Report Overview:
Total Clips (23)
Alumni Association (1)
Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services; Homecoming (1)
Board of Trustees; Budget (2)
Board of Trustees; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Board of Trustees; Town-Gown (1)
Enrollment (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (4)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Higher Education; Partnerships; Research; Students (1)
Higher Education (2)
History (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Office of the President (2)
Physics (1)
WKSU-FM (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni Association (1)
Lester Lefton set to speak at KSU alumni networking luncheon 09/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services; Homecoming (1)
Alumni to be honored at KSU Homecoming 09/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees; Budget (2)
KSU creates 1 percent raise pool (Floyd) 09/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Big increases in registration help Kent State balance the budget 09/15/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
KSU OKs $7 million in campus renovations (Floyd, Frank) 09/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees; Town-Gown (1)
Kent State Spending $2.2 Million to Buy 7 More Properties for Esplanade 09/15/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Enrollment (1)
Cleveland State University has largest and smartest freshman class in history 09/15/2011 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising (4)
State names KSU Fashion School a Center of Excellence (Campbell) 09/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Fashion School Honored 09/14/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Written by Larry States News Release from Kent State University Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro, joined by the Kent State University Board of Trustees, today...

Chancellor praises Kent State and encourages its growth 09/15/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

FASHION SCHOOL AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY DESIGNATED AS OHIO CENTER OF EXCELLENCE (Lefton) 09/14/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.14 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro, joined by the Kent State...


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Higher Education; Partnerships; Research; Students (1)
Update: School of Fashion Declared 'Center of Excellence' at Kent State (Campbell) 09/14/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The already renowned School of Fashion Design and Merchandising at Kent State University can add another distinction to its reputation: Ohio Center of Excellence . Ohio Chancellor Jim Petro — head of the...


Higher Education (2)
KSU on 'Best National Universities' list again 09/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Local universities rated by US News & World Report 09/14/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...programs. Walsh University moved up in rank from its previous No. 76 to No. 72 among Midwest regional universities, a spot it shares in a six-way tie. Kent State University received a spot in the first-tier of best national universities, in a tie at No. 194 with eight other schools. It is the second...


History (1)
The Works Progress Administration leaves a legacy in Northeast Ohio. (Bindas) 09/15/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
WELCOME BACK 09/15/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State-East Liverpool student Jordan Steele (center) hands out t-shirts at the “Welcome Back Fest” held for new and returning students on...

WELCOME BACK 09/15/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State-East Liverpool student Jordan Steele (center) hands out t-shirts at the “Welcome Back Fest” held for new and returning students on...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Kent Trumbull Enrollment Up 15% (Sines, Ritter) 09/14/2011 Business Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

CHAMPION TOWNSHIP, Ohio -- Kent State University at Trumbull's enrollment growth is continuing to climb. Fall semester figures show a 15% increase over last fall, according...


Office of the President (2)
KSU president anticipates growth in Kent (Lefton) 09/14/2011 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Even Lester Lefton's detractors probably wouldn't question his energy or knack for getting things done. As the Kent State University president enters his sixth year at the helm of the school, it would also be hard to dispute that KSU is a very different place...

Lefton aiming for more growth at Kent State (Lefton) 09/14/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Even Lester Lefton's detractors probably wouldn't question his energy or knack for getting things done. As the Kent State University president enters his sixth year at the helm of the school, it would also be hard to dispute that KSU is a very different place...


Physics (1)
Autumn Sky topic at KSU planetarium 09/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


WKSU-FM (2)
Kent State Folk Festival headliners Carolina Chocolate Drops reclaiming old-time music for new generations 09/14/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

The Carolina Chocolate Drops, Peter Yarrow, the Dirty Dozen Brass Band and others will be featured in the 45th Annual Kent State Folk Festival starting Wednesday, Sept. 21 and running through Sept. 25.

KSU Folk Festival kicks off next week 09/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Lester Lefton set to speak at KSU alumni networking luncheon | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: T h e
Kent State
University
Alumni
Association
hosts
its next
Cleveland
Networking
Luncheon
at noon Oct. 5, at
the City Club of Cleveland
with speaker KSU President
Lester A. Lefton.
His talk is titled “Five
Years of Realizing the Vision.”
Lefton will provide
a five-year progress report
that reflects the major, institutional
goals identified in
the KSU Strategy Map.
Lefton marks his fifth anniversary
as KSU's president.
Under his leadership,
enrollment has grown
23 percent in the past five
years, which ranks KSU as
the second largest public
university in Ohio. Student
success measures include
the highest graduation and
retention rates among public
universities in northeast
Ohio. The university also
has achieved record fundraising.
For the fiscal year
ending June 30, 2011, private
contributions reached
$42.1 million, breaking the
institution's fundraising record
for the third year in a
row and bringing the university's
Centennial Campaign
total to $239.4 million, just
more than $10 million away
from its $250 million goal.
Alumni, friends of KSU
and the general public are
welcome to attend the Oct.
5 luncheon. The cost is $15
for Kent State Alumni Association
members and $20
for nonmembers. The registration
deadline is Sept. 23.
For reservations, call 1-800-
320-5368 or respond online
at www.ksualumni.org.
The City Club is at 850
Euclid Ave. in downtown
Cleveland.

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News Headline: Alumni to be honored at KSU Homecoming | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of Kent State University's
2011 Homecoming festivities, the College
of Education, Health, and Human
Services will honor seven distinguished
alumni at its second annual
Hall of Fame Award Ceremony from
6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the Kent
Student Center Ballroom. Tickets
for the event are $38 per person and
include hors d'oeuvres, followed by a
sit-down meal.
The second class in the 2011 College
of EHHS Hall of Fame includes:
CENTENNIAL ALUMNI AWARD
Donald Coffee (1955, 1958) — Coffee
worked for Miller School Middle
School in Akron and Greely School in
Winnetka, Ill., in the 1950s as a teacher.
In the 1960s, he accepted a principal
position in the Crestwood School
District and later worked for the East
Cleveland and Shaker Heights school
districts. He received the National Distinguished
Principal Award by the U.S.
Department of Education in 1986 and
the Shaker Emeritus Educator Award
in 2009 for his continued support and
involvement in education following
retirement.
DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD
Dr. Thomas Fagan (1965, 1966, 1969)
— Fagan is the coordinator of school
psychology programs at the University
of Memphis since 1976 and has
been active in the National Association
of School Psychologists since
1970, holding several elected and appointed
positions including its presidency
in 1980-81 and again in 1987-88.
He also has presided over the state association
in Illinois and twice in Tennessee
in the 1980s and ‘90s. He served
as an editorial board member to the
School Psychology Review from its
founding in 1972 to 2005, and he was
editor of the NASP Communique for
six years.
RECENT ALUMNI AWARD
Dr. Geeta Verma (2001) — Verma,
an associate professor of science education
at the University of Colorado,
is professionally involved with the
American Education Research Association,
National Association for Research
in Science Teaching and the
Association for Science Teacher Education.
She was honored with the Outstanding
Faculty Teaching Award in
2007 at Georgia State University and
serves on the advisory panel and is a
guest speaker at the iDiscoveri Center
for Education and Enterprise in
New Delhi, India.
DIVERSITY ALUMNI AWARD
Shalva Tabatadze (2007) — Tabatadze,
of Tbilisi, Ga., is an instructor
at Tbilisi State University and teaches
intercultural education course. He
is the chairman of the board for the
Centre for Civil Integration and Inter-
Ethic Relations in Georgia and
is the founder of the Samtskhe-Javakheti
Teacher Association. He has
published three textbooks and more
than 15 articles about Georgian education.
He has received the Phi Beta
Delta International Scholars award
in 2006, and he was named the Best
Lecturer and the Most Open-Minded
Lecturer by the students of the program
of Educational Leadership and
Administration of Tbilisi State University
in 2010-2011.
INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI AWARD
Dr. Janette Habashi (2004) — Habashi,
an associate professor in the
department of human relations at
the University of Oklahoma, teaches
courses about local and global human
diversity issues and education
developmental theories. She is committed
to advocating for social policy
that reflects her passion for youth
and social justice. After earning her
M.Ed. degree in Counseling in Education
at the Center for International
Studies, Newcastle Upon Tyne in
the United Kingdom, she pursued
a teaching and counseling career at
Birzeit University. Her research with
children and indigenous populations
examine socialization, national identity,
political participation/resistance,
and children's rights-based approaches
in policy and research.
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE TO EHHS AWARD
(POSTHUMOUS AWARD)
Dr. Gerald H. Read (1936) — Read,
a KSU professor from 1943 to 1976,
established an endowment in 1987 to
create the Gerald H. Read Center for
International and Intercultural Education.
Consistent with the college's
commitment to global cooperation,
the Gerald H. Read Center was designed
to examine curricular issues related
to international and intercultural
education, to facilitate international
student recruitment and retention, to
encourage travel and cultural-immersion
programs for students and faculty,
and to support exchange and research
projects with an international
and/or intercultural focus. To date, the
center continues to draw prominent
scholars, writers and humanitarians
to the Kent State campus; and an international
travel program that offers
valuable opportunities for educators
to engage in overseas travel and observe
various educational systems.
ALUMNI LEADERSHIP AWARD
Dr. Kenneth Dobbins (1987) — Dobbins,
president of Southeast Missouri
State University, serves as chair for the
American Association of State Colleges
and Universities and past chair of
the Missouri Council on Public Higher
Education. Also, he is a member of
the finance committee for the Ohio
Valley Conference President's Council.
He is actively involved in the Cape
Girardeau Chamber of Commerce;
the Greater St. Louis Council, Boy
Scouts of America; and the Southeast
Missouri State University Symphony
Board. He has served as a member of
the Cape Girardeau Area United Way
Board of Directors.
To purchase tickets, visit https://
commerce.cashnet.com/halloffame or
contact Hope Bradley at 330-672-2208
or hbradle2@kent.edu by Oct. 7.

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News Headline: KSU creates 1 percent raise pool (Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State trustees on Wednesday approved a $578.7 million budget for the current school year that includes a 1 percent raise pool for employees.

The total budget is about 6.3 percent larger than last year's.

The additional revenue will come largely from tuition and fees. Undergraduate charges went up 3.5 percent this fall while total enrollment grew 2 percent to an all-time KSU record of 42,185.

Meanwhile, appropriations from the state shrank by $13.4 million and KSU expects costs to rise in employee health insurance, software licenses and maintenance agreements.

Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance, said the university administration would decide in coming months how to partition out the 1 percent to employees.

At a media conference following the trustees meeting, he said he was glad to be able to provide the modest raise pool in light of the state cuts. He pointed out that the university developed a balanced budget without having to lay off any employees.

Meanwhile, 11 administrators received merit raises that began in July, according to a board report.

For example, senior associate provost Timothy Chandler received a $15,000 merit raise on top of a current salary that is $183,750, according to the state database of salaries of higher education officials at tax-supported institutions; Gene Finn, vice president of institutional advancement, $15,000 on top of $214,302; and athletic director Joel Nielsen, $29,000 on top of a $225,000 salary.

The smallest merit increase was $500 to softball coach Karen Linder, who made $75,000.

The university usually announces raises in the summer and has them take effect in September, according to an email distributed on campus by Willis Walker, vice president of human resources.

“My office has received numerous inquiries recently asking about the status of salary increases for the current fiscal year,” he wrote last week.

He said the operating budget presented to trustees would include “a reserve pool for possible pay raises” and the results of the meeting would provide “a clearer picture of the university's financial situation.”

The university also is negotiating with the tenure-track unit of the American Association of Professors, whose three-year contract expired last month.

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News Headline: Big increases in registration help Kent State balance the budget | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Combination of operating efficiencies and tuition revenue boost from attracting record number of new students helps finances

Kent State University finally has a budget. And the schools' employees now know that any raises in the next year are likely to be less than in the recent past. WKSU's Tim Rudell has more from the University's Board of Trustees meeting Wednesday.

For audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/29413

Balancing

The state didn't have its budget sorted out when Kent State's trustees last met in regular session in June. So the university ran on an emergency spending plan until the September 14th board meeting. Now, the University's two-year budget is in place. It allots nearly 545-million dollars in 2011, and close to 579-million in 2012. A 13-percent reduction in state funding was offset by cost cutting, and by a robust increase in student registration, which hit a record 42,000+ for the fall semester. That solidifies Kent's position as the state's second largest university.

Raises

Within the budget is a pool of money earmarked for raises. It is enough to cover a 1-percent increase across the board, but KSU's head of finance and administration Greg Floyd says that's not necessarily how it will be paid out. “We've set the allocation aside to make a 1-percent allocation. That will be made at the University level. And the senior administration, with the board's endorsement will be putting the whole program together.”

A big regional factor

More than fifty-six-hundred people work for Kent State, making it one of the biggest employers in northeast Ohio

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News Headline: KSU OKs $7 million in campus renovations (Floyd, Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Board
of Trustees approved nearly $7 million
in renovations to the campus'
power plant, student center and
athletic arena at Wednesday's meeting.
The Summit Street Power Plant,
built in several stages starting in
2001, will receive the largest amount
of renovation funds.
KSU will put $1.625 million toward
a new engine for the power plant,
to replace one installed in 2004. According
to KSU, the Cognitive Turbine
2 operated more than 25,000
hours, the average lifespan for that
particular engine.
The university has also allocated
$1.7 million for cooling tower upgrades
for the power plant to increase
the facility's chilled water
production rates.
The Kent Student Center, built in
1972, will see just over $2 million in
renovation work on the building's
masonry, roofing and other problem
areas.
Gregg Floyd, KSU vice president
for finance and administration, said
while the university does have a
large backlog of sites that need renovation
and repairs, these sites were
deemed the most critical.
“In all cases we were at the point
where we didn't have time to wait,”
Floyd said.
The board also approved $1.435
million in masonry and window repairs
at the Memorial Athletic and
Convocation Center. At its March
meeting, the trustees approved
$1.25 million to replace a damaged
section of the building's roof.
“In regards to the MACC it was a
pretty easy decision,” KSU
Provost Robert Frank said.
“It's an essential building to
our campus life so we jumped
right on that.”
Frank said the MAC Center
was at risk for further
damage and more expensive
renovation costs down the
road if repairs were put off.
In other action, the board
approved the purchase of
nine properties near downtown
Kent for their Esplanade
walkway expansion.
KSU will purchase three
properties at 117, 123 and 129
S. Willow St., for $534,500 from
Kent Willow Street Rentals,
LLC.
It will buy three properties
on East Main Street: Two located
at 408 and 414 E. Main
St., for $977,500 from Chris
and Deborah Smeiles; and
one located at 402 E. Main
St. from RHS Development
Inc. for $367,500.

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News Headline: Kent State Spending $2.2 Million to Buy 7 More Properties for Esplanade | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One seller stands to gain $1.85 million from Wednesday's purchase agreement

The Kent State University Board of Trustees on Wednesday approved its single largest, one-time purchase to date of properties related to campus expansion and creation of The Esplanade.

The trustees agreed to spend more than $2.2 million to buy seven residential and commercial structures in the neighborhood west of campus. The parcels are in close proximity to other Kent State-owned properties bought within the past four years along College, Lincoln and Willow streets.

Wednesday's approved expense would bring Kent State's total spent buying land in the neighborhood west of campus since 2007 to above $6 million, and that total excludes the $3.28 million expected for construction costs to actually build the Esplanade extension.

Standing to gain the most from the sales approved Wednesday are Chris Smeiles, a Portage County Commissioner and Kent Realtor, and his wife, Deborah.

Kent State is buying the properties “for future expansion of the Kent campus" and the purchases are "consistent with community plans to revitalize the area between the campus and downtown Kent, including extension of the Esplanade to the downtown area," according to the purchase resolution OK'd by university trustees Wednesday.

The properties to be bought through the university's real estate fund, pending necessary state approvals, are:

408 E. Main St. – Currently owned by the Smeileses, the 0.177-acre parcel contains a two-story, 3,582-square-foot commercial/rental building constructed in 1920. Its main tenant is Kent Outfitters. An independent appraisal done in September 2010 placed the property value at $375,000.
414 E. Main St. – Currently owned by the Smeiles, the .033-acre parcel contains a two-story, 6,800-square-foot commercial/office building constructed in 1900. It is home to Cutler Real Estate, and formerly was Century 21 Smeiles Realty. An independent appraisal done in September 2010 placed the property value at $610,000.
While the combined appraised value of the above-listed properties is $985,000, the Smeileses agreed to a sale price of $977,500.

116 S. Lincoln St. – Currently owned by Kent Campus Rentals LLC, in which Smeiles is a partner, the 0.25-acre parcel contains a two-story, 1,968-square-foot home built in 1900 and registered as a licensed boarding house with the Kent Health Department. A September 2010 appraisal states a value of $352,000; it is being sold for $338,500.
129 S. Willow St. – Currently owned by Kent Willow Street Rentals LLC, in which Smeiles is a partner, the 0.27-acre parcel contains a two-story, 1,476-square-foot house built in 1900. It is registered as a licensed boarding house with the Kent Health Department. A September 2010 appraisal states a value of $259,000.
117 S. Willow St. – Also owned by Kent Willow Street Rentals LLC, the 0.10-acre parcel contains a two-story, 1,316-square-foot rental house built in 1910. A September 2010 appraisal states a value of $150,000.
123 S. Willow St. – Also owned by Kent Willow Street Rentals LLC, the 0.24-acre parcel contains a two-story, 1,344-square-foot rental house built in 1901. A September 2010 appraisal states a value of $145,000.
While the combined appraised value of the three above-listed properties owned by Kent Willow Street Rentals is $554,000, the property owner has agreed to a sale price of $534,500.

These aren't the first properties Chris Smeiles has sold to the university for the Esplanade extension.

In 2010, Smeiles sold a licensed rooming house at 133 S. Willow St. to the university for $255,000. Including all sales, Smeiles stands to gain a potential total of more than $2.1 million in properties he will have had a hand in selling to the university.

Smeiles could not be reached for comment Wednesday evening.

The university also agreed to buy one more property in the area of the Esplanade extension: 402 E. Main St. It's owned by RHS Development, and the 0.19-acre parcel contains a two-story, 3,168-square-foot commercial/rental structure built in 1900. It is home to WordSmiths. An independent appraisal finished in September 2010 placed the property value at $380,000; RHS Development agreed to a sale price of $367,500.

The purchase agreement approved Wednesday states that the current owners wish to continue business operations in all the properties being sold. Therefore, conceptual agreements are being developed that will allow the owners to rent from the university for up to five years.

“The university does not have immediate plans to develop this property, and retaining the structures will not interfere with the extension of the university Esplanade. The financial returns from this conceptual agreement will help reduce the net investment in these properties,” the resolution stated.

In a separate resolution, trustees also agreed to buy property at 428-430 E. College Ave. from Dorothy V. Meyer for $230,000, which is its appraised value. The university also will have an option to purchase Meyers' adjacent property at 308 S. Lincoln St. for $200,000, the appraised value, when it becomes available.

In June, university officials said they had secured all the key properties necessary along the proposed Esplanade route, but that they were still working on buying additional properties necessary to provide landscape buffer areas for the Esplanade extension.

Scroll down for past coverage on Esplanade land buys:

Kent State Spending $763,500 on 2 Rental Houses
Lincoln, College Homeowners Among Few Not Bought Out by Kent State
$3 Million Spent by Kent State Buying Land West of Campus
Esplanade Extension gets OK from Kent State Trustees

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News Headline: Cleveland State University has largest and smartest freshman class in history | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Cleveland State University has attracted the largest and smartest freshman class in its history -- which it attributes to a vibrant campus, scholarships and the economy.

Its 1,392 freshmen, up 11 percent from last year, include 380 who received a renewable $3,000 annual scholarship and 96 out-of-state students who received academic scholarships.

The average GPA is 3.2, compared with 2.94 five years ago, said Heike Heinrich, director of undergraduate admissions.

"Overall it is a highly qualified class and the increase is wonderful," she said. "They are amazing students and I am really excited about them."

This year, 380 of the 874 students offered scholarships accepted them. In 2010, the first year of the Freshman Scholars program, 221 of the 647 students offered scholarships enrolled, she said.

"They are all impressed by the new amenities," she said of this year's class. "We need to get them on campus to show it off. That has really worked."

Freshman Allie Dumski of Elyria was surprised when she first visited the campus.

"It was not what I thought it would be at all," she said. "It was very clean, very modernized and up-to-date."

Dumski, 18, said she was accepted by a number of colleges.

"But what it really came down to was the affordability factor," said the Elyria Catholic High School graduate who plans to study pre-med.

She received a renewable scholarship for having at least a 3.0 grade-point average in high school and an ACT score of at least 23. As a Freshman Scholar she was eligible for a $2,100-per-year discount off room-and-board bills that start at about $8,000 a year for students who live in a residence hall.

She's living at Euclid Commons, the new dormitory complex that added 262 beds this fall. About 1,150 students live on campus.

"I thought Cleveland State would be too close to home but it is as close as you make it," she said. "It is different environment living downtown. It's really great."

Heinrich said 320 Freshman Scholars chose the room and board discount and are moved on campus. She said many of the scholars are from Cuyahoga County suburbs.

The 30 percent increase in out-of-state students is due to increased marketing and admissions counselor visits to western Pennsylvania and New York, she said. It is the second year it offered a renewable Voyager Scholarship, available to qualified out-of-state students.

"It provides enough money so that the student pays an in-state rate plus $1," she said. "Our message is starting to spread that we are a viable option."

Kim Norris, spokeswoman for the Ohio Board of Regents said, "These areas have been a priority for Cleveland State University and it appears their hard work is paying off with interest not only from the Cleveland area, but regionally and nationally."

CSU's total enrollment of 17,405 is up 0.6 percent. Fall enrollment at northeast Ohio's public colleges, which had strong increases in recent years, stayed relatively stable or dropped slightly.

Kent State University announced a 1.98 percent increase in enrollment, to 42,185, across its eight campuses. The Kent campus welcomed 4,284 freshmen, its largest class in university history. The University of Akron's enrollment of 29,699 is up 1.53 percent.

Cuyahoga Community College's enrollment of 31,262 is down 1.3 percent from last year's all-time high. Lorain County Community College's enrollment of 13,147 is about 4 percent lower than last year. Lakeland Community College's enrollment of 9,611 dropped 2.6 percent from last year.

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News Headline: State names KSU Fashion School a Center of Excellence (Campbell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Ohio Board of Regents
and Kent State University
announced this week
that the School of Fashion
Design and Merchandising
had been named a Center of
Excellence by the state.
Chancellor Jim Petro of
the Ohio Board of Regents
praised the school and Kent
State University when visited
Rockwell Hall, home
of KSU's fashion program,
Wednesday.
“There are, I believe, 44
designated Centers of Excellence
in Ohio in special disciplines,”
Petro said. “Once
again, Kent State is deserving
of this recognition, and I
can assure you they'll have
other very deserving recognition
in the future.”
J.R. Campbell, director of
the School of Fashion Design
and Merchandising,
gave credit to the school's
faculty for its success.
“I can't say that I've been
to very many institutions
where there is such a great
respect and rapport in the
teaching environment,”
Campbell said.
The Center of Excellence
concept was created
in Ohio's “10-year Strategic
Plan for Higher Education,”
which asked universities to
identify programs they excel
in and concentrate on
building them.
Ohio then works to bring
centers of excellence into
contact with other universities
and private businesses
to encourage collaboration
and investment.
The state of Ohio has established
six categories of
Centers of Excellence: Advanced
Energy; Advanced
Transportation and Aerospace;
Agriculture; Food
Production and Bioproducts;
Biomedicine and
Health Care; Advanced
Materials and Sensors; and
Cultural and Societal Transformation.
The fashion school was
as a Center of Excellence in
the last category, thanks to
its relationships with fashion
schools and the fashion
industry in locations
like Paris, Hong Kong and
New York City, along with
its overall reputation and
achievements.

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News Headline: Kent State Fashion School Honored | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Larry States
News OCR Text: Written by Larry States

News Release from Kent State University

Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro, joined by the Kent State University Board of Trustees, today named The Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising at Kent State an Ohio Center of Excellence in Cultural and Societal Transformation. Ranked as the 3rd best fashion school in the U.S. and 13th in the world, the Fashion School at Kent State has trained its students by using a forward-looking and rigorous curriculum with an aggressive approach in the use of digital technologies for 28 years.

As the sixth and final category of Centers of Excellence for the state, Cultural and Societal Transformation recognizes programs that, in significant and innovative ways, study factors that affect the human condition and community welfare and offer solutions leading to the greater social and economic prosperity of individuals and communities.

Kent State University is to be commended for developing strong relationships with the world's top fashion centers of Paris, Hong Kong, Florence, Italy and New York City, along with providing students with rigorous forward-thinking technology to help establish the university as one of Ohio's Centers of Excellence for its Fashion School,” said Petro.

Partnerships with the Paris Academy and Hong Kong's Institute for Textiles and Clothing, among others, provides the Fashion School's students with a range of international and study abroad experiences. Through dedicated design and lecture studios in both New York City and Florence, Italy, they train more than 180 students abroad, graduate approximately 200 students annually, and boast a job placement rate of more than 90 percent for the program.

Funded research projects at Kent State's Fashion School have ranged from working with the Korean government on counterfeit fashion goods to working with Cotton Incorporated to promote market research.

Additionally, the Fashion School's recently established TechStyleLAB functions as a teaching/learning, research and commercial service environment, bringing together a broad range of digital design and production technologies into one space to investigate models for more localized, sustainable and creative digital supply chains for the fashion industry.

“On behalf of the Kent State University community, I would like to thank Chancellor Petro and the Ohio Board of Regents for recognizing our Fashion School as a Center of Excellence,” said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. “We strive for excellence in all we do, and our Fashion School is a wonderful example of the excellence in action on our campus.”

The first five Centers of Excellence designations are specific to Ohio's growth industries – Advanced Energy, Biomedicine and Health Care, Agriculture, Food Production and Bioproducts, Enabling Technologies: Advanced Materials and Sensors, and Advanced Transportation & Aerospace.

For more information on Ohio's Centers of Excellence, visit www.ohiohighered.org/coe. For more information on The Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/artscollege/fashio

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News Headline: Chancellor praises Kent State and encourages its growth | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising at Kent State was officially declared an Ohio Cener of Excellence

One of the leading fashion schools in the world is in northeast Ohio. And Wednesday, the Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents came to area to officially add the Kent State University program to the list of Ohio Centers of Excellence. WKSU's Tim Rudell reports

For audio: please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/29414

KSU's impact

Citing the program's standing in fashion centers from New York to Paris, and its 90% jobplacement rate, Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro said Kent's fashion school is an asset for Ohio's growth as he declared it one of the state's Centers of Excellence.

Upgrades

And, he said he supports the campus itself growing, including a $250-million building-renovation and upgrade program. The plan includes bond financing to be paid off by student fees that could eventually hit 750-dollars a year. Former Chancellor Fingerhut said that was too much, and blocked plan. But Petro says Kent State needs the upgrade to attract students, faculty, and grant dollars. Kent State Provost Robert Frank says the idea is being reintroduced to the State Controlling Board, where final authority rests. “We're still in conversations with them, and it continues to be an act of education conversation. But nothing has gone to a formal process yet.”

Possible opposition

Some of the controlling board members, including State Senator Tom Sawyer of Akron, have expressed reservations about using student fees to pay for college buildings.

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News Headline: FASHION SCHOOL AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY DESIGNATED AS OHIO CENTER OF EXCELLENCE (Lefton) | Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.14 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro, joined by the Kent State University Board of Trustees, today named The Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising at Kent State an Ohio Center of Excellence in Cultural and Societal Transformation.Ranked as the 3rd best fashion school in the U.S.and 13th in the world, the Fashion School at Kent State has trained its students by using a forward-looking and rigorous curriculum with an aggressive approach in the use of digital technologies for 28 years.

Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim PetroAs the sixth and final category of Centers of Excellence for the state, Cultural and Societal Transformation recognizes programs that, in significant and innovative ways, study factors that affect the human condition and community welfare and offer solutions leading to the greater social and economic prosperity of individuals and communities.

"Kent State University is to be commended for developing strong relationships with the world's top fashion centers of Paris, Hong Kong, Florence, Italy and New York City, along with providing students with rigorous forward-thinking technology to help establish the university as one of Ohio's Centers of Excellence for its Fashion School," said Petro.

Partnerships with the Paris Academy and Hong Kong's Institute for Textiles and Clothing, among others, provides the Fashion School's students with a range of international and study abroad experiences.Through dedicated design and lecture studios in both New York City and Florence, Italy, they train more than 180 students abroad, graduate approximately 200 students annually, and boast a job placement rate of more than 90 percent for the program.

Funded research projects at Kent State's Fashion School have ranged from working with the Korean government on counterfeit fashion goods to working with Cotton Incorporated to promote market research.

Additionally, the Fashion School's recently established TechStyleLAB functions as a teaching/learning, research and commercial service environment, bringing together a broad range of digital design and production technologies into one space to investigate models for more localized, sustainable and creative digital supply chains for the fashion industry.

"On behalf of the Kent State University community, I would like to thank Chancellor Petro and the Ohio Board of Regents for recognizing our Fashion School as a Center of Excellence," said Kent State President Lester A.Lefton."We strive for excellence in all we do, and our Fashion School is a wonderful example of the excellence in action on our campus."

The first five Centers of Excellence designations are specific to Ohio's growth industries - Advanced Energy, Biomedicine and Health Care, Agriculture, Food Production and Bioproducts, Enabling Technologies: Advanced Materials and Sensors, and Advanced Transportation & Aerospace.

For more information on Ohio's Centers of Excellence, visit www.ohiohighered.org/coe.For more information on The Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/artscollege/fashion.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Update: School of Fashion Declared 'Center of Excellence' at Kent State (Campbell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: The already renowned School of Fashion Design and Merchandising at Kent State University can add another distinction to its reputation: Ohio Center of Excellence .

Ohio Chancellor Jim Petro — head of the state's higher education board — made the trip from Columbus to Kent this morning to bestow the honor upon the faculty, staff and students of the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising.

"What a great treasure this university has" Petro said of the fashion school. "It is one of the greatest in the country, as we know."

Petro made the announcement in the atrium of the Kent State Museum .

The school joins about 40 others centers of excellence in Ohio and has the specific designation of Ohio Center of Excellence in Cultural and Societal Transformation. The general excellence distinction spotlights schools that excel in their study and research areas and are described as "important economic drivers for Ohio" on the Ohio Board of Regents website.

"There is nothing, nothing more important to Ohio's economic prospects for the future than our higher education institutions, and Kent State has been a major anchor among those institutions," Petro said this morning.

In January, the fashion website Fashionista.com ranked Kent's fashion school third in the top 50 in the U.S. and 13th in the world.

J.R. Campbell, director of the fashion school, pointed to the school's partnerships in New York City, Florence, Italy — 65 students are studying in Florence this semester — and Hong Kong as part of the reason for the school's new honor.

He also recognized those faculty who attended this morning's press conference and announcement as the driving forces behind the Center of Excellence designation.

"There are folks here who have worked very tirelessly," he said. "It's just unlike any other fashion school that I've experienced internationally, so I'm honored to be part of this and to be recognized with the school as a center of excellence."

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News Headline: KSU on 'Best National Universities' list again | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For the second straight year,
Kent State University has earned a
place in the Best National Universities
category with its inclusion in
the 2012 edition of Best Colleges
by U.S. News & World Report.
The exclusive rankings, which
include rankings of more than
1,500 schools nationwide, are
available at www.usnews.com/
colleges and also will appear in
the 350-page 2012 edition of the
Best Colleges guidebook, available
on newsstands starting Tuesday.
KSU's ranking is 194, tied with
eight other schools out of more
than 1,500 schools.
Over the past two decades,
the U.S. News college rankings,
which group schools based on
categories created by the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement
of Teaching, has grown to
be one of the most comprehensive
research tools for students
and parents considering higher
education opportunities.

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News Headline: Local universities rated by US News & World Report | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Anonymous
News OCR Text: Several area colleges and universities have been cited in the 2012 edition of Best Colleges by U.S. News & World Report. For the 20th consecutive year, the University of Mount Union has been ranked favorably by the magazine. This year Mount Union tied with Buena Vista University at No. 10 among regional colleges in the Midwest. In addition, Mount Union also was cited as an A-Plus School for B Students in the Midwest regional colleges category. Regional colleges are classified as those that focus on undergraduate education but grant fewer than half their degrees in liberal arts disciplines. The Midwest category includes the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Malone University ranked among the top Midwest regional universities for the seventh consecutive year. Malone moved up from No. 61 to No. 58 of a total 146 colleges and universities in the Midwest region. Malone?s ranking represents a four-way tie with Columbia College, North Park University and Olivet Nazarene University. Regional universities are those that provide a full range of undergraduate and master?s degree programs. Walsh University moved up in rank from its previous No. 76 to No. 72 among Midwest regional universities, a spot it shares in a six-way tie. Kent State University received a spot in the first-tier of best national universities, in a tie at No. 194 with eight other schools. It is the second straight year KSU has earned a place on the list. The University of Akron also made the list; however, U.S. News chose not to publish the ranking number. Schools in the national universities category offer a full range of undergraduate majors, master?s and doctoral degrees and are committed to producing groundbreaking research. To determine the rankings, U.S. News & World Report tallied the results of surveys of college presidents, deans and admissions directors. These surveys, combined with educational data provided by the colleges themselves, resulted in the rankings. As stated on the U.S. News and World Report website, colleges and universities were ranked according to graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving. The rankings of more than 1,500 schools nationwide are available online at www.usnews.com/colleges and also will appear in the 350-page 2012 edition of the Best Colleges guidebook, available on newsstands starting Sept. 20.

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News Headline: The Works Progress Administration leaves a legacy in Northeast Ohio. (Bindas) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: President Franklin D. Roosevelt's stimulus package helped build Ohio's infrastructure.

Democrats and Republicans in Washington have been angrily debating government spending targeted at sparking life in a depressed economy. Whether the first round of stimulus spending was too little or too much promises to be a major issue in next year's presidential election. A similar debate arose in the 1930's when the feds tried to push the country out of the Great Depression. But WKSU's Mark Urycki reports that the spending of nearly 90 years ago left a legacy that we still use today.

For audio and images with audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/29394

You could drive on a street today over a bridge through a park and visit a post office before going to a university school building – all of which would have been built by the federal government in the 1930's just to give some one a job. The Franklin Roosevelt Administration created a number of alphabet organizations aimed at stimulating the economy, but most are lumped together today as the WPA, or Works Progress Administration.

The Depression hit heavy industry the hardest and that meant it hit Northeast Ohio, not unlike the Great Recession of 2008 – whose effects still linger. But Kent State University history professor Greg Bindas says the situation in 1931 was much more dire than today.

BINDAS: “The unemployment rate in a place like Youngstown or Toledo or Cleveland is upwards of 60 percent. In Toledo in 1933 its 80 percent of the population. In Cleveland it's upwards to 50 percent.”

CCC: Making its mark East and West
One of the first government responses to the Depression was creating the Civilian Conservation Corps. It resembled bootcamps of young men who are remembered for building national parks out West. But Case Western Reserve University history professor John Grabowski says they did plenty of work here too.

Grabowski: “Our image of the CC are the great national parks, but we have to realize we had the Emerald Necklace right here in greater Cleveland. And one of the prime areas of CCC activity was Brecksville Reservation. And a small museum near Brecksville Reservation has some incredible photographs and images of CC workers there. So because we had a park system , because it was forested, the CCC was employed here.”

The WPA greatly expanded employment efforts in order to get money directly to workers -- not companies -- to both boost the economy and give people hope. And that meant providing jobs for all walks of life. For example, Kent's Bindas says, building a new post office in Warren began with hiring an architect.

Bindas: “This was a WPA draft person who would then do the draft work for it using the drawings of the WPA architect. You had sewing projects, canning projects, mattress-making projects. You name the commodity and the WPA produced it.”

Preserving the arts
That included art. [music of Sokoloff and the Cleveland Orchestra] The first conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra, Nikolai Sokoloff, came of out retirement to head the Federal Music Project.

Bindas: “The Federal Music Project I think had an incredible impact on the national culture and national identity. It exposed American classical music and American composers to 158 million or more people. And these were ordinary people who weren't the ones who normally went to the symphony hall.”

Urycki: “Did that make the difference between some of these orchestras folding and not folding?”

Bindas: “Yes. Cleveland Orchestra, Toledo, Akron, Youngstown – these orchestras would be the Federal Music Project, and without federal support they would have gone under. Cincinnati and Columbus as well. All, the orchestras in Ohio to a large degree were supported during the 1930's by the Federal Music Project. And that gave them a leg up to survive the hard times and the loss of patronage. So when WWII ended and veterans came back, these orchestras had in place the community support to survive.”

Artists and even writers were put to work, much to the relief of Professor Grabowski.

GRABOWSKI: “You can see these great WPA murals. One of the best to my mind is in the post office building at 101st street in downtown Cleveland.”

The WPA also fostered the preservation and writing of history. In Cleveland, the writers project was searching out and cataloguing archival sources. The first list of government archives in Northeast Ohio (is) by historians and others who needed to go to work. And the same project then goes to foreign-language newspapers, and they prepare a series of translated abstracts.

Urycki: “You as a historian must love that.”

Grabowski: “Oh, I absolutely love it. My field is immigration history, and I have a raft of languages under me, so if I want to know what's happening in say the Slovenian community in the 1930's, I can look to the translation of their papers.

“And when I first began studying the Polish community of Cleveland, I found out that the WPA had prepared a manuscript of the Poles of Cleveland. It never saw publication. We found it in the archives of the Ohio Historical Society. And … there is a spectacular Guide to Cleveland that's never been published. We have a copy of it here at the Western Reserve Historical Society. “So here's the federal government producing art, writing history, preserving history. It's all across the board.”

Socialism or a path for moderation?
Grabowski and Bindas acknowledge the programs had their opponents.

Bindas: “There was tremendous opposition to this because many people, a very vocal and powerful minority, saw this as Roosevelt's form of socialism.”

Grabowski: “The experiment was so radical at that time because it wasn't the federal government's business to employ people nor was it to build public housing. “That's the period where -- at least in Cleveland -- public housing begins to be at least legitimized and some WPA monies are used to build the housing.

Urycki: “Are some of that housing projects built then still around?”

Grabowski: “Yes. I believe Lakeview Terrace may have been a WPA project on the near west side. I think Outhwaite Homes began in that period, and Outhwaite Homes was the site that really changed the lives of two African-American brothers – Carl and Lo uis Stokes. As they recalled, it was the first decent housing they were ever able to live in.”

Big business hated the projects, but Bindas and Grabowski both believe President Roosevelt may have protected capitalism from the far more extremist forces on the right and the left.

Grabowski: “In 1919, on May Day, there were a series of riots in the city when socialists/communists protested a march and it broke up into a bloody fracas. That evened out, but when the Depression started, (there were) … voices who were saying we need to look toward the Soviet Union, or some voices who were saying after 1932-35, look at the fascist governments, they put people back to work so maybe that is a model. So there were alternatives floating around here.”

Urycki : “Today, it's conservative conventional wisdom that none of this did any help for the economy in the Great Depression. Did it help?”

Still surviving
Bindas: “Oh gosh, yes. The infrastructure that is collapsing all around us – bridges, for example, throughout the United States -- many of them were built in the 1930's and 1940's as a result of the WPA. Highways were laid out; most of the airports were laid out by the WPA. (Cleveland) Hopkins airport was one of the first WPA projects to build airports. This was when the airline industry was still in its infancy. It was very much like that Field of Dreams analogy: ‘If you build it they will come.'”

Grabowski: “Many of the parkways in the Emerald Necklace have some CCC or WPA in them. Some of the older playgrounds in Cleveland if they've survived. Part of the Shoreway is WPA. The Cultural gardens are WPA.”

In the end, it took the biggest government-spending project of them all to get out of the Great Depression: buying planes and tanks and ships for World War Two. But Bindas says there's a difference between the relatively short-term military spending and the long-term effects of the WPA.

Bindas : “These were projects that continue to give back. We still use Virgina Kendall Reserve; we still use Sand Run. We still use the airports that were laid out, the roads and bridges that were laid out by the WPA. With defense spending you don't quite get that -- more bang for your buck.”

Urycki: “Because in five years, all those airplanes are sitting out in a graveyard in the desert somewhere?”

Bindas: “That's right. In the desert somewhere, waiting for post-apocalyptic us to go out and live in them or something.”

Professor Kenneth Bindas compares building the country's infrastructure in the 1930's to the government building the Internet in the 1980's. saying the great financial payoffs came a few years later.

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News Headline: WELCOME BACK | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State-East Liverpool student Jordan Steele (center) hands out t-shirts at the “Welcome Back Fest” held for new and returning students on Tuesday. Free food was provided, informational booths were available for the students and t-shirts were raffled off. Students could also buy water balloons to throw at the student government president, raising money for the campus' Relay for Life team. The event continues noon to 3 p.m. today. (Photo by Ana Yanni)

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News Headline: WELCOME BACK | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State-East Liverpool student Jordan Steele (center) hands out t-shirts at the “Welcome Back Fest” held for new and returning students on Tuesday. Free food was provided, informational booths were available for the students and t-shirts were raffled off. Students could also buy water balloons to throw at the student government president, raising money for the campus' Relay for Life team. The event continues noon to 3 p.m. today. (Photo by Ana Yanni)

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News Headline: Kent Trumbull Enrollment Up 15% (Sines, Ritter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHAMPION TOWNSHIP, Ohio -- Kent State University at Trumbull's enrollment growth is continuing to climb. Fall semester figures show a 15% increase over last fall, according to the official 15-day figures.

With a count of 3,207 students, the campus bettered its all-time enrollment high, established just one year ago (3,144), and extended an upward trend which has Kent State Trumbull boasting an over near 55% increase from fall 2008 to fall 2011, officials said.

"When you factor in the number of degree options available at our campus -- including a great line-up of bachelor's as well as associate programs, affordability of our tuition and the fact that we are centrally located for so many students and our many day, evening and online class options, we are very pleased with the enrollment numbers," said Robert Sines, KSU Trumbull dean.

"A recent survey of our students indicated that, more and more, students are realizing the affordability of Kent State Trumbull," added James Ritter, director, Enrollment Management & Student Services. "With more than 3,200 students, Kent State Trumbull has the atmosphere of a small college. However, being part of Kent State University, our students also have the resources of a major research university."

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News Headline: KSU president anticipates growth in Kent (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name: Thomas Gallick
News OCR Text: Even Lester Lefton's detractors probably wouldn't question his energy or knack for getting things done.

As the Kent State University president enters his sixth year at the helm of the school, it would also be hard to dispute that KSU is a very different place because of his leadership.

Some might complain the university is growing too large (with a record-breaking freshman class of 4,275 at the main campus this year), too involved with the city (with a downtown hotel and conference center and extended Esplanade walkway in the works) and too ambitious (with plans to implement a student fee-based $250 million renovation in the works).

Lefton said he'll listen to criticism, but being popular is not his goal, and being criticized won't prevent him from taking action he thinks will benefit the university as a whole.

"People want to keep their jobs," Lefton said. "They want to be popular. They want to be liked. That's not necessarily what we need. You've always got to be saying 'What's the right thing to do?' not, 'What's the popular thing to do?'"

Regarding the idea that KSU might be expanding too rapidly, Lefton said the university won't be having any freshman classes much bigger than this one in the near future. KSU won't be trying to trying to compete in size with Ohio State University, in other words.

"What I do want to see is an increase in the quality of the students," Lefton said. "What we're after is quality, not quantity."

Lefton believes KSU's reputation is rapidly growing throughout the state and beyond, which will allow the school to be increasingly selective as to what type of student will be admitted. He said he believes days where students in Ohio thought they had to go to Miami University in Oxford or OSU for a first-rate higher education are nearing an end.

Another area some have criticized as an overreach for the school and the city: the Kent revitalization process that Kent State and Lefton have helped shepherd.

"I think this downtown [redevelopment] is really a cornerstone to attracting better students," Lefton said.

Current and pending redevelopment efforts in downtown Kent include: the expansion of the Acorn Alley retail plaza, the Fairmount Properties mixed-use block, the $24 million Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority Kent Central Gateway and a KSU Hotel and Conference Center. Ground for the hotel at East Erie and South DePeyster streets will be broken Sept. 19.

Lefton said he found an ally in Kent City Manager Dave Ruller, who arrived in Kent a year before Lefton arrived from Tulane University in 2006. Lefton said he and Ruller both have a never say die spirit when it comes to the projects they are passionate about, which played a huge role in the collaborative redevelopment efforts.

Lefton said if he and Ruller had followed conventional wisdom, the revitalization project would likely never have come together. He said he sees the redevelopment as a transformative moment for the university and the city.

Lefton said selecting vice presidents who were willing to fight for his agenda, was key to the university's growth.

"A lot of vice presidents who have moved on were just fonts of negativity," Lefton said. "We've changed a lot, including almost all of them."

As for Lefton's next transformative move, it's still the implementation of the much-discussed plan to borrow $210 million for a $250 million campus renovation and construction on campus, and increase student fees to help pay off the debt.

Eric Fingerhut, former chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, killed the plan in 2010. Current Chancellor Jim Petro supports it, but the university still needs approval from the State Controlling Board.

Lefton said schools don't put an item on the legislative agenda without being assured they have the votes to pass it. He said KSU is not at the point of putting the plan on the agenda yet.

True to his nature, Lefton said he has variations on the renovation plan that he will pursue if this one falls by the wayside. It's yet another project he's unwilling to take "no" for an answer on.

Lefton said it's this type of process that's bothered him the most in his time at KSU. He said state schools are currently being attacked from both sides, with Ohio overregulating and underfunding its university system.

"Ohio is a politically-charged environment where legislators and local politicians are much more involved than they need to be," Lefton said. "I came from private universities where they didn't have this. They ran much more efficiently."

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News Headline: Lefton aiming for more growth at Kent State (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name: Thomas Gallick
News OCR Text: Even Lester Lefton's detractors probably wouldn't question his energy or knack for getting things done.

As the Kent State University president enters his sixth year at the helm of the school, it would also be hard to dispute that KSU is a very different place because of his leadership.

Some might complain the university is growing too large (with a record-breaking freshman class of 4,275 at the main campus this year), too involved with the city (with a downtown hotel and conference center and extended Esplanade walkway in the works) and too ambitious (with plans to implement a student fee-based $250 million renovation in the works).

Lefton said he'll listen to criticism, but being popular is not his goal, and being criticized won't prevent him from taking action he thinks will benefit the university as a whole.

"People want to keep their jobs," Lefton said. "They want to be popular. They want to be liked. That's not necessarily what we need. You've always got to be saying 'What's the right thing to do?' not, 'What's the popular thing to do?'"

Regarding the idea that KSU might be expanding too rapidly, Lefton said the university won't be having any freshman classes much bigger than this one in the near future. KSU won't be trying to trying to compete in size with Ohio State University, in other words.

"What I do want to see is an increase in the quality of the students," Lefton said. "What we're after is quality, not quantity."

Lefton believes KSU's reputation is rapidly growing throughout the state and beyond, which will allow the school to be increasingly selective as to what type of student will be admitted. He said he believes days where students in Ohio thought they had to go to Miami University in Oxford or OSU for a first-rate higher education are nearing an end.

Another draw for the brightest students? Another area some have criticized as an overreach for the school and the city: the Kent revitalization process that Kent State and Lefton have helped shepherd.

"I think this downtown [redevelopment] is really a cornerstone to attracting better students," Lefton said.

Current and pending redevelopment efforts in downtown Kent include: the expansion of the Acorn Alley retail plaza, the Fairmount Properties mixed-use block, the $24 million Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority Kent Central Gateway and a KSU Hotel and Conference Center. Ground for the hotel at East Erie and South DePeyster streets will be broken Sept. 19.

Lefton said he found an ally in Kent City Manager Dave Ruller, who arrived in Kent a year before Lefton arrived from Tulane University in 2006. Lefton said he and Ruller both have a never say die spirit when it comes to the projects they are passionate about, which played a huge role in the collaborative redevelopment efforts.

Lefton said if he and Ruller had followed conventional wisdom, the revitalization project would likely never have come together. He said he sees the redevelopment as a transformative moment for the university and the city.

For evidence of Lefton's ability to transform his environment, one needs only to examine a list of his nine vice presidents. Only one, Edward Mahon, KSU's vice president for information services, was appointed by Lefton's predecessor, Carol Cartwright.

Lefton said selecting vice presidents who were willing to fight for his agenda, was key to the university's growth.

"A lot of vice presidents who have moved on were just fonts of negativity," Lefton said. "We've changed a lot, including almost all of them."

As for Lefton's next transformative move, it's still the implementation of the much-discussed plan to borrow $210 million for a $250 million campus renovation and construction on campus, and increase student fees to help pay off the debt.

Eric Fingerhut, former chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, killed the plan in 2010. Current Chancellor Jim Petro supports it, but the university still needs approval from the State Controlling Board.

Lefton said schools don't put an item on the legislative agenda without being assured they have the votes to pass it. He said KSU is not at the point of putting the plan on the agenda yet.

True to his nature, Lefton said he has variations on the renovation plan that he will pursue if this one falls by the wayside. It's yet another project he's unwilling to take "no" for an answer on.

Lefton said it's this type of process that's bothered him the most in his time at KSU. He said state schools are currently being attacked from both sides, with Ohio overregulating and underfunding its university system.

"Ohio is a politically-charged environment where legislators and local politicians are much more involved than they need to be," Lefton said. "I came from private universities where they didn't have this. They ran much more efficiently."

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News Headline: Autumn Sky topic at KSU planetarium | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “Introduction to the Autumn
Sky,” the first in a series
of free public shows
for the 2011-12 academic
year, will be presented
by Kent State University
Planetarium Director
Brett Ellman.
Programs will take place
at 8 p.m. Sept. 23, 24 and
30 in Room 108 of Smith
Hall.
Ellman will showcase the
prominent autumn constellations,
point out celestial
objects that are visible
to the naked eye, and
tour our neighbors in the
solar system.
This show is free, and
open to all, but is not appropriate
for children under
6. Because seating
capacity is limited, reservations
are suggested. Calling
330-672-2246.
Persons needing special
accommodations are
requested to call at least
one week in advance of
the show.
For more information,
visit http://planetarium.
kent.edu/ Intr

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News Headline: Kent State Folk Festival headliners Carolina Chocolate Drops reclaiming old-time music for new generations | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: Michael Sangiacomo, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: The Carolina Chocolate Drops, Peter Yarrow, the Dirty Dozen Brass Band and others will be featured in the 45th Annual Kent State Folk Festival starting Wednesday, Sept. 21 and running through Sept. 25.

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News Headline: KSU Folk Festival kicks off next week | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 45th Kent State Folk
Festival is set to launch with
Grammy Award winners the
Carolina Chocolate Drops
on the Kent State University
campus on Sept. 21. In
addition, David Wax Museum
and Sleepy Sun on Sept.
24 in support of rising stars
the Low Anthem, and Seth
Glier on Sept. 25 before folk
legend Peter Yarrow, both at
the Kent Stage.
Local favorites Mo' Mojo
get the crowd warmed up for
the hot sounds of the Dirty
Dozen Brass Band at the
Kent Stage on Sept. 22.
David Wax Museum caused
an unexpected stir at the
2010 Newport Folk Festival.
Taking the smallest stage as
the result of a contest win,
the band brought down the
house and was invited to
the mainstage for this year's
event in Newport. A mix of
Americana, folk and rhythms
from Mexico (where leader
David Wax spent summers
working), the band features
an intriguing blend of harmonies
and instrumentation -
including Suz Slezak adding
percussion with an authentic
donkey jawbone.
In Ohio, California seems
like a single destination – the
freewheeling left-coast state,
home to Hollywood and San
Francisco. But Sleepy Sun,
like the state itself, is also
about the mountains and
ocean and quiet moments
between the glitz and glamour.
Tickets are now on sale
for all Kent State Folk Festival
concerts and are available
at the Kent Stage, by
phone at 330-677-5005 or online
at www.KentStateFolk-
Festival.org.
The festival website has
been updated with artist
bios and video, along with
the complete list of free Folk
Alley ‘Round Town performances
throughout Kent
on Sept. 23 and community
workshops at the Kent State
Student Center on from 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 24.
Kent State University students
may buy discount tickets
for all shows by presenting
a valid KSU ID at time of
purchase.

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