Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Enrollment (3)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Higher Education (4)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Mathematical Science (1)
Office of the President (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Enrollment (3)
KSU reports all-time high in enrollment (Lefton) 09/14/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Update: Record Enrollment at Kent State (Lefton, Vincent, Garcia) 09/14/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Record Enrollment at Kent State (Lefton, Garcia) 09/13/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has surpassed last year's record enrollment number to achieve a new all-time high with the release of the university's...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Local news briefs - Sept. 14 09/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email


Higher Education (4)
KSU drops slightly in national magazine's ranking (Lefton) 09/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Falls in U.S. News Ranking (Lefton) 09/14/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Dayton-area colleges rank among U.S. News' Best Colleges 09/13/2011 BizJournals.com Text Attachment Email

...universities felt some ups and downs on the 2012 Best Colleges rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report, which ranks 1,400 schools nationwide. Miami University came in at No. 90, down from No. 79 on the previous list. And the University of Dayton fell two ticks to No. 101 in an eight-way...

KENT STATE RANKS AS ONE OF THE BEST NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES BY U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT FOR A SECOND STRAIGHT YEAR (Lefton) 09/13/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.13 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: For the second straight year, Kent State University has earned a place...


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
WELCOME BACK 09/14/2011 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State-East Liverpool student Jordan Steele (center) hands out t-shirts at the “Welcome Back Fest” held for new and returning students on...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Enrollment down at YSU (Sines) 09/14/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

KSU-Trumbull and Gateway see increase Save | Post a comment | Although Youngstown State University lost enrollment, the number of students attending other area institutions is on the upswing for the 2011 fall semester,...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
OUR VIEW Kent Displays in spotlight 09/14/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Mathematical Science (1)
KSU celebrates opening of library's Math Emporium (Frank, Tonge) 09/14/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Office of the President (1)
KSU head reflects on last 6 years, future (Lefton) 09/14/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

RECORD-COURIER REPORTER Kent -- Even Lester Lefton's detractors probably wouldn't question his energy or knack for getting things done. As the Kent State University president enters his sixth year at the helm, it would be hard to dispute that KSU is a very different place because of his leadership....


University Press (1)
Local historian releases new Civil War book 09/14/2011 Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...publication is about the U.S. involvement in World War I and is titled "Unknown Soldiers: The American Expeditionary Forces in Memory and Remembrance" (Kent State University Press, 2008). During the fall semester of 2008, Snell served as visiting senior lecturer of war studies at the Royal...


News Headline: KSU reports all-time high in enrollment (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 42,185 STUDENTS ENROLLED ACROSS
EIGHT-CAMPUS NETWORK, UP 2 PERCENT

Kent State University's eight-campus system
reached an all-time high in enrollment this semester,
the university announced Tuesday.
According to KSU's records, the school currently
has 42,185 students enrolled, up from
41,365 for the fall 2010 semester, representing
an increase of almost 2 percent. KSU also set a
record for spring enrollment in 2011 with 39,936
total students.
“More people are saying ‘yes' to Kent State
than ever before,” Kent State President Lester
Lefton said in a statement. “They know that we
are a leading public research university that is
affordable and accessible. Students and their
families recognize the great educational quality
and value of a Kent State education, and so
our Kent State community continues to grow.”
Total enrollment at KSU's main campus for
this fall is 26,938. Total enrollment at the seven
regional campuses is 15,247. A big chunk of
the growth on the Kent campus can be traced
back to the record-setting freshman class of
4,284 students.
According to KSU, graduate student enrollment
is up 3.09 percent, while international student
enrollment is up 35 percent.

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News Headline: Update: Record Enrollment at Kent State (Lefton, Vincent, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University reports 42,185 students for the fall 2011 semester

If there is any question about the pace of growth at Kent State University, consider it answered.

The university set a record, yet again, for fall semester enrollment with 42,185 students signed up to take classes at all eight campuses. That beats the previous all-time high set last fall of 41,365 students.

The enrollment record comes with the highest-ever Kent campus freshman class, which has 4,284 students.The previous record freshman class? Set in 2009 at 4,030.

And it very well could be the last record enrollment — at least for a while.

Kent State President Lester Lefton, who is away visiting family in California, said in a recent interview that he wants to start shifting the university's focus away from growth and quantity of students.

"The real issue is quality," he said.

The enrollment records also came as the university struggled with residence halls packed beyond capacity. Kent State started the year with dorms at 101.5 percent capacity and about 100 students in "transitional housing" — lounges converted into temporary student rooms.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said those students who started the year in transitional housing have since been placed into permanent room assignments.

"This was done before the end of the second week of classes," she said.

Enrollment records have fallen repeatedly in recent years.

In spring 2011, Kent State set an all-time high for spring enrollment at 39,936. That number compares with 38,196 in spring 2010 — the previous record for spring enrollment.

In the fall, the university's previous all-time high for total enrollment of 42,365 made Kent State the second-largest university in Ohio behind only Ohio State University.

According to the university, this fall's record saw an increase in international students of 35 percent. And the diversity of students, mostly among the African-American, Latino and Native American populations, rose 6.45 percent.

"The students who have enrolled at Kent State represent great quantity in terms of numbers as well as great quality in terms of student GPA," said T. David Garcia, associate vice president for enrollment management at Kent State. "In addition to that, we have a great diversity in our students and a nice mix of in-state versus out-of-state students as well as international students."

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News Headline: Record Enrollment at Kent State (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Larry States
News OCR Text: Kent State University has surpassed last year's record enrollment number to achieve a new all-time high with the release of the university's official 15th day census data. Kent State announced a 1.98 percent increase in enrollment for the fall 2011 semester across its eight campuses.

News Release From Kent State University

Kent State reports 42,185 students for the fall 2011 semester. This is up from 41,365 students for fall 2010 semester. Unduplicated (or preponderant) headcount at the campus in Kent is 26,938, and the unduplicated headcount for the regional campuses is 15,247. Students are counted only once at the campus at which they hold a majority of their course load.

In addition, the Kent Campus welcomed its largest freshman class in the university's 101-year history. The total number of first-time, full-time freshmen enrolled at the Kent Campus is 4,284 surpassing the record set in fall 2009 with 4,030 students.

“More people are saying ‘yes' to Kent State than ever before,” said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. “They know that we are a leading public research university that is affordable and accessible. Students and their families recognize the great educational quality and value of a Kent State education, and so our Kent State community continues to grow.”

Highlights from the fall 2011 enrollment numbers also include:

Enrollment at Kent State University at Geauga is up 10.64 percent. Kent State Geauga reported 1,498 students for fall 2011 compared to 1,354 in the previous year.

Enrollment of international students is up 35 percent.

Diversity of students, particularly among the AALANA (African American, Latino American and Native American) population, is up 6.45 percent.

Graduate enrollment has increased 3.09 percent.

T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management, said that the university keeps making great strides in attracting a great, diverse mix of students. “The students who have enrolled at Kent State represent great quantity in terms of numbers as well as great quality in terms of student GPA. In addition to that, we have a great diversity in our students and a nice mix of in-state versus out-of-state students as well as international students.”

Kent State's eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.

For the full fall enrollment report, go to www.kent.edu/rpie/enrollment.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - Sept. 14 | Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE

Program honored

KENT: The Fashion School at Kent State will be named an Ohio Center of Excellence in Cultural and Societal Transformation today.

Jim Petro, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, which coordinates higher education statewide, will be at KSU to announce that the school is a distinctive, nationally recognized program.

The ceremony will be held at 11:30 a.m. at Rockwell Home, home of the Fashion School, where students study design and merchandising.

The chancellor's office has named five other Centers of Excellence that relate to Ohio's growth industries, including advanced energy, biomedicine and health care, at Kent State and other institutions statewide.

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News Headline: KSU drops slightly in national magazine's ranking (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College in 194th place, moving from 183rd, among 200 top schools

Kent State dropped slightly in U.S. News and World Report's annual rankings of top colleges nationwide, moving from 183rd to 194th place among the 200 top-ranked universities.

The magazine evaluated more than 1,500 schools nationwide based on 16 indicators of academic quality. It ranked the top 200 and listed the balance alphabetically. Last year 1,400 institutions were in the list.

The new listing, released Tuesday, includes 10 public and private institutions statewide in the top 200 listing.

In addition to Kent State, the others were Case Western Reserve (38), Ohio State (55), Miami (90), Dayton (101), Ohio University (124), Cincinnati (143), Bowling Green (177) and Ashland (190).

Many institutions tied with several others. Kent State, for example, scored evenly with seven others, including East Carolina, Immaculata and Louisiana Tech.

This is the second year in a row that KSU made it into the top 200 tier.

Kent State proves once again with this third-party validation that we are a great university that deserves their attention and consideration,” Kent State President Lester Lefton said in a news release.

The university pointed out that it is the only public university in Northeast Ohio to crack the top 200. The University of Akron, Youngstown State and Cleveland State are unranked.

The U.S. News college report is one of many — and arguably the most prestigious — of the guides that help students and parents make college-going decisions.

The rankings are based on factors that include undergraduate academic reputation, including the opinions of high school guidance counselors for the second year in a row; graduation rates; freshmen retention rates; and student selectivity.

The full rankings are available at www.usnews.com/colleges and will be in the Best Colleges guidebook that goes on sale Tuesday.

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News Headline: Kent State Falls in U.S. News Ranking (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University fell in the 2012 U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges ranking compared with the school's 2011 spot on the list.

The magazine released its annual rankings today, and Kent State landed at 194 to tie with eight other schools out of 1,600 total on the list.

In 2011, Kent State ranked 183 out of 1,400 listed colleges.

Kent State President Lester Lefton, who is out of town visiting family in California, said in prepared remarks he was pleased to see the university ranked on the list for two years in a row.

"For two years in a row, we are the only public university in Northeast Ohio to receive a spot in the prestigious first-tier list," Lefton said. "As students and parents navigate their way in reviewing options in higher education, Kent State proves once again with this third-party validation that we are a great university that deserves their attention and consideration."

Kent State placed in the Best National Universities category.

The listing is the 28th edition released by U.S. News & World Report. Harvard University and Princeton University tied for the top spot as the nation's best university.

Click here to see Kent State's listing.

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News Headline: Dayton-area colleges rank among U.S. News' Best Colleges | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: BizJournals.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dayton-area universities felt some ups and downs on the 2012 Best Colleges rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report, which ranks 1,400 schools nationwide.

Miami University came in at No. 90, down from No. 79 on the previous list. And the University of Dayton fell two ticks to No. 101 in an eight-way tie with other colleges.

However, UD leaders said its overall score increased from 42 on last year's list to 47 this year. Just two years ago, the university's overall score was 38.

Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland ranked the highest among Ohio Schools at No. 38 — the same as last year. Ohio State University ranked No. 55.

Other Ohio schools included: Ohio University (No. 124), University of Cincinnati (No. 143), Bowling Green State University (No. 177) and Kent State University (No. 194).

Among regional colleges, Cedarville University ranked No. 3 in the Midwest, an improvement from No. 5 on the 2011 list.

Overall, the top college spot belonged to Harvard University and Princeton University, which tied for first place.

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News Headline: KENT STATE RANKS AS ONE OF THE BEST NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES BY U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT FOR A SECOND STRAIGHT YEAR (Lefton) | Email

News Date: 09/13/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.13 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

For the second straight year, Kent State University has earned a place in the Best National Universities category with its inclusion in the 2012 edition of Best Colleges by U.S.News & World Report.Once again, Kent State received a coveted spot in the first-tier list of Best National Universities.The exclusive rankings, which include rankings of more than 1,500 schools nationwide, are available Sept.13 at www.usnews.com/colleges and also will appear in the 350-page 2012 edition of the Best Colleges guidebook, available on newsstands starting Sept.20.Kent State's ranking is 194, tied with eight other schools out of more than 1,500 schools.

Over the past two decades, the U.S.News college rankings, which group schools based on categories created by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, has grown to be one of the most comprehensive research tools for students and parents considering higher education opportunities.

"I am so pleased that U.S.News & World Report has again recognized Kent State as one of the best national universities," said Kent State President Lester A.Lefton."For two years in a row, we are the only public university in Northeast Ohio to receive a spot in the prestigious first-tier list.As students and parents navigate their way in reviewing options in higher education, Kent State proves once again with this third-party validation that we are a great university that deserves their attention and consideration."

To assess more than 1,500 of the country's four-year colleges and universities, U.S.News first assigns each to a group of its peers, based on the categories of higher education institutions developed in 2010 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.The National Universities category consists of the 280 institutions (172 public, 101 private and seven for-profit) that offer a wide range of undergraduate majors as well as master's and doctoral degrees.

Data on up to 16 indicators of academic quality are gathered from each institution and tabulated.Schools are ranked in categories by their total weighted score; those receiving the same rank are tied and listed in alphabetical order.

For more information about Best Colleges, visit www.usnews.com/colleges.

For more information about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: WELCOME BACK | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State-East Liverpool student Jordan Steele (center) hands out t-shirts at the “Welcome Back Fest” held for new and returning students on Tuesday. Free food was provided, informational booths were available for the students and t-shirts were raffled off. Students could also buy water balloons to throw at the student government president, raising money for the campus' Relay for Life team. The event continues noon to 3 p.m. today. (Photo by Ana Yanni)

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News Headline: Enrollment down at YSU (Sines) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU-Trumbull and Gateway see increase

Save | Post a comment |

Although Youngstown State University lost enrollment, the number of students attending other area institutions is on the upswing for the 2011 fall semester, according to the latest enrollment numbers.

The good news for YSU is that enrollment has increased 23 percent since 2000.

The bad news is that the latest fall enrollment figures, which reflect a 4.3 percent drop over last year's fall enrollment, hurt the university's budget.

YSU president Cynthia Anderson said the enrollment drop increases the seriousness of the university's financial circumstances.

"We have said for some time now that the budgetary challenges facing YSU are great," Anderson said. "This unexpected drop in enrollment and the resulting loss in revenue makes the situation worse.

We are now facing serious financial circumstances that will require difficult decisions and sacrifices, even beyond what we have been discussing to this point."

According to official preliminary numbers released on Tuesday, YSU enrollment is down 654 students this fall semester.

The numbers at area post-secondary schools includes:

Kent State University at Trumbull reported its enrollment growth continued based on its 15-day fall semester figures, also released Tuesday.

For KSU at Trumbull, that reflects a 2 percent increase over the fall 2010 tally, pushing the campus to its seventh straight semester of increased enrollment with 3,207 students.

The campus bettered its all-time enrollment high, established a year ago at 3,144, and extended an upward trend that boasts nearly a 55 percent increase from fall 2008 to fall 2011.

Robert Sines, dean at KSU at Trumbull, attributed the number of quality programs, including evening and online class options, affordable tuition and the central location of the campus as factors in its growth.

"We are very pleased with the (enrollment) number,'' Sines said. ''I believe this speaks volumes to our place in the field of higher education in this area and to the trust that students have in our ability to prepare them for their futures.''

Enrollment at Eastern Gateway Community College, which has sites in Warren and Youngstown, has boomed - pushing its overall fall 2011 headcount past the 2,400 mark for the first time in the college's history.

The 10 percent growth from last fall sets the student population at 2,435, with 56 percent of the students from Jefferson County, the site of the college's main campus, 18 percent from Mahoning County, 6 percent from Trumbull County and 5 percent from Columbiana County, Eastern Gateway officials reported recently.

The new student count grew by 17 percent and the college's enrollment in online classes continues to grow, with nearly 35 percent of all students taking at least one online class, officials said.

Laura Meeks, EGCC president, said the number of classes being held at local career centers and the college's Warren Center have contributed to the upswing.

"The growth of these classes was slow at the start, but the schedule and locations are catching on with the residents," Meeks said. "This is great news for the college and our partners."

Meanwhile, YSU's headcount enrollment - the actual number of individual students enrolled - is 14,540 this semester, down from 15,194 last fall semester. In addition, full-time equivalent enrollment - a measure that is used in budgeting at both the university and state levels - is down 3.5 percent.

Since YSU budgeted for a 1 percent increase in full-time enrollment this year the drop in students means a loss of an estimated $4.5 million in what was budgeted for the university's general fund. That is on top of a projected $1.7 million deficit already in the general fund budget, which is $159 million this fiscal year.

Gene Grilli, vice president for finance and administration, said it's important to understand the severity of the situation and the significant budgetary actions that will be needed to address it.

"While we have had much success with enrollment over the past decade, we are very disappointed with these numbers," said Jack Fahey, vice president for student affairs. "We are in the process of examining the reasons for this decline."

Recently, Fahey reported the last time the university experienced a decline was in 2005, when there was a contract dispute between the administration and faculty, resulting in a strike by members of the YSU-Ohio Education Association faculty union.

In recent weeks, the university has been at a standstill with YSU-OEA, which represents about 405 university faculty members. The union's faculty have been working without a contract close to a month, with YSU-OEA voting to reject what university administrators said was their best and final offer for a new contract. The union announced plans to strike but then called it off.

Representatives for both sides have said health care premiums remain unsettled.

Classes started as scheduled Aug. 29, when YSU officials reported enrollment was down 2.5 percent, or 372 students, from the first day of classes in fall 2010. At that time, Fahey said the university planned to work hard to increase those numbers.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Kent Displays in spotlight | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AREA HIGH TECH FIRM COULD BE
MODEL FOR ECONOMIC TURNAROUND

KENT DISPLAYS AND ITS BOSS,
CEO Albert Green, received some
nice national attention last week
when Green was invited to join a few select
executives as guests of First Lady Michelle
Obama to hear President Obama's
address to Congress regarding jobs and
reviving the economy.
Having doubled its
revenues and workforce
during the past
two years when the national
economy was in
recession, Kent Displays
is an example of turnaround and the
high tech economy, which, it is hoped, may
be the solution to the high jobless rate.
Kent Displays utilizes the liquid crystals
technology that came out of the Kent State
Liquid Crystal Institute. Its Boogie Board
has become a popular product. A tablet featuring
low-power liquid crystal technology,
drawings can be made on it a stylus and
then erased with the push of a button.
Its newer version of the product, the
Boogie Board Rip, debuted at a trade
show in Germany this month. It can save
images as PDF files. The Boogie Board
Rip will be available for pre-order in October
for delivery in November.
Shining the national spotlight on a firm
such as Kent Displays, Inc. is great publicity
for the up and coming company. It's
also an indicator that Northeastern Ohio
so often labeled as part of the Rust Belt
has some cutting edge industry that will
help position this region for the future.

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News Headline: KSU celebrates opening of library's Math Emporium (Frank, Tonge) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University administration,
faculty and staff gathered on Tuesday to
celebrate the official opening of the university's
Math Emporium, a computerized
math learning center, located on the
library's second floor.
The Math Emporium computer lab,
which encompasses most of the KSU library's
second floor, utilizes a math software
program named ALEKS, designed
to assess students' needs on a individual
basis. Officials hope the emporium will
help increase retention.
Andrew Tonge, chair of the mathematics
department, said the program
is much more effective than a traditional
classroom learning situation.
“The ALEKS software is built on an
artificial intelligence engine and it rapidly
assesses exactly what each student
knows and doesn't know, and then it
builds an individual pathway through a
curriculum,” he said.
Tonge said there are also 10 tutors at
any given time working in the Math Emporium
to provide one-on-one assistance
to students as they need help.
Between KSU's main campus and regional
campuses, approximately 5,000
students are already enrolled in the Math
Emporium, Provost Robert Frank said
during his speech at the ceremony.
“This is really a dream come true,” he
said. “It's really a dream because this facility
and the planning and the programming
that are a part of it are going to
do something for our students that, up
until now, has been a point of real challenge
for them.”
William Hanlon is a graduate student
who teaches two algebra courses and tutors
four hours a week.
He said initially he was nervous that
students would stop showing up to class
if they were learning on the computers.
“In the first three weeks, it's not an issue
as far as I can tell,” he said. “As far
as the learning process, they're progressing
through it more quickly than a normal
class.”

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News Headline: KSU head reflects on last 6 years, future (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: THOMAS GALLICK
News OCR Text: RECORD-COURIER REPORTER

Kent -- Even Lester Lefton's detractors probably wouldn't question his energy or knack for getting things done.

As the Kent State University president enters his sixth year at the helm, it would be hard to dispute that KSU is a very different place because of his leadership.

Some might complain the university is growing too large (record-breaking freshman class of 4,275 at the main campus this year), too involved with the city (a downtown hotel and conference center and extended Esplanade walkway in the works) and too ambitious (plans to implement a student fee-based $250 million renovation in the works).

Lefton said he'll listen to criticism, but being popular is not his goal, and being criticized won't prevent him from taking action he thinks will benefit the university.

"People want to keep their jobs," Lefton said. "They want to be popular. They want to be liked. That's not necessarily what we need. You've always got to be saying 'What's the right thing to do?' not, 'What's the popular thing to do?'"

Regarding the idea that KSU might be expanding too rapidly, Lefton said it won't have any freshman classes much bigger than this one in the near future, and it won't try to compete in size with Ohio State University.

"What I do want to see is an increase in the quality of the students," Lefton said. "What we're after is quality, not quantity."

Lefton believes KSU's reputation is rapidly growing throughout the state and beyond, which will allow it to be increasingly selective as to what type of student will be admitted.

HE SAID he believes the days where students in Ohio thought they had to go to Miami University in Oxford or OSU for a first-rate higher education are nearing an end.

Another draw for the brightest students? Another area some have criticized as an overreach for the school and the city: the Kent revitalization process that KSU and Lefton have helped shepherd.

"I think this downtown [redevelopment] is really a cornerstone to attracting better students," Lefton said.

Current and pending redevelopment efforts in downtown Kent include the expansion of Acorn Alley retail plaza, the Fairmount Properties mixed-use block, the $24 million Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority Kent Central Gateway and a KSU Hotel and Conference Center.

Ground for the hotel at East Erie and South DePeyster streets will be broken Sept. 19.

Lefton said he found an ally in Kent City Manager Dave Ruller, who arrived in Kent a year before Lefton arrived from Tulane University in 2006.

Lefton said he and Ruller have a never-say-die spirit when it comes to the projects they are passionate about, which played a huge role in the collaborative redevelopment efforts.

Lefton said if he and Ruller had followed conventional wisdom, the revitalization project would likely never have come together. He said he sees the redevelopment as a transformative moment for the university and city.

For evidence of Lefton's ability to transform his environment, one needs only to examine a list of his nine vice presidents. Only one -- Edward Mahon, vice president for information services -- was appointed by Lefton predecessor Carol Cartwright.

LEFTON SAID selecting vice presidents who were willing to fight for his agenda, was key to the university's growth.

"A lot of vice presidents who moved on were fonts of negativity," Lefton said. "We've changed a lot, including almost all of them."

As for Lefton's next transformative move, it's still the implementation of the much-discussed plan to borrow $210 million for a $250 million campus renovation and construction program.

Eric Fingerhut, former chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, killed the plan in 2010. Current Chancellor Jim Petro supports it, but the university still needs approval from the State Controlling Board.

Lefton said schools don't put an item on the legislative agenda without being assured they have the votes to pass it. He said KSU is not at the point of putting the plan on the agenda yet.

True to his nature, Lefton said he has variations on the renovation plan that he will pursue if this one falls by the wayside. It's another project he's unwilling to take "no" for an answer on.

Lefton said it's this type of process that's bothered him the most in his time at KSU. He said state schools are being attacked from both sides, with Ohio overregulating and underfunding its university system.

"Ohio is a politically-charged environment where legislators and local politicians are much more involved than they need to be," Lefton said. "I came from private universities where they didn't have this. They ran more efficiently."

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News Headline: Local historian releases new Civil War book | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SHEPHERDSTOWN - The History Press is pleased to introduce the new title: "West Virginia & the Civil War; Mountaineers Are Always Free" by Mark A. Snell.

The only state born as a result of the Civil War, West Virginia was the most divided state in the nation. About 40,000 of its residents served in the combatant forces - about 20,000 on each side. The Mountain State also saw its fair share of battles, skirmishes, raids and guerrilla warfare, with places like Harpers Ferry, Philippi and Rich Mountain becoming household names in 1861.

When the Commonwealth of Virginia seceded from the Union on April 17, 1861, leaders primarily from the northwestern region of the state began the political process that eventually led to the creation of West Virginia on June 20, 1863. Renowned Civil War historian Snell has written the first thorough history of these West Virginians and their civil war in nearly 50 years.

Snell, Ph.D, is the director of the George Tyler Moore Center for the Study of the Civil War and professor of history at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown. He is a retired U.S. Army officer and a former assistant professor at the United States Military Academy, West Point, N. Y.

Snell has written or edited several books about the Civil War, including "From First to Last: The Life of Major General William B. Franklin" (Fordham University Press, 2002).

His most recent publication is about the U.S. involvement in World War I and is titled "Unknown Soldiers: The American Expeditionary Forces in Memory and Remembrance" (Kent State University Press, 2008).

During the fall semester of 2008, Snell served as visiting senior lecturer of war studies at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in the United Kingdom.

In February 2009, he was given the Honorary West Virginian Award by Gov. Joe Manchin, the highest individual honor the governor can bestow on someone who is not a West Virginia citizen. The book is available on amazon.com and other book store locations.

The George Tyler Moore Center for the Study of the Civil War can be reached at 304-876-5429.

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