Report Overview:
Total Clips (11)
Athletics (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Nursing (CON); KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Flashfleet; Sustainability; Town-Gown (1)
Institutional Advancement (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (2)
Mathematical Science; University Libraries (1)
Technology; Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (1)
Hazell, Flashes embrace depth on defense (Hazell) 09/07/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...| Staff writer The expected 100-plus degree temperatures at last weekends season opener at the University of Alabama may have inadvertently helped Kent State develop some depth on its defense for 2011. That sizzling heat never quite arrived, but because the Golden Flashes had already...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Lincoln Institute Celebrates Winners of 2011 Cleveland Design Competition 09/07/2011 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...Methodist Church on Euclid Avenue. Ideas submitted for the Cleveland Design Competition are meant to help the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, Cleveland State University, Campus International School, and schools all over the world imagine the possibilities for school facilities and advance...


College of Nursing (CON); KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
State weighs 4-year degree mandate for nurses (Lappin) 09/07/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...toward their BSN degree. Some nursing staff have obtained master's degrees as well.” He continued, “We are very fortunate to have a facility like Kent State University at Tuscarawas here in our community, which is an excellent nursing school. “Many of our staff have received their...


Flashfleet; Sustainability; Town-Gown (1)
Ride, walk event will kick off in Kent today (Mundy) 09/08/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Institutional Advancement (1)
No Brand Name for Kent State Hotel (Finn) 09/07/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

No brand name will be attached to the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center planned for downtown Kent. The Kent State Foundation Board of Directors...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Area events and upcoming concerts 09/08/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Panelists at KSU drill deep on impact of oil, gas search (Andrews) 09/07/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...“Grown in Ohio” Tour, meeting with government, economic development, education, community and business leaders to hear their concerns. The session at Kent State University at Tuscarawas lasted more than an hour and included 22 people from 10 counties, with about 30 others in the audience....


Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (2)
ChemImage Wins $1 Million to Commercialize Its Filter Technology 09/07/2011 Columbus Dispatch - Online (press release) Text Attachment Email

...knowledge that's unique to Northeast Ohio, giving our company a competitive advantage in the diverse markets that we serve." ChemImage partnered with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's first research center focused on the science of liquid crystals, when current...

ChemImage Wins $1 Million to Commercialize Its Filter Technology 09/07/2011 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...knowledge that's unique to Northeast Ohio, giving our company a competitive advantage in the diverse markets that we serve." ChemImage partnered with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's first research center focused on the science of liquid crystals, when current...


Mathematical Science; University Libraries (1)
KSU's new Math Emporium helps college students stay on track (Frank, Tonge) 09/08/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Technology; Town-Gown (1)
Public Meeting held on City's $1.5 Million 'Clean Ohio' Request 09/08/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...potentially kick start the property's redevelopment, and one idea is to develop the close to 18-acre property into a technology corridor in cooperation with Kent State University. Matt Knecht, president of HzW, said the bulk of the grant money — as much as $925,000 — would be used to fix the...


News Headline: Hazell, Flashes embrace depth on defense (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By David Carducci | Staff writer

The expected 100-plus degree temperatures at last weekends season opener at the University of Alabama may have inadvertently helped Kent State develop some depth on its defense for 2011.

That sizzling heat never quite arrived, but because the Golden Flashes had already worked out their rotations to account for the weather, they still ended up playing more than 30 defensive players. That is unheard of, said first-year head coach Darrell Hazell. And its going to play huge dividends in the future. We thought it would be a lot warmer than it was, so we had to set what we were going to do in terms of rotation on Thursday, because once you get into the heat of a game its hard to do. The deepest position group on the entire team is the defensive line, and fittingly that group saw more players rotate in and out from the sideline. Ends Lee Stalker and Mark Fackler and tackles Ishmaaily Kitchen, Roosevelt Nix and Dana Brown all finished with between two and six tackles, while highly-touted freshmen Anthony Pruitt and Richard Gray made their KSU debuts at tackle and end, respectively.

The Flashes also played several safeties and outside linebackers.

There was less rotation at the cornerback spot and at middle linebacker, where junior Luke Batton was one of the few defensive players to see action on almost every down. Luke was one of the guys who didnt come off the field, said Hazell. I think he played 72 snaps. Its hard for the Flashes to call Batton to the sideline at this stage of the young season. As a returning starter and with so little experience at the linebacking position, they need him on the field.

So far, Batton seems to be relishing his new role as the veteran his teammates turn to for guidance. I like the setting more of being a leader and having people look to me for help or advice, said Batton, who was fourth on the team with five tackles against Alabama. I think it helps me, because I need to learn more so that I can almost teach. The Flashes are still hoping for some players to much more at a few other positions, most notably on the offensive line.

KSU appears to only be comfortable playing six offensive linemen. Only six played at Alabama, with sophomore Tyler Arend the only second-stringer to see action behind starters Brian Winters at left tackle, Terrell Johnson at left guard, Chris Anzevino at center, Kent Cleveland at right guard and Josh Kline at right tackle. Arend had been a candidate to start during the preseason, when tackle Phil Huff was also identified as a linemen who could be ready if called to action. Beyond those first seven, the rest of the line is a work in progress.

Look for KSU to continue to play a large number of players when possible, especially on defense, as the season continues. Well probably play a lot of guys early in the second and third quarter, then make sure you have your guys ready in the fourth quarter, said Hazell. Contact David Carducci at dcarducci@recordpub.com; on Twitter @carducciksu; on his blog ksusportsbeat.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Lincoln Institute Celebrates Winners of 2011 Cleveland Design Competition | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Australian architect Michael Dickson of Brisbane was the winner of the $5,000 first prize in the 2011 Cleveland Design Competition: A New School Vision, which drew 92 submissions from 20 countries to imagine a new location for an international school at an infill site in downtown Cleveland.

The $2,000 second place prize was awarded to Michael Robitz, Sean Franklin and Alexandra VanOrsdale, of New York, New York. The $1,000 third place prize was shared by Drozdov & Partners Ltd. team of Oleg Drozdov, Anna Kosharnaya, Pavel Zabotin, and Andrian Sokolovsky, of Kharkov, Ukraine, and Vincent Feld, of Paris, France.

The Cleveland Design Competition is an open, single-staged design competition begun in 2007 to generate ideas for under-utilized sites in Cleveland, and showcase the potential for great urban design in the city. Past sites that have been the focus of the competition include the Irishtown Bend section, a play area in Detroit Shoreway, and a multi-modal transportation center on the lakefront.

This year, designers from all over the world were asked to submit concepts for a future home for the expanding Campus International School, currently located in the annex of the First Methodist Church on Euclid Avenue. Ideas submitted for the Cleveland Design Competition are meant to help the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, Cleveland State University, Campus International School, and schools all over the world imagine the possibilities for school facilities and advance the conversation around public education.

The winners were announced at Cleveland State University's Student Center atrium on August 19 by Armando Carbonell, senior fellow and chairman of the Department of Planning and Urban Form at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, which has supported the Cleveland Design Competition from its inception. The Lincoln Institute has for many years been engaged in Cleveland, including the production of a feature length documentary film, Cleveland: Confronting Decline in an American City. The institute's founder, John C. Lincoln, was a prominent business and civic leader in the city. Kathryn J. Lincoln, chair of the board of the Lincoln Institute, has been engaged in the Cleveland Design Competition and also serves as a member of the Group Plan Commission, which is examining ways to enhance downtown.

Five teams were also recognized as noteworthy in the 2011 Cleveland Design Competition: A New School Vision: Mason White, Lola Sheppard, Nikole Bouchard, Zoe Renaud-Drouin, Paul Christian, Fionn Byrne, of Toronto; Jedidiah Lau, of Hong Kong; the KGD Architecture team of Stephen Zuber, Carlos Coello, Courtney Boardman, Chad Smith, Ningning Shang, Leah Kleinman, Suttiruck Wongsawan, Randall Wong, and Amanda Wigen, of Rosslyn, Virginia; the Wendel Architecture team of Michael Conroe, Leanne Stepien, Giona Paolercio, Stephanie Vito, of Amherst, New York; and the Studio NU team of Athanas Fontaine, Chad Brintall, Michael Johnson, of Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Images of the winning submissions will be available starting in October at www.clevelandcompetition.com. All entries will be featured as part of a public exhibition from September 16-18 at Ingenuity Festival in Cleveland and at the Colonial Marketplace Arcade from September 26-October 29th in downtown Cleveland.

The 2011 Cleveland Design Competition Awards Jury includes Kevin Daly, AIA, Design Principal-in-Charge, Daly Genik from Santa Monica; Steven Turckes, AIA, REFP, LEED AP, K-12 Educational Global Market Leader, Perkins + Will from Chicago; David Mark Riz, AIA, LEEP AP, Principal, KieranTimberlake from Philadelphia; Amy Green Dines, AIA Associate, IIDA, Chair, Art + Design, College of Architecture and Design at Lawrence Technological University; Edward Schmittgen, Executive Director of Capital Planning and University Architect, Cleveland State University; Linda J. Williams Ph.D., Senior Director of Educational Services, WVIZ/Ideastream and former superintendent.

Other partners included the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, which is the combined home of Kent State University's graduate program in urban design and the public service activities of the Urban Design Center of Northeast Ohio, the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, Cleveland State University, Campus International School, Vocon, Westlake Reed Leskosky, Bustler, and the Colonial Marketplace Arcade.

The Lincoln Institute of Land Policy is a leading resource for key issues concerning the use, regulation, and taxation of land. Providing high quality education and research, the Institute strives to improve public dialogue and decisions about land policy.

Return to Top



News Headline: State weighs 4-year degree mandate for nurses (Lappin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photo courtesy of Union Hospital n Union Hospital nurses Shelly Cochran of Navarre and Monica Scott of New Philadelphia work on a central-line catheter. Talks are under way to pass a state law by 2015 that would require registered nurses to earn a bachelor's degree.

For some major Ohio hospitals, a two-year degree for registered nurses no longer is sufficient. But don't look for Tuscarawas County's two hospitals to follow suit.

The Dayton Daily News reported last week that, for the past two years, hospitals in the state have placed a greater emphasis on hiring nurses with bachelor's degrees. Talks are under way to pass a state law by 2015 that would require registered nurses to earn a bachelor's degree within 10 years.

Officials at Union Hospital wouldn't support such legislation.

“Union Hospital would be opposed to enacting legislation requiring nurses to have four-year degrees,” said Carey Gardner, the hospital's director of development and community relations. “That would limit our flexibility in hiring staff and could make some very skilled, excellent nurses unavailable to the hospital.”

The hospital hires nurses with two-year and four-year degrees.

“We encourage all staff to further their education as a way to continuously improve quality of care,” Gardner said. “Many RNs have obtained their BSN (four-year) degrees working for Union Hospital, using the hospital's tuition-reimbursement benefit that helps nurses pay their tuition charges as they work toward their BSN degree. Some nursing staff have obtained master's degrees as well.”

He continued, “We are very fortunate to have a facility like Kent State University at Tuscarawas here in our community, which is an excellent nursing school.

“Many of our staff have received their training in this program and contribute to the high quality of care Union Hospital provides.

“The nursing shortage is expected to continue in the coming years as the aging baby boom generation demands increasing amounts of health care. Thus, the KSU program will continue to be very important to meeting this community's health care needs in the future.”

Officials at Trinity Hospital Twin City hold similar views.

“I understand and appreciate the desire for more educated nurses,” said Tui Wanosik, interim chief nursing officer and manager of the medical/surgical unit. “However, in my opinion, there is not always a correlation between higher education and quality of patient care. Compassion cannot be taught.

“This hospital has a history of hiring nurses based not only on the skills required to take care of patients, but also upon certain ideals that reflect our hospital's values.

“We have a mixture of nurses with degrees ranging from diploma nurses to nurses with BSNs. Locally, I believe we will see more nurses with BSNs because of the program at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.”

Currently, Kent State Tuscarawas offers a two-year degree with the opportunity for registered nurses to return and get a bachelor's degree after they have received their license, said Joan Lappin, director of nursing at Kent State Tuscarawas. The nursing program has been in existence since 1969.

Nurses seeking a BSN can take classes at the New Philadelphia campus or take online classes from the Kent campus, she said.

“We know facilities are looking for nurses with bachelor's degrees, and we support that additional education,” she said. “But the associate degree is so important to a large number of people who want to be nurses.”

Doing away with associate degree programs would create a shortage of nurses, Lappin said.

Kent stresses to its students that nursing is something that requires lifelong learning because things are constantly changing in the field, she said.

“What we support is that if you do not have a bachelor's degree, you would be required to get one within 10 years of graduation,” she said. “That would give bedside nurses more education, but the students who are becoming nurses could get a job and support their families.”

Kent State Tuscarawas has 80 students entering its nursing program this year and 91 students finishing their second year. Twenty-five students are working on earning their bachelor's degree in a program that began in 2010.

One student has already earned a bachelor's degree through the program, Lappin said.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ride, walk event will kick off in Kent today (Mundy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new event aimed to
bring together Kent State
University and the City of
Kent will kick off today.
The event, “Let's Take A
Ride/Walk,” which is organized
by the student organization
One Kent, is inviting
students, faculty and staff
to meet at the Kent State
Student Center at 11:30 a.m.
and follow the Esplanade
into the city, ending at The
Kent Stage.
Twenty-five Flashfleet bicycles
will be available to
ride with a FlashCard, a free
lunch along with coupons
for shops in downtown Kent
will be given out and students
will receive 500 Flashperk
points.
“The idea is to get students,
faculty and staff, primarily,
in the mindset to
walk or bike from campus
to downtown Kent, especially
with the planned Esplanade
connection that
will be happening within
the next year,” said Marty
Mundy, co-chair of the Community
Outreach Subcommittee
of the KSU Sustainability
Task Force at Kent
State. “This is the first time
we're doing this. It's possible
it could become an annual
event.”
Once downtown, a representative
from Acorn Alley
II, downtown Kent's new
shopping center being developed,
will talk about the
incoming shops. Kent's environmentally
friendly Dr.
GreenBee shop will also give
a presentation on “A Day in
the Life of a GREEN College
Student.”

Return to Top



News Headline: No Brand Name for Kent State Hotel (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: No brand name will be attached to the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center planned for downtown Kent.


The Kent State Foundation Board of Directors recently chose to build the hotel as an independent operation rather than partner with a national hotel chain.


Whether the hotel would be connected to a large brand — and to which one — has been the subject of debate and negotiations for the past several months between the Kent State Foundation and its partner in the project, Columbus developer The Pizzuti Companies .


Gene Finn, executive director of the Kent State Foundation and vice president for institutional advancement, said the foundation board decided to go independent for a number of reasons.


"One, having a flag would not permit us to name the hotel as we wanted – The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center," Finn said in an email.


The partners had most recently been in talks with two different potential brands for the four-story, 95-room hotel, which is expected to carry a price tag of between $15 million and $16 million.


Finn said a franchise agreement with a hotel chain would have locked the foundation into a 10-year contract that could have cost as much as $250,000 a year.


"Both of which were problematic as far as the board was concerned," he said. "It is important to understand that the hotel will be managed by a professional hotel management company and will have a national reservation system. By going this route, we will be able to have a hotel that is more boutique in style and Kent State branded, all of which is important to the foundation, the city and the university."


A groundbreaking ceremony for the hotel and 300-seat conference center is scheduled for Sept. 19 at the construction site near the intersection of Erie and South DePeyster streets in downtown Kent.

Return to Top



News Headline: Area events and upcoming concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Poynter KSU Media Ethics Workshop
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 15.
Tattoos, jerseys, scandal and secrets
mean more in today's headlines than
ever before and at the Poynter Kent
State Media Ethics Workshop, top
sports journalists and ethics professionals
will discuss all of the “Foul Play”
happening in athletics at the
collegiate and professional levels. Location:
Kent State University, Franklin
Hall, Kent.

Return to Top



News Headline: Panelists at KSU drill deep on impact of oil, gas search (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Lee Morrison
News OCR Text: Concerns about protecting the water supply and long-term impact of a natural gas and oil drilling boom in the Tuscarawas Valley region dominated discussion Wednesday during a rural development roundtable held by U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown.

Brown, D-Avon, made the third stop on his “Grown in Ohio” Tour, meeting with government, economic development, education, community and business leaders to hear their concerns. The session at Kent State University at Tuscarawas lasted more than an hour and included 22 people from 10 counties, with about 30 others in the audience.

“Protecting our water and the environment are the top issues we're always hearing,” said Tuscarawas County Commissioner Chris Abbuhl.

He said that state officials always point to laws enacted under Ohio Senate Bill 165 as providing some of the nation's strongest enforcement tools.

“Nothing is 100-percent guaranteed,” Abbuhl said. “We want to be cautious, so that nothing is missed.”

Brown asked New Philadelphia Mayor Michael Taylor, a fellow Democrat, what he's hearing when meeting with other mayors in the region about mining's potential impact on city services.

“There is an underlying fear of ‘What will we look like in 10 years?' ” Taylor said.

He said, “there are a lot of good things now” with the money paid to property owners for signing a lease and company employees paying to stay in area motels and buy food and fuel.

“The concern is that there's not enough history in this to know what it will be like 10 or 15 years from now,” Taylor said.

Brown asked Harrison County Engineer Rob Sterling about the wear and tear on roads. Sterling and Tuscarawas County Engineer Joe Bachman each have met with drilling company officials about road maintenance agreements. Sterling said that Chesapeake Energy Corp. has been good to work with and has paid to help keep roads in shape or even improve them.

When Brown asked about the weight of the trucks, Sterling said the most pressing issue is the number of trips involving hauling water for the fracking process. He said up to six million gallons of water can be used per well, with hundreds of trips involved over a period of a few weeks.

Brown said his mission is “to protect the groundwater and, as much as is possible, to see that the created wealth stays in the area.”

The senator wants to do what he can to help ensure that job training is available for workers associated with the drilling industry.

Abbuhl praised efforts by officials at Kent State-Tuscarawas and Buckeye Career Center who are looking at training opportunities that could be put in place.

“Obviously, the drilling boom also can be a valuable economic benefit for our county,” he added.

When Brown asked about the impact on local businesses, Jo Sexton, director of the Guernsey County Chamber of Commerce, said a coalition has formed there to update business and government leaders and others about opportunities. The 68 members meet each month. She said that issues regarding leases and the environment are separate matters to discuss by other organizations.

“They need local suppliers, they're not moving in self-contained,” she said of the drilling operations.

Not all of the session focused on oil shale development.

The “Grown in Ohio” title ties in to Brown being chairman of the Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Jobs, Rural Economic Growth and Energy. The Senate is starting efforts on the 2012 Farm Bill, and Brown stressed that among the many aspects of the legislation is that it must be used for rural development.

Abbuhl strongly agreed. He read a list of projects that have received millions of dollars combined that would not have been possible without the boost provided through federal funding.

“Because of budget constraints, there are a lot of questions about what will be cut and how much,” Abbuhl said, alluding to recent action on the federal debt ceiling and spending reductions.

“We want to stress what is important to Tuscarawas County and some of the things we've been able to achieve because of federal funding through various programs and how we utilize them. Funds have been used for water and sewer projects, roads and other infrastructure work. Federal funds have been used to leverage obtaining other funds. We want to be sure we can continue to receive federal dollars to be able to do the projects that are crucial for our county,” he said.

The Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Jobs, Rural Economic Growth and Energy that Brown serves on as chairman “is responsible for job creation in rural communities and the continued development of renewable fuels and clean energy technologies that support rural America,” he said, which covers more than half of Ohio's 88 counties.

Brown stressed that access to broadband Internet service will be a key to growth. He said former U.S. Rep. Zack Space, D-Dover, helped secure federal funds to expand the availability of Broadband throughout the Appalachian region. He has also credited Space's role in obtaining federal funds for clean energy development in the region. Brown has said that Ohio could become a clean-energy capital in the nation.

Additionally, Kent State Tuscarawas Dean Gregg Andrews talked about the Knowledge-Based Economic Development approach to attracting high-tech skills to the county. He has worked with the county Community Improvement Corp. to develop the nearby Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park in New Philadelphia.

Return to Top



News Headline: ChemImage Wins $1 Million to Commercialize Its Filter Technology | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online (press release)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By: ChemImage via GlobeNewswire News Releases

PITTSBURGH, Sept. 7, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChemImage announced today that it is one of six companies selected to receive up to $1 million in funding from the Ohio Third Frontier Advanced Materials Program, a program devoted to accelerating the development and growth of the advanced materials industry in Ohio. The award will be used to establish a manufacturing facility for its patented multi-conjugate filter (MCF) technology.

Based on liquid crystal technology, these unique tunable filters are the key component of the company's hyperspectral imaging instrumentation used to characterize the material composition of samples crossing multiple industries.

"The assistance we receive from Ohio Third Frontier will be an important step in establishing ChemImage in an area of Ohio that's well established in the liquid crystal community," said Dr. Thomas Voigt, Executive Vice President of ChemImage & Head of Imaging Technology. "Our new manufacturing facility will make the best use of this knowledge that's unique to Northeast Ohio, giving our company a competitive advantage in the diverse markets that we serve."

ChemImage partnered with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's first research center focused on the science of liquid crystals, when current liquid crystal vendors could not meet their technical requirements.

The Ohio Third Frontier Award will allow ChemImage to continue its collaboration with the Liquid Crystal Institute and establish a permanent manufacturing facility for ChemImage Imaging Technologies in Northeast Ohio, with about twenty jobs expected within the next two to five years of operation.

In addition to its Ohio expansion, ChemImage launched Gateway Analytical, an analytical testing company, last fall in Gibsonia, Pa.

For more information on ChemImage's filter technology, hyperspectral imaging instrumentation or software, visit the company's website at www.chemimage.com.

Suzanne Cibotti

Sr. Marketing Communications Specialist

Phone: (412) 241-7335, ext. 291

About ChemImage

ChemImage Corporation, a leader in hyperspectral imaging technology (i.e., molecular chemical imaging), provides instrumentation, software, contract services and expert consulting to government, industrial and academic organizations. The company's proprietary, state-of-the-art Hyperspectral Imaging technology has many applications, including defense, security, pharmaceuticals, forensics and biomedical diagnostic research, which can reveal critical chemical and biological information from a variety of material systems.

ChemImage's headquarters are located in Pittsburgh, Pa., where it houses research and development laboratories, as well as engineering and manufacturing facilities.

This information was brought to you by Cision http://www.cisionwire.com

The following files are available for download:

wkr0001.pdf ChemImage_OhioFrontierAward

Return to Top



News Headline: ChemImage Wins $1 Million to Commercialize Its Filter Technology | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2011
Outlet Full Name: San Francisco Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PITTSBURGH, Sept. 7, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ChemImage announced today that it is one of six companies selected to receive up to $1 million in funding from the Ohio Third Frontier Advanced Materials Program, a program devoted to accelerating the development and growth of the advanced materials industry in Ohio. The award will be used to establish a manufacturing facility for its patented multi-conjugate filter (MCF) technology.

Based on liquid crystal technology, these unique tunable filters are the key component of the company's hyperspectral imaging instrumentation used to characterize the material composition of samples crossing multiple industries.

"The assistance we receive from Ohio Third Frontier will be an important step in establishing ChemImage in an area of Ohio that's well established in the liquid crystal community," said Dr. Thomas Voigt, Executive Vice President of ChemImage & Head of Imaging Technology. "Our new manufacturing facility will make the best use of this knowledge that's unique to Northeast Ohio, giving our company a competitive advantage in the diverse markets that we serve."

ChemImage partnered with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's first research center focused on the science of liquid crystals, when current liquid crystal vendors could not meet their technical requirements.

The Ohio Third Frontier Award will allow ChemImage to continue its collaboration with the Liquid Crystal Institute and establish a permanent manufacturing facility for ChemImage Imaging Technologies in Northeast Ohio, with about twenty jobs expected within the next two to five years of operation.

In addition to its Ohio expansion, ChemImage launched Gateway Analytical, an analytical testing company, last fall in Gibsonia, Pa.

For more information on ChemImage's filter technology, hyperspectral imaging instrumentation or software, visit the company's website at www.chemimage.com

ChemImage Corporation, a leader in hyperspectral imaging technology (i.e., molecular chemical imaging), provides instrumentation, software, contract services and expert consulting to government, industrial and academic organizations. The company's proprietary, state-of-the-art Hyperspectral Imaging technology has many applications, including defense, security, pharmaceuticals, forensics and biomedical diagnostic research, which can reveal critical chemical and biological information from a variety of material systems. ChemImage's headquarters are located in Pittsburgh, Pa., where it houses research and development laboratories, as well as engineering and manufacturing facilities.

This information was brought to you by Cision http://www.cisionwire.com The following files are available for download:

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU's new Math Emporium helps college students stay on track (Frank, Tonge) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A PERFECT EQUATION

NEW STATE-OF-THE-ART TECHNOLOGY HELPS KENT STATE UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS WITH THEIR MATH SKILLS; CELEBRATION SET FOR TUESDAY

Kent State University is celebrating
the opening of the new Math Emporium,
a state-of-the-art computerized
learning center designed to help students
learn math. Located on the second
floor of the Kent State University
Library, the Math Emporium launched
with the start of classes on Aug. 29.
The university will gather at 4 p.m.
Tuesday at the center for a celebration.
“The university has developed a
specialized learning experience to
equip students with the mathematical
knowledge they will need on their path
to graduation,” said Robert G. Frank,
KSU provost and senior vice president
for academic affairs. “The students will
learn math by interacting with a team
of instructors and the web-based math
software called ALEKS. The Math Emporium
promises to make a significant
impact on our first-year retention. For
some students, it will give them confidence
in their math skills to pursue careers
that require math, such as nursing and finance.”
At the Math Emporium, students will
learn through a computer program designed
to help them become comfortable
and proficient in basic mathematics.
The center serves as the classroom
for four basic algebra classes.
Prior to the beginning of classes, students
take a placement assessment to
determine which math courses they
need. Students who need additional
math preparation to succeed in college
will be matched with the appropriate
course of study in the center.
“Students will focus on
learning exactly what they
need to know at their own
pace while their instructional
team provides individualized
coaching,” said
Andrew Tonge, chairman
of KSU's Department of
Mathematical Sciences.
“The Math Emporium
uses an adaptive software
program, ALEKS, to determine
what students already
know. It then offers
each student an individualized
choice of paths forward.
This enables them to
complete the curriculum
efficiently by always studying
only material they are
ready to learn. All students
can then manage their
study time to focus on actively
learning precisely
the information they need,
with the aid of online help
tools and an interactive ebook,
together with oneon-
one assistance from an
instructional team.”
Periodically, each student
takes a progress assessment
to check that
they have fully understood
the information they recently
studied. Any material
that has not been properly
mastered is reassigned
as part of the future study
plan. At the end of the
course, a comprehensive
assessment determines
the grade. This ensures
students have a sufficiently
rigorous grounding to have
good prospects for success
in subsequent courses.
“The Math Emporium's
potential effect on student
success is very exciting,”
Frank said. “In addition
to this Math Emporium on
our Kent campus, we will
have similar facilities on
our regional campuses.”
The Math Emporium is
11,154-square-feet and has
247 computer stations.

Return to Top



News Headline: Public Meeting held on City's $1.5 Million 'Clean Ohio' Request | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Dorothy Peachock was a little lonely Wednesday night.


She was the sole Kent resident to show up to a public meeting about the city's $1.5 million grant application to the Clean Ohio Fund Brownfield Revitalization program. The city is asking for money to finish efforts at cleaning the former RB&W property at 800 Mogadore Road.


The latest Ohio EPA report on the project shows contaminated groundwater that originates at the property is draining into the Cuyahoga River — albeit at concentration amounts acceptable by the EPA.


The purpose of Wednesday's public meeting, held at the Kent Free Library , was to review public comment that's been received on the application and to give any residents a last chance to discuss and ask questions about it.


"I think the major reason for these public meetings is to make sure there's nothing detrimental taking place," Dan Smith, Kent's Economic Development Director, said.


Aside from Peachock and Smith, the only other people to attend were representatives from Mentor-based HzW Environmental, which is the consulting firm managing the environmental issues at the property. No direct representitives from the property owner, Memphis, TN based Thomas & Betts Corp., attended Wednesday night.


Smith said the next step in the brownfield grant application process will be for representatives from the city to travel to Columbus and pitch their redevelopment plans for the property to state officials. If Kent is awarded the grant money, Thomas & Betts will transfer the land to the city for $1. That would potentially kick start the property's redevelopment, and one idea is to develop the close to 18-acre property into a technology corridor in cooperation with Kent State University.


Matt Knecht, president of HzW, said the bulk of the grant money — as much as $925,000 — would be used to fix the underground chemical containment system that's leaching contaminants into groundwater, which is then migrating off the property and towards the river.


Knecht said the soil on the property meets EPA standards for human contact.


"It's the groundwater on the site that needs addressed," Knecht said. "The primary groundwater problem at the site is associated with the (former) oil lagoons at the south end of the site. We're concerned about that groundwater going into the river … and that is what we want to stop.”


The problem with the property is an underground, clay “slurry wall” that was built in 2005 to try and seal in the remains of five former open-air oil lagoons that were used by various manufacturers at the property throughout the early and mid 1900s. HzW and Ohio EPA officials surmised this year that the slurry wall containment system had failed after groundwater test wells on the property showed increased levels of contaminants . The slurry wall is not directly visible, but it encompasses about two grassy acres at the southern end of the property.


The Clean Ohio Fund grant award, which usually requires a local match or expense on the receiving community's behalf, would not cost Kent any money out-of-pocket. Thomas & Betts has already spent about $2 million cleaning the property, including the demolition of the former RB&W plant, and that money can be used as the local match for the grant.


“They made a commitment to clean up the property and did a large portion of it,” Knecht said. “We're in the home stretch of the clean-up.”


Smith said this land and it's potential for redevelopment is a perfect example of what the Clean Ohio Fund money is designed for.


“We would like to see that become a technology park,” he said.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus