Report Overview:
Total Clips (7)
Art, School of; Student (1)
English (1)
Jewish Studies (1)
KSU at Trumbull (2)
Music (1)
Students (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of; Student (1)
KSU art student headlining exhibit at downtown gallery 10/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


English (1)
Library welcomes musicians, actors, authors 10/19/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

'HEMINGWAY WEEK' "Hemingway Week" continues at Hudson Library and Historical Society Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. when Kent State university professor and Hemingway scholar Dr. Robert W. Trogdon speaks as part of the library's ongoing Author Series. Trogdon is co-editor...


Jewish Studies (1)
Holocaust survivor recounts WWII 10/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


KSU at Trumbull (2)
News in Brief 10/19/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

Jobs 'explosion' set for Thursday WARREN - Free bus transportation to the ''Jobs Explosion'' job fair Thursday at Kent State University Trumbull in Champion will be provided at 9:30 a.m. at the Hot Dog Shoppe on West Market Street, organizers said Tuesday....

Job Fair Set in Warren Thursday 10/18/2011 Fox Youngstown Text Attachment Email

Job Fair Set in Warren Thursday If you are looking for a job, the Kent State University Trumbull branch might be worth a visit later this week. The campus will play host to a job fair from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m....


Music (1)
New Music Series concert is Saturday 10/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Students (1)
Friend discusses dead KSU student (Franquesa) 10/19/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: KSU art student headlining exhibit at downtown gallery | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Susan McClelland, master
of fine arts student, will
headline the Master of Fine
Art Show with her exhibit titled,
“An Oversimplified Construction
of a Complex Uncertainty,”
in the Kent State
University School of Art's
Downtown Gallery from Oct.
26 to Nov. 5. A reception will
be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Oct.
28.
McClelland illustrates the
many stages of change, including
foundation, transformation
and creation. Her
philosophy stems from the
experiences people encounter,
and how those experiences
affect them. Change
is a complex concept that
can be personal or societal.
Sometimes people passively
accept change while other
times they resist it. Some
change is inevitable, but everyone
ultimately decides
whether the transformation
journey will be a smooth or
difficult one.
“Several thoughts inspired
this collection; some came at
the beginning and some while
in the process of making. The
large electrical transformation
poles that seem invincible,
yet with time will deteriorate
and give way. The belief
that many hold that the social
changes this country is
going through will result in
ruination. On a personal level,
reflections of the continual
changes and the accumulation
of these alterations,”
McClelland said.
Spectators can expect an
array of pieces reflecting inevitable
change and the transformation
process through
creation. Undertones of life
and death will shine through
as each piece portrays its
purpose.
“The heavy, dark sculpture
appears to be a collection of
pillars, made from industrial
material, in various stages
of deterioration. A contrasting
piece, visceral, light, and
flowing, made from joining
thin strips of wood looks like
a gestural drawing in space,”
said McClelland.
The Downtown Gallery
is located at 141 East Main
Street. For additional information
regarding the Kent
State University School of
Art's Downtown Gallery
please visit http://galleries.
kent.edu or call 330-672-
7853.

Return to Top



News Headline: Library welcomes musicians, actors, authors | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 'HEMINGWAY WEEK'

"Hemingway Week" continues at Hudson Library and Historical Society Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. when Kent State university professor and Hemingway scholar Dr. Robert W. Trogdon speaks as part of the library's ongoing Author Series.

Trogdon is co-editor (with Sandra Spanier of Pennsylvania State University) of the first volume in the "Cambridge Edition of the Letters of Ernest Hemingway, 1907-1922." Hemingway's personal side, often at odds with his public bravura, is revealed through his private letters in the volume.

Trogdon is a scholar of 20th century American literature and textual editing. He has published extensively on the works of Ernest Hemingway and Joseph Conrad. In addition to his teaching and research, Trogdon is also director of the Institute for Bibliography and Editing.

Registration is not required for this program. Call 300-653-6658 or visit hudsonlibrary.org for more information.

Return to Top



News Headline: Holocaust survivor recounts WWII | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By EMILY INVERSO | DAILY KENT STATER

Eva Schloss turned 15 the
day the German police captured
her and her mther in
Amsterdam. They had been
in hiding for two years —
two years since Schloss had
seen her father, her brother
or her friend, Anne Frank.
“We knew this would be
the end for us,” Schloss
said to a crowd of about
600 at the Kent Stage Tuesday.
“It's what we had been
afraid of for two years, and
it had happened.”
Now in her 80s and a
survivor of the Holocaust,
Schloss travels to tell the
story of her life, of losing
her father and brother in
the Auschwitz-Birkenau
concentration camp and
of her mother marrying
Otto Frank, Anne Frank's
father, after the war was
finally over. She said she
hopes understanding the
past will teach young people
about the dangers of
discrimination.
“In the 21st century, it
cannot be tolerated anymore,”
Schloss said to
the nearly 400 middle and
high school students who
attended the event. “We
have to stop this evil in its
midst.”
A multimedia performance
set the scene for
Schloss's story as area volunteers
performed James
Still's play “And Then They
Came for Me: Remembering
the World of Anne Frank.”
A backdrop screen of video-
recorded interviews with
Holocaust survivors further
told the story.
“I once was speaking
somewhere, and I had a student
ask if I had been able
to keep a pet in Auschwitz,”
said Schloss, who did not
start speaking about her
experience until 1985. “I realized
that some people do
not know what it was like
and that it needed to be
discussed.”
Only five states, California,
Florida, Illinois, New
Jersey and New York, require
schools to teach
about the Holocaust, according
to the Holocaust
Task Force.

Return to Top



News Headline: News in Brief | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jobs 'explosion' set for Thursday

WARREN - Free bus transportation to the ''Jobs Explosion'' job fair Thursday at Kent State University Trumbull in Champion will be provided at 9:30 a.m. at the Hot Dog Shoppe on West Market Street, organizers said Tuesday.

The job fair starts with a job readiness workshop and runs 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Room 117 of the Technology Building. The bus will leave KSU Trumbull at 3:30 p.m. Call Cheryl Saffold at 330-399-8178 for details.

Return to Top



News Headline: Job Fair Set in Warren Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/18/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fox Youngstown
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Job Fair Set in Warren Thursday If you are looking for a job, the Kent State University Trumbull branch might be worth a visit later this week. The campus will play host to a job fair from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday. Warren Councilwoman Cheryl Saffold is helping to put together the event. "We have two of the newer employers in the area who will be there recruiting. There is Anderson Dubose who is building a new facility near Lordstown. He's planning on hiring 100-plus employees. And Phantom Fireworks will be here," Saffold said. At least 30 companies are scheduled to be there.

Return to Top



News Headline: New Music Series concert is Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The first concert of the
2011-12 Kent State University
New Music Series will
be presented at 8 p.m. Saturday
in the Carl F.W. Ludwig
Recital Hall on
the KSU campus.
The concert
will feature
music for soloists
and chamber
ensembles,
presented by
guest artists
and members of the KSU
New Music Ensemble, directed
by Frank Wiley.
Guest artists will be pianist
Raquel Teare, saxophonist
Jeff Heisler, and Akros
Percussion Collective.
Anthony Donofrio of the
KSU Composition and Theory
faculty, serves as artistic
adviser for the New Music
Series.
The program will include
music by Jacob ter Veldhuis,
Scott Robbins, Morton Feldman,
John Luther Adams,
and Anthony Donofrio. Admission
is free, and the event
is open to the public.
The program will begin
with “The Body of Your
Dreams” for piano and electronics,
by the Dutch composer
Jacob ter Veldhuis, performed
by Teare. “The Body
of Your Dreams” is based on
speech melody technique,
using a television advertisement
for a weight-loss product.
Flutist Amanda Cook and
oboist Justin Bannon will
perform the Sonata for Flute
and Oboe by Scott Robbins,
faculty composer at Converse
College, entitled “Spooky
Does the Bunny-Hop.”
“Intermission 6,” by American
composer Morton Feldman,
will be performed by
pianists C.A. Legge and
Donofrio. This piece consists
of a one-page
score, without
specified duration,
of individual
sound
structures of
one to four
notes each.
Heisler will perform his own
arrangement of “Vermont
Counterpoint” by Pulitzer
Prize winning composer
Steve Reich.
Following intermission the
New Music Ensemble, directed
by Donofrio, will present
the world premiere
of the
new ensemble
version
of Donofrio's
composition
“Secrets.” Performers
will include
flutist
Amanda Cook,
oboists Justin Bannon and
Patricia Rolland, clarinetist
Christopher Bowmaster, bassoonist
Adam Farmer, saxophonists
Craig Carnes and
Jessica Stover, hornist Nick
Sohutskay, tubist Michael W.
Nickens, pianists C.A. Legge
and Frank Wiley, percussionist
Alec Schumann, and violist
Dawn Pufahl.
The concert will close with
“Drums of Winter” by John
Luther Adams, performed
by guest artists Akros Percussion
Collective, which includes
Bill Sallak, Jeff Neitzke,
Kevin Lewis and Matt
Dudack.

Return to Top



News Headline: Friend discusses dead KSU student (Franquesa) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BARNES RECALLED AS
CONSIDERATE, POLITE

By ANNA STAVER | DAILY KENT STATER

J a m e s
Barnes came
t o Ke n t
State Univesrity
to begin
a three year
masters
program in
business administration.
He was there for about two
months before he died. Students
and professors on campus
who met Barnes were
only beginning to get to know
the 26-year-old.
But before he came to
Ohio, Barnes attended Pennsylvania's
Slippery Rock University.
He graduated in 2009
with a bachelor's degree in
finance. It was there that he
met Katie Brahaney.
“We quickly developed a
close friendship over our library
conversations, inside
jokes and all nighters during
finals week,” Brahaney
wrote in an email. “He was
known for his smile, laugh
and sincerity.”
Brahaney majored in English
and professional writing
at Slippery Rock. She graduated
with Barnes in 2009.
She said their friendship possessed
a universal quality
that she feels any college student
could relate to.
“He was the friend I'd go
to for comic relief if I didn't
do well on a paper. He was
the friend who wanted to tell
me all about his interest in a
cute study buddy over lunch
at the dining hall,” Brahaney
wrote. “He was the friend
who came to a contemporary
campus poetry reading just
because he knew how excited
I was about it.”
Jaume Franquesa, assistant
professor in the Graduate
School of Management,
said Barnes told him
that he was unsatisfied that
more jobs outside of sales
weren't available to him
with his degree.
“He's one of those students
that look at the
MBA as opportunity to
change careers,” Franquesa
said.
Franquesa said he met
with Barnes several times
to discuss his plans for the
future. What initially struck
Franquesa about Barnes
was his disposition.
“He was somebody very
considerate, very polite
with a desire to better himself,”
Franquesa said. “For
the little time that I knew
him I would say a bit reserved,
very diligent with
his studies. He will certainly
be missed.”
Franquesa said there
were 34 students who
started the MBA program
this fall with Barnes. He
said he and the other professors
told the students
about Barnes' death Monday.
“And of course the class
is in shock,” Franquesa
said. “We're all in shock.”

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus