Report Overview:
Total Clips (23)
Alumni (2)
Athletics (1)
Higher Education; University Registrar (1)
History (6)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (7)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Psychology (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (2)
Funerals scheduled for fallen soldiers 10/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Slain soldier to be buried in Randolph 10/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics (1)
NCAA will allow schools to provide spending money to student-athletes (Nielsen) 10/28/2011 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Higher Education; University Registrar (1)
West Side Education News & Notes (Lefton) 10/28/2011 West Side Leader Text Attachment Email


History (6)
Kent State professor comes under fire for shouting 'Death to Israel' during diplomat's speech (Lefton, Hassler) 10/28/2011 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Anti-Israel statement by Kent State professor stokes national anger (Lefton, Vincent) 10/28/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Responds to Professor's Anti-Israel Outburst 10/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Lefton: Professor's Words 'Deplorable' (Lefton) 10/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State prof shouts 'Death to Israel' at former diplomat 10/27/2011 JTA Daily News Bulletin Text Attachment Email

(JTA) – A Kent State University professor shouted “Death to Israel” at a lecture given by a former Israeli diplomat. Ishmael Khaldi, the former deputy...

KSU prof shouts 'Death to Israel' before walking out (Vincent, Bindas, Pino) 10/28/2011 Cleveland Jewish News Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Film professor's 1973 horror movie comes back to life (West) 10/28/2011 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (1)
The Washington Post Picks Up On Michelle Rhee's $35K Kent State Speech 10/28/2011 StateImpact Ohio Text Attachment Email


KSU at Trumbull (1)
International film series comes to the Valley 10/27/2011 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

Tribune Chronicle , Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com Kent State University at Trumbull in Champion and the Lemon Grove Cafe in Youngstown are teaming up to bring foreign films to the Mahoning Valley....


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
County home's sale cleared (Andrews) 10/28/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...the Tuscarawas County University Branch District Board of Trustees, a month after the facility was sold at auction for $240,000. The trustees oversee Kent State University at Tuscarawas. Campus officials were the highest bidders during a brief auction Sept. 27 for the property at 441 University...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (7)
Crystal Diagnostics launches food safety technology 10/27/2011 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...chief executive officer of Crystal Diagnostics. Crystal Diagnostics unveiled its liquid crystal-based diagnostics test at a press briefing held at Kent State University, the Ohio-based institution where the technology was developed in partnership with Northeast Ohio Medical University five...

Headline News 10/27/11 10/28/2011 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Smart phone technology adapted for foodborne pathogen detection 10/28/2011 Food Production Daily Text Attachment Email

Local researchers cook up way to reduce food-borne illnesses (Lefton) 10/27/2011 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...Wednesday that uses liquid crystals to help quickly detect potentially deadly food-borne pathogens in meats, produce and other products. Researchers at Kent State University and the Northeast Ohio Medical University (Neomed) invented the biosensor technology used in the testing system,...

BUT NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. 10/27/2011 KPXJ 21 News at 9 PM - KPXJ-TV Text Email

THE CDC ESTIMATES THAT ROUGHLY 48 MILLION PEOPLE GET SICK EACH YEAR FROM FOOD BORNE ILLNESSES. BUT NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. JOE MCGEE EXPLAINS. "It promises to save lives and what could be more important than that in today's...

But new testing developed at Kent State University could change that. 10/27/2011 NewsChannel 9 at 5:30 PM - WTVC-TV Text Email

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that roughly 48 million people get sick each year from food borne illnesses. But new testing developed at Kent State University could change that. IIt uses Liquid Crystal technology and can detect salmonella, E-coli and listeria in a single test...

BUT AS JOE- MCGEE EXPLAINS, NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. 10/27/2011 Live 5 News at 5 PM - WCSC-TV Text Email

...DISEASE CONTROL ESTIMATES ROUGHLY 48 MILLION PEOPLE GET SICK EACH YEAR FROM FOOD BORNE ILLNESSES. BUT AS JOE- MCGEE EXPLAINS, NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. "It promises to save lives and what could be more important than that in today's world. " PRESIDENT...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
USDA Announces Economic Development Funding 10/28/2011 Farm Futures - Online Text Attachment Email

...emphasis on rural cooperative housing, dairy production, processing, marketing and information sharing among cooperatives and external partners. Ohio Kent State University: $225,000 grant to provide assistance to small communities by transitioning small businesses to worker-owned cooperatives. ...


Psychology (1)
Research by Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett on Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety Recently Featured (Neal-Barnett) 10/27/2011 Pressbox - Online Text Attachment Email

...performance and the benefit of community as an intervention tool,” explained Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, award-winning psychologist and associate professor at Kent State University. “Through the use of Sister Circles in my research with African American women dealing with anxiety, fear and panic, we...


News Headline: Funerals scheduled for fallen soldiers | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Funerals have been scheduled for two soldiers killed in Afghanistan this month.

The family of 1st Lt. Ashley White Stumpf will receive friends from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday at Marlington High School, 10450 Moulin Ave., Marlboro Township.

She graduated from Marlington in 2005, and Kent State University in 2009.

Her funeral will be 11 a.m. Monday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 2643 Waterloo Road, Randolph Township. She will be buried in the church cemetery.

Stumpf, 24, was assigned to the 230th Brigade Support Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, North Carolina National Guard out of Goldsboro, N.C.

Stumpf, who was a member of the cultural support team that works with women and children, was killed Saturday in Kandahar province. Several bombs were detonated near her position, killing her and two other soldiers.

She is survived by her husband, Jason; parents, Robert and Deborah (Miller) White; twin sister Brittany White of Alliance; brother Josh (Catherine) White of Maryland; and grandparents Robert and Irene Miller of Marlboro, Ohio, and Ronald and Rose White of Gilmer, Texas.

A service for Army Staff Sgt. Robert “Brian” Cowdrey, a former Portage County resident, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at La Junta High School in La Junta, Colo.

Cowdrey, 39, lived in Atwater Township from 2001 to 2003, when he joined the Army.

He was a flight medic with the 3rd Battalion, 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Cowdrey was killed Oct. 13 in Kunar province while on his fourth combat tour. He died from injuries suffered during a rescue mission.

He leaves his wife, Kimberly; three sons; his mother, Donna Faull of Kent; and brother, Quentin Cowdrey of Amanda, Ohio.

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News Headline: Slain soldier to be buried in Randolph | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Record-Courier Staff Report
Calling hours for Kent State University graduate U.S. Army 1st. Lt. Ashley I. (White) Stumpf will be held from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday at Marlington High School, 10450 Moulin Ave., Alliance.
A Mass of Christian Burial will take place at 11 a..m. Monday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 2643 Waterloo Road in Randolph, where Stumpf was a member. The Revs. Thomas Dyer and Edward Wieczorek will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery.
Stumpf, 24, of Alliance, died Oct. 22 in Afghanistan following an attack by enemy forces on a group of U.S. Special Operations troops. She was a 2005 graduate of Marlington High School in Stark County and a 2009 graduate of the ROTC program at KSU.
At the time of her death Stumpf was assigned to the 230th Brigade Support Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, North Carolina National Guard in Goldsboro, N.C.
She is survived by her husband, U.S. Army Capt. Jason Stumpf of Raeford, N.C., parents Robert and Deborah White, twin sister Brittany and brother Josh, all of Alliance.

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News Headline: NCAA will allow schools to provide spending money to student-athletes (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The NCAA crossed the once-taboo line of paying players by passing a measure Thursday that would allow student-athletes to receive up to $2,000 in spending money as part of their scholarships.

That was just one of the sweeping changes made, along with tougher academic standards, tougher graduation performance rates and an allowance for schools to award scholarships for a varying number of years. The changes will affect powerhouse programs such as Ohio State and midlevel athletic programs such as Cleveland State, Kent State and Akron.

"This comes as a little bit of a shock, but here we go," said Akron Athletic Director Tom Wistrcill.

For a major athletic program such as Ohio State, which operates its athletic department in the black, the financial changes could be minimal.

"We feel like we were part of the impetus in regard to the discussion, no question," OSU Athletic Director Gene Smith said. "I'm pleased that it passed."

But Smith understands that the extra $2,000 that may be applied to scholarships isn't feasible for all athletic programs. He estimated that only 60 to 70 of the 347 Division I athletic programs would be able to afford the cost -- or roughly the number of schools playing football in BCS conferences.

For instance, Ohio State has 145 athletes on full scholarships, so the increased cost would be $290,000 per year. For an athletic program that turns a profit and has a budget of $123 million, that's easily doable. But for teams that operate in the red, this is a major added cost to already strapped budgets.

Wistrcill estimates that Akron has about 150 student-athletes on full scholarship.

"That's $300,000 a year or more. That's a lot of money," he said. "If we're going to continue to compete for the top student-athletes, we're going to have to find a way to do it."

And according to Mid-American Conference Commissioner Jon Steinbrecher, the NCAA may not be done.

"What does all this cost? We don't know yet until all this other work gets done, and that won't be until April," he said.

According to Steinbrecher, there are NCAA working committees out there that have yet to determine things such as scholarship limits for various sports and staffing limits for coaches, plus other cost-containment issues.

While the scholarship money got the bulk of the attention, other changes could also have a profound effect on programs:
Graduation requirements: The NCAA Division I Board of Directors approved an implementation plan -- which includes all football bowl games -- that mandates a certain level of academic performance in order to participate in postseason competition.

Smith favored its passage, even though Ohio State basketball was penalized with the loss of two scholarships for the 2008-09 season because of an academic progress rate (APR) shortfall. The Buckeyes had issues with both Greg Oden and Kosta Koufos leaving for the NBA while enrolling but not finishing classes in the spring quarter.

"I love it, I love it," Smith said of the APR postseason ban. "I understand the APR has its challenges, but I think it's important we really make sure that we're doing everything we can to continue to drive the academic reform. What we've seen happen in basketball at some of our schools, it's got to change."

Scholarship changes: For universities not in Ohio State's position, raising the money to pay full-scholarship athletes is just one issue. The issue of scholarship options ranging from one to four years could have major financial and competitive implications as well.

"This thing is multilayered here now," said Kent State Athletic Director Joel Nielsen. "There's a lot to what came out of today's votes. That [various scholarship levels] can cause some considerable consternation in some sports. It adds another variable, if not multiple variables, to what these coaches have to consider and what the recruits and their parents will have to consider."

For example, a quarterback could be offered a four-year scholarship by one school, a two-year scholarship by another and a renewable one-year scholarship by a third.

Athletes' grades: Athletes must now have a minimum 2.3 grade-point average overall, plus they must meet core curriculum and standardized test scores for immediate eligibility.

For example, both Kent State and Cleveland State will have four seniors of the 13 players on basketball scholarships graduate. If their incoming recruits don't meet the new academic standards, they will be allowed on scholarship with 2.0 GPA but won't be allowed to play the first year.

"That could affect us," CSU coach Gary Waters said. "That could really, really affect us. They are really sending a message here."

One school already expected to be impacted for the 2013 NCAA Tournament is defending national basketball champion Connecticut. The Huskies are currently under NCAA sanctions and aren't projected to meet the new NCAA academic progress standards.

Clearly, sweeping NCAA changes are at hand -- and more are still to come.

"Will we see some tweaks along the way? There always is," Wistrcill said. "But once you start giving money to athletes, it's going to be very hard to take it away. Now that it has been voted in and we start to sort out the details, we absolutely have to come together, both on the NCAA level and the conference level, and really determine how we are going to address these issues.

"This is certainly a ground-shaking moment here in college athletics."

Plain Dealer reporter Doug Lesmerises contributed to this story.

More NCAA changes
• The presidents adopted new standards for two-year (junior college) transfer student-athletes. Data indicate that transfers from two-year colleges often struggle academically after arriving at a four-year institution.

The board approved an increase in the transferable grade-point average from 2.0 to 2.5 and limited the number of physical-education activity courses to two. Also, two-year college transfers who didn't qualify academically out of high school will be required to complete a core curriculum that includes English, math and science courses.

The new transfer requirements will apply to any student-athlete enrolling full time in college for the first time in August 2012 or later.

• The board also adopted new initial eligibility standards. The presidents support a model that creates a higher academic standard for incoming freshmen to compete than to receive aid and practice, creating an academic redshirt year.

Student-athletes who achieve the current minimum initial eligibility standard on the test score/grade-point average sliding scale with at least a 2.0 core-course GPA would continue to be eligible for athletically related financial aid during the first year of enrollment and practice during the first regular academic term of enrollment. Student-athletes could earn the second term of enrollment for practice by passing nine semester or eight quarter hours.

The proposal increases the standard for immediate access to competition to at least a 2.3 GPA and an increased sliding scale. Specifically, incoming student-athletes would need to earn a half-point higher GPA for a given test score compared with the current standard. For example, an SAT score of 1,000 would require a 2.5 high school core-course GPA for competition and a 2.0 high school core-course GPA for aid and practice.

-- Elton Alexander

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News Headline: West Side Education News & Notes (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: West Side Leader
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU implements Forever Buckeyes Program for Ohio high school graduates
KENT — Kent State University (KSU) President Lester Lefton has announced KSU has adopted the Forever Buckeyes program, established by the Ohio Board of Regents and the state of Ohio, beginning this fall semester.

The Forever Buckeyes program is a residency provision that extends the in-state resident tuition rate to any Ohio high school graduate who left the state but returns to enroll in an Ohio public institution of higher education and establishes a primary residence in the state.

“At Kent State, we see the need to make education more affordable and within reach of our students,” Lefton said. “By adopting the Forever Buckeyes program this fall, we want to help students in this category stay focused on the path to graduation and encourage future Kent State students by eliminating financial barriers to achieving quality higher education.”

According to KSU officials, the new law became effective in September after most Ohio public universities had already determined students' residency for fall 2011, but KSU has chosen to move forward with implementation to begin benefiting students immediately.

For more information, contact 330-672-3131 or ohioresidency@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Kent State professor comes under fire for shouting 'Death to Israel' during diplomat's speech (Lefton, Hassler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- The statement by a Kent State University professor who shouted "Death to Israel" during a speech by a former Israeli diplomat was deplorable, according to the university president.

President Lester Lefton issued a statement saying Julio Pino had a right to pose a provocative question during the speech on campus Tuesday. But while it may have been Pino's right to shout "Death to Israel," the words are deplorable, Lefton wrote.

"We value critical thinking at this university and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable," the president wrote. " We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values."

Pino, a tenured associate professor of history, made his statement as he left a lecture hall Tuesday night following an exchange with Ishmael Khaldi, former deputy consul general at the Israeli consulate in San Francisco.

Khaldi's speech, on his rise from a small Bedouin village to the Israeli Foreign Service, was sponsored by groups including the Undergraduate Student Government and Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting.

The lecture, attended by about 60 people, was fascinating, said Kevin Papp, executive director of the undergraduate student government.

"He spoke about his journey, his perspective on life and how you set your own destiny," Papp said Thursday.

The atmosphere became strained when Pino posed the first question after the speech and asked Khaldi how he and his government could justify providing aid to countries with blood money that came from the deaths of Palestinian children and babies, Papp said.

Khaldi tried to move on to another questioner but Pino made further comments against Israel then shouted "Death to Israel" as he left, said Papp, 21, a senior from Copley.

One person in the crowd shouted "Shame on you" as Pino left, Papp said. The confrontation did not come up during further questions or at a reception, he said.

Donald Hassler, chairman of the English department and a member of the Faculty Senate, said Thursday that Pino is very opinionated and has a right to his opinions.

"But he needs to speak with civility," Hassler said. "What he said was pretty hateful. He realizes that he lost control."

Pino could not be reached for comment on Thursday.

Pino was also caught up in a controversy in 2003 after writing a column in the Kent Stater, the campus newspaper, that explored the motives of a Palestinian suicide bomber. In 2007, he was cited on websites as being linked to an extremist Islamic website that espoused a holy war. Kent State officials at the time said the extremist site had no connection to Pino or to the university.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: kfarkas@plaind.com, 216-999-5079

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News Headline: Anti-Israel statement by Kent State professor stokes national anger (Lefton, Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The focus is back on a Kent State faculty member with former ties to a jihadist website.

Julio Pino's shout of “Death to Israel” at a public lecture by a former Israeli diplomat “was not surprising,” said Jennifer Chestnut, executive director of the Jewish organization Hillel at Kent State, who attended the speech.

“If he will say this in public, what will he say in the confines of his own classroom when it's just him at the podium?” she asked.

The KSU student news site KentWired reported that Pino, 50, disrupted the Tuesday night lecture by Ishmael Khaldi, who rose from living in a Bedouin tent to the top ranks in the Israeli government.

Pino asked Khaldi how Israel could justify providing aid to countries such as Turkey with “blood money” from the deaths of Palestinians, according to the student website.

The two traded barbs, then Pino stormed out and Khaldi fielded more questions from the 100 people in the audience.

“Is this what that professor is telling you?” he asked at one point. “It is my responsibility to tell you the truth and build relationships.”

Chestnut, the head of Hillel, said Pino distributed anti-Israel fliers in the back of the room and had done so at other events on campus in the past.

Pino, an associate professor of history, could not be reached for comment.

The native of Cuba and convert to Islam has been a lightning rod on campus for a decade.

In 2002, he wrote a column in the Daily Kent Stater eulogizing an 18-year-old Palestinian suicide bomber. In 2005 and 2006, he wrote letters to the student-run paper criticizing American policy in the Muslim world.

One letter from Pino later appeared on a jihadist blog, www. global.war.bloghi.com, to which he told the KSU administration that he had contributed. The website no longer exists under that name.

“You attack, and continue to attack, us everywhere,” read both the letter and submission to the website. “The ill done to the Muslim nations must be requited. The Muslim child does not cry alone; the Muslim woman does not cry alone; and the Muslim man is already at your gates.''

The university fired his department head in 2007 when he allowed Pino to take a fully paid, six-week professional leave to the United Arab Emirates to learn Arabic.

The university said John Jameson did not follow university protocol in approving Pino's travel. Jameson said officials were anxious about further bad publicity about Pino and yanked his title and ordered Pino back to campus in retribution.

In 2009, the U.S. Secret Service acknowledged that it was investigating Pino “as an individual who came to our attention who needed to be interviewed.”

Resident agent in charge David Lee said then that officials went to Pino's home in the “ongoing” investigation and declined to elaborate.

In the latest dust-up, KSU student and event organizer Evan Gildenblatt of Cincinnati, in a guest editorial Thursday in the student media, criticized Pino for abusing his powerful influence over students.

The column by Gildenblatt, who is majoring in conflict resolution and minoring in Jewish studies, called for more understanding between people of different faiths.

“He came with a premeditated plan to disrupt the program, and completely disregarded one of the main messages of the evening: peaceful coexistence through respectful dialogue,” Gildenblatt told the Beacon Journal.

University President Lester A. Lefton released a statement Thursday afternoon saying that Pino treated Khaldi “in a way which I find reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university.”

Lefton, who is Jewish, said he found Pino's words “deplorable and his behavior deeply troubling.”

“We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree,” Lefton said.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the university has received about two dozen complaints about Pino in the past two days.

The Beacon Journal received more than a dozen emailed complaints from various parts of the country in less than an hour Thursday evening.

Pino has tenure, or virtual lifetime employment, in his $73,631 job.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

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News Headline: Kent State Responds to Professor's Anti-Israel Outburst | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Associate professor shouted 'Death to Israel' at public lecture this week

Kent State University is responding to an anti-Israel outburst made by one of its professors at a public lecture this week.

The university released a statement today regarding comments made by history professor Julio Pino, who attended a speech given on campus Tuesday night by Ishmael Khaldi, former deputy consul general at the Israeli Consulate in San Francisco. Pino sparked an argument when he asked Khaldi why Israel was contributing to the deaths of Palestinian women and babies, the Daily Kent Stater reported.

Pino, 50, is a tenured history professor and specializes in Latin American history. And he's been at the center of other controversies in the past during his time at Kent State.

The university released the following statement about Pino's comments:

"The event held Oct. 25 involved an invited speaker who spoke on campus. Dr. Julio Pino, a Kent State faculty member, attended the presentation by Ishmael Khaldi, the former Deputy Consul General at the Israeli Consulate in San Francisco.

"The event was free and open to the public. The format of the event included a question-and-answer session that allowed for exchange and interaction with members of the audience. We acknowledge that Dr. Pino's interaction was not respectful of the speaker and is not the courtesy most speakers experience at Kent State University.

"Clearly, Dr. Pino's outburst was meant to disrupt the occasion and dilute the speaker's message and influence. While his actions are garnering much media attention, we are confident that our students and members of the community who were in attendance will not be distracted from Mr. Khaldi's more powerful message.

"We want to be clear that the university does not speak for Dr. Pino nor defend any views he might have, and he does not speak for Kent State, our departments or faculty. As a university, we are obligated by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to recognize that political speech is strongly protected."

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News Headline: Lefton: Professor's Words 'Deplorable' (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Matt Fredmonsky

Kent State University President Lester Lefton responded to anti-Israel comments made by a faculty member this week

The words of one professor at Kent State University have garnered admonition from the school's top administrator.

Kent State University President Lester Lefton released a statement today about comments made by history professor Julio Pino, who made anti-Israel statements at a public lecture on campus Tuesday.

Lefton's remarks follow a general statement released by the university earlier today. Lefton, who declined an interview, released this statement to Kent Patch this afternoon about Pino's remarks:

"This past Tuesday, a guest lecturer at our campus was treated in a way which I find reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university.

"Ishmael Khaldi, a former deputy counsel general at the Israeli consulate in San Francisco, spoke on our campus about his experiences as a Bedouin in Israel, and on other matters involving the Middle East.

"During the question and answer period Kent State University professor Julio Pino posed a provocative question to Mr. Khaldi, which was his right. But then professor Pino shouted “Death to Israel,” as he left the auditorium.

"It may have been professor Pino's right to do so, but it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling.

"We value critical thinking at this university, and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable. We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values."

Lester A. Lefton
President
Kent State University

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News Headline: Kent State prof shouts 'Death to Israel' at former diplomat | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: JTA Daily News Bulletin
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (JTA) – A Kent State University professor shouted “Death to Israel” at a lecture given by a former Israeli diplomat.

Ishmael Khaldi, the former deputy consul general at the Israeli Consulate in San Francisco, was confronted by Professor Julio Pino during a question-and-answer session following Khaldi's speech on Tuesday, according to Kent Wired, a student publication. Khaldi was speaking about his life as a Bedouin in Israel who rose through the ranks of the Foreign Ministry, as well as Middle East issues.

Pino, a convert to Islam and a tenured professor, asked Khaldi how the Israeli government could justify providing aid to countries like Turkey with “blood money” from the deaths of Palestinian children. After briefly arguing with Khaldi, Pino left the auditorium shouting “Death to Israel.” An audience member responded by shouting “Shame on you” after him.

Pino has courted controversy for years, writing an opinion column in 2002 in which he praised a suicide bomber. In 2007 he was accused of running the blog Global War, which bills itself as “a jihadist news service.” Pino refused to discuss the allegations, describing it as a freedom of speech issue.

After Pino's departure, Khaldi answered more questions, but also addressed the incident. He called for respect in discussion and suggested that people are misunderstanding the situation in Israel.

“Is this what the professor is telling you?" Khaldi asked. "It is my responsibility to tell the truth and build relationships.”

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News Headline: KSU prof shouts 'Death to Israel' before walking out (Vincent, Bindas, Pino) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Jewish News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Matt DeFaveri
Staff Reporter

Before Kent State University history professor Julio Pino walked out during an Oct. 25 program by Ishmael Khaldi, former deputy consul general at the Israel Consulate in San Francisco, he was passing out anti-Israel material.

"Dr. Pino was standing in the back of the auditorium and during the presentation had been handing out material encouraging students to boycott Israel," Jennifer Chestnut, executive director of Hillel at Kent State, told the CJN on Oct. 26. She said she was sitting next to Pino during the presentation in Bowman Hall on campus.

Pino walked out during a question-and-answer session following the presentation. After arguing with Khaldi, Pino twice shouted, "Death to Israel," said Evan Gildenblatt, a Kent State junior who watched the outburst.

"The first question was from a man who identified himself as a Kent State professor," Gildenblatt said. "He proceeded to ask a line of questioning that I consider to be imprudent, inappropriate and very disrespectful toward our speaker. When the speaker rebuffed him and refused to engage in this low level of dialogue, the professor left the room shouting, ‘Death to Israel, death to Israel.'"

Emily Vincent, director of university media relations told the CJN that "the university does not speak for Dr. Pino, nor defend any views he might have, and conversely he does not speak on behalf of the university. He spoke his own personal views. As a university, we are obligated by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to recognize that political speech is strongly protected."

But Gildenblatt said he thinks most people viewed Pino as a representative of Kent State by virtue of him being an employee of the school.

"I don't think it's appropriate for a professor, an employee of the university to engage in such hate speech," he said. "His views do not represent the university. However, when he identifies himself as a professor of the university, it's taken that he is a representative of the university. That's where we encounter problems.

"It is free speech, and essentially short of inciting violence he can say and think what he wants. Regardless of that, the question is ought he say these things? And ought he preach these things? I think the answer is no."

This isn't the first time Pino's actions have been called into question.

In 2002, Pino wrote a controversial guest column in the Daily Kent Stater student newspaper praising an 18-year-old female suicide bomber who killed herself, an Israeli teenager and a guard outside a Jerusalem grocery store.

In 2007, Mike Adams, a criminology professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, accused Pino of contributing to a Jihadist blog, which Pino denied associating with.

Several of Pino's students lodged formal complaints to the history department in the past, said Chestnut.

"My bigger concern is if this is what he's willing to say in a public forum, what is he willing to say in his private classroom? Students see their faculty members as guiding their intellectual development and their academic experience," she said. "So when their professors speak, students take them at their word and trust that what they're saying is true, whether they're in the classroom or at a private event."

Ken Bindas, chair of the KSU history department, said he wasn't aware of any student complaints against Pino.

"The complaints I receive have to do more with a student's desire for a higher grade," he said. "(Pino) teaches Latin American history. In the classroom, he teaches his courses without inflicting his political opinions on them."

Bindas said Pino wasn't attending the program as a professor, but "as a human being."

"Because the volume of mail that's coming in, (Pino and I) have had conversations," Bindas said. " Just about what transpired. I wasn't there, so I'm only going by what I heard, read in the paper and have heard from reporters."

The reaction from students, parents and other professors has been overwhelming, Bindas said.

"I think the number of phone calls and emails I've been getting speak for themselves," he said. "People are upset. They want to know how could this person say these things?

"I don't agree with his comments, but at the same time, I can't not defend his right to free speech."

Gildenblatt hopes the message of the presentation wasn't lost amidst the controversy.

"Ishmael Khaldi grew up in a Bedouin tent and is now a high-ranking officer in the foreign service," he said. "His message was twofold: if you're in a democracy, you can do anything, and if you respect one another, you can have thoughtful and productive dialogue - you have to accept humanity."

Pino told the CJN by telephone today (Oct. 27), "I appreciate you calling, but I really don't feel like being interviewed, I'm sorry."

The presentation was co-sponored by the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America and KSU's Undergraduate Student Government.

MDeFaveri@cjn.org

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News Headline: Film professor's 1973 horror movie comes back to life (West) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cinematheque uncovered the film after the director's former student put clips on Youtube
by WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMAN

Kent State University emeritus professor Robert West will reunite with cast members of his 1973 horror movie, "The Wednesday Children" this weekend at the Cleveland Cinematheque. The thriller about children falling under a demon's spell was filmed in Wadsworth on a very low budget and faded into obscurity after only a few local showings. But West believes its message about the need to listen to our children is just as relevant today.

Bob West believes his 1973 film, “The Wednesday Children”, is still relevant. “It's a message about kids. How to relate to them. What happens if you don't.”

West, an emeritus professor of journalism at Kent State University, shot “The Wednesday Children” in 16 millimeter. He wrote, directed and starred in it, too.

“I played the role of a minister in a small church in Medina County and I just happen to be a minister in a small church in Medina County. So I played myself.”

At 85, West still preaches once a month, and still teaches at Kent State. He was on the edge of the beat poetry movement when he joined the faculty in 1975, and the beat sensibility is reflected in his movie.

“Part of the Beat Generation was the generation gap which started in the mid-50s. If you tell your children they can't do this and you do it. You can't smoke. And you do. You can't drink, and you do. It becomes obvious that it's hypocritical and that generation gap is pointed in this film.”

West made the movie on what he calls “ half a shoestring”.

The money-man was the late Homer Baldwin, a Wadsworth cable television producer. West says Baldwin came up with the title from the old nursery rhyme. “Wednesday's child is full of woe. ”

It's about a group of kids who come under the spell of a demon who turns them against their neglectful parents. Most of the action takes place in a barn where the kids play after school, and where they meet the man West calls the villain of the movie, Mr. Fenton.

“He is the custodian at the church, who is not what he seems to be. He's cynical and he has the power, a secret power he's going to give to the kids so they can take over the country and the world.”

Many of the actors were amateurs, most of them Wadsworth school children. Producer Homer Baldwin, who was also the head custodian at the high school, helped recruit them.

West and Baldwin had met when West, then a radio and advertising executive, first moved to Wadsworth:

“I was teaching film at John Carroll University and on Saturdays or Sunday nights we'd show those films at my home. I had a movie projector downstairs and a wide screen. So these people came over and watched movies. So he said he wanted to make a movie. I said well, ‘I want to write a movie.'”

West has loved movies since the age of two “ My aunt took me as a youngster to downtown Cleveland to see Will Rogers in a movie called ‘Jubilo.'

My father would only go to see a movie if Will Rogers was in it. So we went to see at the old Jennings theater, Will Rogers in ‘Steamboat ‘Round the Bend. '”

His taste turned quickly, though, from the wholesome to the horrific.

“ ‘The Invisible Man' with Claude Rains. That hooked me. And my mother and I, my father wouldn't go, my mother and I went to see a lot of horror films and I got hooked on horror films. I think the master of them all is producer Val Lutin and his movies for RKO including 'The Cat People' , ‘The Leopard Man' , ‘I Walked with a Zombie' ”

But today's horror films…horrify him …and not in a good way.

“Torture porn films I have no use for. ‘Saw', ‘Hostel', films like those.”

By contrast, West follows Siegfried Kracauers' 1960 “Theory of Film” . At Kent State, it's on his film students' reading list.

“ And he says if you're going to do fantasy, ground it in reality.”

“The Wednesday Children” exposes the banality of evil in the middle of sunny Wadsworth.

“No blood. No night scenes. One of the critics labeled it a daylight horror film.”

He's citing a 1973 Plain Dealer review.

A modern-day critic, West's former film student Jorge DeLarosa, loves the reality of “The Wednesday Children”, but he's realistic about how it would go over today.

“By today's standards kids watching it would be bored. It doesn't have the action. It doesn't have the violence and the language and the blood and the fast cuts. It's a lot of talk. But that talking goes somewhere. There is subtlety. It's great. I love the movie.”

Delarosa singlehandedly saved his teacher's film. Professor West hadn't mentioned “The Wednesday Children” in the class Delarosa took. He learned about it from other students and persuaded West to let him have the only VHS copy of the film. Delarosa used that and his newly-learned editing skills to make a trailer for the movie.

Back in 1973, “The Wednesday Children” was publicly screened only a few times.

West is grateful to his former student for putting the trailer on the internet where it caught the attention of the late lead actress's daughter.

“ He got it on Youtube and that's where the daughter of Marji Dodrill saw it and then got to John Ewing at the Cinematheque, and then he saw the preview and decided he should show it on October 29th this year as one of his Halloween films and then he invited me and the cast to talk after the film. The whole thing came from Jorge.”

West never made a penny from his film:

“ I actually probably lost money. I don't care. I did what I wanted to do. I always wanted to make a movie. The opportunity came. It worked out pretty well."

The only film print of Bob West's “The Wednesday Children” will be shown Saturday night at 7 at the Cleveland Cinematheque.

Please click on link for audio/video:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/29631

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News Headline: The Washington Post Picks Up On Michelle Rhee's $35K Kent State Speech | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: StateImpact Ohio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Washington Post's Valerie Strauss picked up on our Oct. 10 story on former D.C. public schools chief Michelle Rhee's $35,000 speaking fee for a talk she gave at Kent State University's Stark Campus earlier this month:

How much money do you think Michelle Rhee, former Washington D.C. schools superintendent who now runs an organization called StudentsFirst, charged a regional 11,000-student campus in the Kent State University public system to speak about school reform?

Did you guess a few thousand dollars? Wrong. Ten thousand? Wrong.…

(Scroll down to read the actual contract.)

Rhee's speech at Kent was reportedly well-attended and engaging.

The other education event that you might not have about was held earlier this week, also at Kent State's Stark campus: A group of education faculty month held a panel discussion as a response to Rhee's speech and presented “an insider's view of education as a profession.”

At the panel discussion, about 40 people — mostly teachers, education faculty and education students — heard seventh grade language arts teacher Jake Schwendiman talk about “tricking” some of his male students into getting excited about reading by offering them the chance to read on Nook e-readers.

They heard teacher Jacki Cain explain how she found her “dream job” teaching seventh graders language arts and math.

And they heard Associate Dean Joanne Arhar talk about the interviews the college does with principals every year to learn what else Kent State should be teaching its future teachers. (On the list last year: more about how to tailor lessons to a room full of kids at different levels.)

None of the speakers, professor and event organizer Claudia Khourey-Bowers said, was paid.

Here's Michelle Rhee's speaking contract with the university:
Please click on link to view contract:
http://stateimpact.npr.org/ohio/2011/10/27/the-washington-post-picks-up-on-michelle-rhees-35k-kent-state-speech/

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News Headline: International film series comes to the Valley | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tribune Chronicle , Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com

Kent State University at Trumbull in Champion and the Lemon Grove Cafe in Youngstown are teaming up to bring foreign films to the Mahoning Valley.

Nine movies from the Global Film Initiative's "Global Lens 2011" film series during the months of November and December will be shown at both venues.

The movies featured in the series come from Argentina, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, China, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, India, Iran and Uruguay.

The movies will be shown in Room 202 of the Classroom Administration Building at Kent-Trumbull and at the Lemon Grove, 122 W. Federal St. All of the screenings are free and open to the public.

This year's schedule:

''The Tenants (Os Inquilinos),'' a Brazilian film about a laborer who must face the mounting chaos of a city under siege when three young criminals move in next door. (6 p.m. Tuesday at Kent-Trumbull and 7 p.m. Dec. 11 at the Lemon Grove)

''Belvedere,'' a 2010 film about a woman trying to forget the years of ethnic cleansing in Bosnia and Herzegovina who is selected to participate in a reality show in a former enemy enclave. (6 p.m. Tuesday at Kent-Trumbull and 7 p.m. Nov. 6 at the Lemon Grove)

''Dooman River,'' a 2009 Chinese film about tensions caused by Korean refugees illegally entering China to flee famine and misery. ( It will be shown at 2 p.m. Nov. 7 at Kent-Trumbull and 6 p.m. Nov. 13 at the Lemon Grove)

''The Invisible Eye (La Mirada Invisible),'' a 2010 film from Argentina set in a private school in Buenos Aires, where the need for total surveillance soon feeds an unhealthy obsession with one of the students. The movie, set during Argentina's military rule of the 1980s, explores the urge of totalitarianism. (6 p.m. Nov. 9 at Kent-Trumbull and 7 p.m. Nov. 27 at the Lemon Grove)

''The Light Thief (Svet-Ake),'' a 2010 film from Kyrgyzstan that is described as a modern-day parable of good and evil. (2 p.m. Nov. 14 at Kent-Trumbull and 6 p.m. Nov. 20 at the Lemon Grove)

''Soul of Sand (Pairon Talle),'' a 2010 film from India described as an eccentric thriller that delves into the dark interstices between Indian modernity and tradition. (6 p.m. Nov. 28 at Kent-Trumbull and 7 p.m. Dec. 4 at the Lemon Grove)

''Street Days (Quchis Dgeebi),'' a look at life in the Republic of Georgia in the post-Soviet era. ( 8 p.m. Nov. 28 at Kent-Trumbull and 8 p.m. Nov. 20 at the Lemon Grove)

''A Useful Life (La Vida Util),'' a 2010 film from Uruguay about a cinema employee who, after experiencing life primarily through the movies for the past 25 years, must deal with the realities of the world when the theater closes. ( 2 p.m. Nov. 15 at Kent Trumbull and 8 p.m. Nov. 13 at the Lemon Grove)

''The White Meadows (Keshtzar Haye Sepid),'' an Iranian film described as an allegory of intolerance and brutality that reflects the challenges faced by artists in that country. ( 6 p.m. Nov. 17 at Kent Trumbull and 7 p.m. Dec. 18 at the Lemon Grove)

For more information, call Kent-Trumbull at 330-847-0571 or the Lemon Grove at 330-744-7683.

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News Headline: County home's sale cleared (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Jon Baker
News OCR Text: Tuscarawas County commissioners voted Thursday to convey Colonial Manor — the former Tuscarawas County Home — to the Tuscarawas County University Branch District Board of Trustees, a month after the facility was sold at auction for $240,000.

The trustees oversee Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

Campus officials were the highest bidders during a brief auction Sept. 27 for the property at 441 University Drive NE, across from Kent State. The site includes the 62-room main building, a seven-stall garage and a 36-foot by 76-foot stone barn, all located on 15.5 acres.

“It's been a long process,” Commission Chris Abbuhl said after the vote. “I think with Kent having control of it, it will be something that will benefit the community for a long time. Kent is a very progressive local campus, and we're excited to see what they have in store for the future.”

Commissioners closed the county home in 2009, citing increasing costs and dwindling revenues as the reason. Later that year, the board offered the property for sale — a main parcel of 9.1 acres that included Colonial Manor, the garage and barn, all appraised at $440,000, and a 2.5-acre parcel west of the building, valued at $75,000.

Only one bid was received, for $253,000. Commissioners rejected it and decided to wait for a more favorable time to try to sell it again. They voted Aug. 18 to put the property up for auction, this time including a third parcel.

“I'm glad we're at the point we are now,” Abbuhl said.

Gregg Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State Tuscarawas, has said it's too early to say what will be done with the Colonial Manor property, but some decision could be made by the spring of 2012.

“Their board does a fantastic job in guiding that educational facility to excellence in more ways than one,” Abbuhl noted.

In other action, commissioners gave their approval to a decision by the Salem Township trustees to enact a frost law for their township. The law reduces weight limits on township roads by 50 percent from Dec. 1 through May 15.

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News Headline: Crystal Diagnostics launches food safety technology | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: [October 27, 2011]

Oct 27, 2011 (Daily Camera - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) -- Broomfield-based Crystal Diagnostics on Wednesday launched a technology that, officials say, could potentially help in the prevention of some food-borne illnesses.

The liquid crystal-based diagnostics test is designed to simultaneously detect multiple -- and possibly deadly -- pathogens such as E. coli, salmonella and listeria in less than 30 minutes. Such a test could be extremely vital in a time when food processors and regulators alike are looking to increase food safety efforts, officials say.

"The technology, and particularly as it's related to the food business, is of stunning significance," said Paul Repetto, chief executive officer of Crystal Diagnostics.

Crystal Diagnostics unveiled its liquid crystal-based diagnostics test at a press briefing held at Kent State University, the Ohio-based institution where the technology was developed in partnership with Northeast Ohio Medical University five years earlier. Crystal Diagnostics is the exclusive licensee of the schools' patented liquid crystal biosensor technologies.

Crystal Diagnostics hopes to commercialize the technology in the form of providing test kits to food producers and processors of all sizes, Repetto said.

He added his firm has been in discussions with several undisclosed companies that have agreed to bring in the equipment and run the tests in tandem with other existing testing efforts -- some of which can take hours or days. If all goes as planned, Crystal Diagnostics could sell its first product by the third quarter of next year, he said.

"We will focus on providing a very powerful new tool for processors to test with, while at the same time supporting what we believe will be an increase in the number and types of tests that might be required," he said.

The vision for the company's MultiPath System is grand -- Repetto lauded the potential uses in not only food safety, but also in the areas of water, national security and medicine.

___ (c)2011 the Daily Camera (Boulder, Colo.) Visit the Daily Camera (Boulder, Colo.) at www.dailycamera.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

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News Headline: Headline News 10/27/11 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The latest WKSU Morning Edition headlines from Amanda Rabinowitz

A new method of testing for E. Coli and listeria is controlled by an iPad… and it was created in Northeast Ohio. The Multipath system was unveiled Wednesday by Crystal Diagnostics, which has been working with Kent State University and Northeast Ohio Medical University on liquid crystal technology for the past decade. Crystal Diagnostics President Dan Minardi says the new test will make it easier to test meat and produce for foodborne pathogens. The Multipath system provides results in about thirty minutes. 48 million foodborne illnesses were reported last year.

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News Headline: Smart phone technology adapted for foodborne pathogen detection | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Food Production Daily
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new food safety testing method using liquid crystals – a technology traditionally used in smart phones and televisions – is being developed with the aim of detecting multiple harmful foodborne pathogens in a single test.

Please click link for full story:
http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Smart-phone-technology-adapted-for-foodborne-pathogen-detection

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News Headline: Local researchers cook up way to reduce food-borne illnesses (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Local researchers cook up way to reduce food-borne illnesses Cheryl Powell KENT, Oct 27, 2011 (The Akron Beacon Journal - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) -- Crystal Diagnostics is trying to beef up the nation's food safety with a locally developed technology. The company unveiled a new system on Wednesday that uses liquid crystals to help quickly detect potentially deadly food-borne pathogens in meats, produce and other products. Researchers at Kent State University and the Northeast Ohio Medical University (Neomed) invented the biosensor technology used in the testing system, known as the Crystal Diagnostics MultiPath System. Unlike other rapid tests on the market, the MultiPath System can be used to detect multiple pathogens at the same time, said Paul Repetto, chief executive of Crystal Diagnostics. Results are available within 30 minutes, compared to 24 to 48 hours for traditional testing methods that rely on growing cultures of contaminating bacteria, Repetto said. "It promises to save lives, and what could be more important than that?" Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton said on Wednesday during an event at Crystal Diagnostics' manufacturing facility in the Kent State University Centennial Research Park. The goal is to have the food-safety system on the market next year after a round of beta-testing with national food producers and processors is complete. The company is trying to capture a piece of the growing food testing market, which Repetto estimates at $3 billion to $4 billion annually. Deadly outbreaks of food-borne illness threaten customers' health, as well as the financial health of food producers and processors. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), food-borne pathogens cause about 48 million illnesses, 128,00 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths nationwide each year. Most recently, a multistate outbreak this fall from tainted cantaloupe from Colorado sickened 133 people and killed 28, according to information released this week by the CDC. The Crystal Diagnostics Multi-Path System works by using a five-cell, disposable test cassette that contains liquid crystals inside a laminate casing. Liquid crystals are commonly used in such items as television screens and computer monitors. Before testing, a food sample is smashed into a thick slurry, said Dan Minardi, Crystal Diagnostics' president and chief technology officer. Antibodies for the bacteria being tested, such as E. coli or listeria, are added before the liquefied mixture is placed in three of the test cells. (The two remaining cells serve as controls.) The test cassette then is placed in a reader, which can display results on an iPad, computer screen or smart phone. "This is groundbreaking technology in food-safety testing," Minardi said. "It's reliable, it's cost-effective and it's easy to use." If the bacteria are present, the antibodies will clump and distort the liquid crystal matrix, explained Gary D. Niehaus, Crystal Diagnostics' chief scientist and a professor of physiology at Neomed. As a result, the reader will detect light passing through and give a positive result. Initially, at least, the Crystal Diagnostics MultiPath System is being marketed to food producers and processors for optional testing, Niehaus said. But the technology also could have future applications for everything from water safety testing to rapid-result testing in physicians' and veterinarians' offices. A price for the one-time use test cassette and reader hasn't been set, Repetto said. However, he added, the cassettes likely will be more cost effective than currently available rapid tests, which can only be used to detect one pathogen at a time. Kent State and Neomed (formerly NEOUCOM) have a licensing deal with Crystal Diagnostics that includes royalties from sales, said Maria Schimer, general counsel for Neomed and board chair for Crystal Diagnostics. "Then we'll be able to plow that back into the research enterprise." The universities also each have a 3 percent ownership stake in the company, officials said. Crystal Diagnostics has offices in Broomfield, Colo., a bioscience laboratory at Neomed in Rootstown Township and the manufacturing facility in Kent. The $3 million Kent facility has the capacity to eventually make 1 million testing cassettes annually, Minardi said. Local employment is expected to grow from the current six to at least 20 as production increases. So far, Crystal Diagnostics has secured $8.5 million in private-venture funding and $3.5 million in state grant funding, Schimer said. The project is a good example of ongoing efforts to translate laboratory findings into products that can create jobs and generate alternative funding for universities at a time when state support is shrinking, Neomed President Dr. Jay A. Gershen said. "We try to take the great ideas of faculty and bring them to the mainstream of commerce," he said. Cheryl Powell can be reached at 330-996-3902 or chpowell@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow Powell on Twitter at twitter.com/abjcherylpowell. ___ (c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com Distributed by MCT Information Services Copyright (C) 2011, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio News Provided by

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News Headline: BUT NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. | Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: KPXJ 21 News at 9 PM - KPXJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THE CDC ESTIMATES THAT ROUGHLY 48 MILLION PEOPLE GET SICK EACH YEAR FROM FOOD BORNE ILLNESSES. BUT NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. JOE MCGEE EXPLAINS. "It promises to save lives and what could be more important than that in today's world. " PRESIDENT LEFTON IS TALKING ABOUT A NEW FOOD TESTING SYSTEM USING LIQUID CRYSTAL TECHNOLOGY, DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. CRYSTAL DIAGNOSTICS, A KENT COMPANY, SHOWED OFF THE NEW SYSTEM THAT THEY SAY CAN DETECT THINGS LIKE SALMONELLA, E. COLI AND LISTERIA IN A SINGLE TEST MUCH FASTER THEN TODAY'S TESTING SYSTEMS. "This technology can detect multiple pathogens in a single test in less than thirty minutes, reliably and all the time. " HERE'S BASICALLY HOW IT WORKS, THEY TAKE A SAMPLE OF THE FOOD, LIKE HAMBURGER. THEN THEY LIQUIFY IT, ADD IT TO THE LIQUID CRYSTAL TESTING CASSETTE ALONG WITH AN ANTIBIOTIC AND PUT IT INTO THE READER. THE ANTIBIOTIC CAUSES THE BACTERIA TO CLUMP TOGETHER. "When those clumps of bacteria are formed in a liquid crystal matrix, they distort the matrix and now light can move across. We essentially count the spots of light that moves across. " IN LESS THAN THIRTY MINUTES THE RESULTS CAN BE DISPLAYED ON YOUR COMPUTER, IPAD OR EVEN YOUR CELLPHONE. THE NEW SYSTEM WILL BE TESTED AT SOME FOOD PROCESSING COMPANIES AND LABS THIS FALL.

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News Headline: But new testing developed at Kent State University could change that. | Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsChannel 9 at 5:30 PM - WTVC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Centers for Disease Control estimates that roughly 48 million people get sick each year from food borne illnesses. But new testing developed at Kent State University could change that. IIt uses Liquid Crystal technology and can detect salmonella, E-coli and listeria in a single test much faster than today's testing system. Developers take a sample of the food, then liquify it, add it to the liquid crystal testing cassette along with an antibiotic, and put it into the reader. The antibiotic causes the bacteria to clump together. SOT FULL "When those clumps of bacteria are formed in a liquid crystal matrix, they distort the matrix and now light can move across. " The results can be displayed on a computer, i-pad or cell phone in 30 minutes.

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News Headline: BUT AS JOE- MCGEE EXPLAINS, NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. | Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Live 5 News at 5 PM - WCSC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL ESTIMATES ROUGHLY 48 MILLION PEOPLE GET SICK EACH YEAR FROM FOOD BORNE ILLNESSES. BUT AS JOE- MCGEE EXPLAINS, NEW TESTING DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY COULD CHANGE THAT. "It promises to save lives and what could be more important than that in today's world. " PRESIDENT LEFTON IS TALKING ABOUT A NEW FOOD TESTING SYSTEM USING LIQUID CRYSTAL TECHNOLOGY, DEVELOPED AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. CRYSTAL DIAGNOSTICS, A KENT COMPANY, SHOWED OFF THE NEW SYSTEM THAT THEY SAY CAN DETECT THINGS LIKE SALMONELLA, E. COLI AND LISTERIA IN A SINGLE TEST MUCH FASTER THEN TODAY'S TESTING SYSTEMS. "This technology can detect multiple pathogens in a single test in less than thirty minutes, reliably and all the time. " HERE'S BASICALLY HOW IT WORKS, THEY TAKE A SAMPLE OF THE FOOD, LIKE HAMBURGER. THEN THEY LIQUIFY IT, ADD IT TO THE LIQUID CRYSTAL TESTING CASSETTE ALONG WITH AN ANTIBIOTIC AND PUT IT INTO THE READER. THE ANTIBIOTIC CAUSES THE BACTERIA TO CLUMP TOGETHER. "When those clumps of bacteria are formed in a liquid crystal matrix, they distort the matrix and now light can move across. We essentially count the spots of light that moves across. " IN LESS THAN THIRTY MINUTES THE RESULTS CAN BE DISPLAYED ON YOUR COMPUTER, IPAD OR EVEN YOUR CELLPHONE. THE NEW SYSTEM WILL BE TESTED AT SOME FOOD PROCESSING COMPANIES AND LABS THIS FALL.

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News Headline: USDA Announces Economic Development Funding | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Farm Futures - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Grants will help create jobs in rural communities in 26 states.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced the selection of 36 organizations in 26 states and the District of Columbia for grants to help rural cooperatives and small businesses expand, create jobs and strengthen their capacity to serve rural citizens and communities. Rural Housing Service Administrator Tammye Treviño announced the recipients on behalf of Secretary Vilsack.

"These grants help cooperatives support local projects and initiatives that create jobs and improve rural economic conditions," Vilsack said. "As we celebrate National Cooperative Month, USDA is proud to continue its support of local and regional efforts to bolster these cooperatives and help them bring increased value and economic opportunity to rural residents."

The grants are being provided through USDA Rural Development's Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. Under this program, grants of up to $225,000 may be awarded to colleges, universities and non-profit groups to create and operate centers that help individuals or groups establish, expand or operate rural businesses, especially cooperatives and mutually-owned businesses. Grants may be used to conduct feasibility studies, create and implement business plans, and help businesses develop new markets for their products and services.

More than $7.9 million in economic development loans and grants were announced. A complete list of projects that were selected for funding is below. Funding for each project is contingent upon the recipient meeting the terms of the grant agreement.

Alabama

Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund: $191,504 grant to provide technical assistance, training and other business development services to minority farmers, ranchers, fisherman and rural communities throughout Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana to help develop new cooperatives and credit unions.

Alaska

University of Alaska-Anchorage: $225,000 grant to improve economic conditions in Alaska by working to establish new cooperatives and providing technical assistance to strengthen existing ones.

Arkansas

Winrock International: $224,993 grant to bolster the Arkansas Rural Enterprise Center by focusing on technical assistance, training, market development, business planning and innovation for cooperatives.

California

California Center for Cooperative Development: $225,000 grant to improve the business and economic conditions of targeted rural areas in California.

Colorado

Rocky Mountain Farmers Union Educational and Charitable Foundation: $225,000 grant to fund activities that focus on improving economic opportunities of rural communities in Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming.

District of Columbia

Cooperative League of the USA, dba National Cooperative Business Association: $225,000 grant to provide guidance, resources and technical assistance for organizing and operating successful cooperatives.

Hawaii

The Kohala Center: $224, 860 grant to provide technical services and education to stimulate rural economic development by strengthening the development of cooperatives.

Indiana

Indiana Cooperative Development Center, Inc.: $225,000 to support the efforts of the center to provide technical assistance to cooperatives and mutually-owned businesses, with an emphasis on local food systems, renewable energy development and child care cooperatives.

Iowa

Iowa State University: $225,000 grant to provide support to the Iowa Alliance for Cooperative Business Development, which focuses on developing alternative economic development strategies through applied research and outreach programs.

Kentucky

Kentucky Center for Agriculture and Rural Development: $225,000 to foster business success and growth in the state through technical assistance and educational opportunities.

Massachusetts

Cooperative Development Institute: $225,000 to build a cooperative economy in New England and New York by creating and developing cooperative enterprises and networks in the northeast region of the country.

Michigan

Michigan State University: $225,000 grant to provide financial support to comprehensive business development training and educational services to individuals and groups in rural areas seeking to organize or expand business cooperatives.

Minnesota

Latino Economic Development Center: $225,000 grant to provide cooperative development assistance to Latino residents in rural communities in the state.

North Country Cooperative Foundation: $225,000 grant to support training and technical assistance that focuses on transforming the manufactured housing sector in the upper Midwest by replacing investor ownership with resident cooperative ownership.

Food Co-Op Initiative: $225,000 grant to provide support that will enable faster and more efficient start-ups of new retail grocery cooperatives.

Mississippi

Mississippi Association of Cooperatives: $225,000 grant to improve the economic vitality of small and socially disadvantaged producers in economically distressed areas of Mississippi.

Montana

Lake County Community Development Corporation: $131,812 grant to help provide technical assistance and access to capital for new and expanding businesses in a four-county region and to the Flathead Indian Reservation in northwest Montana.

Montana Cooperative Development Center, Inc: $225,000 grant to expand the capacity and geographical reach of the center as it provides assistance to rural communities in the state.

New Mexico

Capacity Builders, Inc.: $225,000 grant to establish the National Center for Rural and Tribal Cooperative Development, which will work to improve economic conditions of tribal areas.

Center of Southwest Culture: $191,504 grant to provide technical assistance, training and instruction to preserve historical and cultural Indo-Hispanic communities.

Nebraska

University of Nebraska: $224, 995 grant to deliver customized technical assistance to groups that are developing cooperatives.

North Carolina

North Carolina State University: $225,000 grant to coordinate and facilitate technical and financial assistance to help farmers in North Carolina.

North Dakota

Common Enterprise Development: $225,000 grant to provide assistance and guidance to rural businesses for start-up, expansion and operational improvement, with an emphasis on tribal housing, health care, value-added agriculture, local and regional food systems and business conversions.

North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives: $225,000 grant to provide technical assistance to new and expanding cooperatives, with an emphasis on rural cooperative housing, dairy production, processing, marketing and information sharing among cooperatives and external partners.

Ohio

Kent State University: $225,000 grant to provide assistance to small communities by transitioning small businesses to worker-owned cooperatives.

National Network of Forest Practitioners: $225,000 grant to provide technical, business planning and development assistance to cooperatives that are working in wood-to-energy businesses.

The Ohio State University Research Foundation: $224,783 grant to provide cooperatives with technical assistance, grants and training as they work to enhance economic development through cooperatives in Appalachian and rural areas of Ohio and west-central West Virginia.

Pennsylvania

Keystone Development Center, Inc.: $225,000 grant to support the formation and sustainability of rural-based cooperatives.

South Dakota

Value-Added Agriculture Development Center: $225,000 grant to improve economic conditions in rural South Dakota through the formation and expansion of cooperatives.

Texas

University of Texas-Pan American: $225,000 grant to improve economic conditions in rural Texas and New Mexico by helping new and expanding cooperatives.

Virginia

Cooperative Development Foundation: $225,000 grant to conduct research and outreach to meet the needs of senior citizens in rural areas of the country.

Virginia Foundation for Agriculture, Innovation & Rural Sustainability: $225,000 grant to support the center in its work to help rural Virginians develop and advance their agricultural, economic and social interests.

Washington

Northwest Agriculture Business Center: $225,000 grant to improve the economic vitality of the agriculture industry within Island, San Juan, Skagit, Snohomish, and Whatcom counties through the development of business and cooperative services.

Northwest Cooperative Development Center: $225,000 grant to improve the capacity of the center to provide responsive, consistent, quality assistance to cooperatives as they work to address economic needs of rural citizens.

Wisconsin

Cooperative Development Services, Inc.: $225,000 grant to continue to provide assistance to develop cooperatives in rural areas, with an emphasis on value-added agriculture, forestry, renewable energy, energy efficiency, senior housing and food co-op development services.

Cooperative Network: $225,000 grant to establish the Great Lakes Cooperative Center to help develop new cooperative s in the upper Midwest.

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News Headline: Research by Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett on Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety Recently Featured (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Pressbox - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Business: Research by Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett on Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety Recently Featured in Pre Home > Business > Research by Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett on Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety Recently Featured in Pre Research by Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett on Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety Recently Featured in Pre Pressbox (Press Release) - Article Highlights the Benefits of Sister Circles in Reducing Anxiety among African American Women TALLMADGE, OHIO (October 26, 2011) – Many times described as a case of bad nerves, the issues of anxiety and fear among Black women have a social stigma that has made treatment more difficult. A recent article, Sister Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious Black Women, describes the research of Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett and her team on the healing effect of Sister Circles. The article was featured in CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE in the September, 2011* issue. “We outline the countless studies and research proving a correlation between anxiety and performance and the benefit of community as an intervention tool,” explained Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, award-winning psychologist and associate professor at Kent State University. “Through the use of Sister Circles in my research with African American women dealing with anxiety, fear and panic, we have been able to develop an intervention that can help offer an answer for this problem.” Particularly effective in the treatment of professional African American women, Sister Circle interventions address key elements with culturally infused aspects that include the use of song, community support and faith combined with cognitive behavior therapy. A Sister Circle is defined as a “subset of women embedded within an existing Black women's organization who share an existing concern related to anxiety and fear.” The article explains two exercises developed by Dr. Neal-Barnett and her team using music and a call and response method already prevalent in African American communities which are used as a form of cognitive restructuring. The So What Chorus and the Build Your Own Theme Song (BYOTS), work as a musical intervention in decreasing anxiety symptoms in members of the Sister Circle. Often Black women avoid addressing their anxiety issues out of a fear of appearing less productive or valuable both in the work environment and within their own community. The article offers valuable information proving the benefits of participating in a supportive environment like a Sister Circle as a means of invention in a culturally relevant way. About Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett is a national award winning psychologist, professor, author, and leading expert on anxiety disorders among African Americans. She is a sought-after workshop presenter and speaker, and the author of the best-selling book “Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman's Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, Panic and Fear,” published by Fireside/Simon and Schuster. Currently a tenured member of the psychology faculty at Kent State University, she directs the Program for Research on Anxiety Disorders among African Americans. Dr. Neal-Barnett's work focuses on fears and social anxiety in African American children as well as panic disorder and worry in African American adults. For more information, visit www.SootheYourNerves.com or call 330-608-1937. * Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett et al. Sister Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious Black Women http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-2850.2011.01258.x/abstract Submitted by:Chris Brown Find out more . Disclaimer: Pressbox disclaims any inaccuracies in the content contained in these releases. If you would like a release removed please send an email to remove@pressbox.co.uk together with the url of the release.

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