of Life Community Church on Stow Road, said he knew it was an earthquake as soon as he felt it. He was in his truck at the Wendy's Restaurant on Darrow Road when he noticed his truck shaking from side to side.

He said he spent a year in Costa Rica as a missionary and was exposed to several earthquakes, the biggest one measuring 7.6 on the Richter Scale.

"Costa Rica was paradise, except for the earthquakes," Daltorio said.

Across Ohio, no damages or injuries were reported in the first minutes after the quake, said Kelly Blackwell, spokeswoman for the Ohio Emergency Management Agency.

FirstEnergy Corp. spokeswoman Jennifer Young said there had been no reports of problems at the state's three nuclear power plants, but ground movement was felt at the Perry nuclear plant near Cleveland and a walkthrough was being conducted.

Kent State University Spokesman Bob Burford said parts of the Kent campus library and White Hall were evacuated.

"I've been on campus 20 years and I can't remember anything like this happening," he said.

In Cleveland, the Indians and Seattle Mariners were in the first game of a double header when the press box above home plate and the third-base line moved left and right and some fans headed toward the exits. Play was not interrupted at Progressive Field, and the Indians reported no structural damage.

"I thought it was the wind. I know the stadium is made to move, but I didn't know what was moving it," said a fan. "A lot of people got up and were like 'We're out of here.'"

Return to Top



News Headline: Virginia earthquake shakes up Ohio; locals report feeling tremors (Palmer, Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From staff

and Associated Press reports

An earthquake in Virginia reached as far away as Northeast Ohio, as many residents turned to each other shortly before 2 p.m. on Aug. 23 and asked, "Did you feel that?"

Dr. Donald Palmer, a geology professor at Kent State University, said it is not unusual for waves to be felt many miles from the center of an earthquake. The waves, he said, start at the epicenter of an earthquake and radiate outward.

"It's kind of like when a pebble is thrown into a pond and you see the waves radiate out," he said. "Effectively, what you're getting is the vibrations as they radiate out from the center of the quake."

Madge Fitak of the Ohio Geological Survey said vibrations from the 5.9-magnitude Virginia earthquake were felt up and down the East Coast.

No damages or injuries were reported in the first minutes after the quake in Ohio, said Kelly Blackwell, spokeswoman for the Ohio Emergency Management Agency.

In Stow and Munroe Falls, police said no damage or injuries were reported.

Stow Police received six calls shortly before 2 p.m. from people who were curious about what was happening. One woman reportedly called because a chandelier in her house was moving.

FirstEnergy Corp. spokeswoman Jennifer Young said there had been no reports of problems at the state's three nuclear power plants, but ground movement was felt at the Perry nuclear plant near Cleveland and a walkthrough was being conducted.

In downtown Ravenna, office workers evacuated Riddle Block 1 at the corner of East Main and South Chestnut streets. The building is owned by Portage County and houses workers from Job and Family Services, the Public Defender's Office and Adult Probation, among others.

Portage County Public Defender Dennis Lager said the building started shaking at 1:54 p.m. and was felt on every level of the building. Workers voluntarily left and stood on the Portage County Courthouse lawn.

"We assumed it was an earthquake," he said.

Kent State University spokesman Bob Burford said parts of the Kent campus library and White Hall were evacuated.

"I've been on campus 20 years and I can't remember anything like this happening," he said.

In Cleveland, the Indians and Seattle Mariners were in the first game of a double header when the press box above home plate and the third-base line moved left and right and some fans headed toward the exits. Play was not interrupted at Progressive Field, and the Indians reported no structural damage.

"I thought it was the wind. I know the stadium is made to move, but I didn't know what was moving it," said fan Tim . "A lot of people got up and were like 'We're out of here.'"

Return to Top



News Headline: State's higher education plan prompts concerns about YSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland and his chancellor of higher education, Eric Fingerhut, rolled out the University System of Ohio several years ago, we gave our support because there was a clear understanding of how Youngstown State University would fit into the scheme, and what was expected of YSU and the community at large to meet the goals established by the Ohio Board of Regents.

In other words, the 14 public universities and colleges in Ohio were all participants in the university system.

Democrats Strickland and Fingerhut are now gone, replaced by Republican Gov. John Kasich and Republican Chancellor Jim Petro. Eight months in office and Gov. Kasich has put his stamp on higher education in Ohio. On Aug. 11, Petro, former state attorney general, unveiled the Enterprise University Plan, which charts a new course for higher education. According to a statement released by the chancellor's office, the plan allows the state's public universities and colleges to be “free from mandates which stifle efficiency and innovation.”

But there's a price to be paid for shedding the mandates: The institutions would have to give up some of the money they now receive from state government.

“Ohio's universities are a driver of economic development in the state,” Petro said during the unveiling. “By allowing our universities to be free from mandates and operate as an enterprise of the state, Ohioans gain increased efficiency, effectiveness, and competitiveness that will help drive our 21st Century economy.”

Legislation will be required to put the Enterprise University Plan in motion, which means there should be committee hearings in the General Assembly.

In the spirit of political bipartisanship that Gov. Kasich has advocated, we would hope that the Republican majority in the House and Senate would give the Democratic minority an opportunity to fully explore what Petro has laid out.

This is especially important to regions like the Mahoning Valley, which is served by Youngstown State.

The overarching question that warrants a clear answer is this: What will happen to the open admission, urban university that is designed to make higher education accessible to as broad a segment of the population as possible? A large number of YSU students are the first in their families to seek a college degree.

While the very large universities, such as Ohio State and Cincinnati, are excited about shedding mandates, including the one that eliminates the statutory enrollment limits for them and Bowling Green, Kent State and Miami, we wonder what effect that would have on an institution like YSU.

Branch campuses

We have long challenged the notion of having Kent State's two-year branch campuses scattered throughout the region served by YSU, and now wonder abut the removal of the enrollment caps.

The plan would also give boards of trustees more authority than they now have, which raises the issue of transparency. We understand the need to allow universities to “drive economic development through innovation,” as Petro put it, but a one-size-fits-all strategy will not work. Ohio is too diverse and the higher education needs of the population too varied.

Institutions like YSU have an important role to play, and we will be watching closely to see how that role is defined in the Kasich administration's plan for higher education in Ohio.

Return to Top



News Headline: Valley counting on high-tech jobs for future | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA —

Tuscarawas County officials are pinning their hopes for the area's economic future on jobs in the research and high-tech industries.

And they believe the oil and gas boom that has reached eastern Ohio will have a major impact on the county's economy, as well.

County business and political leaders have devoted time and money over the past decade in developing the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park in New Philadelphia to expand the area's economic base.

“We want to market and sell ourselves as a research and high-tech development area,” said Commissioner Jim Seldenright.

With the launching of Gov. John Kasich's JobsOhio economic development program, inquiries from businesses looking to locate in the state will be funneled through the not-for-profit corporation to specific regions in Ohio.

Seldenright said Tuscarawas County originally was included in the southeastern region, where the emphasis is on agriculture and mining. County officials lobbied instead to be included in the northeastern region, known as Team NEO. “That fits in with our long-term plan to develop research and high-tech jobs,” he said.

But he emphasized that commissioners still appreciate the importance of agriculture and mining to the county economy.

The tech park is not the only project under way to bring new industry to the county. Another is redevelopment of the former Ohio Department of Transportation facility on West High Avenue in New Philadelphia. The property is owned by the Tuscarawas County Port Authority.

Harry Eadon, port authority executive director, said the buildings have been taken down at the 7.8-acre site, and work has begun on the environmental cleanup.

Eadon said there are chemicals of concern in the soil and volatile organic compounds in the groundwater about 30 feet down under the site. Both are being analyzed. The agency is working to secure an $826,000 Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund grant to pay for cleanup.

Once that process is completed, the port authority will either develop the site or sell it to a developer. “The goal is to return the property to active use,” Eadon said.

The oil and gas boom, meanwhile, has the potential to greatly change the area, said Commissioner Chris Abbuhl. “There's no question that we sit on top of a very rich oil and gas formation,” he said, which could bring “billions of dollars” into the region.

Beyond the money pumped into the area by royalties from oil and gas wells, the county could benefit from spin-off businesses created by oil and gas production, Abbuhl said.

He noted that both Kent State Tuscarawas and Buckeye Career Center in New Philadelphia are working on programs to train workers for the industry.

Eadon said a team has been put together to determine the impact the boom will have on Tuscarawas County and to try and be prepared for it. Members are Eadon, Scott Robinson, president of the Tuscarawas County Chamber of Commerce; Gary Little, executive director of the Community Improvement Corp.; and George Reymond, director of the Tuscarawas County Community and Economic Development department.

One potential concern is that the county may not have enough buildings available for all of the businesses that might want to locate here, Eadon said.

“We got an inquiry yesterday for a 15,000- to 25,000-square-foot building on 25 acres in Tuscarawas County. We have very few options for them. We don't have many buildings that aren't already filled,” he said.

If there is no space available to meet their needs, businesses will go elsewhere, Eadon said.

“We need to start making decisions now,” he said, noting that shell buildings might need to be constructed. “That's what our challenge is now — how to do that financially and how much of a risk we're willing to take as an area.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Programs aim to reverse tech job shortage | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Bucyrus Telegraph-Forum - Online
Contact Name: Holly Richards
News OCR Text: From left, Chad Thornsley, of Coshocton, and Mike McIntyre, of Cambridge, listen to part-time instructor Al Law explain the instruction manual for an AC drive. Thornsley and McIntyre are in the multicraft industrial technology class, instructed by Dan Marion at the Mid-East Career and Technology Center's Adult Center for Education. / Trevor Jones/Tribune

COSHOCTON -- As he looked over an AC drive, Chad Thornsley hoped to gain skills and knowledge to make him an in-demand tech employee.

"I was a truck driver for nine years, and I want to find a job closer to home," the Coshocton resident said. "I want to be able to get a factory job and have knowledge and skills so I can be valuable."

Thornsley began taking classes at Zanesville's Mid-East Career and Technology Center's Adult Center for Education in May and is set to graduate from the Multi-Craft Industrial Technology program in April 2012.

As technology continues to transform, Thornsley hopes the lessons and hands-on training he has received with programmable logic controllers, variable frequency drives, wiring schematics and other technology facets will culminate in a job in the field.

Because technology is ever-evolving and improving, not all the bugs have been worked out. Employment trends are on two spectrums -- tech jobs are out there but finding a skilled work force to fill them can be a challenge, or the reverse, in which the students and graduates are qualified but cannot find jobs in the field.

"I've seen no movement either way, except that SOTA Technologies just closed," said Carol Remington, executive director of the Coshocton County Chamber of Commerce. "A lot of companies have their own tech people. I occasionally hear, 'I could use a tech person but can't find one,' but not much of it. These are high-demand jobs, but we don't have high-technology businesses to draw people here."

Careerbuilder.com lists 13 Information Technology openings within 29 miles of the city in a search for "Coshocton." They include IT managers and specialists, certified surgical techs, inventory management routing supervisors, technical analysts and software engineers. Wages are not specified in most of the job postings.

Dice.com, a tech jobs search site, lists 21 technology positions in a search for "Coshocton." Most of the jobs, such as system administrators, designers and engineers, are based in Canton and Wooster. Other positions, including IT specialists, programmers, analysts and engineers, are available in Mount Vernon, Granville and Newark. Market and competitive pay rates are listed for most of those jobs.

"We're hearing in this region that there will be an increase in demand for skills in fields like IT, electrical mechanical and electrical engineering," said Melanie Bolender, administrator of the Coshocton campus of Central Ohio Technical College. "Most of those classes are offered in Newark, but students can start here.

"Some of the feedback we've heard from students is they feel well-prepared," she said. "Some have to look outside of Coshocton, but others have been able to find jobs here. We're hearing the state will emphasize certificate programs that are shorter -- about six to nine months like with technology. This is so people can get the skills they need quickly, they will be immediately applicable and they will be of value when job searching."

Thomas Nelson, instructor of digital media design at COTC, said it has become difficult for students to find tech-specific jobs in the area, but the more common practice is to take classes to add skills to already existing jobs.

"We constantly have companies calling us up to see if their employees can update their skills with us," he said. "I've worked together with a lot of businesses in the area like Roscoe Village and the Chamber (of Commerce) to collaborate on projects that give students real-world experience."

Students also can take courses at the Coshocton County Career Center. People enrolled in the IT Tech Prep Electronics program can take advantage of dual-enrollment, dual-credit options through the Kent State University-Tuscarawas School of Engineering Technology.

The classes include exact or similar content to their college counterparts, and students can earn up to 16 semester credit hours at Kent State upon high school graduation.

"It will assist our electronics students to move more quickly into their chosen fields of study, as well as allow them to explore both electronics and engineering careers," said Debbie Kapp-Salupo, career center superintendent. "We feel confident of our ability to fill the local IT industry void because of this new addition to our curriculum."

hrichards@coshoctontribune.com; (740) 450-6772

Return to Top



News Headline: Programs aim to reverse tech job shortage | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Coshocton Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Holly Richards Staff Wr
News OCR Text: COSHOCTON -- As he looked over an AC drive, Chad Thornsley hoped to gain skills and knowledge to make him an in-demand tech employee.

"I was a truck driver for nine years, and I want to find a job closer to home," the Coshocton resident said. "I want to be able to get a factory job and have knowledge and skills so I can be valuable."

Thornsley began taking classes at Zanesville's Mid-East Career and Technology Center's Adult Center for Education in May and is set to graduate from the Multi-Craft Industrial Technology program in April 2012.

As technology continues to transform, Thornsley hopes the lessons and hands-on training he has received with programmable logic controllers, variable frequency drives, wiring schematics and other technology facets will culminate in a job in the field.

Because technology is ever-evolving and improving, not all the bugs have been worked out. Employment trends are on two spectrums -- tech jobs are out there but finding a skilled work force to fill them can be a challenge, or the reverse, in which the students and graduates are qualified but cannot find jobs in the field.

"I've seen no movement either way, except that SOTA Technologies just closed," said Carol Remington, executive director of the Coshocton County Chamber of Commerce. "A lot of companies have their own tech people. I occasionally hear, 'I could use a tech person but can't find one,' but not much of it. These are high-demand jobs, but we don't have high-technology businesses to draw people here."

Careerbuilder.com lists 13 Information Technology openings within 29 miles of the city in a search for "Coshocton." They include IT managers and specialists, certified surgical techs, inventory management routing supervisors, technical analysts and software engineers. Wages are not specified in most of the job postings.

Dice.com, a tech jobs search site, lists 21 technology positions in a search for "Coshocton." Most of the jobs, such as system administrators, designers and engineers, are based in Canton and Wooster. Other positions, including IT specialists, programmers, analysts and engineers, are available in Mount Vernon, Granville and Newark. Market and competitive pay rates are listed for most of those jobs.

"We're hearing in this region that there will be an increase in demand for skills in fields like IT, electrical mechanical and electrical engineering," said Melanie Bolender, administrator of the Coshocton campus of . "Most of those classes are offered in Newark, but students can start here.

"Some of the feedback we've heard from students is they feel well-prepared," she said. "Some have to look outside of Coshocton, but others have been able to find jobs here. We're hearing the state will emphasize certificate programs that are shorter -- about six to nine months like with technology. This is so people can get the skills they need quickly, they will be immediately applicable and they will be of value when job searching."

Thomas Nelson, instructor of digital media design at COTC, said it has become difficult for students to find tech-specific jobs in the area, but the more common practice is to take classes to add skills to already existing jobs.

"We constantly have companies calling us up to see if their employees can update their skills with us," he said. "I've worked together with a lot of businesses in the area like Roscoe Village and the Chamber (of Commerce) to collaborate on projects that give students real-world experience."

Students also can take courses at the Coshocton County Career Center. People enrolled in the IT Tech Prep Electronics program can take advantage of dual-enrollment, dual-credit options through the Kent State University-Tuscarawas School of Engineering Technology.

The classes include exact or similar content to their college counterparts, and students can earn up to 16 semester credit hours at Kent State upon high school graduation.

"It will assist our electronics students to move more quickly into their chosen fields of study, as well as allow them to explore both electronics and engineering careers," said Debbie Kapp-Salupo, career center superintendent. "We feel confident of our ability to fill the local IT industry void because of this new addition to our curriculum."

Return to Top



News Headline: PORTAGE PATHWAYS: Space crunch had KSU scrambling 75 years ago | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The fastest growing university in the nation was expecting another record-breaking enrollment as the start of the school year neared in 1936.

Kent State, which had achieved university status a year earlier, was expecting 1,800 students to report for classes. That would be 600 more than were enrolled just two years earlier.

"Literally every inch needed for classroom space" had been pressed into service, the Kent Courier-Tribune reported, and Saturday classes were scheduled to ease crowding during the weekdays. "Every available room in buildings on campus has been made ready to handle the increased enrollment."

Crowded classrooms were only half the problem, however.

Blanche Verder, the dean of women, had an even bigger headache: There were far more young women ready to start classes than rooms to accommodate them.

As August 1936 ended, Dean Verder made a plea to the community for housing.

"We are in need of more rooms, especially for freshmen women," she told the Courier-Tribune. "We are looking for appropriate rooms within a mile of the university, which is a convenient walking distance."

Between 30 and 40 rooms were needed for the fall semester, which began in late September.

The two women's dormitories, Lowry Hall and Moulton Hall, had been filled weeks earlier. "There are waiting lists so long ... that we have quit adding additional names," Dean Verder said.

The only alternative was to seek lodging for the young women in private homes, which wasn't an uncommon practice in Kent. Because KSU had no dormitories for men, many residents with a spare bedroom or converted attic opened their homes to students in exchange for room and board payments.

Dean Verder had placed advertisements in area newspapers, including the Courier-Tribune, seeking housing. Because students could only room in homes approved by the university, she and her assistant, Jeanne Parrish, were personally inspecting prospective housing sites.

Students weren't the only ones looking for a place to live. The university had added 15 new faculty members and they were finding housing in short supply, too.

With enrollment expected to increase by at least 300 students, the Courier-Tribune urged Kent residents to do their part to ease the housing crunch. "A good many citizens not accustomed to offering rooms will need to do so in order to alleviate the situation," it editorialized.

Kent State's shortage of housing and classrooms was a long-standing issue, one that had grown worse in the 1930s. While enrollment was booming, construction on college campuses in Ohio had come to a standstill because of the Depression. Kent State's budget for building expansion in 1935-36 was only $975.

University officials had no choice but to resort to makeshift accommodations. A smoking lounge on the ground floor of Merrill Hall became a recitation room for journalism students. A gymnasium in Science Hall was converted into classroom space. The entire music department was moved to a rented home at Main and Sherman streets.

While Dean Verder was scrambling to locate beds for co-eds, university trustees discussed long-range plans for dealing with increased enrollment, which they projected would top the 2,000-student mark within two years.

They agreed to seek state funding for five new construction projects. In addition to dormitories, the wish list included science and fine arts buildings, a student center and presidential residence. The science building ranked first on the list, with the dormitories second.

Students began registering for classes on Sept. 21, with the largest freshman class in Kent State's history -- about 900 first-year students -- reporting to campus.

"Hundreds of new students stood in line for hours awaiting their turns at registration," the Courier-Tribune reported. "University officials sat behind closed doors attempting to devise a plan for additional classrooms to handle the expected 1,800 or 1,900 students."

When registration was complete, 1,837 students were enrolled at Kent State. That was more than double the number of students on campus a decade earlier.

Dean Verder apparently was successful in obtaining lodging for her charges, and classes proceeded as scheduled in the locations pressed into service.

Kent State's enrollment exceeded 2,000 students just a year later, and 400 more were on campus for the 1938 year. By then, relief was in sight. Funding was approved to add onto Lowry Hall and to build a new dormitory, a three-story structure named in honor of President James O. Engelman. A new science building, which would be named for John McGilvrey, Kent's founding president, also was funded.

Blanche Verder retired in the early 1940s, before Kent State was hit with another surge of enrollment fueled by the returning veterans of World War II. That led to a new round of dormitories being built in the 1950s; one of those was Verder Hall, which opened in 1956 -- 20 years after its namesake went door-to-door inspecting housing for Kent State women.

Return to Top



News Headline: WIPO ASSIGNS PATENT TO KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "FAST-SWITCHING SURFACE-STABILIZED LIQUID CRYSTAL CELLS" (AMERICAN INVENTORS) | Email

News Date: 08/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GENEVA, Aug. 29 -- Publication No. WO/2011/102892 was published on Aug. 25.

Title of the invention: "FAST-SWITCHING SURFACE-STABILIZED LIQUID CRYSTAL CELLS."

Applicants: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (US).

Inventors: Liang-Chy Chien (US), Volodymyr Borshch (US) and Jeoung-Yeon Hwang (US).

According to the abstract posted by the World Intellectual Property Organization: "A surface polymer-assisted vertically aligned (SPA-VA) liquid crystal (LC) cell has a surface alignment layer of surface localized polymer nano spikes capable of controlling the pretilt angle of liquid crystal molecules and ensuring fast switching characteristics. The deposition of the polymer nanospikes as a part of the alignment layer is achieved by polymerizing a small amount of a reactive monomer in vertically aligned liquid crystal with or without an applied voltage. Due to the alignment of liquid crystal molecules by the surface alignment layers, the polymerized polymer acts as an internal surface to modify and control the field-induced reorientation of the liquid crystal molecules. The SPA-VA LC cell realizes a stable alignment and the considerable advantage of the formation of polymer spikes via UV irradiation on both substrates of the cell. Furthermore, the switch-off of a SPA-VA is fast due to the enhanced surface anchoring strength by the surface-localized polymer nano spikes."

The patent was filed on Feb. 15 under Application No. PCT/US2011/000275.

For further information please visit: http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/ia.jsp?ia=US2011/000275

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: Lawmakers still leery of Kent plan to finance fix (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some fear building fee would set precedent

Some of the lawmakers who must give Kent State University the final OK to borrow $210 million for a slew of campus upgrades aren't sold yet on the school's proposal to finance the construction plan with a new student fee at a time when the cost of higher education continues to escalate.

Gaining approval from the State Controlling Board, an oversight body made up of six legislators and an appointee of the governor, is the last of many hurdles Kent State must overcome before proceeding with a $250 million renovation and construction plan on its main campus in Kent.

All parties involved agree the renovations are needed as the university has more than $300 million in deferred maintenance. But coming to a consensus on how to pay for the plan is proving trickier than anticipated.

Approving the measure, lawmakers said, could open the floodgates for other state universities to impose steep fee hikes for capital investments — something Kent State president Lester Lefton isn't convinced would happen. Such fees typically are imposed for buildings such as stadiums or student unions, but not for academic buildings, as Kent State proposes.

“Converting student fees on this scale to capital improvements is problematic,” said state Sen. Tom Sawyer, a Democrat on the controlling board who represents Kent State's district. “To run a policy change of this magnitude through the controlling board is, by itself, a concern for a number on the board.”

Kent State had planned to go to market with the bond sale this summer and start renovations this fall. But the disagreement between Kent State officials and lawmakers has set the already-delayed plan back even further.

“This has to happen eventually,” Dr. Lefton said. “It's a matter of when. We're not asking the state for money. It would be very different than if we said we needed $100 million from the state of Ohio.”

Fears of a precedent

While Kent State maintains that its fees and tuition are lower than many other colleges and universities, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle aren't eager to tack more charges on to students' bills, particularly after the Legislature approved allowing colleges to hike tuition by 3.5%.

“I believe if students have that kind of money, they should buy their own home or invest in Ohio some other way rather than invest in the mortgage of Kent State,” said state Rep. Chris Widener, a Springfield Republican serving on the controlling board.

Lawmakers are concerned the new fee Kent State is advocating could set a dangerous precedent for special fees that other schools could follow, ultimately driving the cost of the state's public colleges and universities even higher.

“There are other universities that will come in with similar stories or examples that they should be exempted as well,” said state Rep. Jay Hottinger, a Newark Republican also on the board. “We don't operate in a vacuum. This is not just a Kent State issue.”

Kent State faced similar pushback when the former head of the Ohio Board of Regents, Democrat Eric Fingerhut, stonewalled the proposal because of the fee, which the university would phase in over the next few years; it would add $20 per credit hour when fully implemented in fiscal 2016, which begins July 1, 2015.

The university seemed to catch a break when Gov. John Kasich appointed Jim Petro, a Republican, to head the Board of Regents; Mr. Petro soon thereafter threw his support behind the proposal.

A spokeswoman for Mr. Petro said he was still behind the proposal.

Only one lawmaker on the controlling board — state. Rep Clayton Luckie, a Democrat from Dayton — told Crain's he supported the measure, and only Rep. Widener said definitively that he would vote no. Republican state Rep. John Carey from Wellston wouldn't comment, and state Sen. Shannon Jones, a Republican from Springboro, didn't return repeated calls for comment.

Testing the water

Discussions among lawmakers, the Kasich administration and Kent State officials are ongoing, as all interested parties want to ensure the proposal has enough support before coming up for a vote.

“I suggested to (Kent State officials) that they find out what level of support is out there, and if that request needs to be modified, it makes no sense to bring it forward,” said Randy Cole, whom Gov. Kasich appointed as president of the controlling board in March.

Mr. Cole, who also has a vote, wouldn't comment on whether he supported the proposal.

Dr. Lefton said further delays could add to the cost of the construction initiative as buildings continue to deteriorate and the bond market becomes more challenging. Those additional dollars, Dr. Lefton said, would be added to the $75 million in interest costs the university already planned to stomach after Mr. Fingerhut blocked the proposal and a federal stimulus initiative known as the Build America Bonds program expired; that program would have lowered the university's interest expenses on bonds issued for the construction effort.

Dr. Lefton said the university could manage the debt if the new student fee wasn't part of the construction plan, but ultimately investments in academic areas would suffer because the money would need to come from somewhere and the university already took a $13 million hit in the latest state budget.

“(Lawmakers) want to keep quality high, but they can't keep cutting the budget to the bone,” Dr. Lefton said.

Return to Top



News Headline: New KSU students discover Kent (Crawford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: They say first impressions are the most important and the longest to last. If that is true, then the incoming freshmen at Kent State University got the red carpet treatment during this year's Discover Downtown event Saturday thanks to the collaborative efforts of the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce and Main Street Kent.

There was an impressive increase over the estimated 2,000 students who attended the event last year. This year, students arrived via trolley over a four-hour span. Kent's newest residents were dropped off at the corner of Water and Main streets and pointed in the direction of East Main Street, where nearly 20 businesses set up booths, in addition to the Main Street businesses.

“It was truly a great event all the way around,” said Lori M. Wemhoff, executive director of the chamber. “The whole idea for this event is to bring the students downtown and show them what we have to offer them as a community.”

Mayor Jerry Fiala echoed that sentiment.

“Kent is their home for the next nine months, and we need to show them what we're all about,” he said. “This event is a win-win for everyone involved, the Kent business community, and the students.”

The chamber provided nearly 700 hot dogs, chips, snacks and 40 cases of water, all free to the students.

“We can't thank our members enough for their generosity with donations and discounts for the items given away, especially ACME Fresh Market and Walmart of Ravenna,” Wemhoff said. “The Celebrate Kent grant and a very generous donation by the Central Portage Visitors and Convention Bureau allowed us to purchase more giveaways this year, and the students were very grateful.”

Mary Gilbert, executive director of Main Street Kent, agreed that this year's event was bigger and better.

“Every year more businesses participate, because they understand that the students new to the area are a brand new audience for them to serve,” she said.

This year a number of businesses were first-time participants, including A Few Bucks Dollar Store and PC Surgeons, both located in the ACME Plaza.

“This was definitely worth being a part of,” said Scott McPherson, co-owner of the computer supply and service store.

Being a relatively new business in the area, Michelle Coury of A Few Bucks agreed.

“I'm glad I participated,” she said. “We gave out a lot of fliers and let the students know just how close to campus we're located.”

Andy Crawford, assistant director of KSU's Student Success Programs, was pleased with the turnout.

“This is truly a team effort that works between the university, the chamber, Main Street Kent and the local businesses,” Crawford said.

Well-established Main Streets businesses like McKay Bricker Gallery also took advantage of the increase in potential customers.

“The foot traffic and increase in sales during the event were great for us,” said owner Cass Mayfield.

Jill Chabra, owner of The Dragonfly —an embroidery and screen printing retail store that recently relocated — was amazed at the number of students downtown.

“It was great to see so many people walking along Main Street, and having them come in the store and check us out.”

Businesses just off the beaten path of Main Street, namely Acorn Alley, also benefited from the increased number of visitors to downtown.

“College students apparently love ice cream,” said Michelle Hartman, owner of the Arctic Squirrel Ice Cream Shop. “It was non-stop scooping for our entire staff all afternoon.”

Return to Top



News Headline: One pair of shoes for a year - Fashion design meets social justice | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Wilmington News Journal - Online
Contact Name: AUDREY INGRAM
News OCR Text: Three hundred sixty five days. One pair of shoes. That is the project Rita Yoder, a 2008 Wilmington High School graduate, has begun with fellow Kent State students Adrienne Langan and Casey Sandala to raise awareness and donations for children in need of shoes.

Yoder and Langan each plan to donate one pair of shoes for every day they wear theirs. They have chosen the TOMS brand for it's One for One business model — for every pair of shoes bought from TOMS, the company donates a pair of shoes to a child in need. This matching policy would allow them to donate a total of 1,460 pairs of shoes.

“This is something that's needed,” said Yoder. “Your appearance is how you represent yourself. If you don't have shoes, you can't represent yourself as well, and you're probably going to struggle. It's unfortunate, but with shoes, you can present yourself better than you could otherwise.”

According to the TOMS website, shoes also protect children from soil-transmitted diseases, a leading cause of sickness in developing countries. They also protect feet from getting cut and infected, and allow children to attend school, where shoes are required as part of the uniform.

Yoder and Langan plan to split their part of the shoe donation between two locations, Urban Vision in Akron, and Your Father's Kitchen in Wilmington.

“During the school year, kids can get UV bucks, which allows them to go to the Urban Vision store and purchase school supplies and clothes,” said Yoder. “In Wilmington, I talked to Allen Willoughby and we'd like to make Your Father's Kitchen the central hub. I'd like to talk with him a little more and find out some families who are really in need so we can personalize some of the donations.”

In order to purchase 730 pairs of shoes from Toms, the women have set a fund raising goal of $29,000.

“One thing I've noticed, even at Goodwill and thrift stores, is that there aren't a lot of shoes. Used shoes are often worn out or broken, so we want to donate new ones,” said Yoder.

So far, they have raised just less than $500. Most of those donations have come from customers at the South Street Coffee Shop, where a donation can resides. The students have also been collecting cans, and have plans to apply for one of 15 $25,000 Refresh grants from Pepsi Company. When they apply, their project and video will be placed online so people across the country can vote on it.

The project has a website, www.my-365days.com, and a Facebook page, 365 Days inspired by TOMS. Yoder plans to set up an online donation system.

“We started on July 4, but it's been hard to make progress with all of us in three different places. Adrienne and I are wearing the shoes, and Casey has designed the website, cards, photos and advertising. Now that we're all getting back to school, we're trying to get out there and get the ball rolling. We want to make the website and Facebook group more interactive. We're hoping for a snowball effect,” she said.

In addition to an online donation center, the website will feature blogs and photo updates documenting the progress of Yoder and Langan's one year with one pair of shoes.

“It's already been a very humbling experience,” said Yoder. “This past summer I worked at Camp Joy. We have rafting trips, rain, mud, and these are the only shoes I have. When it storms at night and I was out making sure cabins weren't flooding, I had to wear these shoes. When we went rafting and inevitably got wet, my feet were wet all day.

We've had campers come and only bring one pair and I never understood because prior to this I had about 50 pairs of shoes. Now I've got one and they're getting some wear and tear and I still have to make it through winter in northeastern Ohio. I'm a little worried about that, but we'll make it work,” she added with a laugh.

When they first started the project, Yoder and Langan held a garage sale to kick it off, in which Yoder got rid of 42 pairs. She says that while the eight pairs she has left are more practical, it is still more than most people have.

Yoder first learned about TOMS during her freshman year of college, when a representative came to Kent State. She and Sandala liked the idea and wanted to support it and bought their first pair of TOMS together.

“It's really satisfying to go shopping and help someone,” she said. “So often I think shopping is seen as a guilty pleasure, but when I make that purchase, I know there's a kid out there getting shoes, probably for the first time.”

The inspiration for the project came last fall, while Yoder was studying in Italy.

“We had to do a project on sustainability, and we watched a video about the fact that we need to be sustainable or we're going to run ourselves out of industry and life as we know it,” she said. “There are different aspects of sustainability, both environmental and social, and I want to focus on the social justice.”

The project started as a personal challenge to do something for a whole year.

“That's where 365 came from. Then we decided we should raise money too, and started at $365. But we decided that wouldn't be pushing ourselves enough, and we've already surpassed that,” she said. “Then we decided to have someone given a pair for everyday. It's pretty expensive, but I think that's a good goal. It will be hard to achieve, but I'm glad it's big.”

Yoder will graduate in the spring. After school, she hopes to continue to combine fashion and social justice by working with an adult education program to supply business apparel.

“Representing yourself is half the battle,” she said. “If we're supplying someone with the knowledge, we can supply with the ability to represent themselves to get a lasting job.”

For more information, and to follow the year's progress and donate online, continue to check back at www. my-365days.com. To donate in the meantime, or suggest fund raising ideas, call or email Rita Yoder, (937) 725-5321, ryoder@kent.edu; Adrienne Langan, (330) 321-3040, alangan@kent.edu; or Casey Sandala, (724) 787-8131, csandala@kent.edu.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kids books offer understanding | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Toledo Blade - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Award-winning children's books offer learning, understanding

This is one in a series of monthly reviews of books for young people written by four area teachers of children's literature. Today's are by Alexa Sandmann, professor of literacy at Kent State University.

Winners of the Robert F. Sibert Medal and the Schneider Family Book awards are announced each January at the annual conference of the American Library Association. While the intention of each award is different -- the Sibert Medal is given only to nonfiction, while the Schneider Family awards honor those who struggle with some kind of disability and may be fiction -- important understandings come from reading books in both categories. Information about diverse topics is engagingly shared in the nonfiction winners; The stories of those living with some kind of disability provide compelling connections with those whose experiences may be quite different from ours.

Schneider Family Book Awards

YOUNG CHILDREN

THE PIRATE OF KINDERGARTEN. By George Ella Lyon. Illustrated by Lynne Avril. Atheneum/Simon and Schuster. Ages 4-8. $16.99.

Ginny hadn't always worn an eye patch, but on Vision Screening Day, the nurse realizes that Ginny is seeing double. Off she goes then to the eye doctor, who says that with "exercises, glasses, and for a while, a patch," Ginny would soon only see one of everything, without having to close one eye or squint. Delighted, Ginny finds school work so much easier -- cutting, reading, and even walking to reading circle since there are no guesses about the location of the "real" chair. A charming story about difference.

MIDDLE SCHOOL

AFTER EVER AFTER. By Jordan Sonnenblick. Scholastic. Ages 8-12. $16.99.

The sequel to Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie, this time the story focuses on little brother Jeffrey instead of older brother Steven. Jeffrey, no longer the "boy with cancer" but the "teen in remission," is finding middle school challenging -- just like most middle schoolers. However, as a cancer survivor, nerve damage which impacted his ability to write and to efficiently process new information makes it that much tougher, although fellow survivor Tad makes it a heart-full journey. An insightful view of middle school.

TEEN AWARD

FIVE FLAVORS OF DUMB. By Antony John. Dial Books/Penguin. Ages 13 and up. $16.99.

Piper's challenge? Finding a paying gig for the high school rock band for which she has just become manager--and Piper is deaf. The "Five Flavors" of Dumb are the five musicians who compose the group called "Dumb," although "musician" may be generous in terms of describing their talents. Thrilled not to feel invisible, Piper explores what it means to be deaf in a hearing culture -- at home, at school, and in the wider community. This engaging read portrays the power of working things out.

Robert F. Sibert Medal Winner

KAKAPO RESCUE: SAVING THE WORLD'S STRANGEST PARROT. By Sy Montgomery. Photographs by Nick Bishop. Houghton Mifflin. Ageless. $18.

Who knew that a book about a whiskered, honey-scented, flightless, night-active, nine-pound parrot could be so captivating? Bishop's exquisite photographs surely help, but Montgomery's text, which begins, "It's hours past midnight. You'd think any self-respecting parrot would be asleep. But not Lisa," makes it a narrative hard to put down. The story of Kakapo parrots that live only in New Zealand provides convincing evidence of the need for conservation. Simply fascinating.

Honor Books

BALLET FOR MARTHA: MAKING APPALACHIAN SPRING. By Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan. Illustrated by Brian Floca. Neal Porter Book/Roaring Brook Press. Ages 10 and up. $17.99.

A behind-the-scenes look at the creation of the ballet Appalachian Spring, this picture book highlights the collaboration of Martha Graham, choreographer; Aaron Copland, composer, and Isamu Noguchi, set designer. Appalachian Spring, which debuted at the Library of Congress on Oct. 30, 1944, has become a classic, "A dance about America." The perfect pairing of story and art.

LAFAYETTE AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. By Russell Freedman. Holiday House. Ages 12 and up. $24.95.

Frenchman Lafayette's passion for the colonies' desire for independence aligned well with their own, hardly an "outsider" in the march toward the colonies' autonomy from England. This is an absorbing story of a young man's wish to do something significant with his life, not simply live as a nobleman, whether titled as a "Seigneur," "Marquis," "Baron," or "Lord," titles he had at 2 years old! Freedman's narration is supported well with period drawings, paintings, and documents in this testimony to freedom.

STORY:201108280019 http://www.toledoblade.com/Books/2011/08/28/Award-winning-childrens-books-offer-learning-understanding.html -1

JavaScript is required to view comments

Return to Top



News Headline: History Will Judge Kent's Redevelopment Efforts | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: It's easy to say that Kent's redevelopment will have a hugely positive effect on the city and Kent State University .


After all, that's the goal. To improve both by strengthening physical and political connections between both entities and create a true "college town."


But we don't know what will happen. Of course, you can look at the examples that Kent State President Lester Lefton is fond of pointing to — Ann Arbor, MI, and Ithaca, NY — and see how a vibrant college town atmosphere can be a good thing for both town and gown.


Yet we don't know if Kent will indeed transform into a similar college town — with all its seemingly magical elements — until all the projects are complete.


Over the past five days, Kent Patch has examined different aspects of Kent's redevelopment in our series Kent's Changing Landscape; Redefining a College Town . Through this series, our goal was not to say whether all this construction and planning is good or bad. Our goal was to encapsulate each element in an easy to understand manner so that you, the reader, could make that decision.


Even then, it will take years for history to judge whether the championed "$100 million makeover" proves successful in its goal. Like Kent's historic moments before now, such as the now infamous "bluegill luncheon" of 1910 or the 1970s renovation of the old Erie Depot, it will take years to judge the effect.


One project worthy of further scrutiny will be the actual, physical link to be built between downtown and campus. The Esplanade extension, as approved by the Kent State trustees in June, will see construction of a wide, sweeping pathway connecting campus with the downtown redevelopment projects.


The project itself, a $3.28 million effort, has already seen the university spend more than $3.8 million buying land since 2007 to make the extension possible. Roughly $7 million is a lot to spend on a project that will amount to little more than a very wide pathway with a few sculptures and fixed furniture along the way.


It's been likened to the yellow brick road, and it will be an interesting project to watch over the years to see if the freer flower of pedestrian and bicycle traffic between downtown and campus proves beneficial — and worth the cost.


Scroll down for our introduction and Parts 1-5 of Kent's Changing Landscape; Redefining a College Town.

Kent Remakes Itself for Next Century
Demolition of the Robin Hood is one Skyline Change
Transit Center, New Hotel to Change Downtown's Skyline
AMETEK, Davey Tree Add to Acorn Alley's Success
Kent's Courthouse, Fairchild Bridge and DuBois Property are also Changing the Landscape
Kent's Bones Broken, Remade for Generations

Return to Top



News Headline: VIDEO: Kent State Students 'Discover Downtown' | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Classes start Monday at Kent State University , so Saturday students got a chance to see all that downtown Kent has to offer.

As part of the university's " Welcome Weekend ," a four-day orientation program, students were shuttled from campus to downtown between noon and 4 p.m. Saturday.

The "Discover Downtown" trip, driven by Lolly the Trolley , dropped students off onto a closed Main Street where businesses lined the roadway with information booths.

Throughout the day, hundreds of students made the trip from campus to downtown.

Click here to view video: http://kent.patch.com/articles/video-kent-state-students-discover-downtown

Return to Top



News Headline: BOOK REVIEW: Rock's birth relived through '1950s Radio in Color' | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local West Bridgewater
Contact Name: Peter Chianca / pchianca@wickedlocal.com
News OCR Text: Christopher Kennedy's '1950s Radio in Color' spotlights the lost photos of Cleveland D.J. Tommy Edwards.

Did you know that MTV was invented in 1956? In Cleveland? As far-fetched as either of those suggestions may sound, they're borne out – in a way – by “1950s Radio in Color” (Kent State University Press), Christopher Kennedy's collection of “The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards.”

Edwards, a pioneering D.J. at WERE-AM in Cleveland, was present during the birth of rock 'n' roll, and made it a point of snapping color slides of every singer and celebrity who came through his studio. He'd then project them on the wall when he'd host a record hop – to the delight of teenagers who not only had never seen their idols in color, but in many cases had no idea what they looked like at all.

Kennedy collects more than 200 of those photos in this volume, many of them notable for their candid intimacy. There's a callow Roy Orbison, a smiling Johnny Cash (wearing brown, not black), and Elvis Presley, of course, resplendent with his pink jacket and tousled hair. There's also what many consider to be an iconic shot of Elvis and Bill Haley, sometimes credited previously to “photographer unknown.”

The visceral sense you get through Edwards' amateur lens of these legends in their prime, or just prior to entering it – from Chuck Berry to Dion to Conway Twitty – is nothing short of remarkable. And just as fascinating, maybe more so, are the photos of the one-hit wonders and other now-unknowns, captured at a moment when their careers seemed about to take off – and didn't.

Kennedy, a musician himself, deserves credit for his detective work in digging up the collection, along with the long-lost copies of Edwards' “T.E. Newsletter,” which was sort of like the first-ever music blog. Unfortunately, Kennedy's own writing tends to be hyperbolic and overblown, almost like he's channeling a melodramatic late-night D.J. It's also distractingly present-tense, which makes it easy to lose track of the career arcs being chronicled along with the photos.

Still, his narration is almost beside the point. The most compelling companion to the photographs is the first-person recollections of their subjects, and Kennedy does an amazing job of tracking many of them down. Some offer a few simple lines, and others give incredible details about rock's nascent era – for one thing, you won't believe what Charlie Louvin of the Louvin Brothers recalls his brother Ira saying to Elvis.

And in most cases, their subjects' delight at seeing these photos from their youth, photos they never knew existed, is palpable. You're likely to have a similar reaction.

Peter Chianca writes about Bruce Springsteen and other rock music topics for Gatehouse Media's Blogness on the Edge of Town.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus