Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Fashion Design (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Art, School of (2)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC); Corporate and Professional Development (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Foundation, Leadership and Administration; Town-Gown (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (3)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Public Relations (1)
Renovation at KSU (2)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Going Places: Sept. 5, 2011 09/10/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

4:30 am, September 5, 2011 Find out who's climbing Northeast Ohio's corporate ladder. KENT STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION: John Garofalo (Akron Community Foundation) to president; Maria Schneider to president-elect; Robert Maschke...


Alumni; Fashion Design (1)
5 questions with Stephen (Suede) Baum of Bravo's 'Project Runway' 09/11/2011 Detroit Free Press Text Email

...career that would, they were afraid, just have me waiting tables for the rest of my life. They encouraged me to think of something as a backup. I visited Kent State University and checked out their fashion program. I knew whatever I was going to do, it had to be creative. It turned out my flair...


Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
2011 matR Project: "The Passage" (Steidl) 09/10/2011 International Business Times Text Attachment Email

© Victoria Capranica A team of graduate students recently created a temporary installation on the Kent State University, Kent campus in Ohio. The project grew out of an internal challenge in the matR design competition. Designed by graduate...


Art, School of (2)
Imagination reigns in quirky shows at two Kent galleries (Ott) 09/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State School of Art Opens Season (Turner) 09/09/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The shows currently on view at the Kent State art galleries are oddly coupled. But that's what makes them so interesting. In the School of Art Gallery on the Kent...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC); Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Job help, networking events: Business calendar 09/10/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

By Plain Dealer business staff JOBS HELP TUESDAY Kent State University's Center for Corporate and Professional Development, Breakfast Briefing: 8 to 10:30 a.m. at Kent State's Cleveland Urban...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN SERVICES ANNOUNCES 2011 HALL OF FAME WINNERS 09/09/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.9 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: As part of Kent State University's 2011 Homecoming festivities, the...


Foundation, Leadership and Administration; Town-Gown (1)
KSU hotel to be independent (Finn) 09/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Portage youth discover Arts Alive! 09/11/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...on their photographs created during a four-week photography program in collaboration with David LaBelle, director of the Photojournalism Department at Kent State University. Program participants Taylor Dias, Kaley Utz and Ricky Early provided musical entertainment during the afternoon....


KSU at Salem (1)
KSU Salem grads go nuclear (Berger) 09/10/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Salem recently celebrated the graduation of its nuclear-medicine class. Seniors Nathan Baross, Brittany Drexler,...


KSU at Stark (3)
Kent State hosts interfaith talk on 9/11 09/12/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Slow economy drives college enrollment, career choices (Williams) 09/09/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...hoping a college degree is the path to the elusive jobs. And as more people seek out higher education, area colleges are experiencing enrollment growth. At Kent State University at Stark, enrollment numbers are up 1.5 percent from last fall. ?Our head count is at 4,975,? said Cynthia Williams, the school?s...

9/11 a painful history lesson to teach (Seelye) 09/10/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...nation as images of the terrorist attacks lit up television screens, this 10-year anniversary is particularly poignant. ?I think everyone remembers it,? Kent State University Stark Associate Professor of History Dr. Jim Seelye said. ?Just like people who grew up in the ?60s knew exactly where...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Our Opinion - Drilling jobs on the horizon (Comanitz) 09/11/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...“We don't have the people trained for these jobs, so they're coming from other states,” Hillyer told The Times-Reporter in mid-July. But officials at Kent State University Tuscarawas and Buckeye Career Center are working diligently behind the scenes to quickly identify training opportunities...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Firm with ties to KSU gets $1 million for area manufacturing plant 09/10/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A Pittsburgh-based company partnered with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute will receive up to $1 million in grant funding to build a Northeast Ohio manufacturing plant....


Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Arab-American tries to correct misconceptions about Islam (Mikati) 09/11/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...teachings or beliefs,' " she said. "There always will be some extremists wherever you are." Mikati, 46, coordinator of the Arabic language program at Kent State University and a teacher at Roosevelt High School, never faced any personal attacks because of her ethnicity or religion after 9/11....


Public Relations (1)
George Clooney on 'The Ides of March' and 'The Descendants' 09/11/2011 Wall Street Journal Text Attachment Email

Governor Morris (George Clooney) delivers a major speech at Kent State in “Ides of March.” George Clooney is having a better run this fall than a lot of presidential candidates. After his directorial...


Renovation at KSU (2)
Kent fee proposal is questioned (Floyd) 09/09/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Sept. 09--Some state officials are resisting Kent State University's appeal to charge students as much as $720 a year for new academic buildings. Members of the Ohio Controlling Board say...

OFFICIALS IN OHIO ARE WARY OF KSU FEE PLAN: REQUEST TO CHARGE STUDENTS FOR NEW BUILDINGS QUESTIONED (Floyd) 09/09/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Some state officials are resisting Kent State University's appeal to charge students as much as $720 a year for new academic buildings. Members of the Ohio Controlling Board say...


University Press (1)
Ashland professor writes book about Ohio's ponds 09/11/2011 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...Smithsonian, National Wildlife, National Parks Magazine, National History, and Timeline as well as on numerous posters and calendars. The book was printed by Kent State University Press, which calls the book a "wonderful resource about the wetlands and wildlife that will inspire readers to learn about...


News Headline: Going Places: Sept. 5, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4:30 am, September 5, 2011

Find out who's climbing Northeast Ohio's corporate ladder.

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION: John Garofalo (Akron Community Foundation) to president; Maria Schneider to president-elect; Robert Maschke to vice president; Kathy Reid to secretary; Brian M. Marino to treasurer; Nicholas Sucic to immediate past president.

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News Headline: 5 questions with Stephen (Suede) Baum of Bravo's 'Project Runway' | Email

News Date: 09/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Detroit Free Press
Contact Name: Powers, Nancy Chipman
News OCR Text: Sept. 11--Stephen (Suede) Baum, 40, stepped out from behind the scenes into the limelight on Season 5 of Bravo's "Project Runway" in 2008. Known for his colorful hair and penchant for talking in the third person, Suede will be at the American Sewing Expo Sept. 23-25 at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi. He talked with the Free Press about his name, his style and his new line with Simplicity.

Q:Tell me how you got the nickname Suede?

A:I was the only guy in a class of about 16 girls in college, and we were all really stressed out over a project we were working on ... I made all the girls come over to the swatch bin and told everybody they had to pick a piece of fabric and they had to be that fabric for the day. I chose suede. Everybody loved that, and I was Suede for the rest of my college experience. It was a natural fit when I auditioned for "Project Runway." I thought, "I'll just bring Suede back."

Q: Your bio says you were drawn to the fashion industry after a brief career in acting and modeling.

A:I'm from Cleveland and did a lot of modeling for local retail stores. I really wanted to be an actor, but my parents weren't so thrilled about the thought of me moving to New York City at 17 years old to pursue a career that would, they were afraid, just have me waiting tables for the rest of my life. They encouraged me to think of something as a backup. I visited Kent State University and checked out their fashion program. I knew whatever I was going to do, it had to be creative. It turned out my flair for the dramatic and fashion fit. I excelled in the industry, moved to New York right after graduation, worked for Geoffrey Beene and launched a lot of major mass-marketed brands that did well and earned me respect in the industry. My goal was always to have my own company. "Runway" gave me that platform to be more than just the behind-the-scenes designer.

Q: Tell me about "Project Runway" and what you learned.

A:I had been an import designer my entire career, which means that everything was done overseas, so I hadn't sewn in 15 years when I got on "Project Runway." That was a huge challenge ... because most of those kids who get on that show sew day in and day out. I learned to listen to my inner voice. It gave me the courage to branch out on my own and to start my own collection. It opened a lot of doors but I won't kid you, it is sort of a double-edged sword. Once you have that kind of publicity behind you -- that kind of exposure -- it does make it a little bit tough to be a behind-the-scenes designer again. But I'm not complaining.

Q: And now you're with Simplicity Creative Group?

A:I'm coming out with men's patterns for the (Christmas/Hanukkah) holiday. I'll do a classic look for the guy who wants something fashionable but not over-the-top, and then I'll do a rock look that kind of embodies my spirit -- maybe I'll use zippers or studs. My designs also are going to be featured in Simplicity's New Look under Studio by SUEDEsays, coming out this month. What is really exciting about New Look is it is primarily a British design collection. They felt that my edginess really spoke to that consumer.

Q: What are you going to be doing at the Sewing Expo?

A:We're going to be doing some demos, and I'm certainly going to be talking about my new pattern line as well as all the Simplicity patterns. They're not difficult and that's what I'm about -- making fashion accessible to the consumer.

___

(c)2011 the Detroit Free Press

Visit the Detroit Free Press at www.freep.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 Detroit Free Press

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News Headline: 2011 matR Project: "The Passage" (Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: International Business Times
Contact Name: Brian Pagnotta
News OCR Text: © Victoria Capranica

A team of graduate students recently created a temporary installation on the

Kent State University, Kent campus in Ohio. The project grew out of an internal challenge in the matR design competition. Designed by graduate students Brian Thoma, Carl, Veith, Victoria, Capranica, Matt Veith, and Griffin Morris, the tunnel-like structure called “The Passage” was a study to support the conceptualization and actualization of innovative and experimental material research. The students created the initial form in Rhinoceros with a couple Grasshopper definitions as a waffle structure of 26 vertical ribs and 24 horizontal struts. More images and information after the break.

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© Victoria Capranica

In connection with the Geometric Algorithms course, led by Assistant Professor Bill Lucak, the poject was designed to demonstrate some of the current digital design methodologies for form generation and digital fabrication. The resulting structure explores the translation of a complex three-dimensional object into a nonstandard component system through algorithmic and parametric means. Douglas Steidl, dean of Kent State's College of Architecture and Environmental Design said, “I strongly believe this design is a physical manifestation of the creative thought process, implemented through digital fabrication techniques.”

© Victoria Capranica

The College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State granted $2,000 for the structure to be built on a pathway near Taylor Hall and the May 4th Memorial. Upon receiving the grant, Lucak, Morris, Capranica, and several other students of the CAED helped build the wooden structure with their own tools and no construction company.

© Victoria Capranica

With a 52′ length and a 13′-3″ maximum rib height, the project provided several challenges not present in small prototype construction. With the dimensional limitations of a 4′x8′ sheet of 3/4″ plywood, the struts had to be segmented into smaller components by creating joints in the ribs assembly. Moreover, the vertical ribs are not parallel but radial, and the horizontal ribs have a slight warp to allow for the pinched form. Finally, the installation had to be designed and constructed on a sloped surface.

“We now live in an age where computer are helping us improve our society,” Lucak said. “It would've been almost impossible designing this structure with a pencil. Consequently, this application demonstrates the ability of the CAED at Kent State to teach and execute in the context of current and future design/construction parameters.

Photographs: Victoria Capranica

References: kent.edu/caed

2011 matR Project: "The Passage" originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Sep 2011.

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News Headline: Imagination reigns in quirky shows at two Kent galleries (Ott) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of the points of an education, especially a college education, isn't to get a job. Not if you're doing it right.

Colleges and universities are not just job-training facilities, but places where students go to be exposed to a wide variety of ideas and philosophies, many of them not only contrary to their upbringing, but also utterly new.

It's true that certain programs seem to be hell-bent on assembly-lining, widget-like, their students through tightly constructed paths of study that allow for minimal contact with outside curricula. And that's a shame. A person who comes into a university with a fixed set of ideas and graduates four years later without having changed them one iota has wasted his time and money.

That's why it's refreshing to see that at Kent State University's School of Art Gallery and Downtown Gallery there are two shows that first, challenge students to think outside the canvas, and second, ask them to toss out many of their preconceptions and predilections.

At the School of Art Gallery is Therely Bare, Curated by John Tallman and Ron Buffington, a show of nonobjective art that features the work of 18 artists from around the world, including France, Belgium, New Zealand, the Netherlands and the United States.

This is a show that challenges students — and the rest of us, for that matter — to consider, understand and appreciate art outside our comfort zones.

At the Downtown Gallery is Imprint, a sculpture exhibit by Warren artist Eric England. This exhibit draws on England's extended relationship with comic-book superheroes and combines their attributes with those of ancient African carvings and American Indian totems, exploring the struggle between the body's physical limitations and the mind's infinite imagination.

These days many art students arrive at art school filled with ambitions of becoming computer animators and working at places like Pixar, Dreamworks or Nintendo. Such students are naturally more interested in realism, accuracy, action and things that go “blam!”

The sculptures in Imprint seem to fulfill this desire quite handily, as on first glance the dozens of painted wooden sculptures bear an uncanny likeness to Buzz Lightyear, the animated action figure in the Pixar/Disney classic Toy Story.

Only it appears that these figures are avatars for all action figures, and their general similarities challenge us to connect each piece to the comic-book hero that it purports to represent.

England, who earned his bachelor's BFA from Kent State University in 1987, has a master's degree in medical illustration and actually worked for Disney, knows a great deal about the enthusiasms of adolescent art students, as he has been teaching art at Howland High School in Warren since 2002.

And it would seem that one of the functions of these action figures — or as he calls them, Talismans — is to provide a path through which typical teenage manias can enter into the mysteries of art.

Part of that process is to acquaint oneself with the various “isms” of art, and back at the School of Art Gallery, Therely Bare presents us with a show that rests squarely on the barely visible shoulders of Minimalism.

Therely Bare is based on the premise of the subversive in nonobjective art. It sets up the viewer for certain expectations, then slyly inverts them, as demonstrated by the show's title.

Further evidence of this inversion can be found on the show's introductory panel, where hangs 147 (2006), by New Jersey artist Ken Weathersby, which presents to the viewer a tiny canvas that's reversed and embedded in a larger canvas, its edges given over to optical illusions.

Further on is Hey, Headmaster (2010), an enamel on acrylic panel work by Cincinnati artist Jeffrey Cortland Jones that embodies the classic Minimalist features: a rectangular base upon which only the barest of representations has been laid down, accompanied by the merest hint of color.

Likewise, Buffington's Static presents us with a plastic sheet that, like Saran Wrap, clings to virtually any surface for a predictable period of time. Gallery director Anderson Turner received instructions to spread the plastic out on the wall and leave it there, where it will remain, attached by static electricity, for about 48 hours. When it begins to lose static and peel away from the wall, it's replaced by one of the dozens of duplicates Buffington has provided for the show.

Richard van der Aa, a Paris-based artist, sent along two works, Easy Piece No. 35 and Easy Piece No. 45, each of which is a variation of the blank, White Painting theme so dear to the hearts of early minimalists, especially its originator, Robert Rauschenberg.

However, these canvases are ivory, and the paint is actually manipulated, but only to the extent that one canvas has been placed on its edge before the enamel paint was dry, causing the bottom area to wrinkle slightly; while on the other canvas something, perhaps a small pebble or bead, has been dropped or embedded and the paint allowed to dry around it. If you're into Minimalism, this would rock your world.

One of the artists in this exhibit is Lorri Ott, of Cleveland, who is an adjunct professor at both Kent State University School of Art and the Cleveland Institute of Art. Her work, like several of the pieces in this show, is based on serendipity and the vagaries of her medium.

Ott paints not on canvas, but in polymorphic shapes created by pouring a polymer resin medium. The resin allows for only 90 seconds of mixing time, and five minutes during which she can add color, toss in various found objects and pour it into a shape.

“I only get one shot,” she explained. “Once I compose the elements and pour, that's it.”

These constraints force her to focus, and as she puts it, “I have to go in there knowing what I'm doing before I do it.”

Similarly, the various subversions used by the artists in this show force viewers to bring into play every bit of understanding and knowledge about art they possess, and then be prepared to have that knowledge upended.

Blinky Palermo, for example, was a precocious European art star who died under mysterious circumstances when he was 33. Palermo was one of the pioneers of the painting movement that did away with the canvas, calling into question the status of painting as a treasured, high-skill commodity.

Thus is solved the mystery of Philadelphia artist Kevin Finklea's 2010 acrylic on wood, Parakeet (for Palermo, Group 1). He could even be cited as one of Ott's influences. (In her case, he must share space with the work of American feminist artist Ree Morton.)

Nevertheless, once we are privy to the Blinky Palermo connection, his influence can be detected throughout this show, a placid-appearing, but rigorous and deceptively thorough introduction into the mysteries of art.

What better way to begin a new year in art school? Or anyplace, for that matter.

Dorothy Shinn writes about art and architecture for the Akron Beacon Journal. Send information to her at the Akron Beacon Journal, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309-0640 or dtgshinn@neo.rr.com.

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News Headline: Kent State School of Art Opens Season (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Elaine Hullihen
News OCR Text: The shows currently on view at the Kent State art galleries are oddly coupled.


But that's what makes them so interesting.


In the School of Art Gallery on the Kent State campus is "Therely Bare," an exhibition curated by John Tallman and Ron Buffington that centers around ideas of non-objective art.


This is a stye of art that contains no recognizable figures or objects.


In Kent State's Downtown Gallery, Eric England presents a solo show called "Imprint" inspired by pop culture comic book characters and primitive totems and dolls.


In this show, England uses recognizable figures to create meaning in the work.


And while Anderson Turner, director of Kent State's art galleries, didn't exactly plan it this way, having both shows run simultaneously is a wonderful example of the diverse ways that art is made today.


Turner works with artists to schedule shows in his galleries up to a year in advance. Many artists are alums of Kent State, where Turner then has the opportunity to "connect to the career path" of these artists' years of research. This has been a rewarding experience for Turner.


In the big picture, his aim is to bring artworks into the community that will be thought provoking, engaging and challenge the viewers to think about new ideas.


The School of Art gallery is designed with the intention of bringing international as well as national artists to show work.


"Therely Bare" hosts artists from the United States, France, Belgium, New Zealand and the Netherlands.


The show came to Turner's attention from Lori Ott, a Kent State painting faculty member who also has a piece in the show.


In this show, "We find there are many different approaches to 'painting' (material/technique/application etc.)," Ott said. Her piece, unstrung , blends into it's surroundings by hovering between being there and not being there. Its fleshy color and shape hovers between the organic and the geometric. It is her way of being barely there.


The curators, Tallman and Buffington, are artists and professors from the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga.


"My interest in painting lies in its unending flexibility as a means of individual expression," Tallman said, explaining his reasons for putting this show together.


He added that "within the 'language of non-objective art,' artists can be subversive and dismantle conventions while making it appear that outwardly they're following those conventions."


This curatorial team chose works for the show from the international non-objective art movement they have seen in artist-run project spaces.


On the other hand, the Downtown Gallery intends to show work from local artists.


Eric England is a Kent State alumni who teaches art at Howland High School in Howland, Ohio. England is inspired by our modern American mythology, from Spiderman to Space Ghost to Iron Fist and Halle Berry.


England also pulled inspiration from primitive mythologies. Using techniques similar to African carving and American Indian totems, England translates our modern mythical characters into figures he calls "talismans." There are more than 50 in this show.


The result is like "walking into a comic book store," Turner said.


"They are intensely gratifying to create," England said. "Hand-selected recruits for my own diminutive vigilante army!"


Here the modern meets the archaic, showing us something about ourselves and the "reaches of human imagination and aspiration," as reads England's artist statement.


"Imprint" will be on view at the Downtown Gallery until Sept. 24. It is located at 141 E. Main Street. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Friday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


"Therely Bare" will be on view at the School of Art Gallery until Sept. 30. It is located in the Art Building on Kent State's campus. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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News Headline: Job help, networking events: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Plain Dealer business staff

JOBS HELP

TUESDAY

Kent State University's Center for Corporate and Professional Development, Breakfast Briefing: 8 to 10:30 a.m. at Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Suite 200, 1309 Euclid Ave. in Cleveland's PlayhouseSquare District. Free. To register, go to tinyurl.com/3r5o7ej or call 330-672-8698.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN SERVICES ANNOUNCES 2011 HALL OF FAME WINNERS | Email

News Date: 09/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.9 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

As part of Kent State University's 2011 Homecoming festivities, the College of Education, Health, and Human Services (EHHS) will honor seven distinguished alumni at its second annual EHHS Hall of Fame Award Ceremony on Friday, Oct.14, from 6:30 p.m.to 9:30 p.m.at the Kent Student Center Ballroom.Tickets for the event are $38 per person and include hors d'oeuvres, followed by a sit-down meal.

THE SECOND CLASS IN THE 2011 COLLEGE OF EHHS HALL OF FAME INCLUDES:

CENTENNIAL ALUMNI AWARD Donald Coffee (1955, 1958) Donald Coffee worked for Miller School Middle School in Akron, Ohio, and Greely School in Winnetka, Ill., in the 1950s as a teacher.In the 1960s, he accepted a principal position at Crestwood School District in Mantua, and later worked for East Cleveland School District and Shaker Heights City School District, all in Ohio.He received the National Distinguished Principal Award by the U.S.Department of Education in 1986 and the Shaker Emeritus Educator Award in 2009 for his continued support and involvement in education following retirement.

Distinguished Alumni Award Dr.Thomas Fagan (1965, 1966, 1969) Dr.Thomas Fagan is the coordinator of school psychology programs at the University of Memphis since 1976 and has been active in the National Association of School Psychologists since 1970, holding several elected and appointed positions including its presidency in 1980-81 and again in 1987-88.He also has presided over the state association in Illinois and twice in Tennessee in the 1980s and '90s.He served as an editorial board member to the School Psychology Review from its founding in 1972 to 2005, and he was editor of the NASP Communique for six years.

RECENT ALUMNI AWARD Dr.Geeta Verma (2001) Dr.Geeta Verma, an associate professor of science education at the University of Colorado, is professionally involved with the American Education Research Association (AERA), National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) and the Association for Science Teacher Education (ASTE).She was honored with the Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award in 2007 at Georgia State University and serves on the advisory panel and is a guest speaker at the iDiscoveri Center for Education and Enterprise in New Delhi, India.

DIVERSITY ALUMNI AWARD Shalva Tabatadze (2007) Mr.Shalva Tabatadze, of Tbilisi, Ga., is an instructor at Tbilisi State University and teaches intercultural education course.He is the chairman of the board for the Centre for Civil Integration and Inter-Ethic Relations in Georgia and is the founder of the Samtskhe-Javakheti Teacher Association.He has published three textbooks and more than 15 articles about Georgian education.He has received the Phi Beta Delta International Scholars award in 2006, and he was named the Best Lecturer and the Most Open-Minded Lecturer by the students of the program of Educational Leadership and Administration of Tbilisi State University in 2010-2011.

INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI AWARD Dr.Janette Habashi (2004) Dr.Janette Habashi, an associate professor in the department of human relations at the University of Oklahoma, teaches courses about local and global human diversity issues and education developmental theories.She is committed to advocating for social policy that reflects her passion for youth and social justice.After earning her M.Ed.degree in Counseling in Education at the Center for International Studies, Newcastle Upon Tyne in the United Kingdom, she pursued a teaching and counseling career at Birzeit University.Her research with children and indigenous populations examine socialization, national identity, political participation/resistance, and children's rights-based approaches in policy and research.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE TO EHHS AWARD (POSTHUMOUS AWARD) Dr.Gerald H.Read (1936) Dr.Gerald H.Read, a Kent State professor from 1943 to 1976, established an endowment in 1987 to create the Gerald H.Read Center for International and Intercultural Education.Consistent with the college's commitment to global cooperation, the Gerald H.Read Center was designed to examine curricular issues related to international and intercultural education, to facilitate international student recruitment and retention, to encourage travel and cultural-immersion programs for students and faculty, and to support exchange and research projects with an international and/or intercultural focus.To date, the center continues to draw prominent scholars, writers and humanitarians to the Kent State campus; and an international travel program that offers valuable opportunities for educators to engage in overseas travel and observe various educational systems.

ALUMNI LEADERSHIP AWARD Dr.Kenneth Dobbins (1987) Dr.Kenneth Dobbins, president of Southeast Missouri State University, serves as chair for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities and past chair of the Missouri Council on Public Higher Education.Also, he is a member of the finance committee for the Ohio Valley Conference President's Council.He is actively involved in the Cape Girardeau Chamber of Commerce; the Greater St.Louis Council, Boy Scouts of America; and the Southeast Missouri State University Symphony Board.He has served as a member of the Cape Girardeau Area United Way Board of Directors.

To purchase tickets to the College of Education, Health, and Human Services' Hall of Fame Awards Ceremony at Kent State, visit https://commerce.cashnet.com/halloffame or contact Hope Bradley at 330-672-2208 or hbradle2@kent.edu by Oct.7.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: KSU hotel to be independent (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Foundation decides franchise costs are too expensive for new $13 million center, which will break ground this month

The hotel to be built by the Kent State University Foundation will not be part of a national franchise after all.

Gene Finn, executive director of the foundation and vice president for institutional advancement at KSU, said board members decided it would be cheaper and better for the hotel to be a unique “boutique.”

“From a financial standpoint it's going to be a lot better for us to go independent,” he said. “Two or three years down the road, there's nothing to stop us from pursuing a [franchise] flag if we want to.”

The foundation, the fund-raising arm for the university, will pick up virtually the entire $13 million tab for the 90- to 95-room hotel with indoor pool, lounge and cafe, and 14,000-square-foot conference center.

The foundation also spent $512,000 to buy three properties that will become the footprint of the hotel.

The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, as it will be called, will be part of a $100 million, public-private project in progress that aims to turn downtown Kent into a chic mecca for students, parents and residents. The revitalization will include businesses, restaurants and stores.

KSU's contribution will be to build a one-eighth-mile esplanade – or brick and concrete walkway – in a residential area between downtown and the west edge of campus.

The esplanade will enable pedestrians – such as parents of students and visitors – to walk easily between the revitalized area and the university.

As for the hotel, Finn said franchise fees would have been about $250,000 a year and the foundation would have had to sign a 10-year contract.

Instead of going that route, the foundation will hire a professional management firm with national reservation capabilities at less than half the cost, he said. The decision on whom to hire will be made in the next couple of months.

Finn also said officials wanted to include the KSU name on the marquee, which would have been impossible with a national chain.

Groundbreaking is planned for Sept. 19. The hotel should be finished in December 2012, the last of the pieces of the revitalization to be completed.

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News Headline: Portage youth discover Arts Alive! | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Arts Alive! Youth Photography Exhibit and Art Showcase was held recently at the Family & Community Services' Resources on Oakwood Campus in Ravenna.

Families, community members and business partners gathered to celebrate 33 youth artists who participated in the summer Arts Alive! program.

All artwork in the exhibit was created by children, teens and young adults who participate in Arts Alive! with an emphasis on their photographs created during a four-week photography program in collaboration with David LaBelle, director of the Photojournalism Department at Kent State University.

Program participants Taylor Dias, Kaley Utz and Ricky Early provided musical entertainment during the afternoon.

More than 75 people attended the exhibit, which also served as a benefit for the Arts Alive! program serving Portage County youth. To date, $327 was raised, with 100 percent of the proceeds directly benefiting Arts Alive!

The exhibit will remain up and open to the public until Sept. 19.

For more information on this event and the Arts Alive! program, visit www.artsalive2009.webs.com.

LISA SCALFARO/RECORD-COURIER PHOTOS

Makayla McElwair, 15, draws on her Converse hightops during the pizza party before the Arts Alive! show.

Brittany Kline, 13, and Michelle Penny, 11, eat pizza and drink tea at the pizza party before the Arts Alive! program.

Laura Wynn, coordinator for Arts and Recreation, and Ricky Early, 15, relax at the pizza party.

Pizza Party in the Dietrich Youth Center.

Watercolors by Tucker LaBelle, top, and Ally Carr, bottom.

Elana Emery, 14, shows Ashley Barone, 15, a silkscreen T-shirt she made.

Heather Kubala gets close to the silkscreen print by her son, Alex.

Taylor Dias, 12, at right, and her mother, Chris Dias, at the wall of photographs.

Color photograph by Mason Bartholomy.

Bleached photograph and collage made by Mason Schmunk. Clay pieces made by unknown artists.

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News Headline: KSU Salem grads go nuclear (Berger) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Salem recently celebrated the graduation of its nuclear-medicine class.

Seniors Nathan Baross, Brittany Drexler, Karly Johnson, Tamarah Mahmood, Kristina McKee, Misty Secrest, Jeff Skrinyer, Elizabeth Upshir, Kathy Vogt and Sean Weyant each received a bachelor's degree of radiologic and imaging sciences technology with a concentration in nuclear medicine.

“We are very proud of our students,” said Janet Berger, nuclear-medicine program director. “They have done a tremendous job, and we wish them great success as they begin their careers.”

As new nuclear-medicine technologists, these graduates are allied health professionals who have been educated in the art and skill of diagnostic evaluation and therapeutics through the safe and effective use of radiopharmaceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

“Not only are our students excited about graduation, but they are excited about being able to assist patients using their skills in nuclear medicine. Our students are professional and empathetic to their patients and willing to help in any way possible,” Berger said.

According to the accrediting agency for the Kent State Salem Nuclear Medicine Program, the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology, nuclear-medicine technologists can be responsible for a variety of jobs.

Technologists may be responsible for the preparation, quality-control testing and administration of radioactive compounds; the execution of patient imaging procedures including computer processing and image enhancement; laboratory testing; patient interviews; instruction and preparation for administration of prescribed radioactive compounds for therapy; quality control; and radiation safety.

Upon graduation, these nuclear-medicine technologists will apply their knowledge of radiation physics and safety regulations to limit radiation exposure to those around them, while at the same time work toward continued professional growth and development.

“Graduates are encouraged to continue learning through continuing education and membership in the Society of Nuclear Medicine Technologists,” Berger said. “Not only does this help them as professionals, but the will continually enhance the quality of patient care.”

Kent State Salem is the only campus in the Kent State University system to offer a bachelor's degree in radio-logic and imaging sciences technology. In addition to specializing in nuclear medicine, students may choose to concentrate in computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, diagnostic medical sonography or radiation therapy.

Kent State Salem also offers an associate degree in radiologic technology.

For more information, visit www.col.kent.edu or call 330-332-0361.

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News Headline: Kent State hosts interfaith talk on 9/11 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. — The Rev. Michael Gleason said that in the harrowing weeks following Sept. 11, 2011, he shunned an airline passenger who looked Middle Eastern.

“How tragic for me that I had allowed prejudice and fear to get in the way of what my faith was telling me,” he said. “It was a failed experience for me.”

The executive director of Interfaith Campus Ministries made the admission during “9/11 Ten Years Later: Facts, Fables and the Future,” a symposium held this week on Kent State University's Stark Campus.

Joining Gleason on the interfaith panel were Rabbi Jon Adland of Temple Israel in Canton and Dr. Eyad Nashawati, a physician who practices Islam.

The three discussed the fables and misinformation surrounding the 2001 terror attacks and their hopes for the future.

“We're not here to dialogue about theological differences but to discuss the lessons learned from Sept. 11 and to examine ways to move forward,” Gleason said.

WORLD REACTS

Gleason said the attacks had worldwide reverberations.

“We need to understand this was indeed a world tragedy, a global tragedy,” he said. “Ninety different countries lost persons, including members from all of the major faith traditions. The global impact of this tragedy was very appropriate. The world mourned.”

Nashawati was grateful for support from his patients and non-Muslim friends in the days following the attacks. He noted one of the biggest misconceptions about Islam is that Muslims consider Christians and Jews infidels.

“Jews and Christians are not condemned by infidels, as al-Qaida has pushed,” he said.

Nashawati said Islam recognized the presence of Jews and Christians from its beginnings in 610, and that its practice is incomplete without belief in prophets such as Moses and Jesus.

“The Prophet Muhammad lived three-fourths of his life in Mecca, where Jewish and Christian tribes were present. ... He was quite familiar with them,” he said, adding that the two faiths flourished under Islamic rule during Muhammad's lifetime.

Christianity and Judaism, Nashawati said, could be found in Medina, where Muhammad moved to escape persecution, and that one of the prophet's closest advisers was his first wife's uncle, who was a Christian.

He noted Muhammad didn't prohibit marriage to Jewish and Christian women, who could be found among his own wives, and required Muslim husbands to ensure their non-Muslim spouses were able to practice their religions in safety.

NO EXCEPTION

“Granted, Islam differs from other groups in text, tradition and doctrine, but we share a belief in the same God,” he said.

Nashawati said, though the vast majority of the world's Muslims repudiate terrorism, fears of Islam as violent religion remain prevalent. But acts of religious terror, he noted, exists in all major religions.

“Islam is not the exception,” he said. “The Quran states that killing one human for no right reason is killing all of humanity, and that saving one human is saving all of humanity.

“There is no ‘turning the other cheek' in Islam. God asks us to defend ourselves, but not to attack first. We are to share Islam by persuasion and example, not by the sword.”

Nashawati said much misunderstanding surrounds the term “jihad.”

“The word ‘jihad' in

Arabic literally means ‘struggle,' ” he said.

“The greater jihad is the battle against evil in one's heart. The lesser jihad is the battle to defend oneself.”

Adland said the Sept. 11 attack was characterized by some anti-Semites as a “Zionist conspiracy” to gain support for Israel, but it also taught Jews that Christians and Muslims are not monolithic.

“What we have learned is there are tremendous differences in the ways these communities think,” he said.

BEST EXAMPLE

Adland said the attacks forced people of faith to find ways to talk.

“The event changed relationships,” he said. “We found we had common enemies, individuals who espoused hate and who espoused destruction. Such people must be marginalized. A Muslim terrorist is not a Muslim — he's a terrorist.”

Gleason said there's a belief by some Christians that interacting with people of other faiths compromises their own.

“We share an inherent belief in the Abrahamic faith,” he said of Jews and Muslims. “Yes, we have distinct differences but share commonalties of the human condition. ... One of the best examples of the Christian faith is walking across the lines, to dialogue.”

He lamented that terror has become synonymous with Islam and noted Christians also are capable of such acts. He cited Anders Behring Breivik, an avowed Christian fundamentalist who shot and killed 91 people at a multicultural youth camp in Norway in July.

“It's an appalling interpretation of the Gospel,” Gleason said. “Anyone who dons religion and uses it as vehicle for terror is the absolute opposite example of the Christian faith. It gave me sympathy for what Dr. Nashawati must have felt.”

Copyright 2011 CantonRep.com. Some rights reserved

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News Headline: Slow economy drives college enrollment, career choices (Williams) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Lisa Reicosky
News OCR Text: With the unemployment rate hovering around 9 percent in Ohio ? 10 percent in Stark County ? recent graduates and young adults are hoping a college degree is the path to the elusive jobs. And as more people seek out higher education, area colleges are experiencing enrollment growth. At Kent State University at Stark, enrollment numbers are up 1.5 percent from last fall. ?Our head count is at 4,975,? said Cynthia Williams, the school?s public relations coordinator, who noted there is a lot of interest in communications majors this semester. ?Of the 16 bachelor?s degrees Kent State University at Stark offers, students can earn a communication studies degree in the areas of applied, interpersonal and organizational communications.? Picking the right field of study during poor economic times can be a challenge. Freshman Jeremy Laird of Canton said he is still undecided, but after researching jobs, he is leaning towards supply chain management. It?s a field that deals with Internet and mail-order sales, and one he believes will have job opportunities when he graduates. ?My first choice was criminal justice,? he said, ?But, there?s not a lot of job openings.? The economy played a role in Gary Kinsinger?s choice. The freshman from East Canton followed his sister to Jackson Township?s KSU Stark and lives with his parents. ?It?s close and local. I thought it would be the best place to get the prerequisites done,? he explained. ?It?s definitely cheaper,? said Emma Caswell of Green, a music major hoping to teach high school choir some day. ?There?s not as many loans to take out.? ENROLLMENT TRENDS For the University of Mount Union in Alliance, the number of freshman and transfer students as of Tuesday stands at 687, compared to 686 last year. That number could change slightly because Mount Union hasn?t hit its official enrollment count date, which is Sept. 12. The school?s graduate program, physician assistant studies, saw the biggest increase in enrollment, with 57 students compared to last year?s 46 ? a 24 percent increase. The school?s overall enrollment (full-time, part-time, undergraduate and graduate students) to date stands at 2,243 students compared to 2,255 last year. That relatively steady enrollment pattern fits with the findings of the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center?s study of enrollment trends during a recession. The study concluded that the private sector colleges and universities appear to have maintained market share of student enrollments more effectively than what was expected during the economic downturn. According to the study, that pattern may be attributable to several factors including the likelihood that many financially secure families would have continued to be able to support students in attending private institutions even as the economy worsened. Also, the recruitment efforts of private four-year colleges and universities probably target students who are more likely to enroll there. Exceeding the expectations of the study is Walsh University, which is enjoying a 15.4 percent increase from the previous year in freshman student enrollment, and its largest number of transfer students in school history. While figures are not yet finalized, Brett Freshour, vice president of enrollment management, said Walsh has 515 freshmen at last count, about 70 more than in 2010. ?A big part of that is the nursing students,? Freshour said. ?It?s a top-notch program year in and year out.? He said Walsh students? scores on the state licensing exam have been the highest in Ohio three of the last five years, and Walsh is always ranked in the top five schools. ?Our students are looking at professions in areas where there are jobs,? he said, adding that the economy plays a role in admissions figures in general, but they are trying to meet the needs of those who need help. ?We have approximately 1,800 full-time undergraduate students and we?ve given $18 million this year in financial aid.? COMMUNITY COLLEGES Meanwhile, according to the study, some middle income families, who likely felt more financial strain as a group, saw their students opt for community colleges instead of the four-year institutions they might have considered during better economic times. At Stark State College, spokeswoman Lori Williams reports a 5.7 percent increase in total enrollment over last year. The school?s current head count is 16,075 students. The enrollment trends study suggests that the increase is driven by two groups of traditional-age students believed to have entered community colleges in larger numbers during this time: Those who may have gone to a four-year college but chose to enroll in community colleges, possibly to save money; and students who, in a better economy, may have entered directly into the workforce after high school but could not find jobs. At Aultman College of Nursing and Health Sciences, total enrollment increased over last year by almost 13 percent. The unofficial count is 320 students this year over 284 in 2010. Rebecca Crowl, Aultman College president explains, ?Part of the increase is due to the addition of another degree program, the Associate of Science in Radiography, which began this semester. However, we continue to see strong interest in our nursing program,? she said. ?I think people see health care as one of the more secure industries during turbulent economic times,? said Crowl. ?We are anticipating future growth in order to meet the health care workforce needs of the future.? Figures for Malone College are not yet available.

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News Headline: 9/11 a painful history lesson to teach (Seelye) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ten years was all it took for ?remember when? to become ?history.? Only a decade removed from 9/11, Tuslaw High School American history teacher Bob Schwyer finds himself in the unique position of ?teaching? the events of Sept. 11, 2001. ?These days, it?s interesting to talk to the kids who were only 6 or 7 when it happened,? Schwyer said. ?They remember some of the events of that day, but they did not comprehend the emotions or the impact of that day.? Each chance he has to discuss the events of 9/11 has a tremendous impact on him. In small ways he relives the emotions, the feelings of that day. ?It?s hard,? Schwyer said, ?and I don?t think you can actually teach all of it. You remember that day and I remember that day as adults. But there is more to it (than events). There are emotions ? anger, confusion and little bit of shock.? Each year, Schwyer shows a short video that includes the news footage from broadcasts of that day. In those minutes that the students watch the video, Schwyer said, they go through, on some scale, the myriad of emotions that are forever connected to the day. ?The kids themselves are really shocked, just like we were shocked on that day,? Schwyer said. ?I think when they see that, they really do appreciate what it would have been like to experience it.? FORGETTING TO REMEMBER For those who remember vividly the raw emotions and state of disbelief that flooded over the entire nation as images of the terrorist attacks lit up television screens, this 10-year anniversary is particularly poignant. ?I think everyone remembers it,? Kent State University Stark Associate Professor of History Dr. Jim Seelye said. ?Just like people who grew up in the ?60s knew exactly where they were when (President) Kennedy was assassinated. This event has really impacted (young adults) even being just 10-years-old, 9-years-old or 8-years-old at the time.? For the generation of Americans who were too young to remember Pearl Harbor or too young to have experienced the devastation of war like what unfolded in Vietnam, Sept. 11, 2001 was precedent-setting. It changed the way they understood the world and America?s place in it. ?Sometimes people who are older don?t grasp the implications and the impressions this made on younger students,? Seelye said. ?The U.S. thought of itself as being immune from foreign attacks. ? We never would have thought that the terrorists would use something that we see in the sky everyday as a weapon to kill thousands of people.? Regardless of how old you are or what you can and can?t remember, Seelye emphasizes that it?s important to engage the entire community in discussions about what happened in the days and years that followed 9/11. Because the events of that day should not be forgotten. ?That is why history is so important,? Seelye said. ?We all need to be reminded of what happened in the past. Why do we care? Why should we care? ? This event is still with us. The repercussion and the way it changed the world still impact us.? PRESERVING STORIES In some ways, Seelye is ?teaching? the ?history? of 9/11, too. Even if his students ? and other Americans ? do remember it, they have, in some ways, already moved on. ?September 11 is starting already to become a date on a calendar,? Seelye said. ?Remember when people were talking about the meaning of Sept. 11 and how it would not become just a date on a calendar anymore? Just the other day I heard someone saying it?s becoming just another date.? Preserving the impact of the day means taking the time to remember the personal stories of the people who lived through the day. It means taking the time to think about what it felt like to be a first responder or what it may have been like to be aboard Flight 93 or at the top of the World Trade Center Towers ten years ago. ?I think even people who are adults have forgotten about (9/11),? Seelye said, noting that they have, in some ways, disassociated with the past. ?Maybe that?s part of the 21st century that we live in. Things do change so quickly.? As a professor of history Seelye said he is committed to preserving the stories behind history. If Sept. 11 becomes just another a date on a calendar, it won?t matter, because he is committed to preserving the impact of the events that occurred that day. The stories of those who lived throughout should live on and they should be held sacred by those who choose to ?remember.? ?I am more of a social and cultural historian and, especially, in this case,? Seelye said. ?I am concerned about what it would have been like to not get a hold of your dad on his cellphone or what it would have been like to be on that top floor. What would it have been like to be there and have the constants of your life come tumbling down??

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News Headline: Our Opinion - Drilling jobs on the horizon (Comanitz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: At least $1 billion in oil and gas lease fees has already been paid to Tuscarawas Valley land-owners for rights to drill down into the Marcellus and Utica shale formations. But even if you don't happen to be a land baron, there are opportunities for financial gain from the oil and natural gas boom.

On Labor Day 2011, we're talking about jobs and lots of them.

Uhrichsville attorney Brad Hillyer, who specializes in drawing up energy leases, suggests that the region could gain 6,000 to 8,000 jobs.

“We don't have the people trained for these jobs, so they're coming from other states,” Hillyer told The Times-Reporter in mid-July.

But officials at Kent State University Tuscarawas and Buckeye Career Center are working diligently behind the scenes to quickly identify training opportunities for local citizens in a multitude of jobs that will be coming. That's great news in itself.

Kent State's local Office of Business and Community Services is working on offering initial noncredit sessions yet this fall, with more choices available after January.

“We've been preparing for close to a year,” said Director Pat Comanitz.

She met about six weeks ago with representatives of Chesapeake Energy Corp., one of the major drilling operators, to learn what that firm needs.

Comanitz also has attended meetings throughout

the region offered by oil and gas trade associations “to plan for this educational boom, and to determine what we need to do to get ready to present information and training.”

Kent State's New Philadelphia campus is hoping to have a full-scale curriculum by spring, with more immediate offerings such as training about Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements specific to the industry.

Buckeye Career Center Director of Adult Education Erin VanFossen said 12 career centers are collaborating to provide testing in reading, math and locating information skills — such as reading graphs, maps and charts — for the oil and gas industry. The prescreening in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services will help determine if people qualify for job training.

Additionally, VanFossen has been talking with officials at Westmoreland County Community College in the Pittsburgh area about providing training for the Marcellus ShaleNET program. The college is designing the curriculum for the training and recently issued a request for proposals with a total project grant of $4.9 million available from the U.S. Department of Labor to distribute among training providers.

Buckeye is working to complete its application by the Sept. 29 deadline. If approved for funding, classes could begin Dec. 1.

Buckeye also expects there will be increased demand for people with basic office skills, accounting backgrounds and customer service skills in other businesses that will spring up because of the growth in the oil and gas industry.

With unemployment rates around 9 percent, the region needs more jobs to put more people back to work, and we're pleased to know that local educators are working hard to deliver the training that will be required.

This Labor Day, that's great news.

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News Headline: Firm with ties to KSU gets $1 million for area manufacturing plant | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Pittsburgh-based company partnered with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute will receive up to $1 million in grant funding to build a Northeast Ohio manufacturing plant.

ChemImage Corp. won the grant funding from Ohio's Third Frontier program, which is aimed at creating technology-based jobs in the state.

The firm, which specializes in imaging technology for chemical and biological uses, opened a temporary facility with three workers in Stow in March to continue working closely with KSU's Liquid Crystal Institute, where it previously had an office.

ChemImage plans to use the money to commercialize its research into hyperspectral imaging, creating high-tech sensors with uses in multiple fields.

A spokesperson for ChemImage said there is no definite location for the Northeast Ohio plant yet, but said being located near the Liquid Crystal Institute was “definitely the goal.”

The company hopes to make a decision on the new location by the end of the month.

According to a press release, ChemImage's Ohio plant is expected to bring 20 new jobs to the area in the next two to five years.

The company's collaboration with KSU was one of six projects in Northeast Ohio to receive $6.6 million in funding.

Other winners include SironRX Therapeutics Inc. of Cleveland, which will receive $1 million to commercialize a prescription medication used in treating wounds and $1 million for a multi-party collaborative project to turn livestock waste into an ingredient for asphalt and fertilizers.

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News Headline: Arab-American tries to correct misconceptions about Islam (Mikati) | Email

News Date: 09/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Powell, Cheryl
News OCR Text: Sept. 11--Growing up in Lebanon, Fetna Mikati knew the horrors of war and senseless acts of violence.

Before she and her husband, Fadel, moved to America and settled in Kent, their son, then 2 years old, became so accustomed to the sounds of bombs that he started dancing to the explosions.

"I have vivid memories of bombs and killings and trying to run away," she said.

So when the attacks on America happened the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Mikati felt the pain and loss of the victims and their families on a personal level.

"It was devastating," she recalled.

Her fellow Arab-American and Muslim friends shared those feelings of sadness and grief, along with the fear their religion would be misunderstood as a result of the attacks, she said.

"We had the obligation to tell others and explain to them, 'This is not us. We are not like this. Muslims are not like this. These are not our teachings or beliefs,' " she said.

"There always will be some extremists wherever you are."

Mikati, 46, coordinator of the Arabic language program at Kent State University and a teacher at Roosevelt High School, never faced any personal attacks because of her ethnicity or religion after 9/11. But she knew stereotypes persisted.

When her daughter was in sixth grade several years after the attacks, she overheard some classmates making hurtful jokes about a substitute teacher who donned the traditional head covering some Muslim women wear.

"We have a terrorist today subbing for us," the children said.

To address misconceptions about Arab people and the religion of Islam, Mikati has been presenting workshops for area schools, the Kent State University ROTC program and other community groups since 2002.

"I try anytime there is a possibility to educate people and correct some of the stereotypes they had," she said. "This is my duty to educate."

In those workshops, she highlights the similarities among Islam, Christianity and Judaism. She dispels the concept of a "holy war," which she said does not exist in Islam. It is clear in the sacred book of Quran that followers are expected to respect other people's religion and not force them to change their beliefs.

She explains that the term "jihad" -- an Arabic word that means "struggle" -- is often misused.

There are three types of jihad, she said: personal, verbal and physical. The most important is the personal jihad, which refers to personal struggle against temptation.

The physical jihad is only allowed in cases of self-defense, when provoked, not to attack others without cause, she said.

She also teaches that Islam is a religion of peace that strictly opposes violence.

Mikati said the Quran includes this saying: "If you save one life, it is as if you have saved the whole of humanity. And if you kill one innocent soul, it is as if you have killed the whole of humanity."

Another major misconception she has tried to dispel is that Arabs hate Americans.

"The Arab people make a big distinction between the American people and the government policies," she said. "They don't like some of the policies that are unfair to the Arab people."

When she was a child in Lebanon, she said, she grew up watching Dallas on TV and American movies such as Grease at the movie theaters.

"When I was growing up, it was the land of opportunities," she said of her view of America back then. "There was never any sort of hatred. ... There is no hatred, even today."

Cheryl Powell can be reached at 330-996-3902 or chpowell@thebeaconjournal.com.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: George Clooney on 'The Ides of March' and 'The Descendants' | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Wall Street Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Governor Morris (George Clooney) delivers a major speech at Kent State in “Ides of March.”

George Clooney is having a better run this fall than a lot of presidential candidates.

After his directorial effort “The Ides of March,” in which he also stars as a Democratic presidential candidate, received a warm response at the Venice International Film Festival, Clooney has received further accolades for his endearing performance in Alexander Payne's “The Descendants,” in which he plays a “back-up parent” who suddenly finds himself front and center after his wife suffers a fatal boating accident.

On Saturday, at the Toronto International Film Festival, where “The Descendants” had its official North American premiere, Clooney spoke about his multiple roles.

“The Descendants,” Clooney said, “was obviously a lot more challenging to do. When you're directing yourself,” he explained at a press conference, “you¹re really only doing a part that I know exactly what I need done.”

But as for “The Descendants,” where Clooney has several challenging moments, including a memorable scene in which he screams angrily at his comatose wife, he said, “This is one where you're in a very uncomfortable zone; it's a tricky place to play.”

While one of the central dilemmas in “The Descendants” comes from the character's role as a father to two daughters, Clooney, of course, has never experienced being a dad. But he said that shouldn't matter. “You don't have to shoot heroine to play a heroic addict. And I'm not running for president, but I can play a candidate. Most of the time you don't have to have those things in your life to understand what they're like. I had these girls with me, and it was like having children.”

Both Clooney and Payne, director of “Election” and “Sideways,” also spoke about the difficulty in getting their films made.

“I am very grateful to Fox Searchlight for the opportunity to make this kind of film, at this time in American cinema,” said Payne, “where I see adult dramas are simply, for the most part, not being made. I hope that other filmmakers and financiers can point to it, if it has any degree of success, that there is a lucrative and hungry market for such a film.”

Both “Ides of March” (to be released on Oct. 7) and “The Descendants” (which Fox Searchlight will release on Nov. 18) are now considered frontrunners for this year's coming Oscar race.

When asked what Clooney thought of competing with himself, he responded, “I never think of competing with actors or filmmakers. We try to make films that we want to see. They're not easy to get made; you have to keep the budget low to get them made. But at the end of the day I don't really think about competition. I don't want to think of it as a race with anybody, particularly with Alexander, because I don't want to race him.”

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News Headline: Kent fee proposal is questioned (Floyd) | Email

News Date: 09/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Sept. 09--Some state officials are resisting Kent State University's appeal to charge students as much as $720 a year for new academic buildings.

Members of the Ohio Controlling Board say they worry that approval of the request would invite other tax-supported universities to ask for similar hikes. That would blow the lid off state efforts to restrain tuition and increase the number of Ohioans with a college education.

"The need is clear. The mechanism is not," said state Sen. Tom Sawyer, D-Akron, a Controlling Board member whose district includes the university.

Last September, KSU President Lester Lefton proposed charging students as much as $720 a year to build new academic buildings and improve existing ones on Kent State's main campus.

KSU trustees approved the project, which would include a new home for the School of Architecture and Environmental Design, a renovated home for art and a student resource and service center in Schwartz Hall.

The remake would cost $250 million, with $40 million coming directly from KSU and the rest from students who would pay off bonds with the additional fee for the next 30 years.

"We have been meeting, listening and talking to the Board of Regents, legislators and Gov. Kasich's administration," Gregg Floyd, KSU senior vice president for finance and administration, said in a written statement. "We are committing to finding a solution that is good for all."

KSU's plan has been in play in Columbus since last fall.

Eric Fingerhut, then chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, rejected the request on the grounds that students shouldn't have to pay to build their classrooms. When John Kasich became governor in January, his chancellor, Jim Petro, endorsed the plan in a May directive because of the "documented need" and the "constraints of the state budget to provide alternative funding."

Since then, Kent State has been approaching members of the powerful Ohio Controlling Board, the state panel of six legislators and one state official that oversees adjustments to state budget appropriations. The university needs the board's approval to begin to levy the fee that would start at $7 per credit hour and would be phased in over five years to total $720 a year for full-time undergraduates.

Sawyer said he is concerned that KSU is bypassing the legislature.

The issue of charging students for the construction of academic buildings -- never before done in Ohio --should be explored by the General Assembly, not by the select panel that is the Controlling Board, he said.

Having the Controlling Board authorize the fee "would give me an enormous amount of power," Sawyer said.

"I've told Kent State right from the start that I oppose it," board member Chris Widener, R-Springfield, said. "I just can't see starting down the path of mortgaging capital improvements on the backs of Ohio students."

Board President Randy Cole, a policy adviser of the state Office of Budget and Management, said he "is one of the people asking if this should even be brought forward" and placed on the board's agenda at all.

Board members said they feared the KSU request would set off a stream of similar appeals from the more than 50 tax-supported institutions across the state, subverting efforts to control tuition.

"It becomes difficult for us to allow one institution to go above the (3.5 percent tuition) cap and turn around and tell others that their institution doesn't merit that," state Rep. Jay Hottinger, R-Newark, said.

Luis Proenza, president of the University of Akron, said his university might be one of those to request a similar fee if KSU's were approved.

UA just completed $620 million of campus improvements in the traditional way: tapping state capital funds and selling bonds and paying them back from expanding enrollment.

But there is more to be done, Proenza said.

"It's something that we would want to consider," he said. "If it's the intention of the legislature to pass this, it should be done for all universities."

Two other board members -- Sen. Shannon Jones, R-Springboro; and Rep. Clayton Luckie, D-Dayton -- did not respond to requests for comment. Rep. John Carey, R-Wellston, said through a spokeswoman that he didn't want to comment until the issue is on the agenda.

Issues need at least four of the Controlling Board's seven votes for approval. The board does not have an appeal process, and requests are re-examined only if plans change extensively, Cole said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

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Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: OFFICIALS IN OHIO ARE WARY OF KSU FEE PLAN: REQUEST TO CHARGE STUDENTS FOR NEW BUILDINGS QUESTIONED (Floyd) | Email

News Date: 09/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Some state officials are resisting Kent State University's appeal to charge students as much as $720 a year for new academic buildings.

Members of the Ohio Controlling Board say they worry that approval of the request would invite other tax-supported universities to ask for similar hikes. That would blow the lid off state efforts to restrain tuition and increase the number of Ohioans with a college education.

"The need is clear. The mechanism is not," said state Sen. Tom Sawyer, D-Akron, a Controlling Board member whose district includes the university.

Last September, KSU President Lester Lefton proposed charging students as much as $720 a year to build new academic buildings and improve existing ones on Kent State's main campus.

KSU trustees approved the project, which would include a new home for the School of Architecture and Environmental Design, a renovated home for art and a student resource and service center in Schwartz Hall.

The remake would cost $250 million, with $40 million coming directly from KSU and the rest from students who would pay off bonds with the additional fee for the next 30 years.

"We have been meeting, listening and talking to the Board of Regents, legislators and Gov. Kasich's administration," Gregg Floyd, KSU senior vice president for finance and administration, said in a written statement. "We are committing to finding a solution that is good for all."

KSU's plan has been in play in Columbus since last fall.

Eric Fingerhut, then chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, rejected the request on the grounds that students shouldn't have to pay to build their classrooms. When John Kasich became governor in January, his chancellor, Jim Petro, endorsed the plan in a May directive because of the "documented need" and the "constraints of the state budget to provide alternative funding."

Since then, Kent State has been approaching members of the powerful Ohio Controlling Board, the state panel of six legislators and one state official that oversees adjustments to state budget appropriations. The university needs the board's approval to begin to levy the fee that would start at $7 per credit hour and would be phased in over five years to total $720 a year for full-time undergraduates.

Sawyer said he is concerned that KSU is bypassing the legislature.

The issue of charging students for the construction of academic buildings ? never before done in Ohio ?should be explored by the General Assembly, not by the select panel that is the Controlling Board, he said.

Having the Controlling Board authorize the fee "would give me an enormous amount of power," Sawyer said.

"I've told Kent State right from the start that I oppose it," board member Chris Widener, R-Springfield, said. "I just can't see starting down the path of mortgaging capital improvements on the backs of Ohio students."

Board President Randy Cole, a policy adviser of the state Office of Budget and Management, said he "is one of the people asking if this should even be brought forward" and placed on the board's agenda at all.

Board members said they feared the KSU request would set off a stream of similar appeals from the more than 50 tax-supported institutions across the state, subverting efforts to control tuition.

"It becomes difficult for us to allow one institution to go above the (3.5 percent tuition) cap and turn around and tell others that their institution doesn't merit that," state Rep. Jay Hottinger, R-Newark, said.

Luis Proenza, president of the University of Akron, said his university might be one of those to request a similar fee if KSU's were approved.

UA just completed $620 million of campus improvements in the traditional way: tapping state capital funds and selling bonds and paying them back from expanding enrollment.

But there is more to be done, Proenza said.

"It's something that we would want to consider," he said. "If it's the intention of the legislature to pass this, it should be done for all universities."

Two other board members ? Sen. Shannon Jones, R-Springboro; and Rep. Clayton Luckie, D-Dayton ? did not respond to requests for comment. Rep. John Carey, R-Wellston, said through a spokeswoman that he didn't want to comment until the issue is on the agenda.

Issues need at least four of the Controlling Board's seven votes for approval. The board does not have an appeal process, and requests are re-examined only if plans change extensively, Cole said.

Copyright © 2011 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Ashland professor writes book about Ohio's ponds | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ASHLAND -- Dr. David FitzSimmons, associate professor of English at Ashland University, is the author of a new book, "Animals of Ohio's Ponds and Vernal Pools."

The book takes a close-up look at unique wetlands, from fascinating fish and amphibians to intriguing insects and birds. It examines pond and vernal pool ecology

In prose, FitzSimmons uncovers both the rare and common life-forms found in and around Ohio's ponds and vernal pools. He discusses Ohio's variety of small lakes, covering everything from managed farm ponds to glacially formed basins. He then turns to vernal pools, temporary waters that fill in the late winter or spring and dry up in the summer.

Accompanying these scientifically accurate and poetic descriptions are Gary Meszaros's photographs, including close-ups of multicolored dragonflies, underwater shots of fish, beautiful images of birds, and idyllic vistas of Ohio's serene ponds and secluded pools.

Meszaros, a retired Cleveland City School teacher, has had his photographs appear in many publications, including Smithsonian, National Wildlife, National Parks Magazine, National History, and Timeline as well as on numerous posters and calendars.

The book was printed by Kent State University Press, which calls the book a "wonderful resource about the wetlands and wildlife that will inspire readers to learn about and protect their own natural environments."

Fitzsimmons' next book, "Curious Critters," will be available Nov. 7. The children's picture book will feature Fitzsimmons' photography and writing.

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