Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Alumni (2)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Interior Design (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Biomedical Science (1)
Chemical Physics (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry; Research (1)
KSU at Salem (3)
KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (5)
Recreational Services (3)
Town-Gown (1)
WKSU-FM (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (2)
Columnist married to U.S. senator quits newspaper job 09/20/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Associated Press in an email. "Connie made the decision to leave the Plain Dealer to preserve her personal and professional independence."Schultz, a 1979 Kent State University graduate, won a Pulitzer for commentary in 2005.Brown is in the fifth year of his first Senate term. When Brown ran for...

Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion Hosts Guest Artist Mark Matthews 09/19/2011 Artdaily Text Attachment Email

...London, and the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, N.Y., among others.He was introduced to working with molten glass while an undergraduate student at Kent State University. After earning a master of fine arts degree from Ohio University, he started working full time in glass, concentrating...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Interior Design (1)
On the Move: Pamela Evans 09/20/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Council for Interior Design Accreditation: Pamela Evans was appointed as a director representing accredited programs. Evans is interim associate dean of Kent State University's College of Architecture and Environmental Design and director of the college's interior design program.


Biological Sciences (1)
Research Data from Kent State University Update Understanding of Obesity (Novak) 09/20/2011 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic differences in physical activity...


Biomedical Science (1)
Investigators at Kent State University Target Primatology 09/20/2011 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...systems range from small group monogamy in Callicebus to large multimale-multifemale groups in Chiropotes and Cacajao," wrote C.L. Thompson and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "As the middle taxon in this platyrrhine radiation, behavioral strategies of white-faced...


Chemical Physics (1)
Findings in Chemical Physics Reported from Kent State University 09/20/2011 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...strain in the protein is not the sole factor determining whether a region will ultimately crack during the transition," wrote S. Tripathi and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "These results emphasize that the residue interactions found exclusively in one of the...


Chemistry and Biochemistry; Research (1)
New Science Study Findings Recently Were Reported by Researchers at Kent State University 09/20/2011 Science Letter Text Email

...similar rupture forces of 22-26 pN, which are higher than those that can stall transcription catalyzed by RNA polymerases," wrote S. Dhakal and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "This suggests, from a mechanical perspective alone, that either of the structures...


KSU at Salem (3)
Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 (McCullagn) 09/20/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state...

Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 (McCullagn) 09/20/2011 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state...

September 19, 2011 Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 09/19/2011 Salem News Text Attachment Email

Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1September 19, 2011SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state...


KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (5)
VIDEO: Downtown rebirth continues in Kent (Lefton) 09/20/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Ground was broken Monday morning for another piece of Kent's downtown rebirth.Kent State University, KSU Foundation and city officials dodged rain showers to join in turning shovels of dirt for the four-story, 95-room...

VIDEO: Kent Native Leads Hotel Project 09/20/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

PHOTOS: Kent State Hotel Groundbreaking 09/20/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State Breaks Ground on $15 Million Hotel 09/20/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

New hotel will link Kent State University, city in whole new way (Lefton) 09/19/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Groundbreaking part of $100M project KENT, Ohio - A new 95 room hotel and 300 seat banquet and conference center are coming to downtown Kent. Kent State University President Lester Lefton said the facility, which will bear the university's name, will link the university and the city...


Recreational Services (3)
"You're killin' me, Dave..." 09/19/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

Sunday, September 18, 2011 I think I need to stay away from this Dave Herpy guy and his classes at Kent State. I'm learning some fantastic skills for group leadership and kayaking, but I don't think I'll live through another day with him....

My Town: Volunteers Needed To Clean Up the Cuyahoga River 09/19/2011 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

1:51 p.m. EDT, September 19, 2011 Crooked River Adventures at Kent State University is heading up the third annual "Clean Up the Cuyahoga" on Saturday, September 24 and they are looking for a few helping...

HELP CROOKED RIVER ADVENTURES CLEAN UP THE CROOKED RIVER SEPT. 24 09/19/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The days of the Cuyahoga River catching on fire may be a thing of the past, but...


Town-Gown (1)
PARTA removing dirt from Kent location: Busing authority OKs $1.15 million contract for work 09/20/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...2012 and the parking deck be open and running.The DePeyster/Haymaker area of Kent will be a busy construction zone for months with the gateway, the new Kent State University hotel and conference center and a mixed-use commercial project by Fairmount Properties.Smith said the city suggested,...


WKSU-FM (1)
Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Carolina Chocolate Drops 09/20/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...latest album, "Genuine Negro Jig," won this year's Grammy Award for best traditional folk album, will appear in concert Wedsnesday at 8 p.m. at the the Kent State University Auditorium, as part of the Kent State Folk Festival. Tickets are $25 at www.tix.com. Full folk festival details...


News Headline: Columnist married to U.S. senator quits newspaper job | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tuesday, September 20, 2011Columnist married to U.S. senator quits newspaper job September 20,2011 02:39 AM GMTThomas J. SheeranAssociated PressCLEVELAND: Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Connie Schultz resigned from the Plain Dealer in Cleveland on Monday to avoid ethical conflicts as her husband, Democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, prepares to seek re-election next year.Schultz explained her decision in a letter to colleagues posted on the newspaper's website.She said it had become "painfully clear" to her in recent weeks that her professional and personal independence "is possible only if I'm no longer writing for the newspaper that covers my husband's Senate race on a daily basis."Schultz apologized in early September for her column about a tea party event featuring a potential Republican challenger to Brown, state Treasurer Josh Mandel. She had not mentioned Mandel's appearance at the event, and she later said that was a mistake."I'm sorry I didn't let you know Mandel showed up," she wrote.Reader response was mixed, according to Editor Debra Adams Simmons."Many readers came to her defense; others thought she crossed a line," Simmons told the Associated Press in an email. "Connie made the decision to leave the Plain Dealer to preserve her personal and professional independence."Schultz, a 1979 Kent State University graduate, won a Pulitzer for commentary in 2005.Brown is in the fifth year of his first Senate term. When Brown ran for the Senate in 2006, Schultz took a leave of absence from the newspaper, telling readers, "It's time to do what feels right."She wrote at the time that she was becoming more limited in her choice of column topics because she could be accused of campaigning for her husband.She published a memoir about that campaign, ... and His Lovely Wife about her travels across Ohio with Brown.Schultz told colleagues in her farewell note that she is writing another book and would continue to write essays for Parade magazine, which appears in the Plain Dealer."I'll continue to focus on issues of social and economic justice. I'm weighing other options, and look forward to what comes next," she said.Schultz, who worked for the paper for nearly 18 years, thanked the newspaper for taking a chance on "a 36-year-old newly single mother who had spent 15 years writing freelance stories from my kitchen table."Simmons said Schultz's departure would be a loss for the newspaper."Connie is one of the most talented journalists in Plain Dealer history. Her 2005 Pulitzer Prize is testament to her work," Simmons said.Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

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News Headline: Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion Hosts Guest Artist Mark Matthews | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Artdaily
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TOLEDO, OH.- Internationally known independent glass artist Mark Matthews will be a special guest artist July 17-19 at the Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion. In addition to a glassblowing workshop, the artist will give a public presentation.Matthews’ works are part of the permanent collections of the Toledo Museum of Art, the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C.; the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, N.Y., among others.He was introduced to working with molten glass while an undergraduate student at Kent State University. After earning a master of fine arts degree from Ohio University, he started working full time in glass, concentrating on spheres in 1985. Today he is artist-in-residence at the Sauder Village in Archbold, Ohio, and internationally recognized for his mastery of the marble.Says Matthews, “For me, the marble is a device that unifies my radically diverse explorations in glass.”The glass artist utilizes both modern and ancient techniques to create everything from traditional swirls and lutzes to realistic interpretations of animal pelts.His slide presentation at the Glass Pavilion will start at 6 p.m. on Friday, July 17. Those attending will be able to watch him work that evening from 7-10 p.m. at the Glass Pavilion’s Hot Shop.Weekend visitors to the Museum will be able to see Matthews at work at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 18, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, July 19 in the Glass Pavilion Hot Shop.Google AdsToday's News

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News Headline: On the Move: Pamela Evans | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Council for Interior Design Accreditation: Pamela Evans was appointed as a director representing accredited programs. Evans is interim associate dean of Kent State University's College of Architecture and Environmental Design and director of the college's interior design program.

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News Headline: Research Data from Kent State University Update Understanding of Obesity (Novak) | Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Investigators publish new data in the report "Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity." According to the authors of recent research from Kent, Ohio, "Though obesity is common, some people remain resistant to weight gain even in an obesogenic environment. The propensity to remain lean may be partly associated with high endurance capacity along with high spontaneous physical activity and the energy expenditure of activity, called non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)."

"Previous studies have shown that high-capacity running rats (HCR) are lean compared to low-capacity runners (LCR), which are susceptible to cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Here, we examine the effect of diet on spontaneous activity and NEAT, as well as potential mechanisms underlying these traits, in rats selectively bred for high or low intrinsic aerobic endurance capacity. Compared to LCR, HCR were resistant to the sizeable increases in body mass and fat mass induced by a high-fat diet; HCR also had lower levels of circulating leptin. HCR were consistently more active than LCR, and had lower fuel economy of activity, regardless of diet. Nonetheless, both HCR and LCR showed a similar decrease in daily activity levels after high-fat feeding, as well as decreases in hypothalamic orexin-A content. The HCR were more sensitive to the NEAT-activating effects of intra-paraventricular orexin-A compared to LCR, especially after high-fat feeding. Lastly, levels of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in the skeletal muscle of HCR were consistently higher than LCR, and the high-fat diet decreased skeletal muscle PEPCK-C in both groups of rats. Differences in muscle PEPCK were not secondary to the differing amount of activity," wrote C.M. Novak and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "This suggests the possibility that intrinsic differences in physical activity levels may originate at the level of the skeletal muscle, which could alter brain responsiveness to neuropeptides and other factors that regulate spontaneous daily activity and NEAT."

Novak and colleagues published their study in Hormones and Behavior (Spontaneous activity, economy of activity, and resistance to diet-induced obesity in rats bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity. Hormones and Behavior, 2010;58(3):355-67).

For additional information, contact C.M. Novak, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Copyright © 2011 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Investigators at Kent State University Target Primatology | Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "White-faced saki monkeys (Pithecia pithecia) lack most of the behavioral and physical traits typical of primate monogamy [Fuentes, 1999]. In order to determine if social bonds in this species reflect patterns displayed by pair-bonded groups or larger multimale-multifemale groups, we draw on 17 months of data collected on wild white-faced sakis at Brownsberg Nature Park, Suriname," researchers in Kent, Ohio report (see also ).

"We analyzed within-group social bonds for three habituated groups (one two-adult and two multiadult groups) by measuring grooming, proximity, and approach/leave patterns between adult and subadult group members. We found that both two-adult and multiadult groups showed significantly stronger social bonds between a single male-female dyad within each group (deemed 'primary dyads''). In all three groups, primary dyads were composed of the oldest adult male and a breeding female. These pairs had significantly higher levels of grooming than other within-group dyads and were also in close proximity (< 1 m) more often than nonprimary dyads. Grooming in primary dyads was nonreciprocal, and consistently biased toward female investment. Grooming patterns in nonprimary dyads varied, but were often more reciprocal. Grooming and proximity of the primary dyad also changed in relation to infant development. Our results suggest that while white-faced sakis do not show behavioral and physical traits typical of monogamy or pair-bonding, social bonds are strongest between a single male-female pair. Pitheciine social systems range from small group monogamy in Callicebus to large multimale-multifemale groups in Chiropotes and Cacajao," wrote C.L. Thompson and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "As the middle taxon in this platyrrhine radiation, behavioral strategies of white-faced sakis provide a model for how social bonds and affiliation could be influenced by and affect the evolution of larger group size in primates. Am. J. Primatol. 73: 1051-1061, 2011."

Thompson and colleagues published their study in American Journal of Primatology (Within-Group Social Bonds in White-Faced Saki Monkeys (Pithecia pithecia) Display Male-Female Pair Preference. American Journal of Primatology, 2011;73(10):1051-1061).

For additional information, contact C.L. Thompson, Kent State University, School Biomedical Science, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the American Journal of Primatology is: Wiley-Blackwell, Commerce Place, 350 Main St., Malden 02148, MA, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Findings in Chemical Physics Reported from Kent State University | Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Conformational flexibility plays a central role in allosteric transition of proteins. In this paper, we extend the analysis of our previous study [S. Tripathi and J. J. Portman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. United States.A. 106, 2104 (2009)] to investigate how relatively minor structural changes of the meta-stable states can significantly influence the conformational flexibility and allosteric transition mechanism," scientists in Kent, Ohio report (see also ).

"We use the allosteric transitions of the domains of calmodulin as an example system to highlight the relationship between the transition mechanism and the inter-residue contacts present in the meta-stable states. In particular, we focus on the origin of transient local unfolding (cracking), a mechanism that can lower free energy barriers of allosteric transitions, in terms of the inter-residue contacts of the meta-stable states and the pattern of local strain that develops during the transition. We find that the magnitude of the local strain in the protein is not the sole factor determining whether a region will ultimately crack during the transition," wrote S. Tripathi and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "These results emphasize that the residue interactions found exclusively in one of the two meta-stable states is the key in understanding the mechanism of allosteric conformational change."

Tripathi and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Chemical Physics (Conformational flexibility and the mechanisms of allosteric transitions in topologically similar proteins. Journal of Chemical Physics, 2011;135(7):382-390).

For additional information, contact S. Tripathi, Kent State University, Dept. of Physics, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

The publisher's contact information for the Journal of Chemical Physics is: American Institute Physics, Circulation & Fulfillment Division, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Ste. 1 N O 1, Melville, NY 11747-4501, USA.

Copyright © 2011 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: New Science Study Findings Recently Were Reported by Researchers at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Research findings, "Coexistence of an ILPR i-motif and a partially folded structure with comparable mechanical stability revealed at the single-molecule level," are discussed in a new report. According to the authors of a study from Kent, Ohio, "Investigation of i-motif is of high importance to fully understand the biological functions of G quadruplexes in the context of double-stranded DNA. Whereas single-molecule approaches have profiled G quadruplexes from a perspective unavailable by bulk techniques, there is a lack of similar literature on the i-motif in the cytosine (C)-rich region complementary to G quadruplex-forming sequences."

"Here, we have used laser tweezers to investigate the structures formed in 5'-(TGTCCCCACACCCC)(2), a predominate variant in the insulin-linked polymorphic region (ILPR). We have observed two species with the change in contour length (DeltaL) of 10.4 (±0.1) and 5.1 (±0.5) nm, respectively. Since DeltaL of 10.4 nm is located within the expected range for an i-motif structure, we assign this species to the i-motif. The formation of the i-motif in the same sequence has been corroborated by bulk experiments such as Br(2) footprinting, circular dichroism, and thermal denaturation. The assignment of the i-motif is further confirmed by decreased formation of this structure (23% to 1.3%) with pH 5.5 -- >7.0, which is a well-established behavior for i-motifs. In contrast to that of the i-motif, the formation of the second species with DeltaL of 5.1 nm remains unchanged (6.1 ±1.6%) in the same pH range, implying that pH-sensitive C:CH(+) pairs may not contribute to the structure as significantly as those to the i-motif. Compared to the DeltaG(unfold) of an i-motif (16.0 ±0.8 kcal/mol), the decreased free energy in the partially folded structure (DeltaG(unfold) 10.4 ±0.7 kcal/mol) may reflect a weakened structure with reduced C:CH(+) pairs. Both DeltaL and DeltaG(unfold) argue for the intermediate nature of the partially folded structure in comparison to the i-motif. In line with this argument, we have directly observed the unfolding of an i-motif through the partially folded structure. The i-motif and the partially folded structure share similar rupture forces of 22-26 pN, which are higher than those that can stall transcription catalyzed by RNA polymerases," wrote S. Dhakal and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "This suggests, from a mechanical perspective alone, that either of the structures can stop RNA transcription."

Dhakal and colleagues published their study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (Coexistence of an ILPR i-motif and a partially folded structure with comparable mechanical stability revealed at the single-molecule level. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2010;132(26):8991-7).

For more information, contact S. Dhakal, Dept. of Chemistry, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242, United States.

Copyright © 2011 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 (McCullagn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state Route 45 in Salem.

In addition to the free children's activities, the event will include a Scholastic Book Fair to support the Leetonia School District, along with a health fair and flu clinic.

Public Relations Coordinator Ruth McCullagh said she expects a larger crowd with the additional events. "We consistently have a large turnout for this event," McCullagh said. "With the addition of the health fair, I anticipate our numbers will increase."

The health fair includes free screenings and $20 flu shots provided by the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association. Medicare is accepted. Shots are available for children and adults. The health fair is in the campus' new multi-million dollar health and sciences wing.

The Kids' Fun Fest, which is geared toward children ages 3-13, has a recycling focus. "Many of our crafts demonstrate how everyday items can be reused," said Danielle Stewart, president of the student government organization, which hosts the event.

Stewart said other activities include pumpkin painting and story time. Kent State University mascot, Flash, is planning to make a special appearance, too. The Quaker Trolley will also be on site for students to explore.

As in past years, a community resource center made up of area agencies will be available for participants to visit.

"We hold the Kids' Fun Fest so Kent State Salem students who have families can come enjoy time with their children," Stewart said. "Plus, this is a great way for us to give back to the community and show the area what a great university we have."

To speed up registration, attendees may pre-register at www.surveymonkey.com/s/kidsfunfest or call the campus at 330-332-0361.

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News Headline: Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 (McCullagn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state Route 45 in Salem.

In addition to the free children's activities, the event will include a Scholastic Book Fair to support the Leetonia School District, along with a health fair and flu clinic.

Public Relations Coordinator Ruth McCullagh said she expects a larger crowd with the additional events. "We consistently have a large turnout for this event," McCullagh said. "With the addition of the health fair, I anticipate our numbers will increase."

The health fair includes free screenings and $20 flu shots provided by the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association. Medicare is accepted. Shots are available for children and adults. The health fair is in the campus' new multi-million dollar health and sciences wing.

The Kids' Fun Fest, which is geared toward children ages 3-13, has a recycling focus. "Many of our crafts demonstrate how everyday items can be reused," said Danielle Stewart, president of the student government organization, which hosts the event.

Stewart said other activities include pumpkin painting and story time. Kent State University mascot, Flash, is planning to make a special appearance, too. The Quaker Trolley will also be on site for students to explore.

As in past years, a community resource center made up of area agencies will be available for participants to visit.

"We hold the Kids' Fun Fest so Kent State Salem students who have families can come enjoy time with their children," Stewart said. "Plus, this is a great way for us to give back to the community and show the area what a great university we have."

To speed up registration, attendees may pre-register at www.surveymonkey.com/s/kidsfunfest or call the campus at 330-332-0361.

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News Headline: September 19, 2011 Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Salem's annual Kids' Fun Fest is Oct. 1September 19, 2011SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is hosting its sixth annual Kids' Fun Fest from 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sat., Oct.1 at the campus, located at 2491 state Route 45 in Salem.In addition to the free children's activities, the event will include a Scholastic Book Fair to support the Leetonia School District, along with a health fair and flu clinic.Public Relations Coordinator Ruth McCullagh said she expects a larger crowd with the additional events. "We consistently have a large turnout for this event," McCullagh said. "With the addition of the health fair, I anticipate our numbers will increase."The health fair includes free screenings and $20 flu shots provided by the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association. Medicare is accepted. Shots are available for children and adults. The health fair is in the campus' new multi-million dollar health and sciences wing.The Kids' Fun Fest, which is geared toward children ages 3-13, has a recycling focus. "Many of our crafts demonstrate how everyday items can be reused," said Danielle Stewart, president of the student government organization, which hosts the event.Stewart said other activities include pumpkin painting and story time. Kent State University mascot, Flash, is planning to make a special appearance, too. The Quaker Trolley will also be on site for students to explore.As in past years, a community resource center made up of area agencies will be available for participants to visit."We hold the Kids' Fun Fest so Kent State Salem students who have families can come enjoy time with their children," Stewart said. "Plus, this is a great way for us to give back to the community and show the area what a great university we have."To speed up registration, attendees may pre-register at www.surveymonkey.com/s/kidsfunfest or call the campus at 330-332-0361.- Submitted material

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News Headline: VIDEO: Downtown rebirth continues in Kent (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ground was broken Monday morning for another piece of Kent's downtown rebirth.Kent State University, KSU Foundation and city officials dodged rain showers to join in turning shovels of dirt for the four-story, 95-room hotel and attached conference center with a 300-person capacity.The project, expected to cost about $15 million, will include 5,400 square feet of meeting space, a pool and exercise area on a triangular site facing South DePeyster Street with frontage on Haymaker Parkway and East Erie Street. The site was the former location of the Record-Courier's Kent office, which was razed last year.Ron Pizzuti, chairman and CEO of The Pizzuti Companies, developer of the complex, said the day "was a long time coming.""Downtown Kent is going to be reborn," he said, looking across DePeyster Street to where the Acorn Alley II project is going up, and at vacant land where other mixed office and retail buildings will be going up soon.Pizzuti, a Kent native and KSU graduate, said he was on the university's board of trustees 22 years ago when the board determined "we had a strong need" for a place for people to stay who came to do business, hold meetings or visit the university."Initially it was a conference center. It grew from a 10- or 12-room center to a 100-room hotel and conference center with room for up to 300 people," he said."The new project will benefit the university big time, but it certainly benefits the city of Kent as well," he said.Pizzuti recalled his family moved nine times during his school years in Kent and that he used to buy milk at Fenn Dairy, which was located at the site until the Record-Courier moved there in 1964. He lived in two homes nears the future hotel site.He said it was "nice to be able to give something back to the university that changed my life and the city that groomed my whole family."Pizzuti and other speakers praised the spirit of cooperation among the city, university and private developers.Other speakers included Gary Brahler, chairman of the investments committee of the KSU Foundation board of directors, KSU President Lester Lefton and Mayor Jerry Fiala."Another piece of the puzzle of downtown development has been put into place," Fiala said.Lefton, speaking to about 75 people in a large tent before the groundbreaking, joked that the university is "always lean and mean, so I want you to understand - this is the hotel- we're going to put cots in here and charge $17.50 a night."Speaking seriously, he said, "A hotel and conference center is the cornerstone of Kent's redevelopment."The project is expected to be finished the spring of 2013 but Pizzuti said he'd like to see if that schedule can't be sped up.It is one of four major construction projects under way in Kent. Acorn Alley II is nearing completion on the northwest corner of Erie and DePeyster; PARTA's multi-modal transit center is slated for the northeast corner; and Fairmount Properties' complex housing Davey Tree Expert Co. and Ametek is set for construction at South Water and Erie streets.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://www.recordpub.com/news/article/5097965

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent Native Leads Hotel Project | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ron Pizzuti grew up in Kent, and he's partnering to build the new Kent State Hotel

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://kent.patch.com/articles/video-kent-native-leads-hotel-project#video-7829194

The ceremonial start to construction of the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center started this morning with a groundbreaking and speeches from university officials.

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News Headline: PHOTOS: Kent State Hotel Groundbreaking | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Construction 'started' this morning on the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center

A few shovels of dirt brought the long-awaited Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center one step closer to reality this morning.

Want a room with a pool? A banquet center for your 300-guest wedding or conference? Close to 100 guest rooms? The new hotel will bring all those amenities and more to downtown Kent when it opens in 2013 or earlier.

Here's the numerical rundown on the Kent State hotel, which will not be tied to a national chain.

Estimated project cost: more than $15 million
First floor: 22,780 total square feet with 11,000 square feet dedicated to the 300-seat conference area
95 guest rooms and a fitness center spread out over three upper floors; four floors total
Total building size of 76,350 square feet
It's a big building, but bigger still is the partnership that is making it happen.

"This was a public-private partnership. An amalgam of city officials ... federal officials, the university all linking arms to get something very important done," Kent State University President Lester Lefton said.

Even the man whose business is managing the project — and whose large financial contributions to the university made buying the land for the hotel possible — paid tribute to that partnership.

Ron Pizzuti, chairman and CEO of The Pizzuti Companies, which is partnering with the Kent State Foundation for the hotel, thanked leaders with the city, university and foundation for helping make the new hotel possible.

"The leadership that has come from the city, from the mayor and from my friend ... (Kent City Manager) Dave Ruller and his crew and the folks at the foundation ... it's been a nice ride," Pizzuti said. "It's nice to come back and nice to be able to give something back to the university that changed my life and the town that grew up our entire family."

Pizzuti grew up in Kent and graduated from Kent State in 1962. He also served as a university trustee. He recalled visiting the site of the hotel when it was Fenn Dairy and buying milk there as a youngster before it became the Record-Courier Kent office.

Pizzuti said the hotel is scheduled to open in the spring of 2013, but he joked Monday that he wanted to talk with the construction firm managing the project after the groundbreaking to see if they could speed up the opening date.

The university foundation board voted in June to partner with Pizzuti and invest in the hotel, but how much the foundation will invest remains unclear. University officials have said in the past the foundation is expected to invest up to $3 million in the project. The foundation has already spent more than $500,000 buying the two large properties needed for the hotel, but those land buys were possible thanks to a large, personal donation from Pizzuti.

The hotel is just one aspect of downtown Kent's estimated $100 million redevelopment. Other projects downtown include:

Acorn Alley II, which developer Ron Burbick could cut the ribbon on as early as this week.
The city and Fairmount Properties mixed-use redevelopment, which broke ground earlier this summer.
PARTA's transit center, which will rise across Erie Street from the new hotel.
The Esplanade pathway, which will extend from the Kent State campus into downtown and to the new hotel.
The sign package for the hotel must be approved by the Kent Planning Commission but has not yet been submitted to the city.

"There are days in the life of an institution that are remarkable ... but today is a very special and remarkable day," Lefton said of Monday's groundbreaking. "It's a day that we've long looked forward to."

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News Headline: Kent State Breaks Ground on $15 Million Hotel | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 95-room boutique hotel set to open in spring 2013

Ron Pizzuti, center, chair of The Pizzuti Companies hotel development firm, presents a ceremonial shovel to Gary Brahler of the Kent State University Foundation Board of Directors and Kent State President Lester Lefton, far left, during the groundbreaking ceremony this morning for the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW PHOTOS: http://kent.patch.com/articles/kent-state-breaks-ground-on-15-million-hotel#photo-7828114

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News Headline: New hotel will link Kent State University, city in whole new way (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Groundbreaking part of $100M project

KENT, Ohio - A new 95 room hotel and 300 seat banquet and conference center are coming to downtown Kent.

Kent State University President Lester Lefton said the facility, which will bear the university's name, will link the university and the city in a whole new way.

The City of Kent is in the middle of a $100 million project to redevelop it's downtown. Lefton said the project will make Kent a destination city, which in turn will help the university.

"This is going to transform this city into something that it has never been before. We are going to look more like Ann Arbor, San Antonio or Ithics then you can imagine."

Ron Pizzuti, Chairman and CEO of The Pizzuti Companies, a partner in the project and Kent native, said he hopes the project will bring people to Kent and keep people in Kent.

"This will be a suitcase school again. Only the suitcases are going to come here."

The hotel is expected to open in the spring of 2013.

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News Headline: "You're killin' me, Dave..." | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name: John Rolf
News OCR Text: Sunday, September 18, 2011

I think I need to stay away from this Dave Herpy guy and his classes at Kent State. I'm learning some fantastic skills for group leadership and kayaking, but I don't think I'll live through another day with him. Okay...I'm getting a little ahead of myself.

I stopped by John's place in Twinsburg on the way home from Kent after my kayak training. I'd promised to drop off the air mattress I had in my trunk which I'd put there for the camping I never did during the training. I had hoped to camp at Mogador, but was disappointed to discover there were no state camp grounds on the reservoir. In any event, John was preparing to buy another thermarest for our trip to the Adirondacks, but I'd convinced him to try my air mattress before making the purchase. Like me, he has trouble sleeping comfortably on our camping trips, but I assured him this mattress worked. "And we have two of them. You bought one...which I took...and I bought one as a backup," I explained over the phone earlier in the day.

I pulled in his drive and popped the trunk as he came out to join me. After tearing through all the gear in my trunk and not finding it, I concluded that I'd forgotten to pack it. "Good thing I didn't camp out after all. I'd have been pissed to find out I'd left it home. I'm coming down again tomorrow to complete the training. I'll bring it with me and swing by and give it to you on the way home," I said. He was looking at me funny while I spoke...not that that's anything too unusual for me. "You sound sick, dude," he said. And he was right. I sounded congested...because I was...and I felt like I was running a fever. "I went in the water around 1 p.m. and then we paddled for another 3 hours before I had to practice our rescues. I was a little cold after the first dunking, but really caught a chill after the second one. I've been feeling a little stuffed up since then, too," I said...not whining at all.

I headed home thinking of all the preparations and studying I needed to do for my final day of training. I had to completely rethink my on-land presentation and I wanted to go over some videos of the stroke and rescue I was teaching so I had a better idea how to do them. I started studying around 8 and didn't finish until midnight...by which time my head was throbbing. I went to bed and fell asleep quickly, but woke at 2 a.m. with 100% blockage of my sinus passages...something I have never had. I moved to the recliner downstairs to try and sleep thinking a more upright position would help me drain and when that didn't work, took a hot shower and tried to blow it out. Except I couldn't blow since I was so completely blocked. By five in the morning, I concluded that I would not be doing the final day of training...there was no way I could go back in the water...so I laid down in bed for an hour before getting up to go to Mogador and explain my situation to Dave.

I arrived there in time to see the sun rising over the water and took some great pictures of the fishermen in their boats on the water in the shroud the of morning mist. The glow of the long rays of the morning sun reflected off the water and their boats and added to the beautiful serenity of the morning. How I wished I wasn't in the shape I was and could join them on the water with a sleek kayak to cut through the fog to get some other great pictures. When Dave arrived, I strode up to him to explain the situation. "I come to a seminar three weeks ago and you give me food poisoning and this time you're not feeding us...so you dunk me in a lake and let the bacteria make me sick," I said with a nasal-clogged twang. "You don't sound so good, John," he said while probably thinking I was some kind of delicate wall flower who couldn't handle the environment. And I felt that way. I mean I was perfectly healthy and fit all day yesterday and, it seemed, in a matter of moments...was sick. "Look...you were doing pretty well. You need some work on your strokes, but you know how to teach. Just come down next summer and help me teach an intro class and we'll certify you then," he said. What else could I do? Damn...but I was close.

Still...I learned so much over the two days and would be able to put it to practical use with my own paddling as well as with helping people just giving the sport a try and since I'm taking newcomers out all the time, that would prove invaluable.

I stopped by John's place on the way home and gave him the mattress which he tried out and thought would work. John is a treasure trove of medication...he's always got something wrong...so I asked him for his pharmaceutical assistance with my clogged sinuses. He returned with some nasal spray and Sudafed. "You can get addicted to that nasal spray...so use it sparingly," he said. I was desperate to breathe again...which I needed to do to sleep again...so I squirted it and inhaled while leaning my head back...as instructed. In two minutes, I was breathing again. What a miracle elixir I'd just shot up my nose!

I went home and slept for a couple of hours before getting up to cut the lawn. Even riding the mower, I felt exhausted and was beginning to worry about my climbing trip...now four days off. I collapsed in a chair upon completion and watched 'Stand by Me' with Jason. I asked him about going to the park to do the workout, but he'd already lifted and declined. Probably a good thing since I don't think I could have...or should have...done it anyway.

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News Headline: My Town: Volunteers Needed To Clean Up the Cuyahoga River | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jacque Jovic Web Producer
News OCR Text: 1:51 p.m. EDT, September 19, 2011

Crooked River Adventures at Kent State University is heading up the third annual "Clean Up the Cuyahoga" on Saturday, September 24 and they are looking for a few helping hands. Organizers will provide a shuttle to and from clean up locations. They will also provide all necessary equipment and will serve lunch to the volunteers.

Beginning at 8:30 a.m., three groups of volunteers will travel down the river in canoes, picking up garbage along the way.

Canoe groups:

Depart from Tannery Park in Kent and travel to Middlebury Road.

Group two will depart from Middlebury Road and travel to Brust Park in Munroe Falls.

Group three will depart from Brust Park and travel to Waterworks Park in Cuyahoga Falls.

Volunteers are also needed to walk along the river bank, assist boaters and pick up debris along the shore.

To volunteer, call Mike McFall at (330)672-2802 by September 20.

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News Headline: HELP CROOKED RIVER ADVENTURES CLEAN UP THE CROOKED RIVER SEPT. 24 | Email

News Date: 09/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The days of the Cuyahoga River catching on fire may be a thing of the past, but there is still a substantial amount of trash and debris lingering in the water.Crooked River Adventures, operated by the Department of Recreational Services at Kent State University, opened last year with a mission to be mindful of the environmental concerns of the local community.Keeping true to its promise, the livery will host the third annual "Clean Up the Cuyahoga" on Saturday, Sept.24.

Three groups of volunteers will travel down the river during the clean up event, picking up garbage along the way.Group one will depart from Tannery Park in Kent and travel to Middlebury Road.Group two will depart from Middlebury Road and travel to Brust Park in Munroe Falls.Group three will depart from Brust Park and travel to Waterworks Park in Cuyahoga Falls.All groups will begin collecting trash at 8:30 a.m., with the event expected to last three to four hours.

Volunteers will be shuttled to and from locations, provided the equipment they need to collect trash and served lunch.Crooked River Adventures will have 20 kayaks and seven canoes on hand for volunteers to use.Previous paddling experience is recommended, but not required.Any volunteers that have their own boats are welcome to bring them, and return transportation will be provided.

The livery is also looking for volunteers to walk along the river bank, assist boaters and pick up debris along the shore.

To volunteer for the river clean up, contact Mike McFall at 330-672-2802 or mmcfall5@kent.edu by Sept.20.

Crooked River Adventures will complete its second year of operation this October.Kent State's Department of Recreational Services oversees the facility, which rents canoes, kayaks and bicycles for use in and near the Cuyahoga River in Kent.The department has received statewide recognition for its award-winning boating programs from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Watercraft.

For more information about Crooked River Adventures, call 330-541-7467 or visit www.kent.edu/crookedriver.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: PARTA removing dirt from Kent location: Busing authority OKs $1.15 million contract for work | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority has a low bid of $1.15 million to move an estimated 33,000 cubic yards of dirt from the site of its planned transportation center in downtown Kent. About 27,000 cubic yards is to go off site.Precision Engineering and Contracting, Solon, was the lowest of six bids received. The PARTA board is expected to award the contract this Thursday.Bryan Smith, PARTA's director of planning, said he expects the company to be on the site within two weeks, and start moving dirt in mid-October.

Some of the dirt to go off site will be used for the Esplanade construction"We're working with the university and the city to get the best place to dump the dirt," Smith said. That represents a savings for PARTA and for the university which would have had to buy dirt, he said. Moving the dirt across the street to the Esplanade lowered Precision's bid to PARTA by $60,000.The Kent Central Gateway will be located at 115 S. DePeyster St. and will include a parking deck, bus depot and retail space. T

he project cost is estimated $26 million, and is expected to be substantially complete by December 2012 and the parking deck be open and running.The DePeyster/Haymaker area of Kent will be a busy construction zone for months with the gateway, the new Kent State University hotel and conference center and a mixed-use commercial project by Fairmount Properties.Smith said the city suggested, and the university hosted, a meeting of all the developers and construction managers to compare time schedules. Smith said the meeting was very helpful and is another example of cooperation among the parties.

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News Headline: Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Carolina Chocolate Drops | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Carolina Chocolate Drops, whose latest album, "Genuine Negro Jig," won this year's Grammy Award for best traditional folk album, will appear in concert Wedsnesday at 8 p.m. at the the Kent State University Auditorium, as part of the Kent State Folk Festival. Tickets are $25 at www.tix.com. Full folk festival details may be found at www.kentstatefolkfestival.org .Look here daily for CantonRep.com Entertainment Writer Dan Kane's best picks for things to do this week.

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