Report Overview:
Total Clips (36)
Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
English (2)
Higher Education (1)
Homecoming (4)
Information and Religion, Center for (CSIR) (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull (3)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Mathematical Science (1)
Music (2)
Political Science (3)
Safety (2)
Students (8)
Theatre and Dance (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Ken Dobbins honored at KSU 10/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Edwin S. Gould was a leading Kent State professor: news obituary (Tubergen) 10/17/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Celebrations: Oct. 16 10/17/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


English (2)
Writers to visit Hudson Library in October 10/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Young Hemingway's Letters: A Rare Look at the Author's Tender Side 10/17/2011 Atlantic, The Text Attachment Email


Higher Education (1)
Kent State ranked as one of top schools in the world (Lefton) 10/15/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...15, 2011 @ 12:00 a.m. Staff report kent For the second-consecutive year, Times Higher Education, a London-based higher-education magazine, has ranked Kent State University as one of world's top universities in its annual World University Rankings. Kent State was the only public research university...


Homecoming (4)
Parade kicks off Homecoming at KSU today (Circosta) 10/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

VIDEO, PHOTO GALLERY: KSU celebrates Homecoming (Karpinski) 10/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Watch Highlights from Homecoming Parade 10/17/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

PHOTOS: Homecoming Parade at Kent State 10/17/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Information and Religion, Center for (CSIR) (1)
World Vision leader visits to promote youth activism 10/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...to encourage young people to be politically engaged in the fight for justice and human rights at 7 p.m. Thursday in room 317 of the Student Center at Kent State University. Taylor, vice president of advocacy at World Vision (an evangelical development and relief organization) and youth activist,...


KSU at Stark (2)
Michelle Rhee Speech at Kent State/Stark Prompts Faculty to Organize Counter Event (Biasella) 10/16/2011 National Public Radio Text Attachment Email

Michelle Rhee Speech at Kent State/Stark Prompts Faculty to Organize Counter Event Alex Wong / Getty Images Former D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee speaks...

Michelle Rhee's Three Ways to Improve Education in America 10/16/2011 National Public Radio Text Attachment Email

Michelle Rhee's Three Ways to Improve Education in America Michelle Rhee spoke at Kent State University's Stark Campus yesterday. North Canton Patch reports that Rhee said there really is no single answer to solving education's...


KSU at Trumbull (3)
High schools struggle to offer AP college courses 10/16/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...high school's curriculum after the only certified teacher left. The district, like others, relies on partnerships with Eastern Gateway Community College, Youngstown State University and Kent State University Trumbull Campus to build dual credit courses that outsource college credit coursework....

Jobs fair set at KSU Trumbull Campus 10/16/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Published: Sun, October 16, 2011 @ 12:01 a.m. Staff report WARREN Warren City Councilwoman Cheryl Saffold and Kent State University Trumbull Campus will have a jobs fair from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday in Room 117 of the Technology Building at KSU Trumbull,...

Sculptor is inspired by geometry 10/16/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...tetrahedron, the octahedron, the cube, the icosahedron and the dodecahedron — he pursued a simple vision of beauty. On Thursday, Colbert debuted a sculpture at Kent State University Trumbull Campus next to the Technology Building. “Tetra” is an interactive sculpture in which students are welcome to...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Lights, camera action! - New Philadelphia, OH - The Times-Reporter 10/14/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...also will be a sneak peak of "Old Fashioned." "10 Greatest Films of all Time," 7 p.m. Nov. 30 in the Dover Public Library. Dan Fuller, a professor at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia, will lead a discussion, and clips of scenes from classic films will be shown. The evening...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (Oct. 15) 10/15/2011 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...NewsEdge) Targeted News Service Targeted News Service ALEXANDRIA, Va., Oct. 15 -- The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in Ohio. *** Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Oct. 15 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,035,279)...


Mathematical Science (1)
Numbers matter at Kent State University (Frank, Lefton, Laux, Tonge) 10/17/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

University invests $1.2M in Math Emporium to address students' lagging abilities On the first day of classes at Kent State University, a student looked math instructor Tracy Laux in the eye and remarked, “There's no way out.” Indeed, no Facebook, no...


Music (2)
ALONG THE WAY: An impressive orchestra debut 10/16/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Schumann, Mozart part of Stow Symphony's fall concert 10/16/2011 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

The Stow Symphony Orchestra will perform its fall concert at the Ludwig Recital Hall on the Kent State University Campus, at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 1. Ludwig Hall is located in the University's Music and Speech Building at 1325 Theatre...


Political Science (3)
Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) 10/16/2011 Cincinnati Enquirer - Online Text Attachment Email

...maintain services. SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University. "What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia...

Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) 10/16/2011 Kentucky Enquirer - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...maintain services. SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University. "What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia...

Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) 10/16/2011 Community Recorder Text Attachment Email

...maintain services. SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University. "What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia...


Safety (2)
Big savings in IT collaboration, consolidation 10/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...an upgrade to more efficient equipment created a $39,500 savings on the city's $139,000 telecommunications bill. Dean Tondiglia, assistant chief for Kent State University's police department, found consolidating record-keeping systems for the school and the city not only led to some reduced...

OFFICIALS EYEING IT COLLABORATION: CONFERENCE FOCUSES ON POSSIBLE SAVINGS?TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS 10/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...an upgrade to more efficient equipment created a $39,500 savings on the city's $139,000 telecommunications bill. Dean Tondiglia, assistant chief for Kent State University's police department, found consolidating record-keeping systems for the school and the city not only led to some reduced...


Students (8)
Kent State student found dead in dorm room (Vincent) 10/17/2011 Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online) Text Attachment Email

BRIEF: Body discovered in Kent State residence hall (Vincent) 10/16/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Oct. 16--A body was discovered Sunday in Leebrick Hall at Kent State University. University spokeswoman Emily Vincent confirmed the discovery but said she didn't know the gender of the person or...

Body found at KSU dorm: Investigator says man dead for "a couple of days' (Vincent) 10/17/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Man Found Dead in Kent State Residence Hall (Vincent) 10/17/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Body found in residence hall at Kent State University (Vincent) 10/17/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Email

Student found dead in Kent State Univ. residence hall (Vincent) 10/17/2011 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Kent State student found dead in dorm room (Vincent) 10/17/2011 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Coroner: Kent State University Student Found Dead in Dorm (Vincent) 10/17/2011 Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email


Theatre and Dance (1)
Theater: '14' examines violent therapy for gay Mormons in the 1970s (Van Baars) 10/16/2011 Boulder Daily Camera - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the original actor cast in the role had to leave five days prior to opening, van Baars took on the character in a production that Cameron directed at Kent State University, where van Baars teaches theater. Getting another crack at the role has been enjoyable, van Baars said. "I've been able...


University Press (1)
Hemingway's Finca Vigia restored in partnership of Cuban, U.S. preservationists 10/15/2011 Washington Post - Online Text Attachment Email

...years, Villerreal says, he loved Hemingway like a father and respected him as a friend and employer, even writing his own book, “Hemingway's Cuban Son” (Kent State University Press, 2009). He knows Finca Vigia as if it were his own. “Papa used to hide manuscripts in a valise on the top shelf...


News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Ken Dobbins honored at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: At Friday night's KSU College of Education
Hall of Fame dinner, Mike Schwartz, who served
successfully as Kent State president and later as
Cleveland State president, introduced his protege,
Ken Dobbins, as “the best utility player we
had,” when the two were at Kent State.
President Schwartz, a baseball fan who loves
his metaphors, was right. Ken at Kent State was
the go-to guy whenever a difficult assignment
arose. Accompanied by his lovely wife, Jeannine
and son, Paul, he was on campus to receive the
College of Education's Alumni Leadership award
and attend Homecoming.
Intelligent, friendly, and down to earth, Ken
was very popular and highly respected on and
off campus during his KSU years, but wanting to
move up, 20 years ago accepted a vice presidency
at Southeast Missouri State in beautiful Cape
Giardeau on the Mississippi River.
For the last 13 years, Ken has served as its president
and he's made a major impact in strengthening
curriculum and enrollment and the economic
development of Missouri as well.
Southeast Missouri purchased a large monastery
that had been vacated and remodeled it
into a spectacular fine arts school with Ken at
the helm
Six others Friday evening were also honored by
the College of Education, one of them most appropriately
being the late Dr. Gerald H. Read, whose
daughter, Victoria Thornbury, accepted.

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News Headline: Edwin S. Gould was a leading Kent State professor: news obituary (Tubergen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent -- Edwin Sheldon Gould was one of Kent State's last "university professors," who could basically teach what they wanted.

Gould was still teaching honors chemistry last spring at age 84, but retired in August while struggling with lung cancer. He died Tuesday, Oct. 11, at home in Kent at 85.

He was a leading chemist, an author of two widely used textbooks, a poet and a violinist.

"He knew exactly what he wanted, always, and went after it," said his wife, the former Carol Williams Brown, whom Gould met through a matchmaking service.

Michael Tubergen, chemistry chairman, called him a seminal author and passionate teacher. Gould sometimes called out to students passing by, "What's the concentration of water?"

It was a surprising question, since chemists normally talk about the concentration of other substances in water, and took hard calculations. Tubergen began to teach the problem to prepare students for Gould's hallway quizzes.

Gould was raised in Hollywood and earned a doctorate from the University of California at Los Angeles. He worked in California and New York before coming to Kent State in 1967.

He wrote standard textbooks on organic and inorganic chemistry that have been translated into German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese and Serbo-Croatian. He published about 200 research articles, many of them about titanium. He trained 24 graduate students and 21 post-doctoral ones. He lived a couple of blocks from school and walked to work in bright red Converse high-tops.

In 1982, Gould was named a university professor, a title no longer given today. It meant he could decide what and how much to teach on any subject. He focused on the first two levels of honors chemistry. He also won the university's Distinguished Scholar and Distinguished Honors Faculty Teaching awards.

Gould often played in chamber music groups. For more than 40 years, he attended adult musical camps at Interlochen, Mich., and Humboldt, Calif. He published several books of poetry and contributed to monthly recitals at Kent.

Gould's first wife, the former Marjorie McFarlin, died in 2003. He married again in 2005. He closed his laboratory a couple of years ago but kept teaching.

In a poem called "Recipe for Triumph," he wrote:

If you perform your experiments incorrectly

But somehow reach the right conclusion

You are probably a genius

With God on your side.

Edwin Sheldon Gould

1926-2011

Survivors: Wife, the former Carol Williams Brown, sons, Richard Gould-Saltman of Los Angeles and Kirk Gould of Menlo Park, Calif.; step-daughter, Laura Darby Singh of New York City; five grandchildren, a great-granddaughter and a sister.

Memorial event: 4 p.m. on Oct. 29 at the Kiva, Kent State University Student Center.

Contributions: American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718, cancer.org, or Wick Poetry Center, P.O. Box 5190, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242-0001, www.kent.edu/wick.

Arrangements: Bissler and Sons.

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News Headline: Celebrations: Oct. 16 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Shaun Patrick Miller, an August graduate of Kent State's recreation, park and tourism management program, was selected for the 2011 Young Professional Network Outstanding Undergraduate Award from the National Recreation and Park Association. He has accepted a job conducting outreach programs and leading snowshoe-guided hikes at the National Park Service's visitor center in the Grand Tetons in Wyoming. Miller formerly lived in Cuyahoga Falls.

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News Headline: Writers to visit Hudson Library in October | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Best-selling author Paula McLain
will discuss her book, “The Paris
Wife,” at 7 p.m. Oct. 26 at the Hudson
Library, 96 Library St. Tickets
are required in advance by visiting
http://hudsonlibrary.org.
Kent State University professor
Dr. Robert Trogdon, co-editor
of “The Letters of Ernest Hemingway,
1907-1922,” will answer any
questions about the larger-than-life
author at 7 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Hudson
Library.
Columnist, commentator and
author Bob Morris will talk about
his recent book, “Assisted Loving:
True Tales of Double Dating with
My Dad,” at 2 p.m. Oct. 30 at the
Hudson Library.
For more information, call the
library at 330-653-6658 or visit
http://hudsonlibrary.org.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Young Hemingway's Letters: A Rare Look at the Author's Tender Side | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Atlantic, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From the lovely illustrated correspondence of Edward Gorey to the touching vintage letters of luminaries on the love of libraries, we've previously explored how the uncovered letters of cultural icons set ajar the door to a whole new wonderland of their private selves. Such is the case with The Letters of Ernest Hemingway: Volume 1, 1907-1922 -- a fascinating new volume that peels away at a young Hemingway different, richer, more tender than the machismo-encrusted persona we've come to know through his published works. After spending a decade sifting through Hemingway's correspondence, Penn State professor Sandra Spanier collaborated with Kent State University's Robert W. Trogdon to curate this first in what will be a series of at least 16 volumes.

Though Hemingway had articulated to his wife in the 1950s that he didn't want his correspondence published, his son, Patrick Hemingway, says these letters could dispel the myth of the writer as a tortured figure and distorted soul, a pop-culture image of his father he feels doesn't tell a complete and honest story.

My principal motive for wanting it to happen was that I think it gives a much better picture of Hemingway's life than any of his biographers to date.... [My father] was not a tragic figure. He had the misfortune to have mental troubles in old age. Up until that, he was a rather lighthearted and humorous person. --Patrick Hemingway

Click here to view video: http://www.theatlantic.com/life/archive/2011/10/young-hemingways-letters-a-rare-look-at-the-authors-tender-side/246612/

The letters -- lively, quirky, full of doodles and delightfully unusual spellings -- cover everything from Hemingway's childhood in Oak Park, Illinois, to his adventures as an ambulance driver on the Italian front in World War I to the heartbreak of his romance with a Red Cross nurse named Agnes von Kurowsky and his eventual marriage to Hadley Richardson.

From lovers to rivals to his mother, the recipients of the letters each seem to get a different piece of Hemingway, custom-tailored for them not in the hypocritical way of an inauthentic social chameleon but in the way great writers know the heart, mind, and language of their reader. The letters thus become not only a tender homage to this unknown Hemingway, revealing new insights into his creative process along the way, but also a bow before the lost art of letter-writing itself.

Via The Chronicle of Higher Education.

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News Headline: Kent State ranked as one of top schools in the world (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Sat, October 15, 2011 @ 12:00 a.m. Staff report kent For the second-consecutive year, Times Higher Education, a London-based higher-education magazine, has ranked Kent State University as one of world's top universities in its annual World University Rankings. Kent State was the only public research university in Northeast Ohio to be awarded the honor and one of only four public and private schools in the state of Ohio to make the list, along with Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati. Kent State ranked in the 301 to 350 range globally and is among the 113 American universities represented on the international list. The 2011-12 World University Rankings is considered “the gold standard” for world-class research institutions by Times Higher Education. The Times Higher Education tables, using data from Thomson Reuters, are widely recognized as the most authoritative source of broad comparative performance information on universities across the world. Kent State President Lester A. Lefton said the world ranking is yet another validation of the broad-based success the university is experiencing. “Kent State is truly a world-class institution of higher education that is preparing students for the demands of the 21st century,” Lefton said. “We are proud to receive this prestigious ranking two years in a row. “The faculty and staff of Kent State University are dedicated to continued excellence in education, research and student success,” Lefton continued. “As Kent State continues to broaden its international reach, rankings of this type demonstrate our success on the global stage.” The news from Times Higher Education comes on the heels of two other prestigious rankings for the university. Kent State received a coveted spot in the first-tier list of Best National Universities in the 2012 edition of Best Colleges by U.S. News & World Report, and recently was ranked among the top 500 universities according to the 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities. For the eighth annual list, the 2011-12 World University Rankings used a sophisticated methodology first introduced last year. However, Times Higher Education has continued to refine the process and made a number of improvements for this year, resulting in the most detailed, rigorous and comprehensive study of global university performance ever taken. This year's list includes the top 400 universities in the world. “We employed 13 separate performance indicators, across the full range of a university's core activity,” said Ann Mroz, editor of Times Higher Education. “These allowed us to take a serious look at the teaching environment for the first time, as well as to examine research, knowledge transfer and internationalization in depth. We also reduced our reliance on subjective measures.” The global rankings are built on performance indicators designed to capture the full range of university activities, from teaching to research to knowledge transfer. The 13 indicators are brought together into five broad categories, which are: teaching, citations (measuring research influence), research (measured in volume, income and reputation), international outlook (measured in staff, students and research) and industry income (measured in innovation). For more information on the 2011-12 World University Rankings and to see the complete list of the top universities in the world, visit www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/world-university-rankings. Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content. © 2011 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator. 107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503 Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565

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News Headline: Parade kicks off Homecoming at KSU today (Circosta) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City and university officials
are expecting thousands to
line the streets of Kent today
for the annual Kent State
University Homecoming parade.
The parade steps off at
10 a.m. on Midway Drive
on KSU Campus and follows
East Main Street before
turning at Franklin Avenue,
wrapping up at 11:45 a.m.
Along with the KSU
Marching Band, bands
from Theodore Roosevelt
High School, Waterloo High
School and Lutheran High
School West will participate
in the parade.
Before the parade, KSU
alumni will meet for a free
open house and continental
breakfast at 9 a.m. at the
Williamson Alumni Center at
1200 E. Main St.
After the parade, couples
who met at KSU can
head for the letter “K” at
Risman Plaza on campus.
KSU officials are hoping
to start a new tradition
by having couples who
met at the school kiss on
the “K” when the clock
strikes noon.
Carrie Circosta, assistant
director of alumni
relations at KSU, said the
idea for the event came to
the staff during a brainstorming
session for new
alumni activities.
“We're always looking
at different ways to make
our alumni feel more connected
to the university,”
Circosta said. “We noticed
this year's Homecoming
is on Sweetest
Day. ... We can't pass this
up.”
At 12:30 p.m., the tailgating
lots will open up
at Dix Stadium for Golden
Flash fans who want to
get in the game day spirit
early.
The KSU football team
will take on the Miami
University RedHawks at
3:30 p.m. at the stadium.

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News Headline: VIDEO, PHOTO GALLERY: KSU celebrates Homecoming (Karpinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Chilly winds and overcast skies couldn't deter parade spectators from lining Main Street for the annual Homecoming celebration.

University students, faculty, staff, alumni and surrounding community members were among the estimated thousands in attendance to watch about 80 floats on their journey from campus to downtown Kent.

Click here to view video: http://www.recordpub.com/news/article/5110389

The KSU Marching Band was joined by bands from Theodore Roosevelt High School, Waterloo High School and Lutheran High School West to energize the KSU football team to “Rock out the RedHawks,” prior to the homecoming game against Miami University of Ohio. The Golden Flashes lost 9-3.

Before the parade stepped off at 10 a.m., alumni could get their morning fill at the alumni breakfast at the Williamson Alumni Center, and after the parade a few alumni couples made their way to Risman Plaza for the first “Kiss on the ‘K.'” Any couple that met while at KSU was encouraged to show some public affection and smooch on the brick “K” in the plaza at noon. About 20 couples did just that.

Larry and Sandy Disbro, who met in 1973 while attending the university, may have been shunned by their high school classmates, had they met and dated prior to college.

“She lived in Prentice Hall and I worked for the food service,” Larry said, adding that meals were a buffet everyday back then. “One time she came through the line and she had a Lakeland Community College shirt. I was from Mentor and asked if she was too and she said, ‘No, I'm from Mayfield.,'” which was Mentor High School's rival, he added.

Regardless of high school differences, Larry said they went on a few dates, he'd drive her to class and everything fell into place.

Joe and Kathy Karpinski met a few years later, on February 3, 1978, in the Town House bar in the old downtown hotel. By November that year, they tied the knot.

“A friend of mine introduced us and that was it,” Joe said. “It was my last year and she had one more year.”

Kathy said at the time, it was more normal for students to be married.

“It didn't feel like you needed to wait until you graduated before getting married,” she said.

Joe now teaches in the College of Technology at KSU and together, the Karpinskis have put all three of their children through the university.

“All five of us have Kent State ties,” Joe said.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Watch Highlights from Homecoming Parade | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University alumni celebrated Homecoming this weekend

Kent State Homecoming 2011
Watch highlights from Kent State's Homecoming Parade Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011.

Click here to view video: http://kent.patch.com/articles/watch-highlights-from-homecoming-parade#video-8123738

Did you miss the Kent State Homecoming Parade Saturday? Watch the video highlights, and check out our huge photo gallery from the parade.

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News Headline: PHOTOS: Homecoming Parade at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An hour-long parade marched through the city Saturday morning.

Kent State Homecoming 2011

Students at Kent State carry the banner for the 2011 Homecoming Parade, which marched through the city Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011.

Picture-perfect fall weather — gray skies and biting winds — set the backdrop for Kent State University's 2011 Homecoming Parade Saturday.

Crowds lined East Main Street from Midway Drive all the way to Franklin Avenue for the parade, which started at 10 a.m. and finished about an hour later.

The parade was just one of several events held yesterday for homecoming weekend.

If you took photos or video yesterday, add them to this story by clicking "Add photos..." underneath the main feature.

Click here to view photos: http://kent.patch.com/articles/photos-homecoming-parade-at-kent-state#photo-8122922

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News Headline: World Vision leader visits to promote youth activism | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Saturday, October 15, 2011 World Vision leader visits to promote youth activism October 15,2011 03:55 AM GMT Colette M. Jenkins Beacon Journal Publishing Co. The Rev. Adam Taylor will share his vision of how to encourage young people to be politically engaged in the fight for justice and human rights at 7 p.m. Thursday in room 317 of the Student Center at Kent State University. Taylor, vice president of advocacy at World Vision (an evangelical development and relief organization) and youth activist, will focus on what it means to revitalize activism for a younger generation. He will incorporate lessons from the civil rights and anti-apartheid movements with new methods and strategies. His goal is to help those in attendance understand how they can combat injustice and inequality. Taylor earned degrees at Emory University and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He founded and served as executive director of Global Justice, an organization that mobilizes students around issues of global human rights and economic justice. He is the author of Mobilizing Hope (InterVarsity Press, 2010) and an ordained minister at First Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Taylor's presentation is part of a symposium sponsored by the Center for the Study of Information and Religion in the School of Library and Information Science.

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News Headline: Michelle Rhee Speech at Kent State/Stark Prompts Faculty to Organize Counter Event (Biasella) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: National Public Radio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Michelle Rhee Speech at Kent State/Stark Prompts Faculty to Organize Counter Event Alex Wong / Getty Images Former D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee speaks at a 2010 press conference. Michelle Rhee , the former D.C. public schools chief, will speak to a full house at Kent State University's Stark campus tonight as part of its Featured Speakers Series . In response, the university's education faculty will hold their own event later this month to present “an insider's view of education as a profession.” The Rhee speech this evening, for which Rhee is being paid $35,000, is free and open to the public, but tickets are no longer available. The Oct. 25 faculty event , which features five Kent State Stark professors, is also free and open to the public. The university will include flyers announcing the Oct. 25 event in the programs for tonight's event. Rhee has become one of the spokespeople for a brand of school reform that her organization, StudentsFirst , describes as building “a national movement to defend the interests of children in public education and pursue transformative reform, so that America has the best education system in the world.” Rhee, who appeared in the documentary Waiting for Superman , has criticized seniority-based teacher retention and supported performance pay and improving teacher evaluations. Gov. John Kasich is a fan of Rhee's and cohosted a screening of Waiting for Superman with Rhee earlier this year. University organizers invited Rhee because education is a “hot topic,” said Tina Biasella, Kent State Stark's director of external affairs: “We're looking for things that would be of interest to our students and are of a timely interest.” After Rhee's speech, a select group of students majoring in education and other fields will have a chance to talk with her at a private reception, Biasella said: “This is an opportunity for our students to meet people they wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity to meet.” Although Rhee's policy agenda includes “elevat[ing] the teaching profession by valuing teachers' impact on students,” some educators have criticized her as being anti-union and anti-teacher . Claudia Khourey-Bowers is the director of graduate education at Kent State Stark. She organized the Oct. 25 event to present an alternative to Rhee's agenda and ensure “the voice of professional educators” was heard: I felt that the format of the Featured Speakers event was more social than conducive to an exchange of ideas. I believe that the voice of professional educators is too rarely heard, and very rarely heard from their perspective. While we thought it was beneficial to our students to hear an opposing spokesperson, lack of response could be interpreted by them and the general public as support for the ideas that Rhee represents. The other reason I felt compelled to offer our insights was in the face of increasingly challenging assessment demands placed on student teachers and other teacher-candidates. The disparity in national/state expectations for traditionally-prepared teacher candidates and alternatively-prepared teacher candidates is of great concern. – Here's Michelle Rhee's speaking contract with the university:

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News Headline: Michelle Rhee's Three Ways to Improve Education in America | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: National Public Radio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Michelle Rhee's Three Ways to Improve Education in America Michelle Rhee spoke at Kent State University's Stark Campus yesterday. North Canton Patch reports that Rhee said there really is no single answer to solving education's problems: What is the answer to education reform? Rhee believes three factors are the focus of reform. First, recognize that there are “unbelievably great teachers doing great things for their kids.” Second, America needs to regain its competitive spirit, especially in classrooms. Kids are being rewarded for just showing up. Third, Rhee said, “In order to transform education, we have to stop the political partisanship and look at what's best for kids and families.” The speech was part of Kent State Stark's Featured Speaker Series.

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News Headline: High schools struggle to offer AP college courses | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Sun, October 16, 2011 @ 12:03 a.m. By Caitlin Cook and Doug Livingston The News Outlet Tim Saxton enrolled in the only Advanced Placement course that Boardman High School offered when he attended in the early 1980s. When he became principal of his alma mater in 2001, the district still offered only AP calculus. But since 2004, that has changed. Boardman's current AP classes — seven — are on par with larger Ohio high schools. As early as their sophomore year, Boardman students now have the opportunity to take AP courses that challenge and prepare them for college education. Saxton is among many school officials who believe a strong AP program is essential for student success in college. High school graduates who take advantage of AP classes can knock out college classes at a fraction of the price. Some enter college as sophomores, bypassing an entire year of school. For college admissions officers, success in AP classes indicates a student's determination and academic achievement. But offering AP courses isn't an option for every school. The majority of Valley districts struggle to offer any AP option. WHY SO FEW IN VALLEY? Mahoning and Trumbull districts average fewer than two AP classes each. More than a third of the districts offer none. Schools that offer no AP sections are typically smaller, rural districts that lack qualified teachers and the number of students needed to fill AP classrooms. It's an issue of staff and students, not dollars. “Typically schools don't see the cost of AP as being as much of a barrier as how do we find teachers that we can ensure are going to be qualified to teach college-level courses in our school,” said Trevor Packer, vice president of the College Board, the national group that oversees all AP offerings in America. “Even though the costs of offering AP itself are not significant, if the school has a small number of students [they may have to choose], ‘Are we going to allocate a teacher to teach an AP section or a non-AP section?” Packer said. Taxpayers ultimately fund the courses. School administrators must justify offering AP classes by filling the seats. “When we offer an AP class, we need to have at least 15, 20, 25 kids in a class to be accountable to the community,” Saxton said. “I wish we had the luxury of having a faculty in which we could afford to teach a class and pay for someone to teach a class with 10 to 15 students. Times have changed.” Though Boardman and other larger districts rely on numbers to fill AP sections, rural schools such as Bloomfield suffer from smaller class sizes, making it difficult to create and fill an AP class. Bloomfield last offered AP calculus three year ago. With one student enrolled, the class was cut from the high school's curriculum after the only certified teacher left. The district, like others, relies on partnerships with Eastern Gateway Community College, Youngstown State University and Kent State University Trumbull Campus to build dual credit courses that outsource college credit coursework. OHIO LACKS IN AP Lacking AP sections isn't just a local problem. According to a national study conducted by ProPublica, a national reporting organization, the state overall has fallen behind. Ohio school districts with more than 3,000 students offer seven AP classes on average. The national average for that size district is 8.35 classes. Mahoning and Trumbull counties have six school districts with more than 3,000 students. But only two — Boardman and Warren — meet the statewide average of seven classes. Austintown offers three. Canfield, Howland and Youngstown high schools all offer two AP classes. Canfield High School Principal John Tullio has applied for and received an advanced-placement network grant through the Ohio Department of Education. Starting next year, Tullio plans to double the school's two AP courses with the grant funds. “We want to stay competitive,” Tullio said. “We want to stay on top of the game and offer the best for our students. And that's the reason for expansion.” Of the 13 school districts with fewer than 1,000 students, only two offer AP classes. Maplewood and Joseph Badger districts offer four and five AP classes respectively. “One of the things we do is run very [efficiently],” said Joseph Badger Principal Edwin Baldwin. With support from the board of education, Baldwin analyzes course offerings and class sizes, much as other districts do. If half of the 120 high school juniors and seniors enroll in an upper-level course like psychology, then the district adds AP psychology to the curriculum and expects 15 to 20 students to register. That is the case for AP psychology this year. “We decided we are going to give those kids every chance to get college credit and just implement the AP program,” Baldwin said. The AP courses at Joseph Badger often replace similar honors classes. This avoids additional expenses of hiring another teacher or adding another class. “It's the only way that we can do it,” Baldwin said. He also requires his AP teachers to instruct freshman courses. This lets the teachers become recruiters for prospective AP students who are encouraged to enroll in honors classes by their sophomore year. Honors classes pipeline students into AP courses. “[Recruiting is] how we keep these courses viable and how we keep them alive,” Baldwin said. Teachers undergo training at colleges and programs accredited by the College Board to become certified to teach AP courses. The cost of training teachers is often reimbursed by the district. Training costs, from $1,500 to $4,000, vary by institution. Some take college workshops or online training programs. Most use AP training to fulfill their obligation as educators to further their education. COSTLY EXAMS To gain college credit for successfully completing AP class, students must pass an $87 exam offered in May. The federal government subsidizes this fee for students who receive free or reduced lunch. Officials are concerned some students in impoverished districts cannot afford the $87 AP final exam fee — even though it pales in comparison to hundreds of dollars in college tuition that would have been paid. Not all students who qualify for federal subsidy enroll in the free or reduced lunch program, and therefore do not receive aid for taking the AP exam. The benefit of successfully completing an AP course depends on the college. Tara Milliken, an admissions counselor at The Ohio State University, said accelerated courses in the AP program better prepare students for college, but they are not a primary consideration for admission. “I think any time a student is able to take a more rigorous course. that better prepares them for the academic challenges they may face,” Milliken said. “It works in their favor.” At YSU, an open- enrollment institution, AP classes have no bearing on admissions, according to Sue Davis, director of undergraduate admissions. However, Davis also sees the benefit of offering college-level courses in high school. “It gives students a little bit of an idea of what is going to be required in college,” she said, “because they will be required to do a lot more with this AP course than they would in a typical high school course.” Boardman senior Evan Heintz embraces the options his school provides and hopes to skip a couple of courses heading into college so he's “not so lost.” “It's a big advantage for Boardman students to have a lot of AP classes to choose from. It gives us a ton of options. So it gives us opportunities to succeed,” Heintz said. The NewsOutlet is a joint media venture by student and professional journalists and is a collaboration of Youngstown State University, WYSU radio and The Vindicator. Major brands always give out their popular brand samples (in a way to promote the products) best place on the internet is Official Get Samples find them & enjoy your samples Suggest removal: ! In order to raise test scores in reading, for example, teachers should be using Advanced Placement strategies. AP teachers don't just teach reading; they teach critical reading. There is a huge difference. The more teachers and students trained to use these critical reading strategies, the higher the performance level will be on state tests. Suggest removal: ! © 2011 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator. 107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503 Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565

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News Headline: Jobs fair set at KSU Trumbull Campus | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Sun, October 16, 2011 @ 12:01 a.m. Staff report WARREN Warren City Councilwoman Cheryl Saffold and Kent State University Trumbull Campus will have a jobs fair from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday in Room 117 of the Technology Building at KSU Trumbull, 4314 Mahoning Ave. NW. “This event is aimed at assisting local residents who are unemployed or seeking employment in the public or private sector,” Saffold said. Many large and small businesses, nonprofit organizations and career- services agencies are expected to participate, including AVI, Anderson-Dubose, Home Savings, Wal-Mart, Things Remembered, Phantom Fireworks, Global Solutions, Corp Temps, Infocision, Liberty Tax, TCAP, Warren Urban League, Mentoring Mom's, Trumbull Career and Technical Center, City of Warren Business Incubator, FedEx Ground, Farmers Bank, West Corp., Trumbull Metropolitan Housing Authority, MVP Plastics, Staff Right, AT&T, Verizon, Drake Manufacturing, Dunkin Donuts and Job Corps. The fair also will feature assistance with r sum writing, and there will be a job-readiness workshop at 10:30 a.m. The Trumbull County One-Stop office, a division of the county Department of Job and Family Services, also will be on hand to assist job-seekers. Free bus transportation will be available in the parking lot of the Hot Dog Shoppe, 740 West Market Street. The bus will leave at 9:30 a.m. and return at 3:30 p.m. © 2011 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator. 107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503 Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565

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News Headline: Sculptor is inspired by geometry | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Sun, October 16, 2011 @ 12:01 a.m. By HILARY CRISAN news@vindy.com champion Sculptor David Colbert focuses on a subject many people do not understand: geometry. Colbert focused on geometric patterns for most of his life, as well as their interrelationships and their structural characteristics. Through focusing on five particular geometric shapes — the tetrahedron, the octahedron, the cube, the icosahedron and the dodecahedron — he pursued a simple vision of beauty. On Thursday, Colbert debuted a sculpture at Kent State University Trumbull Campus next to the Technology Building. “Tetra” is an interactive sculpture in which students are welcome to sit and relax. It consists of a limestone-gravel circle of about 40 feet and stainless-steel truncated tetrahedron tables and seats that create a 35-foot triangle. Locally grown sunset-maple trees surround the entire piece. The sculpture represents the relationship between arts and sciences. Colbert was commissioned $92,000 to do this sculpture including fabrication and installation. The cost of the raw steel was about $8,000. The Ohio Percent for Art Program commissioned the piece. Since 1990, this program has provided state funds for the acquisition, commissioning and installation of works of art. Out of 56 artists, Colbert was chosen. People are welcome to sit at these tetrahedrons, based on Colbert's desire to sit outdoors in college. “I want to make it a place that draws people in,” he says, “becoming a place where people want to be, where their spirit can relax and expand.” He chose tetrahedrons and a circle because they are the simplest geometric forms. “It possesses such singular power and beauty,” he said. The tables are set in a high/low pattern, which will create many arrays of patterns and textures as the viewer moves through the piece. Since stainless steel is a sensitive reflector, light will transform the piece throughout the day. Because of Ohio's harsh winters, the snow will mound on the triangular tops, and ice will make them crystalline. Colbert, 55, has been doing sculpture for about 30 years. He was born in rural Connecticut, which served as a large inspiration to his work. “Being in a beautiful environment inspires my work,” he said, “so I live in a beautiful place.” Other influences include painters Josef Albers, Ad Reinhardt and Agnes Martin. Colbert received a general liberal-arts degree in college but pursued art on his own. Colbert's abstract work creates a connection between the person and nature. In his artist's statement, he says, “I feel drawn to uncertain and mysterious qualities of light and space. What emerges from the juxtaposition of these forms is revealed in all its complexity, time and changing light.” For more information, go to www.davidcolbert.com.

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News Headline: Lights, camera action! - New Philadelphia, OH - The Times-Reporter | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Programs to focus on ‘the movies' By Rex Huffman GateHouse News Service Posted Oct 14, 2011 @ 12:01 AM DOVER - The excitement generated by the filming of the movie "Old Fashioned" in Tuscarawas County has resulted in "Film in the Valley," a series of movie-related programs that will get under way at 7 p.m. Thursday with a Director's Cut short film competition. The series was put together by the Dover Public Library in partnership with Quaker Cinema in New Philadelphia. "Old Fashioned," an independent film, is a romantic comedy about modern-day courtship. It is currently being filmed in Bolivar and elsewhere in the county under the direction of Rik Swartzwelder, a native of New Philadelphia and graduate of Tuscarawas Valley High who now lives in Burbank, Calif. Swartzwelder also wrote the film's screenplay and is playing the male lead. "There is no doubt that there is an incredible amount of interest and enthusiasm because of the filming of �Old Fashioned' in the Tuscarawas Valley this fall," said Jim Gill, director of the Dover Public Library. "To be a part of something like that is really a unique opportunity. It is not everyday that Hollywood comes to your hometown. The library wanted to capture some of that enthusiasm in the hope of creating a forum for those with an interest in film and film making," Gill continued. "Our hope was to give the public the opportunity to connect with Rik Swartzwelder and his work and to become part of the whole experience." The final program in the series is sure to bring back memories for many area residents. "OHMS: The �Other' Movie Filmed in Tuscarawas County" is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Dec. 1 in the Dover Public Library. "OHMS" was filmed in Tuscarawas County in 1979 as a CBS made-for-television movie which aired during the 1979-80 TV season. It starred Ralph White as Floyd Wing, a conservative Midwest farmer who rallies his neighbors against a power company which plans to use their land to erect huge towers across the area. Also in the cast were David Birney, Dixie Carter, Talia Balsam, Leslie Nielsen and Cameron Mitchell. The program will include information about the movie which has had little to no TV exposure since it appeared on TV. Clips from the movie also will be shown. To register, call 330-343-6123. "I remember watching "OHMS" in fourth grade and being amazed that a real movie was being filmed in the area where I grew up," said Gill. "Even as a little kid I knew who Ralph Waite (he played the father on the TV series "The Waltons") was. "The library's program on �OHMS' is an opportunity for those who know little of the film to learn about what happened in the fictional Ohio town of Freedom Plains. It is also an opportunity for those who know about the movie, or were even involved in some way with the film, to reminisce a bit," said Gill. The first of two Director's Cut short film competitions is planned for Thursday in the Quaker Cinema at 158 W. High Ave. in New Philadelphia. A second competition is scheduled for 7 p.m. Nov. 17. Other programs in the series are: "Create a Family Legacy Movie with Movie Maker," planned for Nov. 10 at 6:30 p.m. in the Dover Public Library at 525 N. Walnut St., Dover. Participants will learn how to use a Microsoft Movie Maker to create a family legacy movie that can be burned on a CD or uploaded to YouTube for easy sharing with friends and family. To register for the program, call the library at 330-343-6123. "An Evening with Filmmaker Rik Swartzwelder," Nov. 21 at 7 p.m. in the Dover Public Library. Fresh off the shooting of "Old Fashioned," Swartzwelder will share his thoughts and experiences of filming in the Tuscarawas Valley. Swartzwelder will also share the story of how he became a filmmaker. To register call 330-343-6123. "Rik Swartzwelder: On the Big Screen," to be held at 7 p.m. Nov. 22 in the Quaker Cinema at 158 W. High Ave., New Philadelphia. The program will feature clips from previous films by Swartzwelder, who will provide commentary. There also will be a sneak peak of "Old Fashioned." "10 Greatest Films of all Time," 7 p.m. Nov. 30 in the Dover Public Library. Dan Fuller, a professor at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia, will lead a discussion, and clips of scenes from classic films will be shown. The evening will feature fun, movie trivia and more! To register, call 330-343-6123. Loading commenting interface... Thank you for the abuse report. We will review the report and take appropriate action. Related Stories

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News Headline: U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (Oct. 15) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [October 15, 2011]

(Targeted News Service Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) Targeted News Service Targeted News Service ALEXANDRIA, Va., Oct. 15 -- The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in Ohio.

*** Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Oct. 15 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,035,279) developed by five co-inventors for "electro-mechanical energy conversion devices and systems." The co-inventors are Antal I. Jakli, Kent, Ohio, John Ernest Harden Jr., Streetsboro, Ohio, Samuel Sprunt, Hudson, Ohio, James T. Gleeson, Kent, Ohio, and Peter Palffy-Muhoray, Kent, Ohio.

The abstract of the patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states: "There are provided methods for creating energy conversion devices based on the giant flexoelectric effect in non-calamitic liquid crystals. By preparing a substance comprising at least one type of non-calamitic liquid crystal molecules and stabilizing the substance to form a mechanically flexible material, flexible conductive electrodes may be applied to the material to create an electro-mechanical energy conversion device which relies on the giant flexoelectric effect to produce electrical and/or mechanical energy that is usable in such applications as, for example, power sources, energy dissipation, sensors/transducers, and actuators." The patent application was filed on March 19, 2010 (12/727,394). The full-text of the patent can be found at http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=8,035,279&OS=8,035,279&RS=8,035,279 Written by Satyaban Rath; edited by Hemanta Panigrahi.

For more information about Targeted News Service products and services, please contact: Myron Struck, editor, Targeted News Service LLC, Springfield, Va., 703/304-1897; editor@targetednews.com; http://targetednews.com.

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News Headline: Numbers matter at Kent State University (Frank, Lefton, Laux, Tonge) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University invests $1.2M in Math Emporium to address students' lagging abilities

On the first day of classes at Kent State University, a student looked math instructor Tracy Laux in the eye and remarked, “There's no way out.”

Indeed, no Facebook, no sleeping through a professor's lecture and, basically, no way to coast through the university's remedial math courses without putting the time and effort into actually learning the material.

Seated in front of the available 247 computers in a sprawling, 11,154-square-foot space on the second floor of the university's library, students are tasked with using computer software to learn basic mathematics. Forget the traditional lecture course; consider this math boot camp in a computer lab on steroids (and decorated with couches resembling addition signs).

Based on diagnostic testing, freshmen who come to Kent State prepared for college-level mathematics can bypass the emporium, but this fall more than 1,400 students are enrolled in the program.

“In order to pass the course and succeed in the course, the student has to do the mathematics. They have to sit there and work problem after problem,” Mr. Laux said. “There is no more passive learning or even an attempt at passive learning.”

The computer software is comparable to a video game of sorts. Students, for one, are given individualized lesson plans and must master each task at their own pace before moving on to the next. Also, last- minute cramming won't do, as steady progress is required to get through the class.

The university this fall invested about $1.2 million in the facility, now dubbed the “Math Emporium,” to combat a 30% to 35% rate of students receiving an “F” or “D” or withdrawing from the university's remedial algebra courses — a problem all too familiar for colleges and universities throughout the country.

Students aren't coming to college with the proper background in mathematics, which often leads to poor academic performances and perhaps a decision to leave the university. That hurts the university's retention rate and ultimately its finances.

“Kids with low GPAs typically don't return,” Kent State provost Robert Frank said. “This is fundamental to graduation and retention rates.”
Robot U.?

Kent State president Lester Lefton said the math emporium is designed to pick up the slack for the nation's lagging K-12 system, which he believes is churning graduates who aren't ready for a college workload.

“It's big, it's bold, it's innovative,” Dr. Lefton said about the emporium concept. “This is the kind of thing other universities in Ohio might want to do.”

Despite some initial concerns, parents need not worry their children are being educated by machines, Kent State officials said. The lab is staffed by 10 teaching assistants and faculty at any time throughout the day.

Before starting the course, students are given diagnostic tests to place them at the appropriate level of coursework. If students need help beyond the digital tools offered through the software, faculty members are willing to work one-on-one with students.

“We're teaching our students,” Mr. Laux said. “We're incorporating software just like many classrooms incorporate textbooks, but the software is much more responsive.”

Andrew Tonge, chairman of the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Kent State, said the early data suggest students are learning in the emporium model and progressing through the software at a steady pace.

Of the 1,400 students enrolled in the emporium this semester, about 200 have finished the coursework.

Mr. Laux said while the early results are encouraging, he's interested to see how well the students retain the material as they advance in their studies.

“I'm quite interested to what happens when they step outside the emporium model and take their first college-level course, he said. “To tell you the truth, only time will tell.”
Adding to the equation

The math emporium concept was first developed in 1997 at Virginia Tech University. While university officials at Virginia Tech say they don't have any concrete data to share that suggest the model is working, they're confident students are learning the material.

“All aspects of our instructional model, including the online text, on-demand help, and unlimited practice problems, emphasize that students learn math by doing math,” said Terri Bourdon, manager of Virginia Tech's math emporium in an email. “The large numbers of students who use our facility to work on their math courses without being required to do so provides substantial evidence of our success.”

Kent State officials maintain the investment will save the university and students money in the long haul, and it would only take the university two or three years to recoup the $1 million price tag of the facilities.

In the meantime, the university is considering using the emporium model in other areas of study, with foreign languages being a top contender.

But for Mr. Laux, witnessing a sea of students learning is a sight to behold.

“Every time I walk in, there are 240 students learning and talking mathematics,” he said. “There's no way out. I had a big smile on my face on Day One.”

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: An impressive orchestra debut | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Liz Grossman, who started directing the Kent
State Orchestra this year, was a big hit with her
students and the audience at her debut performance
Sunday two weeks ago.
She is favoring contemporary music and what's
nice for the under-educated like me is that she explains
the piece the orchestra is about to perform
the way Leonard Bernstein did on those televised
orchestra performances for young people he used
to do in the 1960s.
The Grossman repertoire that samples modern
music is probably going to shake up some of
us traditionalists, but maybe it will broaden our
outlook too. Her next concert in November will
touch on movie and cartoon music.
Grossman is the founder and conductor of the
award-winning Contemporary Youth Orchestra
of Cleveland. She is on the faculty at Interlochen
Center for the Arts, the Michigan summer
youth camp.
Lee Goske, the landscape designer and former
KSU faculty member with whom we were sitting
two weeks ago, said at the conclusion of the performance,
“It's nice to see someone who's about
the kids,” her compliment meaning that Grossman
seemed more interested in teaching her students
than focusing attention on herself.
If the enthusiasm of the students is an indicator,
her remark is right on target

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News Headline: Schumann, Mozart part of Stow Symphony's fall concert | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Stow Symphony Orchestra will perform its fall concert at the Ludwig Recital Hall on the Kent State University Campus, at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 1.

Ludwig Hall is located in the University's Music and Speech Building at 1325 Theatre Drive, near the intersection of Route 59 and Horning Road.

The concert, directed by Stow Symphony conductor and music director Darrell Lee Music, will feature Schumann's "Manfred Overture", Mozart's "Concerto No. 21 in C Major, K.467 for Piano and Orchestra", and Beethoven's "Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92".

Jerry Wong, assistant professor of piano at Kent State's Music Department, will be featured in the Mozart concerto.

The Schumann Overture establishes the theme for his musical setting of Lord Byron's epic poem, which depicts the tribulations of his gothic supernatural hero.

Mozart's 21st has long been considered one of his greatest works. The piece is often known as the "Elvira Madigan" concerto, taking the nickname from the 1967 Swedish movie which used the lovely 2nd movement as its background theme.

At its premiere, Beethoven described the Seventh Symphony as one of his best works. The second movement (Allegretto) achieved instant popularity which resulted in its frequent performance separate from the complete symphony. The Stow Symphony recently performed this movement as its contribution to the Stow 9/11 10th Anniversary Memorial.

Tickets for the concert, available at the door, are priced at $10 for adults, and $7 or seniors and students. Children under 12 are admitted free.

Tickets are available for presale at www.StowOrchestra.org/tickets.htm, or by calling 330-678-0029, or in limited numbers at the door.

For group rates call 330-678-0029. For details and a map to Ludwig Hall visit the orchestra's website.

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News Headline: Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cincinnati Enquirer - Online
Contact Name: Paul E. Kostyu
News OCR Text: SB 5 could lower taxes, increase job competition

• Issue 2 is a referendum-driven vote on Senate Bill 5, which was signed into law March 31 but put on hold until after the results of the November election.

• SB 5 changes the way collective bargaining is conducted for Ohio's public employers and their employees at the state and local levels.

• A "yes" vote for Issue 2 allows SB 5 to take effect. A "no" vote repeals the legislation.

Issue 2 directly affects 359,000 state, education and local government workers, or 6.5 percent of Ohio's 5.5 million work force. About 48 percent of them are covered by a labor agreement.

But why should the rest of us, the vast majority of whom are not government workers, care?

Here are some ways Issue 2 will affect you:

• State and local taxes could decrease, giving you more money to spend or save.

"Senate Bill 5 is a tool to lower (everyone's) taxes," said Matt A. Mayer, president of The Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions, a conservative think tank.

• More Elections 2011 coverage

That will happen, he and others have said, because Issue 2 gives local governments and school districts greater control over their budgets via labor negotiations, which will lower their costs. That, in turn, means they will not have to go to taxpayers as often seeking additional property or income taxes.

SB 5 opponents counter that people's safety will be put at risk because the terms that can be negotiated by firefighters and police will be limited. They also contend taxes will go up because Republican legislators who passed SB 5 already added to Ohioans' tax burden by cutting state funding to education and local governments in the two-year state budget. That will force schools, counties, townships and municipalities to seek more money from local residents to maintain services.

SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University.

"What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia University economist and author of the recently released book The Price of Civilization. "What they are trying to do is everything possible to free up taxes on the richest people."

• Competition for already scarce jobs could increase because of government layoffs.

"It's a reshuffling of the cards," Weinberg said. "It could spill into the private sector, and there could be an effective weakening of bargaining rights for other (non-government) people. There could be a trickle-down or a trickle-up effect."

The trickle-down effect occurs if there are fewer government employees, making competition for private sector jobs keener. A trickle-up effect occurs if government outsources more functions to the private sector, which could create jobs.

For example, Butler County this week announced the layoff of 50 union and non-union employees from its Department of Job and Family Services.

Thom Yantek, an associate professor of political science at Kent State University, said history shows that when workers in the private sector have more rights to negotiate contracts, the income disparity between the rich and poor is less. He called SB 5 "heavy-handed."

• Local businesses could see their income decline if government workers have less to spend.

There could be positive or negative consequences on private businesses that supply materials to government, depending on whether they receive more or fewer orders. Those businesses that benefit from having government employees nearby, such as eateries, could lose business if the number of public employees or their buying power declines.

"There's a consumption side of the story here if state employees have less to spend and whether that is offset by the savings reduction that goes to taxpayers," Weinberg said. "Hopefully, taxpayers have a little bit more money that they can spend."

• Private sector jobs could increase if state and local governments outsource work they used to handle.

There will be winners and losers, Weinberg said.

"My sense is that government employees are a bit nervous. It won't be just a redistribution (of money) between one group of state employees to another group of state employees. There is some concern that the size of the pie to government employees is going to shrink."

The end result of how Issue 2 will affect Ohioans will come only after voters decide which way they want to go.

"If you get a bunch of public economists together, they will debate until everyone is blue to what extent, if and when do you cut taxes," Weinberg said. "It's an unresolved issue. You get the academic equivalent of (the) Jerry Springer (show)."

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News Headline: Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kentucky Enquirer - Online, The
Contact Name: Paul E. Kostyu
News OCR Text: SB 5 could lower taxes, increase job competition

• Issue 2 is a referendum-driven vote on Senate Bill 5, which was signed into law March 31 but put on hold until after the results of the November election.

• SB 5 changes the way collective bargaining is conducted for Ohio's public employers and their employees at the state and local levels.

• A "yes" vote for Issue 2 allows SB 5 to take effect. A "no" vote repeals the legislation.

Issue 2 directly affects 359,000 state, education and local government workers, or 6.5 percent of Ohio's 5.5 million work force. About 48 percent of them are covered by a labor agreement.

But why should the rest of us, the vast majority of whom are not government workers, care?

Here are some ways Issue 2 will affect you:

• State and local taxes could decrease, giving you more money to spend or save.

"Senate Bill 5 is a tool to lower (everyone's) taxes," said Matt A. Mayer, president of The Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions, a conservative think tank.

• More Elections 2011 coverage

That will happen, he and others have said, because Issue 2 gives local governments and school districts greater control over their budgets via labor negotiations, which will lower their costs. That, in turn, means they will not have to go to taxpayers as often seeking additional property or income taxes.

SB 5 opponents counter that people's safety will be put at risk because the terms that can be negotiated by firefighters and police will be limited. They also contend taxes will go up because Republican legislators who passed SB 5 already added to Ohioans' tax burden by cutting state funding to education and local governments in the two-year state budget. That will force schools, counties, townships and municipalities to seek more money from local residents to maintain services.

SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University.

"What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia University economist and author of the recently released book The Price of Civilization. "What they are trying to do is everything possible to free up taxes on the richest people."

• Competition for already scarce jobs could increase because of government layoffs.

"It's a reshuffling of the cards," Weinberg said. "It could spill into the private sector, and there could be an effective weakening of bargaining rights for other (non-government) people. There could be a trickle-down or a trickle-up effect."

The trickle-down effect occurs if there are fewer government employees, making competition for private sector jobs keener. A trickle-up effect occurs if government outsources more functions to the private sector, which could create jobs.

For example, Butler County this week announced the layoff of 50 union and non-union employees from its Department of Job and Family Services.

Thom Yantek, an associate professor of political science at Kent State University, said history shows that when workers in the private sector have more rights to negotiate contracts, the income disparity between the rich and poor is less. He called SB 5 "heavy-handed."

• Local businesses could see their income decline if government workers have less to spend.

There could be positive or negative consequences on private businesses that supply materials to government, depending on whether they receive more or fewer orders. Those businesses that benefit from having government employees nearby, such as eateries, could lose business if the number of public employees or their buying power declines.

"There's a consumption side of the story here if state employees have less to spend and whether that is offset by the savings reduction that goes to taxpayers," Weinberg said. "Hopefully, taxpayers have a little bit more money that they can spend."

• Private sector jobs could increase if state and local governments outsource work they used to handle.

There will be winners and losers, Weinberg said.

"My sense is that government employees are a bit nervous. It won't be just a redistribution (of money) between one group of state employees to another group of state employees. There is some concern that the size of the pie to government employees is going to shrink."

The end result of how Issue 2 will affect Ohioans will come only after voters decide which way they want to go.

"If you get a bunch of public economists together, they will debate until everyone is blue to what extent, if and when do you cut taxes," Weinberg said. "It's an unresolved issue. You get the academic equivalent of (the) Jerry Springer (show)."

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News Headline: Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Community Recorder
Contact Name: Paul E. Kostyu
News OCR Text: SB 5 could lower taxes, increase job competition

• Issue 2 is a referendum-driven vote on Senate Bill 5, which was signed into law March 31 but put on hold until after the results of the November election.

• SB 5 changes the way collective bargaining is conducted for Ohio's public employers and their employees at the state and local levels.

• A "yes" vote for Issue 2 allows SB 5 to take effect. A "no" vote repeals the legislation.

Issue 2 directly affects 359,000 state, education and local government workers, or 6.5 percent of Ohio's 5.5 million work force. About 48 percent of them are covered by a labor agreement.

But why should the rest of us, the vast majority of whom are not government workers, care?

Here are some ways Issue 2 will affect you:

• State and local taxes could decrease, giving you more money to spend or save.

"Senate Bill 5 is a tool to lower (everyone's) taxes," said Matt A. Mayer, president of The Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions, a conservative think tank.

• More Elections 2011 coverage

That will happen, he and others have said, because Issue 2 gives local governments and school districts greater control over their budgets via labor negotiations, which will lower their costs. That, in turn, means they will not have to go to taxpayers as often seeking additional property or income taxes.

SB 5 opponents counter that people's safety will be put at risk because the terms that can be negotiated by firefighters and police will be limited. They also contend taxes will go up because Republican legislators who passed SB 5 already added to Ohioans' tax burden by cutting state funding to education and local governments in the two-year state budget. That will force schools, counties, townships and municipalities to seek more money from local residents to maintain services.

SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University.

"What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia University economist and author of the recently released book The Price of Civilization. "What they are trying to do is everything possible to free up taxes on the richest people."

• Competition for already scarce jobs could increase because of government layoffs.

"It's a reshuffling of the cards," Weinberg said. "It could spill into the private sector, and there could be an effective weakening of bargaining rights for other (non-government) people. There could be a trickle-down or a trickle-up effect."

The trickle-down effect occurs if there are fewer government employees, making competition for private sector jobs keener. A trickle-up effect occurs if government outsources more functions to the private sector, which could create jobs.

For example, Butler County this week announced the layoff of 50 union and non-union employees from its Department of Job and Family Services.

Thom Yantek, an associate professor of political science at Kent State University, said history shows that when workers in the private sector have more rights to negotiate contracts, the income disparity between the rich and poor is less. He called SB 5 "heavy-handed."

• Local businesses could see their income decline if government workers have less to spend.

There could be positive or negative consequences on private businesses that supply materials to government, depending on whether they receive more or fewer orders. Those businesses that benefit from having government employees nearby, such as eateries, could lose business if the number of public employees or their buying power declines.

"There's a consumption side of the story here if state employees have less to spend and whether that is offset by the savings reduction that goes to taxpayers," Weinberg said. "Hopefully, taxpayers have a little bit more money that they can spend."

• Private sector jobs could increase if state and local governments outsource work they used to handle.

There will be winners and losers, Weinberg said.

"My sense is that government employees are a bit nervous. It won't be just a redistribution (of money) between one group of state employees to another group of state employees. There is some concern that the size of the pie to government employees is going to shrink."

The end result of how Issue 2 will affect Ohioans will come only after voters decide which way they want to go.

"If you get a bunch of public economists together, they will debate until everyone is blue to what extent, if and when do you cut taxes," Weinberg said. "It's an unresolved issue. You get the academic equivalent of (the) Jerry Springer (show)."

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News Headline: Big savings in IT collaboration, consolidation | Email

News Date: 10/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Scott, Dave
News OCR Text: Oct. 14--Taxpayers could see huge savings if governments would consolidate and update their information technology departments, and a group of leaders gathered Thursday at the John S. Knight Center in Akron to hear details about how to do it.

The EfficientGovNetwork Regional Collaboration Conference brought together more than 100 area governmental leaders to talk about their experiences making government more efficient. Portage County and Tallmadge took the lead in information technology.

Tallmadge Mayor David Kline talked about how studying data lines in the city revealed an unused line was costing the city $500 a month. More important, an upgrade to more efficient equipment created a $39,500 savings on the city's $139,000 telecommunications bill.

Dean Tondiglia, assistant chief for Kent State University's police department, found consolidating record-keeping systems for the school and the city not only led to some reduced staffing but also allowed police officers to remain in the field longer because they could write reports on computers in their cars.

Since then, Aurora and Brimfield have joined the system without stressing its capacity. While dispatchers and officers formerly used paper and pencil to keep records, requiring that it be transcribed into court records, now an officer can type the information into an electronic file that can be passed along to the court.

The result is different departments can double-check names and spot problems early.

"In Portage County you don't want to go for a marriage license if you have an arrest warrant in municipal or common pleas court because you are going to go to jail before going to the altar under this system," said Brian Kelley, chief information officer for Portage County.

With budgets tightening and tax revenue down, governments might find information technology systems an area for potential improvement.

"We've gone through furloughing, we've gone through budget cuts," said Kelley. "We've gone though downsizing and we're really at the end of the rope as far as what we can do to save costs and improve efficiency, and IT collaboration provides us with this opportunity."

The conference also was for government leaders who are just getting started. Ed Jerse, Cuyahoga County director of regional collaboration, had some advice for them.

His proposals can be politically complicated, such as getting local governments to agree not to poach businesses from each other. He said it might be best to start small.

"One of the indications of success is having the habit of collaborating," he said. "Having done it before with somebody makes you comfortable with the idea that you can share a service."

Dave Scott can be reached at 330-996-3577 or davescott@thebeaconjournal.com

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: OFFICIALS EYEING IT COLLABORATION: CONFERENCE FOCUSES ON POSSIBLE SAVINGS?TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS | Email

News Date: 10/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Scott, Dave
News OCR Text: Taxpayers could see huge savings if governments would consolidate and update their information technology departments, and a group of leaders gathered Thursday at the John S. Knight Center in Akron to hear details about how to do it.

The EfficientGovNetwork Regional Collaboration Conference brought together more than 100 area governmental leaders to talk about their experiences making government more efficient. Portage County and Tallmadge took the lead in information technology.

Tallmadge Mayor David Kline talked about how studying data lines in the city revealed an unused line was costing the city $500 a month. More important, an upgrade to more efficient equipment created a $39,500 savings on the city's $139,000 telecommunications bill.

Dean Tondiglia, assistant chief for Kent State University's police department, found consolidating record-keeping systems for the school and the city not only led to some reduced staffing but also allowed police officers to remain in the field longer because they could write reports on computers in their cars.

Since then, Aurora and Brimfield have joined the system without stressing its capacity. While dispatchers and officers formerly used paper and pencil to keep records, requiring that it be transcribed into court records, now an officer can type the information into an electronic file that can be passed along to the court.

The result is different departments can double-check names and spot problems early.

"In Portage County you don't want to go for a marriage license if you have an arrest warrant in municipal or common pleas court because you are going to go to jail before going to the altar under this system," said Brian Kelley, chief information officer for Portage County.

With budgets tightening and tax revenue down, governments might find information technology systems an area for potential improvement.

"We've gone through furloughing, we've gone through budget cuts," said Kelley. "We've gone though downsizing and we're really at the end of the rope as far as what we can do to save costs and improve efficiency, and IT collaboration provides us with this opportunity."

The conference also was for government leaders who are just getting started. Ed Jerse, Cuyahoga County director of regional collaboration, had some advice for them.

His proposals can be politically complicated, such as getting local governments to agree not to poach businesses from each other. He said it might be best to start small.

"One of the indications of success is having the habit of collaborating," he said. "Having done it before with somebody makes you comfortable with the idea that you can share a service."

Copyright © 2011 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Kent State student found dead in dorm room (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com (Plain Dealer - Online)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- A student was found dead in his dorm room Sunday afternoon about 4:45 p.m., according to university spokeswoman Emily Vincent.

A family member called the school Sunday and asked for a welfare check after they hadn't heard from him in a while, Vincent said. The student's identity will not be released until all family is notified, she said.

The student was in Leebrick Hall, a single-room residence hall on the eastern edge of campus that houses 325 students from freshman to upperclassmen.

An autopsy will be performed Monday. Foul play is not suspected, Vincent said.

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News Headline: BRIEF: Body discovered in Kent State residence hall (Vincent) | Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Oct. 16--A body was discovered Sunday in Leebrick Hall at Kent State University.

University spokeswoman Emily Vincent confirmed the discovery but said she didn't know the gender of the person or whether he or she was a student.

Leebrick is a coed hall in Tri-Towers that houses about 325 students in single rooms, according to the university's website.

University police responded to the call, but a dispatcher said she could not provide additional information.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Body found at KSU dorm: Investigator says man dead for "a couple of days' (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University police and the Portage County Coroner's Office are investigating the death of a man inside a residence hall on the Kent campus.
KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent confirmed that a body was discovered sometime around 5 p.m. in Leebrick Hall, one of the Tri-Towers residence halls, off Loop Road on the east side of the Kent campus.
Reports put the body somewhere on the fourth floor of the 12-story residence hall. According to KSU, it houses 325 students.
Tom Decker, an investigator for the coroner's office, said the body was that of a male, in his mid- to late-20s. He said investigators had a “tentative ID” on the deceased person, but were waiting to identify the next of kin before releasing a name.
Decker said he believed the dead person was a KSU student, and that the man had been dead “for a minimum of a couple of days.” He said all deaths his office investigates are treated as suspicious until proven otherwise, and that an autopsy was scheduled today at the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office in Akron.
Along with KSU police, the Kent Fire Department also responded to the scene.
Vincent said university police were working to identify the body and notify next of kin, but could not verify if the person was a student.
She said that in the event of a death, or any other traumatic event on campus, KSU's Residence Services and University Health Services provide grief counseling, therapy dogs and other resources to members of the campus community who require them.

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News Headline: Man Found Dead in Kent State Residence Hall (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Unidentified male discovered Sunday in Leebrick Hall

Homecoming weekend at Kent State University came to a tragic end Sunday when a body was discovered in a residence hall.

An unidentified male was found Sunday afternoon on the fourth floor of Leebrick Hall, which is a part of the Tri-Towers dorm complex off Loop Road on the eastern edge of campus. The cause of death is unknown.

The chief investigator for the Portage County Coroner's Office, Tom Decker, said the man's body was found between 5:30 and 6 p.m.

Decker said how long the man lay dead before he was found "has not been determined yet."

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent told Kent Wired university officials didn't yet have the man's ID, so it's unknown if he was a student or just visiting campus. Kent Wired also reported the man was in his twenties.

Vincent told Kent Patch police are working to get a positive ID so family can be identified. She confirmed the body was found on the fourth floor.

Leebrick Hall is comprised of single rooms and is home to about 325 students, according to the university's website. Alcohol is allowed for of-age students on floors one through five of the 12-floor, co-ed dorm.

Students took to Twitter Sunday evening with a wide range of posts from solemn condolences to unconfirmed rumors that the man had been stabbed to death.

Decker said the man's body would likely be taken to the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office for an autopsy.

Look for updates to this developing story here on Kent Patch.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Body found in residence hall at Kent State University (Vincent) | Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - School officials at Kent State University confirmed a body was found inside Leebrick Hall on Sunday around 4:45 p.m.

Click here to view video: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/body-found-in-residence-hall-at-kent-state-university

According to Spokeswoman Emily Vincent the body was found during a welfare check after a family member called the university saying they hadn't heard from their student in a while.

The death is still under investigation, but according to Kent State University police, foul play is not suspected.

Police are not releasing the name of the victim pending family notification.

An autopsy is scheduled for Monday morning with the Portage County Coroner.

Police closed a portion of the fourth floor of Leebrick Hall during their investigation. Residents were told they would be notified when they could return to their rooms.

Leebrick Hall is on the east side of KSU's campus.

Continue checking newsnet5.com for updates on this developing story.

Read more: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/body-found-in-residence-hall-at-kent-state-university#ixzz1b2zza5GB

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News Headline: Student found dead in Kent State Univ. residence hall (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- A Kent State University spokesperson has confirmed that the body of a student was found dead in a residence hall on-campus Sunday evening.

Emily Vincent says the body was found just after 4:55 p.m. on the fourth floor of Leebrick Hall during a welfare check. Welfare checks are done at the request of family members when they have not heard from someone in a while.

The body has been taken by the Portage County Coroner. The Coroner's office says the victim is a man in his late 20's.

Chief Investigator for the Coroner's office, Tom Decker, says there's no visible cause of death. An autopsy will be performed Monday to determine the cause of death. Foul play is not suspected at this time.

Decker also says they have identified the man but will not release his name until family members can be notified.

University Police had no response as the investigation continues.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent State student found dead in dorm room (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Police are investigating after a Kent State student was found dead in his dorm room.

26-year-old James Barnes of Midland, PA was found in his room after his family contacted police to do a welfare check.

Barnes was discovered Sunday afternoon around 5PM on the fourth floor of Leebrick Hall - which houses freshmen and upperclassmen.

The building is located in the Tri-Towers area, on the eastern edge of the KSU campus.

There were no obvious signs of foul play. An autopsy will be performed today.

Click here to view video: http://www.woio.com/story/15708707/kent-state-student-found-dead-in-dorm-room

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News Headline: Coroner: Kent State University Student Found Dead in Dorm (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/17/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio— Kent State University officials confirmed a body was found in a dormitory Sunday, Fox 8 News reports.

Spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the discovery was made at approximately 4:45 p.m. in Leebrick Hall, which is on the eastern edge of the campus.

Related
Kent State University
Portage County Coroner's Office
Topics
Colleges and Universities
According to Tom Decker, chief investigator for the Portage County Coroner's Office, the victim was a male student, believed to be in his late 20s.

Vincent said the student was found in his room by police officers making a welfare check. The man's family reportedly grew concerned after not hearing from him for an extended period of time.

Kent State University police did not immediately release the man's identity because family members were still being notified.

Decker said an autopsy would be completed Monday. He also noted that foul play was not suspected in the death.

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News Headline: Theater: '14' examines violent therapy for gay Mormons in the 1970s (Van Baars) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/16/2011
Outlet Full Name: Boulder Daily Camera - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Theater: '14' examines violent therapy for gay Mormons in the 1970s A shocking truth By Mark Collins Camera Theater Critic Posted: 10/16/2011 01:00:00 AM MDT Eric van Baars, left, and Cameron Varner rehearse a scene from the play "14" in the Loft Theater at the University of Colorado in Boulder. (MARK LEFFINGWELL) If you go What: CU Department of Theatre and Dance presents "14" When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Oct. 23 Where: Loft Theatre in the University Theatre Building Tickets: $8-$10 Info: 303-492-8181 or cutheatre.org Parents' guide: Sexuality, violence John Clarence Cameron doesn't view himself as a victim. But he wants the truth about what he endured to be told. Cameron is not a victim, he says, because it was his choice to take part in so-called reparation therapy in 1974 while a student at Brigham Young University. Cameron was one of 14 young men that year that volunteered for the therapy. Designed to "cure" them of their homosexual tendencies, the therapy consisted of hooking the men to electrodes and showing them pictures of other men. When the men were shown the images, they were administered electric shocks. The theory was that giving electric shocks to the men when they viewed the images would create a negative response to the images. Twenty-five years later, Cameron was interviewed about the events. That interview sparked something in the theater professor at the University of Iowa, and he decided to put what he went through into dramatic form. His play, "14," named for the 14 men who volunteered for the controversial form of therapy, will be performed in CU's Loft Theatre Wednesday through Oct. 23. In an email interview with the Camera, Cameron stressed the play isn't an attack on his alma mater or on the Church of Latter Day Saints. "I'm not interested in ... blaming them for the personal struggles I faced after the therapy ended," Cameron said. "Some may say that the Church's oppressive attitudes against homosexuality drove me to my decision and so 'forced' me to do the therapy. I don't believe this to be true. You have to remember that in 1974, the whole world was pretty much anti-gay. You could lose your job, your home, even your life (for being part) of a sub-group that was considered prurient and deviant." That doesn't mean Cameron wants to sugar coat what transpired. "I would like everyone to tell the truth, admit the mistakes that took place, and stop trying to act like it didn't happen," he said. Roe Green, a CU graduate who is sponsoring the CU production, showed CU theater chairman Bud Coleman the script of "14" last year. Coleman directs the CU show. "It's a memory play," Coleman said. The story features an adult Ron (the name given to Cameron's autobiographical character) and a younger version of himself. "It's a wonderful premise, to think that you could go back and meet your young self and give them advice," said Eric van Baars, the Roe Green Visiting Guest Artist who plays the lead in "14." Some of the action involves nightmares and the two versions of Ron in violent conflict with each other. "It's a very violent act, going through electroshock therapy," van Baars said. "(Cameron) wanted the audience to experience the cathartic value of that violence because there is something about experiencing that together that is shocking." Second time around This is the second time van Baars is playing Ron. Two years ago, when the original actor cast in the role had to leave five days prior to opening, van Baars took on the character in a production that Cameron directed at Kent State University, where van Baars teaches theater. Getting another crack at the role has been enjoyable, van Baars said. "I've been able to find many more layers to the character," he said. "I've discovered so many things about the play that I didn't realize were there the first time." The CU production also features 14 student actors who play multiple roles. Some are comic. Bringing levity to a dark and difficult subject was important, Cameron said. "First of all it's my voice. There is humor in everything I write," he said. "It's my support and defense, and it has gotten me through the most difficult times in my life." Gay purge Even the events depicted in the play took place more than 35 years ago, the issues it covers are still relevant, said Angela Hunt, who serves as dramaturg and assistant director on "14." Hunt, a Ph.D. candidate in the CU theater department, attended BYU. So did her brother, who encountered what Hunt said was a semi-regular "gay purge" at the school. Hunt said her brother, who is gay, and several of his friends in the BYU theater department in 2009 were called before the school's honor code committee because they were suspected as being gay. "He was told that he could stay (at BYU) as long as he went through a process," said Hunt, who is a member of the LDS Church. "He would have to come weekly to be counseled, and he was asked to write papers about why being gay was wrong." The LDS Church is aligned with an organization called Evergreen International, an organization that promotes different forms of reparative therapy (also commonly called conversion therapy). Hunt said, however, the LDS Church has softened its stance on gay people in the past 35 years. "There's an openly gay member of the bishopric in California," she said. "BYU has changed the honor code so that if I was there I could be a gay rights activist and still be a student." Mainstream psychology doesn't recognize reparative therapy as legitimate these days, nor does it consider homosexuality as a mental disorder. But some psychologists, typically aligned with religious groups, still practice various forms of the therapy. It even made political news this year when it was revealed GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann's husband, Marcus, ran a clinic that practiced reparative therapy. Cameron just wants the truth out there. "I don't want anyone to feel sorry for me," he said. "I wrote the play for myself -- to work through the residue of emotional damage and self-loathing from the experiment that I had not really dealt with over the decades. It worked. I've moved on. "In the play, I challenge the Mormon Church, and all religions, to reexamine their thinking about truth, sin, and homosexuality. Yes, there's anger in the play, and some may perceive that as an attack. But I think it's a shallow response and I hope they will look deeper." Contact Camera Theater Critic Mark Collins at BDCTheater@comcast.net . Article ID: Flood3

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News Headline: Hemingway's Finca Vigia restored in partnership of Cuban, U.S. preservationists | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Ernest Hemingway departed Cuba for Spain on July 25, 1960, he thought he'd be coming back.

He was wrong. Less than a year later, on July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho, he leveled the barrels of his beloved W. & C. Scott & Son Monte Carlo B shotgun to his head and pulled the trigger.

On the Caribbean island he left behind were his boat, his car and his house — a stuccoed, one-story affair that had been his base of operations for more than two decades.

Now, thanks to an unprecedented partnership between Cuban and American preservationists, his house, called Finca Vigia (Lookout Farm), has been restored and photographed for a new book on the island's little-publicized elegant architecture. Although most visitors, both foreign and domestic, are denied access to the house's light and airy interiors, author Michael Connors and photographer Brent Winebrenner were granted carte blanche for “The Splendor of Cuba: 450 Years of Architecture and Interiors” (Rizzoli, 2011).

“We shot last year after the restoration of the house,” Connors says. “We've been the only ones allowed to step in the house and actually move the furniture, to style it for the lighting. Others have to shoot from the windows and doors.”

The late 19th-century Cuban vernacular house, surrounded by verandas, patios, walkways, tennis courts, guest house, pool and tower, was discovered in 1939 by Hemingway's third wife, journalist Martha Gellhorn.

“She was strategic,” says Mary-Jo Adams, executive director of the Finca Vigia Foundation, a small U.S. nonprofit organization that takes its name from the house. “She suggested he buy it because she wanted to get him out of the temptations of downtown Havana.”

He would live there for the next 22 years, his longest stretch in a single place. Inside, he left behind his clothes, his china, his papers and 9,000 of his books, 20 percent with writing in the margins. “He was a pack rat,” Adams says.

Today, through the concerted efforts of the foundation, along with the Cuban government's Office of Cultural Patrimony and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, a restored and pristine Finca Vigia looks as though the boyishly grinning, Nobel Prize-winning author might pop in at any minute, fishing rod in hand, back from a week-long cruise on the Pilar.

On his desk are period magazines, letter openers, pens and pencils. Nothing has been removed, and nothing added. No curator has stepped in for an interpretation. What's there represents exactly the way he lived. The original bottles of liquor stand atop his living room bar, their labels cracking and peeling.

“It struck me as something you don't see anywhere,” Connors says. “It's preserving the exact history of the owner of the house. You walk in the library and see the paperbacks and the hardbacks of what he read.”

Much of the house's historical accuracy can be credited to the efforts and recollections of Hemingway's former majordomo, a native Cuban named Rene Villerreal, now living in New Jersey. For 20 years, Villerreal says, he loved Hemingway like a father and respected him as a friend and employer, even writing his own book, “Hemingway's Cuban Son” (Kent State University Press, 2009). He knows Finca Vigia as if it were his own.

“Papa used to hide manuscripts in a valise on the top shelf of the closet in the study. The manuscripts were first wrapped in brown paper, then a towel and then stuffed in a valise. It was a way to assure that little humidity would get to them,” Villerreal said in a recent e-mail, interpreted by his son. “Hemingway also hid letters he received from his friend Marlene Dietrich and other women behind the bookcases in his workroom.” The others included Adriana Ivancich, a 19-year-old Venetian beauty who visited Finca Vigia in 1950, and who served as inspiration for Renata, the female protagonist in “Across the River and Into the Trees.”

A year after the author's death, Villerreal gave a tour of the house to Fidel Castro, who would turn it into a museum and hire him as its director. From 1962 to 1964, Villerreal restored the house, which had been occupied by Cuban soldiers after Hemingway left. In 1968, he resigned, deciding to leave Cuba. After the fall of the Soviet Union and the withdrawal of its financial support, the Cubans maintained the museum, although water damage did begin to take its toll inside.

The story of the house's recent rebirth is something of an unlikely miracle — a celebration of a shared icon that the people of two nations can claim as their own. It begins with Max Perkins, Hemingway's editor at Scribner's in New York — or more specifically, Perkins's granddaughter, Jenny Phillips.

She was touring Cuba on a cultural trip in 2001 when she decided on a whim to visit Finca Vigia, thinking some of her grandfather's papers might be there.

“We went out, and I introduced myself to one of the guards, who got very excited,” Phillips says. “He said: ‘Come back tomorrow, and you can go inside.' ”

She returned, only to be denied access to the basement where most of Hemingway's documents were stored. The refusal spurred her to action.

“It became a mystery and an energizer,” she says.

Back in the States, her husband, a political reporter for the Boston Globe, touched base with the John F. Kennedy Library in Cambridge, Mass., which houses Hemingway's papers. “Someone there told him that the basement was full of things they'd been trying to see forever, but the Cubans wouldn't let them,” she says. “Scholars had been trying on their own, too.”

He also contacted Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.), who, because of his favorable relations with the Cuban government, got the ball rolling on the preservation of the documents and books inside. McGovern “wanted to see the cultural legacy preserved and said it could be done by collaborating with the Cubans,” she said.

In March 2002, Phillips was back in Havana, signing an accord with the Office of Cultural Patrimony. By 2008, three sets of 3,000 of documents were digitized and microfilmed — one for the Kennedy Library, one for a Chicago vault for safekeeping and one for Finca Vigia. The originals never left the house, which was suffering from a leaking roof, with rampant mold and fungus.

“We were going to preserve the documents — preserve them like Twain's or Faulkner's,” Adams says. “But the house had moisture, and no temperature or humidity control.”

In 2005, the National Trust had listed Finca Vigia as an endangered site, with no objections from the Cuban government; that same year, the World Monuments Fund listed it as one of its 100 most endangered sites. When the Bush administration was slow to grant a license for the foundation to move forward in Cuba, Richard Moe, then president of the National Trust, called Phillips to say he wanted to get involved.

Once it was licensed, Cambridge-based architect Lee Cott and the National Trust's chief architect, William Dupont, pulled together preservation architects, structural engineers and landscape architects to go to Havana to act as consultants on the house's restoration. In Cuba, they were met by a corresponding number of counterparts.

“The Cuban architects did drawings, and we gave technical commentary,” says Dupont, now director of the Center for Cultural Sustainability at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

“We used an overlay of yellow paper with notes on top of their drawings. When we were there, we were working together.”

The roof was replaced and windows reconstructed. The stucco was re-plastered. Termite-ridden wood was re-framed. The Cuban government funded all of the restoration, while Phillips's foundation raised money to send the teams. Never before in Castro's Cuba have U.S. architects been sanctioned to practice.

“They have their fingers on the pulse of the interpolitical — the political structure working in concert with Cuban conservators,” says author Paul Hendrickson, whose book “Hemingway's Boat: Everything He Loved in Life, and Lost, 1934-1961” (Knopf, 2011) was published last month. “They have heroically gone about the business of getting Finca Vigia restored and getting the boat restored.”

And they're not done yet. Hemingway's car now sits on the property, awaiting its turn.

“It's a 1957 Chrysler,” Phillips said. “It's the most mangled-up and rusty thing. It looks like roadkill, but it will be restored.”

For the foundation and the Cuban Office of Cultural Patrimony, that would translate into the perfect Hemingway hat trick.

Welton writes about architecture, art and design for national and regional publications. He also publishes an online design magazine at www.architectsandartisans.com.

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