Report Overview:
Total Clips (38)
Aeronautics; College of Technology (1)
Athletics (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Biomedical Science; Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Global Education; History; Jewish Studies; Pan-African Studies (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
English (1)
Entrepreneurship; Town-Gown (2)
Geography (1)
Higher Education (1)
Interior Design (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (3)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Mathematics; University Libraries (1)
Music (2)
Political Science (1)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Students (3)
Town-Gown (2)
University Press (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)
WKSU-FM (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics; College of Technology (1)
Kent State's Fall Aviation Fair Moved to Spring (Vincent) 09/19/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Athletics (1)
What do you do? Suggestions please 09/18/2011 Daily Record - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Darrell Hazell isn't finding the right buttons to push in his first season at Kent State. He came to Kent with good intentions and some good ideas,...


Biological Sciences (1)
Research Data from Kent State University Update Understanding of Obesity (Novak) 09/19/2011 NewsRx.com Text Email

...PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic differences in physical activity...


Biomedical Science; Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Cob(I)alamin and Peroxynitrite: Rapid Oxidation of Cob(I)alamin to Cob(II)alamin by Peroxynitrous Acid. 09/17/2011 BioPortfolio Text Attachment Email

...Germany) » Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Cob(I)alamin and Peroxyn... Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and School of Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (USA). Name: Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany) A potent oxidant synthesized by the...


Board of Trustees (1)
ON THE MOVE 09/19/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Email


Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Mechanistic Studies on the Reaction between Cob(II)alamin and Peroxynitrite: Evidence for a Dual Role for Cob(II)alamin as a Scavenger of Peroxynitrous Acid and Nitrogen Dioxide. 09/17/2011 BioPortfolio Text Attachment Email

...Cbl(II) molecules are rapidly oxidized to inactive Cbl(III) upon exposure to peroxynitrite or (.) NO(2) . Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (USA). Name: Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany) A potent oxidant synthesized by the...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
North Canton master plan meeting on Tuesday 09/16/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Pages Search provided by local.com NORTH CANTON — Residents are invited to the second North Canton Master Plan public meeting on Tuesday at Walsh University's Barrette Center. The meeting will feature a review of the project so far, and participants will break into working groups to...

CoolCleveland :: Videos :: Popping Up On Euclid Avenue: Urban Design Takes On The Region 09/17/2011 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

...has invigorated overlooked spaces throughout the region, and now wants to reinvent retail on Euclid Avenue. Watch the video .As Interim Director of the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative, she is overseeing their recent move to Playhouse Square, centralizing their efforts to work with community...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Global Education; History; Jewish Studies; Pan-African Studies (1)
PROFESSOR TO LECTURE ABOUT JEWISH CULTURE (Wilson-Fall) 09/16/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.16 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies presents Dr.Aomar...


College of Business (COB) (1)
SMFHS business teachers attend global institute 09/18/2011 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...programs or technology in grades K-12 participated. This was a three-day residential institute built on the successes of the 2009 Global Institute at Kent State University and 2010 Global Institute at Ohio State University. The 2011 Global Institute was a collaborative efforts of the Ohio Department...


English (1)
Hemingway's Boat 09/16/2011 Christian Science Monitor - Online Text Attachment Email

...like to write letters? I do because it's such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you've done something.” Spanier, an English professor at Pennsylvania State University, and Trogdon, an English professor at Kent State University, have collaborated with other scholars as well as...


Entrepreneurship; Town-Gown (2)
VIDEO: An international event; Multicultural festival brings music, food to Kent 09/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

PHOTOS: Kent's First International Festival 09/19/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Geography (1)
Californians should brace for longer, deadlier heat waves 09/17/2011 SFGate Text Attachment Email

...warming climate accounts for just a quarter of the change, however; the rest is due to shifting demographics.The study was conducted by Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University geographer who also conducted a 2006 preliminary analysis for CARB.


Higher Education (1)
Michael K. McIntyre's Tipoff 09/19/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


Interior Design (1)
ON THE MOVE 09/19/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
2 editors win McGruder diversity awards from APME 09/17/2011 First Amendment Center Text Attachment Email

...the spirit of McGruder, a former executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, former managing editor of The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer and a graduate of Kent State University,” APME said. McGruder, who died in 2002, was a past president of APME and a former member of the American Society of News...


KSU at Salem (1)
Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 (McCullagn) 09/19/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state...


KSU at Stark (3)
July 3: The Monday After: Students study Civil War in print (Heaphy) 09/17/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...was a design issue, and not a reflection on the importance of the War Between the States. But, it still was an interesting discovery of two students at Kent State University Stark Campus ? Kara Carowick and Dina Musaelyan ? who spent months in the last school year perusing Civil War editions...

Regula calls redistricting plan 'outrageous' (Tudor) 09/17/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...running clear over to Dennis Kucinich's district all along Lake Erie. You look at that map, there are some odd-looking things."But Dr. Jarrod Tudor, a Kent State Stark political professor, who gave a presentation on the redistricting plan Friday, said the proposal could have been much worse...

DREAM PROGRAM: Pharmacy Tech is hands-on 09/16/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Washington High School gave students new opportunities by rolling out a career and technical prep program: Pharmacy Technology. Through a partnership with Kent State University and Aultman Hospital, the program is already thriving and, as a health science career prep program, has found a comfortable...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Newcomerstown BOE meeting 09/17/2011 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...funding through the governor's biennial budget, and funds from the federal government stimulus program “dried up” as of June 30. The board approved four Kent State University dual enrollment classes to be taught at the high school. Two of the courses are new. Offered for the first time are...


KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (2)
KSU ready to break ground on hotel (Finn) 09/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Groundbreaking Today for Kent State Hotel 09/19/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
AUDIO: Exploradio - The liquid crystal kingdom (Yokoyama) 09/19/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email


Mathematics; University Libraries (1)
KSU celebrates opening of its new learning center, Math Emporium (Frank, Tonge) 09/17/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Published: Sat, September 17, 2011 @ 12:00 a.m.Staff reportkentMembers of the Kent State University community recently celebrated the opening of the new Kent State University Math Emporium, a state-of-the-art...


Music (2)
Faculty Recital planned Sept. 25 at Kent State 09/17/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...harpsichord and Keith Robinson, violoncello, will be held at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at the Carl F.W. Ludwig Recital Hall at the Music and Speech Center at Kent State University. The program includes VIII Fantasia ex F, Bartolomeo de Selma y Salaverde, ca.1580-ca.1638; Valsas para Fagote Solo...

Symphony Orchestra opens 14th season 09/18/2011 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Directed by Darrell Lee Music, the Stow Symphony Orchestra will perform its fall concert at the Ludwig Recital Hall on the Kent State University Campus, at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 1. Ludwig Hall is located in the university's Music and Speech Building at 1325 Theatre Drive,...


Political Science (1)
The George Washington University (GWU) Elliott School of International Affairs - Discussion 09/16/2011 FIND Washington Daybook Text Email

...Rabab El Mahdi, assistant professor of political science at the American University of Cairo; Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University; Mona El-Ghobashy, assistant professor of political science at Barnard College; and Marc Lynch, director of the GWU Institute...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Kayaking 101... 09/19/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

...attend an Kayak Instructor Certification course offered through the American Canoe Association and being taught by Instructor Trainer, Dave Herpy, of Kent State University. The program began with a classroom session on Friday for five hours to be followed with two eight-hour sessions on Saturday...


Students (3)
Business Briefs - Sept. 18: DQ fundraiser supports scholarship 09/18/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...and Hudson resident; 2008 Hudson High School graduate; enthusiastic member of the HHS Swing Marching Band, Wind Ensemble and Jazz 1 Percussion Ensemble; Kent State University student and brother of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, died in December 2010 at the age of 21. The Tau Kappa Epsilon Chapter...

Rick Perry's Views Supported By Republicans, Not So Much By Independents 09/16/2011 Outside The Beltway Text Attachment Email

...evolution science and whether humans contribute to climate change. “Science is an integral part of our culture,” said Danyelle Lowers, 27, a student at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, who considers herself an independent voter. “To have such a general disregard for the sciences is rather...

GOP poll shows Perry as front-runner 09/16/2011 Buffalo News Text Email

...evolution science and whether humans contribute to climate change. "Science is an integral part of our culture," said Danyelle Lowers, 27, a student at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, who considers herself an independent voter. "To have such a general disregard for the sciences is rather...


Town-Gown (2)
An international event 09/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Bulletin Board: Cuyahoga River Cleanup Project will be Sept. 24 09/18/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

The city of Cuyahoga Falls is partnering with Kent State University and the cities of Kent, Munroe Falls and several other Cuyahoga River watershed communities in the third annual National...


University Press (1)
July 18: The Monday After: Civil War images are focus of exhibit 09/18/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...to Ohio, was inspired by a collection of Civil War photos from the archives of Western Reserve Historical Society. A companion publication published by Kent State University Press, "Feel the Bonds that Draw," will combine those images with text by Christine Dee.The museum chose more than three...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
Speak Peace Tomorrow at the UA Poetry Center (Hassler) 09/16/2011 Tucson Weekly - Online Text Attachment Email

...poetic responses to the painings. Speak Peace is on display through Friday, Sept. 23. The exhibit is a collaboration between the War Remnants Museum, Kent State's Wick Poetry Center and School of Art Galleries, and Soldiers' Heart, a veterans' return and healing organization. The paintings...


WKSU-FM (1)
WKSU News: Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul, and Mary returns to Kent 09/19/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Yarrow's solo performance Sunday closes the 45th annual Kent State Folk Festivalby WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMANReporterVivian GoodmanIn The Region:Peter Yarrow of "Peter, Paul, and Mar," one of the best...


News Headline: Kent State's Fall Aviation Fair Moved to Spring (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The air show is normally in the fall, but this year it has been moved to April because it will coincide with two alumni events

Since alumni will be in town in April, the Aviation Heritage Fair at the Kent Sate University Airport has been moved to the spring instead of this fall.

The annual event is normally in the fall, but to coincide with two events put on by Kent State's College of Technology and its Aeronautics Program, the air show will be April 21, 2012.

"The new spring date allows Kent State alumni who will be attending the Richard Schwabe Golf Outing April 20, 2012, and the Vision 21 Banquet on April 21, 2012, to join community members to enjoy an all-day event of aviation activities, a pancake breakfast, airplane rides, music and entertainment, as well as meet aviation scholars, enthusiasts and industry professionals," said Emily Vincent, a Kent State spokesperson.

The Aviation Heritage Fair features activities for both the flight enthusiast and casual fan. Event admission and parking are free. There is a cost for airplane rides.

The event is run by the faculty, staff and students of the university's Aeronautics Program with help from the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club.

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News Headline: What do you do? Suggestions please | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record - Online, The
Contact Name: DavidCarducci
News OCR Text: Darrell Hazell isn't finding the right buttons to push in his first season at Kent State.

He came to Kent with good intentions and some good ideas, but like so many coaches before him, he didn't know what he didn't know when he took this job. It's as tough a job as any in Division I football, and there are no quick fixes in turning around this program.

It may take a little longer than he expected to learn how to win at Kent State. Hopefully the fans and administrators will be patient.

In the meantime, while there are no quick fixes to turning KSU into an actual contender, maybe there are some adjustments that can be made right now that can make the Flashes look like an actual Division I football team.

I have a few ideas. Hazell left Saturday's game at Kansas State saying “we need to figure out who we are ,” and then admitted “right now, I don't know who we are.” That can't be an easy thing to say for a head coach.

But he is right. He doesn't know what KSU is. Is it a running team? Is it a passing team? There are more questions to answer there. But before Hazell can figure out who his team is, he may need to figure out what his team has. It doesn't appear that Hazell has figured out his roster.

For some reason, Hazell continues the Matthew Hurdle experiment when all the obscenely-talented junior wide receiver does on the field is prove himself unworthy of his coach's faith by his boorish behavior. Another personal foul at Kansas State should be the final straw. If I was a head coach, Hurdle couldn't play for me until he demonstrated some discipline in practice, and over a long period of time.

And while Hurdle has played and stayed on the first team, KSU for some reason continues to reduce the role of Tyshon Goode (zero catches Saturday night at K-State). I understand this staff wasn't in Kent during the last two years when he proved himself as a playmaker over and over again in actual games, but Goode has built some equity with his teammates and KSU's fans with his play. That should mean more than some intangible idea of untapped talent in the players who have moved ahead of Goode on the depth chart. Getting Goode back into the gameplan may be a good way to start curing what is ailing the Flashes offense. Giving Spencer Keith his security blanket back could also only help the struggling quarterback.

Anyone else have any other ideas?

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News Headline: Research Data from Kent State University Update Understanding of Obesity (Novak) | Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Investigators publish new data in the report "Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity." According to the authors of recent research from Kent, Ohio, "Though obesity is common, some people remain resistant to weight gain even in an obesogenic environment. The propensity to remain lean may be partly associated with high endurance capacity along with high spontaneous physical activity and the energy expenditure of activity, called non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)."

"Previous studies have shown that high-capacity running rats (HCR) are lean compared to low-capacity runners (LCR), which are susceptible to cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Here, we examine the effect of diet on spontaneous activity and NEAT, as well as potential mechanisms underlying these traits, in rats selectively bred for high or low intrinsic aerobic endurance capacity. Compared to LCR, HCR were resistant to the sizeable increases in body mass and fat mass induced by a high-fat diet; HCR also had lower levels of circulating leptin. HCR were consistently more active than LCR, and had lower fuel economy of activity, regardless of diet. Nonetheless, both HCR and LCR showed a similar decrease in daily activity levels after high-fat feeding, as well as decreases in hypothalamic orexin-A content. The HCR were more sensitive to the NEAT-activating effects of intra-paraventricular orexin-A compared to LCR, especially after high-fat feeding. Lastly, levels of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in the skeletal muscle of HCR were consistently higher than LCR, and the high-fat diet decreased skeletal muscle PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic differences in physical activity levels may originate at the level of the skeletal muscle, which could alter brain responsiveness to neuropeptides and other factors that regulate spontaneous daily activity and NEAT."

Novak and colleagues published their study in Hormones and Behavior (Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity. Hormones and Behavior, 2010;58(3):355-67).

For additional information, contact C.M. Novak, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Copyright © 2011 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Cob(I)alamin and Peroxynitrite: Rapid Oxidation of Cob(I)alamin to Cob(II)alamin by Peroxynitrous Acid. | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: BioPortfolio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Home » Latest PubMed Articles » Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany) » Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Cob(I)alamin and Peroxyn...

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and School of Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (USA).

Name: Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany)

A potent oxidant synthesized by the cell during its normal metabolism. Peroxynitrite is formed from the reaction of two free radicals, NITRIC OXIDE and the superoxide anion (SUPEROXIDES).

Compounds that accept electrons in an oxidation-reduction reaction. The reaction is induced by or accelerated by exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the spectrum of visible or ultraviolet light.

Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.

A reagent commonly used in biochemical studies as a protective agent to prevent the oxidation of SH (thiol) groups and for reducing disulphides to dithiols.

The reaction of two molecular entities via oxidation usually catalyzed by a transition metal compound and involving dioxygen as the oxidant.

PubMed Articles 9291 Associated PubMed Articles

Peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid (ONOO(-) /ONOOH; pK(a(ONOOH)) =6.8) is implicated in multiple chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Both mammalian B(12) -dependent enzymes are inactiva...

A novel fluorescent probe, HKGreen-3, for sensing peroxynitrite is designed on the basis of the rhodol scaffold and a peroxynitrite-specific oxidation reaction. The probe turns out to be highly sensit...

Abstract The peroxynitrite-induced functional impairment of myosin was studied in different reaction conditions, known to alter the oxidative chemistry of peroxynitrite, to better understand the molec...

Our mechanistic understanding of the conversion of vitamin B(12) into coenzyme B(12) (a.k.a. adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl) has been substantially advanced in recent years. Insights into the multiple role...

This report described the direct voltammetric detection of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) at a novel cyanocobalamin modified glassy carbon electrode prepared by electropolymeriation method. The electrochemic...

Clinical Trials 1356 Associated Clinical Trials

OBJECTIVES: I. Characterize inheritance patterns of mutations in patients with beta-oxidation disorders.

To evaluate the clinical performance of the PRO-Kinetic ENERGY® coronary bare metal stent system in a patient population within that defined in the Instructions for Use.

This project will attempt to validate the utilization of a stable isotope kinetic biomarker (KineMarkerTM) as a predictive test for disease progression in early stage chronic lymphocytic l...

There is evidence that total carbohydrate oxidation during exercise is higher after ingestion of fructose:glucose mixture than after ingestion of equimolar amounts of glucose alone. This m...

Does the consumption of various combinations of mono and disaccharides (lactose, sucrose and fructose) and protein isolates (whey or soy) result in altered substrate absorption, substrate...

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News Headline: ON THE MOVE | Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Richard Marsh was appointed by Gov. John Kasich to the board of trustees. Marsh retired from FirstEnergy Corp. in July 2009 after 29 years with the Akron company

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News Headline: Mechanistic Studies on the Reaction between Cob(II)alamin and Peroxynitrite: Evidence for a Dual Role for Cob(II)alamin as a Scavenger of Peroxynitrous Acid and Nitrogen Dioxide. | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: BioPortfolio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Home » Latest PubMed Articles » Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany) » Mechanistic Studies on the Reaction between Cob(II)alamin and Pe...

Peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid (ONOO(-) /ONOOH; pK(a(ONOOH)) =6.8) is implicated in multiple chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Both mammalian B(12) -dependent enzymes are inactivated under oxidative stress conditions. We report studies on the kinetics of the reaction between peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid and a major intracellular vitamin B(12) form, cob(II)alamin (Cbl(II)), using stopped-flow spectroscopy. The pH dependence of the reaction is consistent with peroxynitrous acid reacting directly with Cbl(II) to give cob(III)alamin (Cbl(III)) and (.) NO(2) , followed by a subsequent rapid reaction between (.) NO(2) and a second molecule of Cbl(II) to primarily form nitrocobalamin. In support of this mechanism, a Cbl(II)/ONOO(H) stoichiometry of 2:1 is observed at pH�7.35 and 12.0. The final major Cbl(III) product observed (nitrocobalamin or hydroxycobalamin) depends on the solution pH. Analysis of the reaction products in the presence of tyrosine-a well-established (.) NO(2) scavenger-reveals that Cbl(II) reacts with (.) NO(2) at least an order of magnitude faster than tyrosine itself. Given that protein-bound Cbl is accessible to small molecules, it is likely that enzyme-bound and free intracellular Cbl(II) molecules are rapidly oxidized to inactive Cbl(III) upon exposure to peroxynitrite or (.) NO(2) .

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (USA).

Name: Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany)

A potent oxidant synthesized by the cell during its normal metabolism. Peroxynitrite is formed from the reaction of two free radicals, NITRIC OXIDE and the superoxide anion (SUPEROXIDES).

Inflammation of an intervertebral disk or disk space which may lead to disk erosion. Until recently, discitis has been defined as a nonbacterial inflammation and has been attributed to aseptic processes (e.g., chemical reaction to an injected substance). However, recent studies provide evidence that infection may be the initial cause, but perhaps not the promoter, of most cases of discitis. Discitis has been diagnosed in patients following discography, myelography, lumbar puncture, paravertebral injection, and obstetrical epidural anesthesia. Discitis following chemonucleolysis (especially with chymopapain) is attributed to chemical reaction by some and to introduction of microorganisms by others.

Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.

A preconceived judgment made without adequate evidence and not easily alterable by presentation of contrary evidence.

Dual Specificity Phosphatase 3

A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED MAP KINASES.

PubMed Articles 9463 Associated PubMed Articles

Our mechanistic understanding of the conversion of vitamin B(12) into coenzyme B(12) (a.k.a. adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl) has been substantially advanced in recent years. Insights into the multiple role...

Salmonella enterica degrades 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) in a coenzyme B12 (adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl) -dependent fashion. Salmonella obtains AdoCbl by assimilation of complex precursors such as vitamin...

A novel fluorescent probe, HKGreen-3, for sensing peroxynitrite is designed on the basis of the rhodol scaffold and a peroxynitrite-specific oxidation reaction. The probe turns out to be highly sensit...

Cellular damage occurring under oxidative conditions has been ascribed mainly to the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOOH/ONOO(-)) that originates from the reaction of NO(*) with O(2) (*-). The detriment...

Clinical Trials 1809 Associated Clinical Trials

This project will help counselors in substance abuse treatment programs make effective referrals of dually diagnosed patients (those with a co-occurring psychiatric disorder) to self-help...

Evidence indicates that almond consumption is associated with multiple health benefits. However, nuts are commonly excluded from diets on the basis that their high energy content may induc...

The purpose of this study is to compare Dual LV (left ventricular) pacing to standard single LV pacing (BiV pacing) to see if Dual LV pacing: 1. Improves the way the heart's left ventri...

Objective of the trial is to assess the safety and efficacy of Montelukast in treatment of Erythema Nodosum leprosum (ENL) reaction in multibacillary leprosy patients either in combination...

This project is designed to establish whether pesticides or other environmental agents have a role in the excess birth defects identified in the Red River Valley of Minnesota. In this huma...

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News Headline: North Canton master plan meeting on Tuesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: with Totally Local Yellow Pages

Search provided by local.com

NORTH CANTON —

Residents are invited to the second North Canton Master Plan public meeting on Tuesday at Walsh University's Barrette Center.

The meeting will feature a review of the project so far, and participants will break into working groups to focus on future development areas, the downtown and the city's corridors.

Tuesday's meeting, which begins at 6:30 p.m., follows up on the initial meeting in July. Suggestions made during the July meeting will be considered and a list of achievable goals will be developed. The list will be further reviewed when the committee meets on Nov. 16.

The master plan project is a joint effort by city officials and the North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce. The goal is to create a road map for the city's future growth. The project is being coordinated by Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Center.

For more information about the project, visit www.ncantonmasterplan.org.

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News Headline: CoolCleveland :: Videos :: Popping Up On Euclid Avenue: Urban Design Takes On The Region | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Popping Up On Euclid Avenue: Urban Design Takes On The Region
Another CoolCleveland.com video exclusive.
Terry Schwarz does not sit still. Her Pop-Up City project has invigorated overlooked spaces throughout the region, and now wants to reinvent retail on Euclid Avenue. Watch the video .As Interim Director of the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative, she is overseeing their recent move to Playhouse Square, centralizing their efforts to work with community partners near and far while they are "Reimagining A More Sustainable Cleveland." It's a full-time job just following Terry around. http://www.cudc.kent.eduWin an iPhone or $300 by registering at http://www.CoolCleveland.comThis video was uploaded on 2010-08-23

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News Headline: PROFESSOR TO LECTURE ABOUT JEWISH CULTURE (Wilson-Fall) | Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.16 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies presents Dr.Aomar Boum to lecture about Jewish culture and societies in the Sahara.His lecture, titled "Saharan Jewry: History, Memory and the Politics of Identity," takes place Monday, Sept.26, at 7 p.m.in room 214 of Oscar Ritchie Hall.The lecture follows a reception that will be held at 6 p.m.on the first floor of Oscar Ritchie Hall.

The lecture and reception are free and open to the public.Boum will be available to Kent State students and faculty on Tuesday, Sept.27, from 10:45 a.m.to noon at an informal gathering hosted by Hillel at Kent State.

Boum's appearance at Kent State is co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program, with further support from the Department of History, the Office of Global Education, and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

"This is an opportunity for professors and students alike to learn more about the diverse cultures of North Africa," said Wendy Wilson-Fall, chair and associate professor of Kent State's Department of Pan-African Studies.

Boum is an assistant professor of Near Eastern studies, religious studies and Judaic studies at the University of Arizona.In 2006, he earned a Ph.D.in socio-cultural anthropology from the University of Arizona, with a minor in history and a minor in Near Eastern studies.Boum is currently the vice president of the American Institute for Maghrib Studies.

"We need to be informed about the Sahara because it is important historically and in the current political climate," Wilson-Fall said."It is of immediate importance to everyone."

Boum was born and raised in the oasis of Mhamid, Foum Zguid (Povidence of Tata, southern Morocco).He earned a master's degree from Al-Akhawayn University and a bachelor's degree from Cadi Ayyad University, both in Morocco.

Boum's main research explores how different generations of Moroccan Muslims remember, picture and construct Moroccan Jews, Jewishness and Judaism.Boum's research revolves generally around the Middle East, along with North, West and Sub-Saharan Africa.His interests include Moroccan history, ethnic and religious minorities, Islamic movements, Moroccan politics, Islam, migration, traditional Islamic and modern education, Arab media and youth movements.

Boum has published a number of articles on the history and historiography of the Jewish communities of Southern Morocco, Jewish-Muslim interfaith dialogue, representation of Jews in Moroccan museums, Jewish migration in the context of Arab nationalism and Zionism, and the Alliance Israelite Universelle in rural Moroccan communities.

For more information, visit the Jewish Studies Program website at www.kent.edu/cas/jewishstudiesprogram or the Pan-African Studies website at www.kent.edu/cas/pas.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: SMFHS business teachers attend global institute | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Instructors Carrie Harris and Lisa Mowls, of the International Business and Marketing Institute at Stow-Munroe Falls High School, attended the 2011 Ohio Global Institute which took place Aug. 2-4, at Ohio University.

One hundred Ohio teachers who teach English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, fine arts, world languages, career programs or technology in grades K-12 participated. This was a three-day residential institute built on the successes of the 2009 Global Institute at Kent State University and 2010 Global Institute at Ohio State University.

The 2011 Global Institute was a collaborative efforts of the Ohio Department of Education; The Ohio State University; Ohio University; Kent State University; Shawnee State University; and the University of Cincinnati.

With contributions from the partner organizations, and a grant from the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation the 2011 Global Institute provided Ohio educators across the content areas the opportunity to: Share best practices in international education; obtain new resources and tools for internationalizing across the curriculum; network with Ohio and international PK-20 educators; and develop an action plan for implementation in their classroom and school.

The International Business & Marketing Institute (IBMI) at SMFHS is a rigorous, two-year College Tech Prep course designed in collaboration with university staff to provide content relevant to today's global business world. Students who successfully complete both years of the program and show mastery of the subject matter will be eligible to earn up to 9 credit hours of college coursework through The University of Akron (transferable credits).

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News Headline: Hemingway's Boat | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Christian Science Monitor - Online
Contact Name: Steve Weinberg
News OCR Text: By 1934, when Ernest Hemingway turned 35 years old, he had become perhaps the most celebrated living writer in the English language – and perhaps in any language. That year, Hemingway purchased a fishing boat that he would dock in Key West, Florida, or in Cuba or less permanent places where he might be able to reel in the big ones. He named the boat Pilar. Hemingway treasured that boat until the day he shot himself at his Idaho home during 1961. A lot of his outer life and inner life occurred on or near Pilar, which served as a place to write, read, sleep, copulate, and entertain friends as well as a fishing vessel.

After Hemingway's death, Paul Hendrickson, two generations younger, began earning his reputation as a superb newspaper feature writer, magazine freelancer, and daring nonfiction book author. In 1980, by chance, Hendrickson met a surviving Hemingway brother. In 1987, Hendrickson wrote a feature about Hemingway's three surviving sons, published by the Washington Post, where Hendrickson earned a paycheck. Some sort of Hemingway book began to take shape in Hendrickson's mind. But not a traditional biography. Readers had plenty to choose from already.

Between the preliminary thinking about a Hemingway book and the appearance of Hemingway's Boat this month, Hendrickson published a memoir about his religious training (“Seminary: A Search”), and three books with people other than himself at the center, although none could be categorized as a traditional biography (“The Living and the Dead: Robert McNamara and Five Lives of a Lost War”; “Looking for the Light: The Hidden Life and Art of Marion Post Wolcott”; and “Sons of Mississippi: A Story of Race and Its Legacy”).

I have read all of Hendrickson's books. Each contains a connecting thread that might not occur to most authors to employ. For example, “Sons of Mississippi” is built around a 1962 photograph of racist Southern sheriffs. Using Pilar as the connecting thread of a rumination cum partial biography of Hemingway fits the pattern, and the choice feels inspired.

By connecting Hemingway's moods and accomplishments to his time with and away from Pilar, Hendrickson connects the man (young, middle aged, and old-ish) to the sea. The connecting thread of the boat helps Hendrickson understand for himself – and then explain to readers – Hemingway's alternating jags of cruelty and compassion toward his four wives, his three sons, his hired help, his fellow writers, his editors, his friends and enemies on solid land, and his friends and enemies on the water, all sharing the boat. Wisely employing thousands of letters Hemingway wrote and retained, Hendrickson is able to explain what happened as it happened, supplemented by wise use of oral histories, memoirs, traditional biographies, and interviews with a few individuals still living who knew Hemingway well, or at least the children of those individuals who recall anecdotes passed on to them.

As always, Hendrickson writes so well that every page is a pleasure to absorb. He is also honest, sometimes excruciatingly so, about the gaps in his knowledge and the inner turmoil caused by his speculations, however well grounded in the best available evidence.

My only criticism of “Hemingway's Boat” is related to the final third, as Hendrickson struggles to figure out the meaning of the relationship between the famous writer and son Gregory, who found a career as a physician and a tortured life as a transvestite. Too much Gregory in the book for my liking, because the narrative and the speculation about him becomes repetitious and Pilar seems forgotten for a while. Other readers might disagree with my reservation. In any case, “Hemingway's Boat” is educational and enthralling, an obviously desirable combination.

Also newly available is the first of numerous planned volumes, “The Letters of Ernest Hemingway,” edited by scholars Sandra Spanier and Robert W. Trogdon, published by Cambridge University Press. The letters in volume one cover 1907-1922. Hemingway as a young man said to fellow author F. Scott Fitzgerald: “[D]on't you like to write letters? I do because it's such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you've done something.”

Spanier, an English professor at Pennsylvania State University, and Trogdon, an English professor at Kent State University, have collaborated with other scholars as well as non-academics to round up as many letters from and to Hemingway as possible. The first volume covers letters from Hemingway's childhood, World War I experiences, and his decision to reside in Paris. The letters are skillfully annotated, the photographs are revelatory, and every other aid to learning about Hemingway throughout the book feels just right.

I hope that by the time I have absorbed the richness of Volume 1, the next volume will be ready.

Steve Weinberg is a member of the National Book Critics Circle.

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News Headline: VIDEO: An international event; Multicultural festival brings music, food to Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TO VIEW VIDEO, CLICK HERE: http://www.recordpub.com/news/article/5097437

The strip of Main Street between Water Street and Depeyster Street in Kent closed off Saturday and opened it's arms to celebrate diversity for the first Kent International Festival.
Vendors selling various ethnic goods, crafts and foods lined the Main Street strip near Acorn Alley, while music from different cultures of the world filled the Home Savings Plaza at the intersection of Main and Water streets.
“People are eating, and drinking and being merry,” said Heather Malarcik, marketing and promotions coordinator for Main Street Kent, which co-sponsored the event with H.O.M.E. Markets. “We have some pretty good variety out there. We tried to keep it international and not make it like a carnival.”
Inside Acorn Alley, people visited the beer garden, sponsored by the Kent Jaycees and Main Street Kent, and could try different brews from around the globe and sake, a Japanese rice wine.
Elizabeth Colaco, owner of Bombay Grill, stayed busy serving her restaurant's Indian cuisine to hungry festival-goers.
“We love it — we get a lot of business,” she said of the festival. “It's wonderful to try the new foods and learn about the different nationalities that are set up here.”
At 8 p.m., more than 100 biodegradable sky lanterns were released into the air to float off into the sky for the main event.
Malarcik said the Kent International Festival will be back again.
“This is our first year, so we're kind of testing some things out,” she said. “Next year, we'll probably try to double it up and just make it bigger and better — definitely it will be an annual thing.”

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News Headline: PHOTOS: Kent's First International Festival | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Rising Star performing group demonstrates traditional Chinese acrobatic folk dancing at the Kent International Festival, Sept. 17, 2011

CLICK HERE TO VIEW PHOTOS: http://kent.patch.com/articles/photos-kents-first-international-festival#photo-7807837

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News Headline: Californians should brace for longer, deadlier heat waves | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: SFGate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Californians should brace for longer, deadlier heat waves A new study [PDF] commissioned by the Air Resources Board says Californians should brace for more frequent heat waves in the coming decades. The heat waves will likely have an increased death toll as a result of the state's aging population.Using a new modeling method that considers wind and cloud cover, among other mitigating factors, the study found that 10-or-more-day heat waves will increase by two to ten times over, (depending on the region) by the end of the century.In the nine urban areas included in the study, heat currently causes about 500 deaths every year among senior citizens, who are particularly susceptible to it. By the end of the century, 4,700 to 8.800 seniors will die of heat-related causes every year, according to the analysis. The warming climate accounts for just a quarter of the change, however; the rest is due to shifting demographics.The study was conducted by Scott Sheridan, a Kent State University geographer who also conducted a 2006 preliminary analysis for CARB.

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News Headline: Michael K. McIntyre's Tipoff | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: How they rank: Colleges always gripe about the U.S. News and World Report rankings because a magazine's arbitrary list has become such an important tool for recruitment and alumni appeasement.

This year, the crowing is drowning out the griping in Northeast Ohio.

Case Western Reserve University is doing back flips about rising three slots to 38th among national universities in a list headed by Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Columbia universities. It had ranked 41st for four years.

"We're 38th!" isn't usually the makings of a battle cry, but on the U.S. News national ranking, it's a pretty big deal. (Kent State was 194th, Cleveland State and Akron were in the 200s.)

"I am delighted that the hard work of people across this campus is being recognized nationally," President Barbara Snyder said in a news release. The university credited its increase to being more selective in admitting students, admitting more students from the top 10 percent of their high school class and improving its graduation rate.

But going to a top-40 school is going to put you in the top 10 in debt.

Another U.S. News list for heaviest student debt load ranked CWRU ninth, noting that 60 percent of CWRU students graduated with debt and the average amount was $39,236.

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News Headline: ON THE MOVE | Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Council for Interior Design Accreditation: Pamela Evans was appointed as a director representing accredited programs. Evans is interim associate dean of Kent State University's College of Architecture and Environmental Design and director of the college's interior design program

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News Headline: 2 editors win McGruder diversity awards from APME | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: First Amendment Center
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 10th annual Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership, sponsored by the recently renamed Associated Press Media Editors, goes to Gregory Moore, editor of The Denver Post, and Sherrie Marshall, editor of The Macon (Ga.) Telegraph.

“The awards are given annually to individuals, newsrooms or teams of journalists who embody the spirit of McGruder, a former executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, former managing editor of The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer and a graduate of Kent State University,” APME said. McGruder, who died in 2002, was a past president of APME and a former member of the American Society of News Editors' board of directors.

“McGruder was a relentless diversity champion,” APME said, adding that Moore and Marshall were honored for their “longstanding commitment to diversity in newspaper content and in newsroom recruiting and staff development.”

Honored Sept. 15 at the annual APME conference in Denver, the editors each received $2,500 and a leadership trophy.

Co-sponsors of the awards were the Free Press, The Plain Dealer, Kent State University and the Freedom Forum, parent foundation of the First Amendment Center.

Tags: Freedom Forum, journalist award, newsroom diversity

More articles related to In The News | Freedom Forum, journalist award, newsroom diversity.

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News Headline: Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 (McCullagn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state Route 45 in Salem.

In addition to the free children's activities, the event will include a Scholastic Book Fair to support the Leetonia School District, along with a health fair and flu clinic.

Public Relations Coordinator Ruth McCullagh said she expects a larger crowd with the additional events. "We consistently have a large turnout for this event," McCullagh said. "With the addition of the health fair, I anticipate our numbers will increase."

The health fair includes free screenings and $20 flu shots provided by the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association. Medicare is accepted. Shots are available for children and adults. The health fair is in the campus' new multi-million dollar health and sciences wing.

The Kids' Fun Fest, which is geared toward children ages 3-13, has a recycling focus. "Many of our crafts demonstrate how everyday items can be reused," said Danielle Stewart, president of the student government organization, which hosts the event.

Stewart said other activities include pumpkin painting and story time. Kent State University mascot, Flash, is planning to make a special appearance, too. The Quaker Trolley will also be on site for students to explore.

As in past years, a community resource center made up of area agencies will be available for participants to visit.

"We hold the Kids' Fun Fest so Kent State Salem students who have families can come enjoy time with their children," Stewart said. "Plus, this is a great way for us to give back to the community and show the area what a great university we have."

To speed up registration, attendees may pre-register at www.surveymonkey.com/s/kidsfunfest or call the campus at 330-332-0361.

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News Headline: July 3: The Monday After: Students study Civil War in print (Heaphy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Gary Brown
News OCR Text: The Civil War was not front page news in The Ohio Repository early in the 1860s. It was a design issue, and not a reflection on the importance of the War Between the States. But, it still was an interesting discovery of two students at Kent State University Stark Campus ? Kara Carowick and Dina Musaelyan ? who spent months in the last school year perusing Civil War editions of the newspaper on microfilm. ?The majority of the war news was on the second page, not the front page,? said Carowick. ?And it wasn?t big headlines.? Few headlines in those days, of course, were wider than a column. And the front pages of most issues of The Repository during the 1860s were relegated to information and entertainment thought to be of interest to readers 150 years ago. Poetry. Lifestyle stories. Reprints of laws passed by Congress and the Ohio legislature. Agricultural news. Practical advice. Short ?filler? items about odd news or international events. HISTORY PROJECT The Ohio Repository was a four-page weekly publication in the 1860s, and the two students looked through every issue from shortly before the beginning of the war at Fort Sumter, S.C., in April 1861 to the weeks following its end at Appomattox Court House, Va., in April 1865. The research that was done under the direction of Kent Stark history professor Leslie Heaphy will be used in the Canton Museum of Art exhibition in September and October, ?A Nation Divided: The Heartland Responds,? which will recognize the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Information uncovered during Carowick?s and Musaelyan?s microfilm search also will be displayed in an exhibit planned for later this year at the Kent Stark campus, said Heaphy. The professor noted that the students became so involved in the research that they are continuing to look through Civil War editions of The Massillon Independent. ?We would like to select about 20 interesting articles and enlarge them (for the exhibition),? said M.J. Albacete, executive director of Canton Museum of Art. Albacete said that other articles might be copied and included in a notebook that visitors to ?A Nation Divided? could read. WHAT STUDENTS FOUND Many of the articles about the Civil War in The Ohio Repository were short dispatches that offered news from the battlefields ? often days after the fighting occurred. ?They gave a lot of reports from battles that were published in other papers,? explained Heaphy. The students found a few longer ?feature? articles. ?They did have a big article on Jennie (Mary Virginia) Wade, the only woman shot at Gettysburg,? said Carowick. ?They called her the hero of Gettysburg because she was baking bread for the troops ... She would hand it over to them as they went by.? Carowick also found an article about men who were becoming well-known Civil War military personalities. ?Every now and then they?d have a story about (William Tecumseh) Sherman and (Ulysses S.) Grant ? they called them the ?Ohio boys.? ? TIDBITS OF HISTORY Frequently, said Musaelyan, the students found a story of only a few paragraphs that would put the time period in perspective. Some gave glimpses, for example, at how African-Americans were viewed in Ohio. Collected, the articles said that blacks ?are people, they should have jobs, and should be treated with respect ? be treated like every other person ? because they were fighting for their country,? Musaelyan said. Surprisingly, few letters from the battlefields were printed by The Ohio Repository. ?Some letters were written home, but fewer than I expected,? said Carowick. Carowick also found a Repository report that captured the eagerness ? at least at the start of the war ? with which Stark County residents chose to take part in the fighting of the Civil War. ?I found one article about a 12-year-old boy who ran away from home. It didn?t say that he ran away from home to join the army. It just said that they were looking for him. But, it wasn?t uncommon for young boys to run away to join the army.? SPANS DECADES Most of the Civil War material that the researchers uncovered was published in the style of the journalistic times ? single column stories, with little art, often written in a flowery manner. Still, one article transcended the time between that 150-year-old past. A commentary published during Lincoln?s campaign was expressed almost in a way that is familiar from modern lifestyle magazines and newspaper sections, said Musaelyan. ?It gave ?8 reasons we should vote for Lincoln.? ?

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News Headline: Regula calls redistricting plan 'outrageous' (Tudor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Regula calls redistricting plan 'outrageous'By Matthew RinkIndeOnline.com staff writerPosted Sep 17, 2011 @ 12:41 AMBEACH CITY -Ralph Regula, who served the 16th District in Congress for 36 years, says a Republican plan to carve Stark County into three separate congressional districts is "outrageous.""One of the key elements of a congressional district is that people have to know where to go when they need help," he said. "They've got to know who their congressman is, and the people of Stark County are not going to know."Regula said the proposal passed by the Ohio House on Thursday has an "unusual breakdown" of congressional districts and includes "elements" of gerrymandering.Under the plan, the 16th District would cover only Canal Fulton, North Canton, Lawrence and Jackson townships, a western portion of Lake Township, an eastern part of Perry Township and slices of Canton and Canton Township. U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci of Wadsworth represents the district.Alliance, Lexington Township and a portion of Washington Township would join the 13th District, which currently is represented by U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Niles. Trumbull, Mahoning, Portage and Summit counties would round out the 13th.A bulk of the county, including all of Massillon and most of Canton, would become part of Ohio's 7th District, which currently is represented by U.S. Rep. Bob Gibbs, R-Lakeville.The district would run from northern Tuscarawas County toward Lorain County and include Coshocton, Holmes, Knox, and Ashland counties, northern Richland County, western Medina County, southeastern Huron County and part of Erie County.The proposal passed the Republican-led Ohio House on Thursday, with Democrats voting against the measure. State Rep. Christina Hagan, R-Marlboro Township voted in favor of it, but Republican State Rep. Kirk Schuring of Jackson Township joined Democratic Reps. Stephen Slesnick, of Canton, and Mark Okey, of Carrollton, in voting against it."The new congressional district map is good for Stark County," Hagan said in a prepared statement. "The county will now have three sources of congressional representation that can provide assistance related to federal issues. This increases the number of voices that the people of Stark County have to represent them and allows our region to have additional clout in Washington. While the state is losing two congressmen, Stark County could gain two, to our benefit."The Ohio Senate will consider it this week.Regula, a Republican who served between 1973 to 2009, believes the proposal would confuse voters and diminish Stark's influence in Washington. He says that politics have played an obvious role in redistricting efforts,Currently, the 16th District is made up of all of Stark and Wayne counties and portions of Ashland and Medina counties. Stark and Wayne have been part of the 16th District since before Regula's predecessor, U.S. Rep. Frank T. Bow, took office in 1951, Regula said."People knew when they wanted some congressional help they called Frank Bow or they called me," he said from his Beach City farm on Thursday. "Now who do they call? It'll be three different districts."Redistricting occurs every 10 years following the release of the U.S. Census in order to provide equal representation in Congress. Because Ohio's population is growing at a slower pace than other states, its representation is shrinking from 18 to 16 congressional districts."I guess they figured this was one way to do it (eliminate two districts)," Regula said. "Whatever their reasoning was I don't understand. It was, I guess, an easy way for them to do it, pick out two districts, and of course they wanted to make sure the two districts that were lost were Democrats. It's a political document among other things."The newly drawn lines would pit incumbent Democrats Marcy Kaptur, the state's longest-serving representative, against Dennis Kucinich, an eight-term representative, in a primary battle. Renacci would likely eventually face incumbent Democrat Betty Sutton.Ohio Democratic Party Chairman Chris Redfern said "we are witnessing Republicans rush through shameless, politically motivated legislation." He called it "gerrymandering, plain and simple.""It has elements of that," Regula said. "You have Marcy Kaptur running clear over to Dennis Kucinich's district all along Lake Erie. You look at that map, there are some odd-looking things."But Dr. Jarrod Tudor, a Kent State Stark political professor, who gave a presentation on the redistricting plan Friday, said the proposal could have been much worse for Democrats. He believes it will stand up to any legal challenge."I don't see any legal challenges to it," he said. "The districts could have been drawn worse for the Democrats than they were. There's a lot more gerrymandering that could have been done well within the law. Democrats who were upset with it were probably going to be upset either way."If this is the plan the Republicans want, it's going to happen," he said.The proposal creates 68 fragmented counties, as opposed to the 44 that exist now, according to the Ohio Campaign for Accountable Redistricting.Tudor believes that having three congressional representatives strengthens Stark's position in Washington. Also, he said representatives will have to make themselves known to their new constituents and be responsive to others who call them for help."It's incumbent upon both political parties to do a good job of voter education, letting people know where they live and who their representative is," he said. "Of course, American democracy expects people to know."Loading commenting interface...Thank you for the abuse report. 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News Headline: DREAM PROGRAM: Pharmacy Tech is hands-on | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sometimes, a healthy dose of hands-on learning is all it takes to cure the uncertainty of career planning. This school year, Washington High School gave students new opportunities by rolling out a career and technical prep program: Pharmacy Technology. Through a partnership with Kent State University and Aultman Hospital, the program is already thriving and, as a health science career prep program, has found a comfortable place within the DREAM curriculum. Jannean Roschival serves as instructor for the course, which is available to students in grades 10-12. Students, however, must be involved with the program during their junior and senior years. While the course does rely heavily on chemistry and mathematics, Roschival admits she does the best she can to engage students in what they are learning by providing hands-on educational opportunities throughout the week. On Wednesday, students, for the first time, were able to sort and count faux pills ? no real medications are kept in the classroom. Roschival notes that it?s important for her to engage her students because it encourages them to stay involved with the course of study. Doing so, after all, could pay dividends. Massillon has partnered with Kent State University in an effort to provide students with a head start on their college education. According to Jennie Royer, director of the Kent College Tech Prep Consortium, students who participate in Massillon?s Pharmacy Tech program could earn as many as 24 of the 66 credits they need to earn an associates degree. ?That?s about two full semesters of course work,? Royer said. ?That?s a huge savings for them because it saves them time, but it also saves them money.? Pharmacy tech students who qualify for the credits with a high enough grade point average and proper course completion could save more than $8,000 in tuition costs if they apply to Kent State within 15 months of graduation. Through partnerships with Aultman, Washington High is in a position to prepare students for careers as pharmacy assistants or pharmacists in a variety of settings. As part of its contribution to the program, Aultman donated new hospital-specific equipment to properly mix and prepare intravenous (IV) fluids. Experience with the equipment provides the students with a basic understanding of a hospital-specific pharmacy, but also presents them the opportunity to explore pharmaceutical careers in a hospital setting. ?This is such a unique fixture of this program,? Aultman Director of Pharmacy Steve Armatass said of the opportunity to study hospital specific pharmacy technology. ?This is not something that is made available in other programs. We are really giving the edge to these students.?

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News Headline: Newcomerstown BOE meeting | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: Penny Regula
News OCR Text: KEY ACTION Newcomerstown school district's 2012 fiscal year permanent appropriations — the expected revenues for the school year — are down about $750,000 from last year, according to Treasurer Dan Stocker.

At a recent meeting, the Board of Education approved the appropriations that have been certified by the Coshocton County Budget Commission.

DISCUSSION Stocker explained that the district lost funds from two different sources this year — reductions in state funding through the governor's biennial budget, and funds from the federal government stimulus program “dried up” as of June 30.

The board approved four Kent State University dual enrollment classes to be taught at the high school. Two of the courses are new.

Offered for the first time are courses in game design/multi-media/TV, and PC networking. Auto Computer Aided Design and MS Word/Excel are being taught again this year.

In another high school curriculum upgrade, Advanced Placement English is being expanded with the addition of AP Language and AP Literature.

The board approved the calamity-day make-up day schedule for the year. The first three make-up days are set for April 2-4 — part of a five-day spring-break week new to the district this year. May 31 and June 1 would be used next, with any additional days being made up at the end of the school year.

The board heard the first reading of an updated policy to comply with current laws for the use of medications. The new policy addresses methods of administering medication and the training of people who administer it. Superintendent Jeff Staggs said after the meeting that one requirement of the new policy is a doctor's permission slip for the distribution of any medication.

OTHER ACTION

Custodians Mary Beth Sellers and Terry Sproat were transferred to first shifts at the high school and middle school, respectively. Both moves are effective Jan. 1. Teacher Marjorie Hursey was transferred to instruct the fourth/fifth-grade class. The move, taken to reduce class sizes, will be paid for through Title 1 funds.

Amanda Armstrong was hired as middle school in-school suspension monitor two days per week as needed, and as intervention/study island teacher one day per week.

Enrollment was approved for three foreign exchange students at Newcomerstown High: Anna Voraberger, Austria; Luis Dresch, Brazil; and Ben Smith, Norway.

Three teachers were approved as technology support staff — Carol Boltz, middle school; Sascha Durbin, West Elementary; and Angela Stewart, East Elementary. Staggs said these staff members will handle minor technology problems. Major problems still will be handled by the technology director.

Teachers Tim Rogers, Amy Miller, Michelle Love-Schneider and Richelle Lefler were approved as home instruction tutors on an as-needed basis.

The Newcomerstown Rotary Club was granted permission to use the West Elementary building for a blood screening and health fair 6 to 11 a.m. Oct. 1.

Coshocton County Memorial Hospital was contracted to provide school-based physical therapy for students identified as needing evaluations and/or treatment programs at a rate of $75 per on-site hour. Audiology services will be provided through an agreement with the East Central Ohio Educational Service Center. A contract was signed with Tri-Rivers Educational Computer Association, an online digital academy, for provision of support service for fiscal year 2012. There is no set fee as charges are based on student daily participation.

A $231 donation from the Moose Lodge was accepted.

Staggs announced that nominations for the high school “Wall of Honor” (Newcomerstown alumni) and the “Citizens Wall of Honor” are being sought.

An executive session was held to discuss personnel and legal matters. No action was taken.

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News Headline: KSU ready to break ground on hotel (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will break ground today on its part of a $100 million redevelopment effort in downtown Kent at a ceremony celebrating the beginning of construction on a new hotel and conference center.

The 95-room hotel and conference center with a capacity of 300 people is a partnership between the KSU Foundation and Columbus-based developers Pizzuti Companies. The project will be dedicated at 11 a.m. on its location near the intersection of South DePeyster Street and Haymaker Parkway.

The finished hotel and conference center will sit next to the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway, a facility located at 115 S. DePeyster St. that will include a parking deck, bus depot and retail space. That project is expected to cost $26 million, while the hotel and conference center project has an estimated price tag of $15 million.

Both projects are part of public and private downtown redevelopment efforts topping $100 million.

KSU Foundation Executive Director Gene Finn, also the school's vice president for institutional advancement, said that while decisions about the project were made by the foundation board and not the university, KSU President Lester Lefton worked in close consultation with them.

“Obviously this hotel was the president's vision to begin with,” Finn said. “(The board's) decisions reflect his opinions.”

Recently, the board decided that the hotel would not be partnered with a national franchise. Finn said the board saw little value in having a national brand name on the hotel, preferring instead to include KSU in the hotel's name.

Finn said Lefton and the board also originally envisioned the hotel as more of a “boutique,” than a hotel that resembles or operates like a franchise.

Finn said there's not a firm finish date for the project, but he estimates it will be completed by sometime in fall 2012.

“Originally it was going to be September 2012, but that's likely not going to happen,” he said.

Finn said crews should start physical work on the site later this week.

Officials including Lefton, Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala and State Rep. Kathleen Clyde are expected at the groundbreaking.

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News Headline: Groundbreaking Today for Kent State Hotel | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This morning officials at Kent State University will break ground on a new hotel bearing the same name to be built in downtown Kent.

The Kent State Foundation is partnering with Columbus developer The Pizzuti Companies to build the four-story hotel, which is expected to have about 95 rooms and a 300-seat banquet and conference center.

The groundbreaking is scheduled to start at 11 a.m. at the construction site, which is bordered by Haymaker Parkway, South DePeyster and Erie streets in downtown Kent.

Look for coverage of the ceremony here on Kent Patch.

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News Headline: AUDIO: Exploradio - The liquid crystal kingdom (Yokoyama) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The future is just around the corner at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's foremost lab dedicated to research in this mysterious state of matter.

Look around and you're likely to encounter liquid crystal technology somewhere nearby - your computer screen, alarm clock, cell phone, calculator -- even the parking meter.

What was once an obscure branch of chemistry is now indispensible technology, and the world center for liquid crystal research is at Kent State University.

In this week's Exploradio, we meet the new head of the program, and learn what's next at the Liquid Crystal Institute.

Occupying a state between liquid and solid phases, liquid crystals respond to minute electric fields in a myriad of display and other applications. You're likely viewing this on an LCD panel.

TO LISTEN, CLICK HERE: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/29445

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News Headline: KSU celebrates opening of its new learning center, Math Emporium (Frank, Tonge) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Sat, September 17, 2011 @ 12:00 a.m.Staff reportkentMembers of the Kent State University community recently celebrated the opening of the new Kent State University Math Emporium, a state-of-the-art computerized learning center designed to help students learn math.Located on the second floor of the Kent State University Library, the Math Emporium launched this fall with the start of classes.The introduction of the Math Emporium is an example of how Kent State is dedicated to the success of its students. Basic math skills are an essential foundation for many courses of study and necessary for students' overall academic success in college.“The university has developed a specialized learning experience to equip students with the mathematical knowledge they will need on their path to graduation,” said Robert G. Frank, Kent State provost and senior vice president for academic affairs.“The students will learn math by interacting with a team of instructors and the Web-based math software called ALEKS. The Math Emporium promises to make a significant impact on our first-year retention. For some students, it will give them confidence in their math skills to pursue careers that require math, such as nursing and finance.”At the Math Emporium, students will learn through an innovative, engaging and easy-to-use program designed to help them become comfortable and proficient in basic mathematics.The Math Emporium serves as the classroom for four classes: Basic Algebra 1, 2, 3 and 4. Before the beginning of school, students take a placement assessment to determine which math courses they need.Students who need additional math preparation to succeed in college will be matched with the appropriate course of study in the Math Emporium.“Students will focus on learning exactly what they need to know at their own pace, while their instructional team provides individualized coaching,” said Andrew Tonge, chairman of the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Kent State.“The Math Emporium uses an adaptive software program, ALEKS, to determine what students already know. It then offers each student an individualized choice of paths forward. This enables them to complete the curriculum efficiently by always studying only material they are ready to learn. All students can then manage their study time to focus on actively learning precisely the information they need, with the aid of online help tools and an interactive e-book, together with one-on-one assistance from an instructional team,” Tonge said.The lead professor and the instructional team at the Math Emporium function as coaches, providing in-depth personalized teaching and support.Periodically, each student takes a progress assessment to check that they have fully understood the information they recently studied. Any material that has not been properly mastered is reassigned as part of the future study plan.At the end of the course, a comprehensive assessment determines the grade. This ensures students have a sufficiently rigorous grounding to have good prospects for success in subsequent courses.“The Math Emporium's potential effect on student success is very exciting,” Frank said. “In addition to this Math Emporium on our Kent campus, we will have similar facilities on our regional campuses.”The Math Emporium features state-of-the-art technology with 247 computer stations in an 11,154-square-foot space.The facility also features bright, vibrant colors and comfortable furniture, making it an attractive and appealing environment.The Math Emporium is staffed from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday; and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday.Students also can access the program from any Web browser.For more information on the Math Emporium, visit www.kent.edu/mathemporium.Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.© 2011 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565

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News Headline: Faculty Recital planned Sept. 25 at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Faculty Recital, featuring David DeBolt, bassoon, assisted by Dana Brown, piano and harpsichord and Keith Robinson, violoncello, will be held at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at the Carl F.W. Ludwig Recital Hall at the Music and Speech Center at Kent State University.

The program includes VIII Fantasia ex F, Bartolomeo de Selma y Salaverde, ca.1580-ca.1638; Valsas para Fagote Solo (1979-1981), Francisco Mignone, Aquela Modinha que o Villa nao Escreveu, 1897-1986, Valsa da Outra Esquina Macunaima; and Sonata in F Major, William Yeats Hurlstone Vivace, 1876-1906, Ballade: Moderato ma sempre a piacere, Allegretto Moderato; Animato.

Following intermission, the program continues with Sonata in B-flat Major for Bassoon and 'Cello, KV196c; Allegro, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Andante, 1756-1791, Allegro; and Concerto for Bassoon and Strings, Gordon Jacob, Allegro, 1895-1984, Adagio Allegro giocoso.

The recital is free and open to the public.

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News Headline: Symphony Orchestra opens 14th season | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Directed by Darrell Lee Music, the Stow Symphony Orchestra will perform its fall concert at the Ludwig Recital Hall on the Kent State University Campus, at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 1. Ludwig Hall is located in the university's Music and Speech Building at 1325 Theatre Drive, near the intersection of Route 59 and Horning Road.

The concert will feature Schumann's "Manfred Overture", Mozart's "Concerto No. 21 in C Major, K.467 for Piano and Orchestra, and Beethoven's "Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92."

Jerry Wong, assistant professor of piano at Kent State's Music Department, will be featured in the Mozart concerto.

The Schumann Overture establishes the theme for his musical setting of Lord Byron's epic poem, which depicts the tribulations of his gothic super-natural hero.

On a lighter note, Mozart's 21st has long been considered one of his greatest works. The piece is often known as the "Elvira Madigan" concerto, taking the nickname from the 1967 Swedish movie which used the second movement as its background theme.

Soloist Jerry Wong is a graduate of Indiana University, Peabody Conservatory and Manhattan School of Music, where he completed the doctor of musical arts degree. A prize-winning artist, he has performed across the U.S. and internationally. His playing has been characterized as "eloquent and elegant... (with) passion and introspection...sensitivity and a finely honed sense of style."

At its premiere, Beethoven fondly described the Seventh Symphony as one of his best works. The second movement (Allegretto) achieved instant popularity which resulted in its frequent performance separate from the complete symphony. The Stow Symphony recently performed this movement as its contribution to the Stow 9/11 10th Anniversary Memorial) .

Tickets for the concert, available at the door, are priced at $10 for adults, and $7 for seniors and students. Children under 12 are admitted free.

Tickets are available for pre-sale at www.StowOrchestra.org/tickets.htm, or by calling 330-678-0029, or in limited numbers at the door.

For group rates call 330-678-0029. For more information and a map to Ludwig Hall visit www.stoworchestra.org.

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News Headline: The George Washington University (GWU) Elliott School of International Affairs - Discussion | Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: FIND Washington Daybook
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The George Washington University (GWU) Elliott School of International Affairs

TIME: 3 p.m.

EVENT: The George Washington University (GWU) Elliott School of International Affairs holds a discussion on "State of the Egyptian Revolution."

PARTICIPANTS: Rabab El Mahdi, assistant professor of political science at the American University of Cairo; Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University; Mona El-Ghobashy, assistant professor of political science at Barnard College; and Marc Lynch, director of the GWU Institute for Middle East Studies

DATE: September 21, 2011

LOCATION: GWU Elliott School, 1957 E Street NW, Lindner Family Commons, Room 602, Washington, D.C.

CONTACT: 202-994-8025; http://elliott.gwu.edu [Note: RSVP at http://tiny.cc/6qbii]

Copyright © 2006 Federal Information & News Dispatch, Inc.

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News Headline: Kayaking 101... | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: John Rolf
News OCR Text: It was the beginning of what was going to be a very busy nine days. I was scheduled to attend an Kayak Instructor Certification course offered through the American Canoe Association and being taught by Instructor Trainer, Dave Herpy, of Kent State University. The program began with a classroom session on Friday for five hours to be followed with two eight-hour sessions on Saturday and Sunday at Mogador Reservoir about 10 miles south of Kent. I'd be working Monday and Tuesday and then leaving for five more days in the Adirondacks. Some where in there, I needed to get in some good workouts. I knew it would be tight so I planned to make any time I did get really count.

I hit the park after work for a Survival Workout and started with an all-time push-up high of 62. Starting this way drives me harder throughout because it makes me feel like if I push, all my numbers will be higher. I don't really know all of my numbers...it's hard to gauge if you're lifting more when you're lifting odd rocks along the trail and that is on purpose...but I know my push-up, pull-up and pole climbing numbers well and managed to bust them all. I finished my last set of push-ups with a 59 which broke my two-day old record for three sets by nine and it now stands at 175. I suppose I should start thinking I can take it to 200 and get the one-set record up to 70, but that's hard to imagine right now.

I figured the kayak training and certification would be difficult for me. Though I've been kayaking for 13 years, I've never used a sea kayak, don't know all the strokes or the nomenclature, have never rolled and will be with people who live to kayak, I think. I like the sport and would probably do a lot more of it if it was easier to access. It takes about an hour to load and drive to any really good kayaking spots, and with limited time to work out, that usually means I'll hop on the bike or go to the park 10 minutes away to get in a workout. Still...I wanted to learn as much as I could about the discipline and believed taking a crash course designed to make me an instructor to teach entry-level kayaking would improve my skills and knowledge base tremendously.

Once at the class...there were 12 other people...and hearing everyone's level of experience, I no longer felt quite so intimidated. I surmised that although all of the people had time in the water with kayaks, none seemed to have done and extended trip kayaking...something I had done often...and so I at least had practical experience that would match or exceed half of the folks in the group. The down side was I was teaching two different things for evaluation to the group...the 'pivot' stroke and something on the topic of 'balance, posture and trim' as it relates to kayaking and knew almost nothing about either one. The course would be testing my ability to gather information quickly and turn it into a presentation that made it sound like I knew what I was talking about...you know...bullshitting. If it came down to that...I had nothing to worry about. After all, I have my PhD. in it already.

Survival Workout duration: 60 minutes.

Training Heart Rate: 100 to 150 bpm.

Calories burned during workout: 600.

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News Headline: Business Briefs - Sept. 18: DQ fundraiser supports scholarship | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Hudson DQ Orange Julius, 80 W. Streetsboro St., will host a charity fundraiser Sept. 21 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. to honor the memory of Alex Stebbins. A percentage of sales will be donated to the Alexander K. Stebbins Music Scholarship formed to help local musicians.

Alex Stebbins, a Stow and Hudson resident; 2008 Hudson High School graduate; enthusiastic member of the HHS Swing Marching Band, Wind Ensemble and Jazz 1 Percussion Ensemble; Kent State University student and brother of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, died in December 2010 at the age of 21.

The Tau Kappa Epsilon Chapter of Kent State University and the family and friends of Alexander Stebbins are organizing a memorial walk-a-thon at Hudson Springs Park on Sept. 24 from noon to 3 p.m. To participate in this event by walking with a group, sponsoring food or beverage, or donating, email twentyonemi4alex@aol.com or call 216-268-9359.

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News Headline: Rick Perry's Views Supported By Republicans, Not So Much By Independents | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Outside The Beltway
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rick Perry is the Republican frontrunner largely because he holds views that are widely supported within the party. Those same views could pose a real problem for him in the General Election, though:

In a hypothetical general election matchup, Perry trails President Barack Obama among the poll's entire sample, 49 percent to 40 percent, about twice the deficit for Romney. Perry also confronts negative reactions from Americans disinclined to vote for a candidate expressing the skepticism he has about the viability of Social Security, evolution science and whether humans contribute to climate change.

“Science is an integral part of our culture,” said Danyelle Lowers, 27, a student at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, who considers herself an independent voter. “To have such a general disregard for the sciences is rather terrifying.”

The most publicized campaign issue focusing on Perry — his characterization of Social Security as a “Ponzi Scheme” — has Americans divided. Among all respondents, 46 percent said they agree with the remark, while 50 percent said they disagree.

Among Republicans, 65 percent agree with Perry's statements about Social Security, while 33 percent disagree. Independents are nearly equally split.

Forty-five percent of Americans say they'd be less inclined to support a candidate who says science isn't settled on whether human activity contributes to global warming, while 25 percent said it would make them more likely to back that candidate. Half said they would be turned off by a candidate who says evolution remains an unproven theory, with 20 percent saying they'd be more inclined to support someone who holds that view.

Interestingly, the poll also shows what could be slippage in the GOP horserace by Perry, perhaps due to the comments that have come out over the past two weeks of debating:

The results are similar in a new Gallup poll:

Texas Gov. and presidential candidate Rick Perry's comments on Social Security, which include calling it a “Ponzi scheme,” appear to be a non-issue for most Republicans. However, they could cost him support with independents should he ultimately win the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. As many Republicans say they are more likely to vote for Perry for president because of his views on Social Security as say they are less likely — 19% each. Among independents, 12% are more likely to vote for him and 32% less likely.

Perry's statements on Social Security are more likely to harm his campaign indirectly by weakening his perceived viability than they are to turn off Republicans who disagree with his views. In contrast to the 19% of Republicans who say they would personally be less likely to support Perry over his Social Security views, 37% believe those views would hurt his chances of being elected president if he were the GOP nominee. Just 17% say they will help his chances.

Independents tilt even more strongly toward perceiving the issue hurts rather than helps Perry's electability, 40% vs. 11%.

The 2012 General Election is going to be a battle for the independent voters. As I noted yesterday, President Obama is having trouble with those voters in battleground states, thus giving the GOP an opening to take back many of of the states they lost in 2008. A Republican nominee like Perry, though. may just be what sends the independents back into Obama's fold.

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News Headline: GOP poll shows Perry as front-runner | Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Buffalo News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Republicans give Rick Perry front-runner status in their party's presidential primary race even as warning signs flash over his ability to win support in the general election.

The Texas governor is the preferred choice of 26 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents in a Bloomberg National Poll conducted Sept. 9-12. Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney places second at 22 percent, while all of the other Republican candidates get less than 10 percent.

In a hypothetical general election matchup, Perry trails President Obama among the poll's entire sample, 49 percent to 40 percent, about twice the deficit for Romney. Perry also confronts negative reactions from Americans disinclined to vote for a candidate expressing the skepticism he has about the viability of Social Security, evolution science and whether humans contribute to climate change.

"Science is an integral part of our culture," said Danyelle Lowers, 27, a student at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, who considers herself an independent voter. "To have such a general disregard for the sciences is rather terrifying."

Still, positions and statements that could hurt Perry in a faceoff with Obama work to his advantage with his most immediate audience -- Republican primary voters.

"Perry leads in the primary contest in part because some of his most famous stands don't turn off the primary electorate all that much," said J. Ann Selzer, president of Des Moines, Iowa-based Selzer & Co., which conducted the poll. "In the general election, these issues will matter more."

Perry, 61, who joined the Republican field last month, starts the race viewed unfavorably by 41 percent of Americans and favorably by 32 percent. More than a quarter haven't yet formed an opinion.

The most publicized campaign issue focusing on Perry -- his characterization of Social Security as a "Ponzi Scheme" -- has Americans divided. Among respondents, 46 percent said they agree with the remark, while 50 percent disagree.

Among Republicans, 65 percent agree with Perry's statements about Social Security, while 33 percent disagree. Independents are nearly equally split.

Some of the other positions Perry has taken could also present difficulties for him in a general election when independent voters are the key to winning.

Forty-five percent of Americans say they'd be less inclined to support a candidate who says science isn't settled on whether human activity contributes to global warming, while 25 percent said it would make them more likely to back that candidate. Half said they would be turned off by a candidate who says evolution remains an unproven theory, with 20 percent saying they'd be more inclined to support someone who holds that view.

Romney was the only Republican tested in the poll who was viewed more favorably than unfavorably by all respondents.

Also among the entire sample, Obama leads Romney in a hypothetical match-up, 48 percent to 43 percent. Among respondents who said they are likely to vote in 2012, a group that is hard to discern 14 months before the election, Romney leads Obama, 48 percent to 45 percent.

The poll of 997 adults has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points and plus or minus 3.6 points for likely general election voters.

Copyright © 2011 The Buffalo News

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News Headline: An international event | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL BRINGS MUSIC, FOOD TO KENT

The strip of Main Street between
Water Street and Depeyster
Street in Kent closed
off Saturday and opened it's
arms to celebrate diversity
for the first Kent International
Festival.
Vendors selling various ethnic
goods, crafts and foods
lined the Main Street strip
near Acorn Alley, while music
from different cultures of the
world filled the Home Savings
Plaza at the intersection of
Main and Water streets.
“People are eating, and
drinking and being merry,”
said Heather Malarcik, marketing
and promotions coordinator
for Main Street Kent,
which co-sponsored the event
with H.O.M.E. Markets. “We
have some pretty good variety
out there. We tried to
keep it international and not
make it like a carnival.”
Inside Acorn Alley, people
visited the beer garden, sponsored
by the Kent Jaycees
and Main Street Kent, and
could try different brews from
around the globe and sake, a
Japanese rice wine.
Elizabeth Colaco, owner of
Bombay Grill, stayed busy
serving her restaurant's Indian
cuisine to hungry festival-
goers.
“We love it — we get a lot
of business,” she said of the
festival. “It's wonderful to
try the new foods and learn
about the different nationalities
that are set up here.”
At 8 p.m., more than 100
biodegradable sky lanterns
were released into the air to
float off into the sky for the
main event.
Malarcik said the Kent International
Festival will be
back again.
“This is our first year, so
we're kind of testing some
things out,” she said. “Next
year, we'll probably try to
double it up and just make
it bigger and better — definitely
it will be an annual
thing.”
CLICK HERE TO VIEW PHOTOS: http://www.recordpub.com/images/media/20110918/pdf/A04.pdf

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News Headline: Bulletin Board: Cuyahoga River Cleanup Project will be Sept. 24 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Cuyahoga Falls is partnering with Kent State University and the cities of Kent, Munroe Falls and several other Cuyahoga River watershed communities in the third annual National Public Lands Day Cuyahoga River Cleanup Project Sept. 24.

Volunteers are needed to assist either on land or via canoe. Lunch, trash bags, litter grabbers and gloves will be provided for cleanup volunteers.

Volunteers cleaning up litter on land along the Cuyahoga River will meet at the boat dock in Water Works Park at 9 a.m. Volunteers will help clean up litter on foot along the river as well as throughout surrounding public grounds areas, and will help unload canoes when they arrive at Water Works Park.

The project is expected to conclude by noon. To volunteer to help with cleanup on land, call Becky McCleary at 330-971-8201 or email mcclearyrm@cityof.com.

To volunteer to help with cleanup on the Cuyahoga River via canoe, call Mike McFall at 330-672-2802 or email mmcfall5@kent.edu.

Registration of volunteers by Sept. 21 is appreciated.

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News Headline: July 18: The Monday After: Civil War images are focus of exhibit | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Gary BrownCantonRep.com staff writerPosted Jul 12, 2011 @ 07:16 AMLast update Jul 18, 2011 @ 11:44 AMCANTON -Images from the Civil War will highlight the upcoming Canton Museum of Art exhibition scheduled to open early in September and be on display through October.Tickets are being sold for the opening reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Sept. 1. A free public kickoff will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Sept. 2."A Nation Divided: The Heartland Responds," an exhibition of Civil War photography and artifacts relevant to Ohio, was inspired by a collection of Civil War photos from the archives of Western Reserve Historical Society. A companion publication published by Kent State University Press, "Feel the Bonds that Draw," will combine those images with text by Christine Dee.The museum chose more than three dozen of the images and enlarged them for the exhibit."We chose the ones that would have more human interest, more historical relevance and had the most graphical quality," said M.J. Albacete, executive director of Canton Museum of Art. "We chose ones that said the most about the war and the people who were in it."OTHER IMAGESThe exhibition also will include artwork by Winslow Homer, on loan from Butler Institute of American Art, that will depict camp life during the Civil War."During the 1860s, Homer's illustrations were reproduced in newspapers using a block printing technique, as the technology for printing photographs in newspapers was not invented until 1880," noted information from the museum supplied by Mary Byrne, marketing and development manager.Albacete said that curator Lynnda Arrasmith "tried to bring the reality of the war closer to home by including such authentic memorabilia as weapons, uniforms, newspaper accounts, diaries and letters."Uniforms and memorabilia from the collection of the Wm. McKinley Presidential Library & Museum, as well as private collections, will be displayed. Among those artifacts will be items associated with the Civil War service of Andrew Smith of Massillon, who was a member of the 6th Ohio Cavalry.FOCUS ON PHOTOGRAPHSStill, the focal point of the exhibition will be the photographs from Western Reserve, which will provide visitors to the museum an accurate and detailed look at the war between the states."Since photography was such a new medium ... photographers took every opportunity to capture all aspects of life in the Civil War era," said Albacete."And they took thousands of pictures. Never before had any conflict been so carefully documented. Photos of soldiers posing for their loved ones, camp scenes, battlefields strewn with the dead, shattered buildings, the machinery of war - trains, barges, steamboats, factories, the plight of slaves, pictures of the victorious and the defeated, the savagery of war."A highlight of the exhibition will be the opportunity to view stereograph images, a form of 3-D viewing technology invented by Oliver Wendell Holmes in 1859. Although traditionally such images were viewed through hand-held stereoscopes, in the exhibition they will be projected as digitized images, so large groups of spectators can view them by wearing "anaglyph" (red and green) glasses."Stereo cameras took pictures in 3-D like today's movies - and we will reproduce them in digital 3-D, so you can actually see scenes from the Civil war as real as life."The significance of photography during the Civil War will be evident to exhibition visitors _ as it was during the time the war was fought."Such photos brought home to all the astonishing realization that this enormous catastrophe was taking place on American soul, costing hundreds of thousands of American lives," explained Albacete. "For many who though of war as a glorious adventure, the photos proved otherwise." About the exhibit

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News Headline: Speak Peace Tomorrow at the UA Poetry Center (Hassler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tucson Weekly - Online
Contact Name: Irene Messina
News OCR Text: Together Protect Peace

Speak Peace: American Voices Respond to Vietnamese Children's Paintings, currently on display at the UA Poetry Center, features poems written in response to Vietnamese children's paintings on peace and war.

The traveling exhibit contains 34 paintings collected by the War Remnants Museum in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The museum has held a yearly art contest for the past 10 years. Each painting is displayed with one or more poems written in response to the art. Poems were written by American children, veterans and writers. Sixty poems were chosen out of 1,200 that were submitted.

Tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 17, at 11:30 a.m., members of the Hopi Foundation's Owl and Panther Project will read their poetic responses to the painings. Speak Peace is on display through Friday, Sept. 23.

The exhibit is a collaboration between the War Remnants Museum, Kent State's Wick Poetry Center and School of Art Galleries, and Soldiers' Heart, a veterans' return and healing organization.

The paintings are very expressive with bold colors and graphic images. "Terrible War" by Nguyen Pham Bao Tran, 12, shows planes dropping bombs, fires burning, black clouds of smoke, dead bodies and a distraught man.

These children "are growing up in a society (where) remnants of war, both physically and emotionally are very present. It's part of their everyday life," says David Hassler, director of the Wick Poetry Center.

The public is invited to add their thoughts about war and peace to a large scale installation created by local artist Kim Largey. The installation is in the children's corner of the Poetry Center.

The UA Poetry Center is located at 1508 E. Helen Street. Visit poetry.arizona.edu and speakpeace.net for more information.

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News Headline: WKSU News: Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul, and Mary returns to Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
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News OCR Text: Yarrow's solo performance Sunday closes the 45th annual Kent State Folk Festivalby WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMANReporterVivian GoodmanIn The Region:Peter Yarrow of "Peter, Paul, and Mar," one of the best known folk trios of the early sixties and seventies, performs Sunday night at the Kent Stage to close the 45th Kent State Folk Festival. He'll sing his best-known protest songs, plus one that he uses to fight bullies.Peter Yarrow says he first heard Steve Seskin and Allen Shamblin's, "Don't Laugh at Me" in Texas at the Kerrville Folk Festival. He says it made him cry. And when he played it for Mary Travers, she cried, too.Mary died from side effects of chemotherapy two years ago. Sixteen years ago she had come to Kent , along with Peter and Paul, to sing Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind" on the 25th anniversary of the May 4th shootings.But the trio never played the Kent State folk Festival." In years past when Mary was alive, " said Yarrow, "We didn't sing at folk festivals, but I have the greatest respect for the Kent State Folk Festival and I'm delighted that I'm coming there."Now 73, Yarrow still performs occasionally with Noel Paul Stookey including concerts last year in Hong Kong and at Carnegie Hall. And he still fights for social justice, giving more than 500 solo benefit performances over the past decade.Yarrow says he lives by the Talmudic commandment of "Tikkun Olom"... repair the world.He says he and his musical partners came together in Greenwich Village in 1960 to fight racism and sexism and stop the Vietnam WarYarrow says, "The song that probably affected certain people more deeply than any song was The Great Mandala."He says the song posed what to many was an unavoidable question, " Whether or not in the face of the Vietnamese war they could go along with its premise, or whether they had to make a choice to oppose the war. So I would say the Great Mandela. But on the other hand if you're talking about people being moved. ‘Puff the Magic Dragon' was not a little children's song for them. It kind of resonates with an era in which people cared and were sensitive to each other. That kind of effect of just touching people's hearts."Yarrow says he was a student at New York's High School of Music and Art when he first realized the power of folk music. He heard the Weavers play ‘If I had a Hammer' at Carnegie Hall." That was kind of the ‘aha moment' for me and many others who were in the audience including Tom Paxton , who by the way was at that concert, and Mary Travers. And from that moment on I realized that when people sing together, and they confirm that deep caring and understanding, the audience gets that and not only are they responding to the music but they're responding to the relationship of the people on stage. "He believes folk music is making a comeback."Buddy Monlock's songs are amazing , and David Wilcox. There are singer-songwriters now . And they are more important . And what makes it possible for them to be heard is the shift to the net. There is an emerging revival, but what I'm looking forward to , and I don't think we're far away from that , a revival so that this music of conscience, heart, and caring does hit the center mainstage of the media in the face of very grave challenges."Yarrow stood with Martin Luther King in Selma, Alabama, and Washington, D.C. in 1963, and helped organize the 1969 March on Washington. Today , his main focus is stopping school bullying. He thinks it's fueled by popular culture."It's a national phenomenom that adults are sitting there watching their television sets, amused by the way in which other adults are humiliating each other and injuring each other emotionally. That trains kids to say, "oh, that's the way to behave.'"He knows what it's like to be bullied. It happened in his freshman year at Cornell." Someone made the kind of anti-semitic remark that I couldn't repeat on the air. He was a wrestler and he put me in a hold and I thought my leg was going to break, my ankle was going to break. It wasn't that it was so painful to me . What was painful to me was being attacked for no reason. And we all had that. Mary, a high school dropout. She told stories about that. Noel was very tall and skinny and he told stories about that."In the year 2000, Yarrow founded an anti-bullying program called Operation Respect . It's now used in more than 20,000 schools worldwide. Its principal tool is a song."And I will be singing it when I'm at the Kent State Folk Festival. The unique thing about Operation Respect's ‘Don't Laugh at Me' program is the fact that it uses music in the very same sense that it was part of the Peter , Paul, and Mary experience at the March on Washington and at all of our concerts."Peter Yarrow will perform at 7:30 Sunday night at the Kent Stage.

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