Report Overview:
Total Clips (42)
Alumni (4)
Athletics (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Communication Studies (3)
English; Theatre and Dance (1)
Higher Education (1)
Higher Education; KSU at Salem (1)
History (8)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (2)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Political Science (1)
Psychology (3)
Students (5)
Theatre and Dance (4)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (4)
First female soldier in region to die in combat had "quiet courage" 10/31/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Twin recalls her sister's life 10/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Friends, loved ones pay tribute to Ashley White Stumpf 10/31/2011 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...graduate, said she was Stumpf's best friend in high school and the two went to college together as well. They roomed together during their freshman year at Kent State University and were a part of the same sorority -- Chi Omega. "She was the most caring, thoughtful and loving friend, and probably...

A KENT STATE GRADUATE AND MEMBER OF THE NORTH CAROLINA NATIONAL GUARD, WHITE LEFT A LASTING IMPRESSION ON THOSE WHO KNEW HER. 10/31/2011 Channel 3 News at Sunrise - WKYC-TV Text Email

...FAMILY WILL GATHER, TO PAY TRIBUTE TO A LOCAL SOLDIER, KILLED LAST WEEK, IN AFGHANISTAN. ARMY FIRST LIEUTENANT ASHLEY WHITE WAS JUST 24-YEARS OLD. A KENT STATE GRADUATE AND MEMBER OF THE NORTH CAROLINA NATIONAL GUARD, WHITE LEFT A LASTING IMPRESSION ON THOSE WHO KNEW HER. OF THE MORE THAN...


Athletics (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Twin talent on the links 10/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Business (COB) (1)
Job help, networking events: Business calendar 10/29/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

CALENDAR Kent State University, Pilliod Lecture Series: 4:30 p.m. at the Kent State University Business Administration Building, Room 215. Free. Go to...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Thomas D. Moore helped lead Kent State: news obituary 10/31/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email


Communication Studies (3)
Bob West and 'The Wednesday Children': Film professor's 1973 movie screens at Cinematheque 10/29/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Bob West, film professor at Kent State University and Cuyahoga Community College, made a "horror" movie in 1973. He'll show "The Wednesday Children" and talk about it Saturday...

Bob West and 'The Wednesday Children': Film professor's 1973 movie screens at Cinematheque 10/30/2011 I4U News Text Attachment Email

...... 1 day ago, 2:10pm CDT More like this The first movie Tyler Davidson produced was the 2002 drama The Year That Trembled, a coming-of-age story set at Kent State University in 1970. Not too many people saw it, and those who did weren't all that impressed. His latest, Take Shelter, is having...

New Findings in Health and Medicine Described from Kent State University (Waite) 10/31/2011 NewsRx.com Text Email

...these interwoven emotions emerge. It is suggested that sympathy shares feeling whereas empathy shares understanding," wrote L.A Waite and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "The narrative includes a dilemma and the consequence that results from ineffective communication,...


English; Theatre and Dance (1)
Other Religion News 10/29/2011 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

In other religion news: Sister Diana Culbertson, professor emeritus at Kent State University, and member of the Sisters of St. Dominic in Akron, will speak on the theology of death and resurrection, the destiny of our...


Higher Education (1)
Eastern Gateway Community College seeks Valley site to call home 10/29/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...communities. We are preparing students for quicker entry into the job market and affordable opportunities to achieve credits for transfer to Youngstown, Kent State or other universities.” An actual bricks-and-mortar facility in the Mahoning Valley is something that the Alliance for Congregational...


Higher Education; KSU at Salem (1)
McGraw-Hill Education Expands Educational Services Offerings Through Groundbreaking College Readines 10/29/2011 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...guided study based on areas where that individual student needs improvement. The pilot took place at six schools in Ohio this summer including the University of Akron, Cleveland State University, Edison Community College, Ohio University, Reynoldsburg High School and Kent State...


History (8)
Lefton calls KSU prof's outburst 'deplorable' (Lefton) 10/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Lefton: KSU prof Pino's 'Death to Israel' outburst 'deplorable' (Lefton) 10/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Professor's 'Death to Israel' Rant Sparks Controversy at Kent State University (Lefton, Neumann, Hassler, Bindas) 10/31/2011 Fox News Channel Text Attachment Email

Kent State professor yells 'Death to Israel' at Israeli diplomat (Lefton) 10/31/2011 Haaretz.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State president lambasts Israel bashing professor (Lefton) 10/31/2011 Jerusalem Post - US Text Attachment Email

ADL Praises Kent State President For Clear Statement Rejecting Faculty Member's Anti-Israel Outburst (Lefton) 10/28/2011 ADL on the Frontline - Online Text Attachment Email

Cleveland, OH, October 28, 2011 … The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) today praised the president of Kent State University for his clear statement condemning the behavior of a professor who interrupted a speech by a guest lecturer, a former...

Kent State University president slams anti-Israel professor (Lefton) 10/31/2011 JTA Daily News Bulletin Text Attachment Email

KSU, Jewish community react to prof's anti-Israel outburst (Lefton) 10/31/2011 Cleveland Jewish News Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (1)
Area entertainment events 10/28/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...klezmer music  Di Tsvey: The Greenman/Rushefsky Duo will perform a free concert of Jewish klezmer music at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Main Hall Auditorium at Kent State University Stark Campus. The duo of Steven Greenman and Pete Rushefsky features the traditional pairing of the violin and tsimbl, the Jewish...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Program at KSU Tusc offers boost to businesses 10/31/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

With the economy experiencing ups and downs in the Tuscarawas Valley, the Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas is offering aid to individuals in starting, sustaining and growing their businesses. The OSBDC is receiving...

Small Business Development Center ready to assist local entrepreneurs 10/28/2011 Free Press Text Attachment Email

Assisting individuals in the starting, sustaining and growing of their businesses is the mission of the Ohio Small Business Development Center (OSBDC) at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. They have been able to assist more entrepreneurs since receiving funding from the federally sponsored Jobs...


KSU Museum (1)
Allure Of The Ink: A Date With Kate 10/28/2011 Ocala Style - Online Text Attachment Email

...career. Before her death in 2003, she requested that her treasured outfits be given to an educational institution and never be sold at auction. In 2008, Kent State University acquired many of the legendary actress's costumes and publicity outfits from her estate. Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
10/31/11 Business Briefs: Innovation and Venture Capital' discussion set 10/30/2011 Yakima Herald-Republic Text Email

...and How They Meet," at 3:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at the theater of the university's Student Union and Recreation Center, 400 E. University Way. John West, a Kent State University chemistry professor and a Liquid Crystal Institute senior research fellow, will speak on innovation. West has 13 U.S....


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (2)
Broomfield company launches food safety technology 10/30/2011 Broomfield Enterprise - Online Text Attachment Email

...Repetto, chief executive officer of Crystal Diagnostics. Crystal Diagnostics unveiled its liquid crystal-based diagnostics test at a press briefing held at Kent State University, the Ohio-based institution where the technology was developed in partnership with Northeast Ohio Medical University five...

Smart phone technology adapted for foodborne pathogen detection 10/28/2011 Food Production Daily Text Attachment Email

...technique, which offers significant time savings over current industry standard testing methods, is being developed by Crystal Diagnostics in conjunction with Kent State University and Northeast Ohio Medical University in the US. The Crystal Diagnostics MultiPath SystemTM, which has been in development...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
USDA Announces Economic Development Funding 10/28/2011 Carolina-Virginia Farmer - Online Text Attachment Email

...emphasis on rural cooperative housing, dairy production, processing, marketing and information sharing among cooperatives and external partners. Ohio Kent State University: $225,000 grant to provide assistance to small communities by transitioning small businesses to worker-owned cooperatives. National...


Political Science (1)
Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) 10/31/2011 Cincinnati Enquirer - Online Text Attachment Email

...maintain services. SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University. "What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia...


Psychology (3)
Kent State Professor Speaks 10/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

14 Health Worries Not to Fret Over 10/28/2011 Everyday Health Text Attachment Email

...and more honest,” he says. Rather than keeping us from reaching out to our friends, they simply provide another avenue of communication. Research from Kent State University found that having a lot of Facebook friends and posting regularly boosts people's self-esteem and mental health. Be...

Research on Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety Recently Featured (Neal-Barnett) 10/29/2011 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...performance and the benefit of community as an intervention tool," explained Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, award-winning psychologist and associate professor at Kent State University. "Through the use of Sister Circles in my research with African American women dealing with anxiety, fear and panic, we...


Students (5)
Students sentenced for KSU robbery: Pair admit their role in hold-up on campus 10/31/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State Students Plead Guilty to Forgery Charges 10/31/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Halloween party Saturday night 10/30/2011 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...fighting and there was only one hospitalization reported. Officials were expecting around 20,000 people at the annual Halloween celebration near the Kent State Campus. Police were in full force patrolling the area and watching out for underage drinkers.

Fewer Assaults, No Felony Arrests at KSU Halloween Bashes 10/30/2011 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

8:42 p.m. EDT, October 30, 2011 It was a Halloween good time over the weekend at Kent State. While there was some trouble, police said there were not as many arrests as years past. An estimated 20,000 people converged...

Kent: Fewer arrests at this year's Halloween bash 10/31/2011 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email


Theatre and Dance (4)
'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) 10/30/2011 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes...

'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) 10/30/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes...

'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) 10/30/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes...

Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) 10/30/2011 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

...appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes and...


News Headline: First female soldier in region to die in combat had "quiet courage" | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LEXINGTON TOWNSHIP: The first woman in the Akron region to be killed in combat in either Afghanistan or Iraq was faithful to the end.

“She died with a faith card in one pocket and a rosary in the other pocket,” said Brittany White, 24, of Marlboro Township, the twin sister of Army 1st Lt. Ashley I. White Stumpf, who was killed Oct. 22 in Afghanistan. White spoke at a gathering in Stark County outside Marlington High School, where the Army officer graduated in 2005.

As some 1,000 people paid their respects, White also spoke of her sister's courage, compassion and dedication.

“Words cannot begin to describe the beautiful person that was Ashley Irene White Stumpf,” White said, reading from a family statement. “We celebrate her service, her quiet courage, and most of all, her compassion.”

Mass of the Christian Burial for Lt. Stumpf will be held 11 a.m. today at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 2643 Waterloo Road in Randolph Township.

Lt. Stumpf, 24, who was married in May to Army Captain Jason Stumpf, was a 2009 graduate of Kent State University.

She was a KSU freshman when she joined the Ohio Army National Guard six years ago today. She joined the North Carolina National Guard in December 2009 and was the first member of the Army's new Cultural Support Team to be killed in the line of duty.

She died with two Army Rangers, Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij, 29, of San Diego, Calif., and Pfc. Christopher A. Horns, 20, of Colorado Springs, Co., when they were struck by a roadside bomb on Oct. 22 in Kandahar Province.

Army Lt. Col. Tom Bryant, director of public affairs for the U.S. Special Operations Command, said Lt. Stumpf volunteered to join the cultural support unit and went through a rigorous selection process and seven weeks of training before arriving in Afghanistan in August. The unit has about 150 members.

“They focus on learning and gaining a deepening understanding of Afghan culture,” Bryant said. They also receive training in advanced negotiating techniques “that help when they interact with Afghan women and children.”

White said her sister “died doing what she loved and knowing that she was making a difference in the lives of countless Afghani women and children.”

Lt. Stumpf was a hard worker and a kind soul, her sister said, who “put others first and lived to serve others.”

“Her determination is what drove her to be the best. She raised the bar of standard so high in everything she did that it will take a lot for others to match her accomplishments,” White said.

The “void we all feel in our hearts is one that will remain forever,” she said. “...However, we also take great comfort in knowing that she is watching over us from above and always will be.”

White said her sister wouldn't want tears of sadness shed for her.

“Instead, she would want us to cry tears of joy and pride as we remember her and strive to touch the lives of the people around us in the way that she touched the lives of so many,” she said.

White also read a Bible verse from the book of Romans 14:8: “If we live, we live to the Lord; and if we die, we die to the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord.”

Today's funeral procession for Lt. Stumpf will leave the Arnold Funeral Home , 504 W. Maple St. in Hartville, at 10 a.m., travel east on state Route 619, head north on state Route 44, then west on Waterloo Road to the church.

Return to Top



News Headline: Twin recalls her sister's life | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The outpouring of support at Sunday's calling hours for Ashley White Stumpf gave a glimpse into the type of person she was, both in her personal and professional life.
Prior to the beginning of calling hours, White Stumpf's twin sister, Brittany White, read a statement to the media on behalf of her family. She began by reading a scripture from Matthew 5:4, “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.”
“We do not want to dwell on the details of her death,” White said. “Instead of how Ashley White Stumpf died, we want to tell you how she lived. Here we celebrate her service, her quite courage, and most of all, her compassion.”
“Words cannot begin to describe the beautiful person that was Ashley Irene White Stumpf,” she continued. “She was a loving and devoted wife, daughter, sister, aunt, and soldier. In Kandahar, her most prized possessions were the pictures of her family. Her family was her source of strength. Her husband, sister, brother, parents and niece made her long, hard days worthwhile. Ashley called home every chance she got. The words she had for her family were not of her own activities but rather asking about the well-being of everyone back at home. She was comforting those at home even while being oceans apart.”
“She died doing what she loved and knowing that she was making a difference in the lives of countless Afghani women and children,” White continued. “She was very strong in her faith as well. She died with a faith card in one pocket and her rosary in the other pocket.”
White said her sister was a “kind soul” who put others before herself and lived to serve others.
“Perhaps this is why the military was such a perfect place for Ashley,” she said. “She was able to maximize her ability to serve, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Even during her ‘down time,' Ashley would continue to serve. Among her favorite things to do were baking homemade bread, popping popcorn, and making coffee for her fellow soldiers.”
“Our family is overflowing with pride,” White said. “Pride at the person Ashley was, pride at the endeavors she chose to pursue, and pride in the service she gave our country. The void we all feel in our hearts is one that will remain forever. A person who is as special and wonderful as Ashley can never be replaced. However, we also take great comfort in knowing that she is watching over us from above and always will be.”
“She would not want the tears we cry to be tears of sadness. Instead, she would want us to cry tears of joy and pride as we remember her and strive to touch the lives of the people around us in the way that she touched the lives of so many of us,” she said.
Caitlin Croft, a Marlington graduate, said she was White Stumpf's best friend in high school and the two went to college together as well. They roomed together during their freshman year at Kent State University and were a part of the same sorority — Chi Omega.
“She was the most caring, thoughtful and loving friend, and probably the bravest person I'd ever met in my life,” Croft said.
Jeanette Nachman of Vermillion was also a college roommate of White Stumpf's, and a member of Chi Omega.
“She was always there for everyone,” Nachman said. “She was always so strong. She was so dedicated — this (military) was her life. She never put herself first, always somebody else.”
Many in attendance did not personally know White Stumpf, but came to pay their respects to the soldier who gave all.
“I just feel we should show our respects to the kids that are in the armed forces,” said Debbie Tournoux of Marlboro Township.
Dale and Melinda Mattern and their children Krista and Kyler of Washington Township also came to pay their respects.
“We just very much respect the sacrifice and her life,” Dale said.
“This is one of our own that has been lost and I want my son and daughter to know there's a sacrifice for freedom — some have given all so we can have our freedom and I want them to respect that,” Melinda said. “We wanted to let the family know that we appreciate the sacrifice they as a family made for our country.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Friends, loved ones pay tribute to Ashley White Stumpf | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name: JONI BOWEN
News OCR Text: The outpouring of support at Sunday's calling hours for Ashley White Stumpf gave a glimpse into the type of person she was, in both her personal and professional life.

Prior to the beginning of calling hours, Stumpf's twin sister, Brittany White, read a statement to the media on behalf of her family. She began by reading a scripture from Matthew 5:4, "Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted."

"We do not want to dwell on the details of her death," White said. "Instead of how Ashley White Stumpf died, we want to tell you how she lived. Here we celebrate her service, her quiet courage and, most of all, her compassion."

"Words cannot begin to describe the beautiful person that was Ashley Irene White Stumpf," she continued. "She was a loving and devoted wife, daughter, sister, aunt and soldier. In Kandahar, her most prized possessions were the pictures of her family. Her family was her source of strength. Her husband, sister, brother, parents and niece made her long, hard days worthwhile. Ashley called home every chance she got. The words she had for her family were not of her own activities but rather asking about the well-being of everyone back at home. She was comforting those at home even while being oceans apart."

"She died doing what she loved and knowing that she was making a difference in the lives of countless Afghan women and children," White continued. "She was very strong in her faith as well. She died with a faith card in one pocket and her rosary in the other pocket."

White said her sister was a "kind soul" who put others before herself and lived to serve others.

"Perhaps this is why the military was such a perfect place for Ashley," she said. "She was able to maximize her ability to serve, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Even during her 'down time,' Ashley would continue to serve. Among her favorite things to do were baking homemade bread, popping popcorn and making coffee for her fellow soldiers. "Pride at the person Ashley was, pride at the endeavors she chose to pursue, and pride in the service she gave our country. The void we all feel in our hearts is one that will remain forever. A person who is as special and wonderful as Ashley can never be replaced. However, we also take great comfort in knowing that she is watching over us from above and always will be. She would not want the tears we cry to be tears of sadness. Instead, she would want us to cry tears of joy and pride as we remember her and strive to touch the lives of the people around us in the way that she touched the lives of so many of us."

Caitlin Croft, a Marlington graduate, said she was Stumpf's best friend in high school and the two went to college together as well. They roomed together during their freshman year at Kent State University and were a part of the same sorority -- Chi Omega.

"She was the most caring, thoughtful and loving friend, and probably the bravest person I'd ever met in my life," Croft said.

Jeanette Nachman of Vermillion was also a college roommate of Stumpf's and a member of Chi Omega.

"She was always there for everyone," Nachman said. "She was always so strong. She was so dedicated -- this (military) was her life. She never put herself first, always somebody else."

Many in attendance did not personally know Stumpf but came to pay their respects to the soldier who gave all.

"I just feel we should show our respects to the kids that are in the armed forces," said Debbie Tournoux of Marlboro Township.

Dale and Melinda Mattern and their children, Krista and Kyler, of Washington Township also came to pay their respects.

"We just very much respect the sacrifice and her life," Dale said.

"This is one of our own that has been lost and I want my son and daughter to know there's a sacrifice for freedom -- some have given all so we can have our freedom and I want them to respect that," Melinda said. "We wanted to let the family know that we appreciate the sacrifice they, as a family, made for our country."

Return to Top



News Headline: A KENT STATE GRADUATE AND MEMBER OF THE NORTH CAROLINA NATIONAL GUARD, WHITE LEFT A LASTING IMPRESSION ON THOSE WHO KNEW HER. | Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Channel 3 News at Sunrise - WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LATER THIS MORNING FRIENDS AND FAMILY WILL GATHER, TO PAY TRIBUTE TO A LOCAL SOLDIER, KILLED LAST WEEK, IN AFGHANISTAN. ARMY FIRST LIEUTENANT ASHLEY WHITE WAS JUST 24-YEARS OLD. A KENT STATE GRADUATE AND MEMBER OF THE NORTH CAROLINA NATIONAL GUARD, WHITE LEFT A LASTING IMPRESSION ON THOSE WHO KNEW HER. OF THE MORE THAN SIX THOUSAND US SERVICE MEMBERS KILLED IN EITHER IRAQ OR AFGHANISTAN, WHITE IS THE 135TH FEMALE CASUALTY. SHE IS SURVIVED BY HER HUSBAND, AN ARMY CAPTAIN AT FORT BRAGG AS WELL AS A TWIN SISTER, A BROTHER, AND HER PARENTS IN ALLIANCE. HER LOVED ONES SAY, HER SELF-LESS SERVICE AND LOVE FOR HER FAMILY, IS WHAT THEY WILL REMEMBER HER BY. SHE DIED DOING AND KNOWING THAT SHE WAS MAKING A LIVES OF COUNTLESS AFGHANI WOMEN AND I CAME OUT OF ASHLEY, AND I THINK SHE DID A SLEEP AT NIGHT KNOWING THAT HER AND ALL THE OTHER GENTLEMEN ARE TAKING CARE OF US TAKING CARE OF US. ASHLEY WHITE WILL BE BURIED LATER THIS MORNING, IN THE CEMETERY AT ST. JOSEPH CHURCH IN RANDOLPH, FOLLOWING A SERVICE THERE.

Return to Top



News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Twin talent on the links | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Twin talent on the links
He can still hold his own on the golf course with
his twin daughters, Kasey and Kelly, but Kent
State Athletic Director Joel Nielsen says competing
with them lately is taking a bigger club to
out-drive them.
Small wonder. Kasey and Kelley, both freshman
at Roosevelt, did well in district competition,
Kasey advancing to statewide competition
where she placed 41st, only nine strokes out of
the top 20 high school women golfers.
“They're about even,” their father said Wednesday,
adding when Kasey bested her sister in district
competition, that it could have just as easily
gone the other way.
A third sister, Kory, two years behind, is also a
good golfer so with the three Nielsens, the Roosevelt
women's golf program is “loaded” for the
next few years.
Their mother, Sharon, was a scholarship golfer
as an undergraduate at Northern Illinois.
His busy schedule as athletic director has not
helped his game, Nielsen said, “but I've played for
43 years and believe I could bring my game back
if I had the time.”
A family of perfectionists, it appears.

Return to Top



News Headline: Job help, networking events: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press business staff
News OCR Text: CALENDAR

Kent State University, Pilliod Lecture Series: 4:30 p.m. at the Kent State University Business Administration Building, Room 215. Free. Go to tinyurl.com/3jz6ygg for more information.

Return to Top



News Headline: Thomas D. Moore helped lead Kent State: news obituary | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thomas David Moore was second in charge at Kent State University.

The retired provost, vice president and education professor died Oct. 17 at Robinson Memorial Hospital, after an operation for an infection. He was 74.

Michael Schwartz, retired president of Kent State and Cleveland State, said, "He was remarkably bright, was a storehouse of institutional memory, was devoted to the University, and worked very diligently and productively on its behalf."

Gordon Keller, a retired vice provost, said "Tom had enormous moral courage. He was very bright and tough-minded. He expected a lot of people who worked for him and with him, and he was even tougher on people above him."

Moore was raised in Rochester, New York and earned a doctorate at Rutgers University. He worked at Kent State from 1965 until retiring in 1990. He became chairperson of the faculty senate, Kent State president of the American Association of University Professors and head of several university committees.

As provost and vice president, he was responsible for seven different campuses. He boosted scholarship in arts, sciences, business and education, helping Kent State earn a Carnegie Foundation designation as a top-level research university. He promoted diversity among students and staffers. He championed low tuition costs.

Bissler & Sons is arranging a funeral at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 29, at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Kent. Survivors include his wife, the former Virginia Muller, two children and seven grandchildren

Return to Top



News Headline: Bob West and 'The Wednesday Children': Film professor's 1973 movie screens at Cinematheque | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Clint O'Connor, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Bob West, film professor at Kent State University and Cuyahoga Community College, made a "horror" movie in 1973. He'll show "The Wednesday Children" and talk about it Saturday night at the CIA Cinematheque.

Return to Top



News Headline: Bob West and 'The Wednesday Children': Film professor's 1973 movie screens at Cinematheque | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: I4U News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Black Friday: Bob West and 'The Wednesday Children': Film professor's 1973 movie screens at Cinematheque Gus Chan, The Plain DealerNortheast Ohio film professor Bob West will screen and discuss his 1973 movie "The Wednesday Children" Saturday night at the CIA Cinematheque. Spend some time with Bob West and you'll feel like a five-star slacker. The man is a ... 1 day ago, 2:10pm CDT More like this The first movie Tyler Davidson produced was the 2002 drama The Year That Trembled, a coming-of-age story set at Kent State University in 1970. Not too many people saw it, and those who did weren't all that impressed. His latest, Take Shelter, is having n ... 3 days ago, 3:00am CDT Tyler Davidson: Northeast Ohio producer enjoys breakthrough year with 'Take Shelter' Gus Chan, The Plain DealerNortheast Ohio movie producer Tyler Davidson is enjoying a breakthrough year with "Take Shelter." "Take Shelter" is brewing genuine Oscar buzz and will likely score multiple nominations. If so, it will be the first Academy Award ... 4 days ago, 5:23pm CDT Gallery of the Month: Hot Cheerleaders 2011

Return to Top



News Headline: New Findings in Health and Medicine Described from Kent State University (Waite) | Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2011 OCT 31 - () -- New research, "What is it they say about best intentions?: a life lesson in empathy and sympathy," is the subject of a report (see also ). "This narrative exposes a critical communication lesson through a true account. In describing empathy and sympathy, it ushers readers on a brief journey where one vital exchange goes awry," scientists writing in the journal Health Communication report.

"A lesson emerges for clinical staff and patients communicating in sensitive circumstances. Empathy and sympathy both express feelings but differ in how these interwoven emotions emerge. It is suggested that sympathy shares feeling whereas empathy shares understanding," wrote L.A Waite and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "The narrative includes a dilemma and the consequence that results from ineffective communication, and concludes with suggestions to successfully manage similar communication encounters."

Waite and colleagues published their study in Health Communication (What is it they say about best intentions?: a life lesson in empathy and sympathy Health Communication, 2011;26(4):389-91).

Additional information can be obtained by contacting L.A. Waite, School of Communication, Kent State University, Canton, OH 44720, United States.

Copyright © 2011 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Other Religion News | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In other religion news: Sister Diana Culbertson, professor emeritus at Kent State University, and member of the Sisters of St. Dominic in Akron, will speak on the theology of death and resurrection, the destiny of our loved ones and our own experience of eternal life now. 330-492-2939. Malone University -- 2600 Cleveland Ave. NW, Canton. 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday.

Speaking Up for Yourself will focus on ways people can use their speaking voices to full potential, with Professor Chuck Richie of Kent State University School of Theatre and Dance and acting student Raquel Encalada. 330-673-5445.

Copyright (C) 2011, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: Eastern Gateway Community College seeks Valley site to call home | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Eastern Gateway Community College is looking for a Mahoning Valley home. Earlier this month, the EGCC trustees approved the establishment of a Letter of Understanding between the college and Higher Education Partners of New Bedford, Mass. “HEP and college officials will seek a facility in the Mahoning Valley to meet Eastern Gateway's growing needs,” Ann Koon, EGCC spokeswoman said in an email. The letter doesn't specify a dollar amount or any preferred locations. More details are expected to be finalized at future board meetings. The partnership development will be done with the guidance and review of the Ohio Attorney General's Office, she said. For fall semester, the college reported record enrollment including twice as many Mahoning Valley residents enrolled between fall 2010 and fall 2011. Koon's email said EGCC's 15 percent enrollment increase is the largest increase of any state institution of higher education according to the Fall 2011 Preliminary Headcount Enrollment from the Ohio Public Colleges and Universities report from the Ohio Board of Regents. “As part of the college's strategic plan, we are looking for facilities to meet our growing needs to have space to offer classes and labs, and to provide student support services such as advising, library, bookstore and student activities,” EGCC President Laura Meeks said in the email. “We will continue our partnerships with the career centers, but the demand for community college classes and services is now developing at a great pace. We are pleased that Valley residents are recognizing the opportunities Eastern Gateway is bringing to their communities. We are preparing students for quicker entry into the job market and affordable opportunities to achieve credits for transfer to Youngstown, Kent State or other universities.” An actual bricks-and-mortar facility in the Mahoning Valley is something that the Alliance for Congregational Transformation Influencing Our Neighborhoods, or ACTION, has been advocating since EGCC began offering classes here. The group delivered petitions with 5,000 signatures advocating a Mahoning Valley EGCC location to the former Ohio chancellor and has met more recently with other state and local officials. “It's coming to fruition now,” said Rose Carter, ACTION's executive director and community organizer. “They're seeing where it is essential for a community to have a brick and mortar building. I'm really excited about.” It's an important aspect of the area's economic development, she said. “I feel we need jobs,” Carter said. “The Mahoning Valley is in dire need of economic development, and Eastern Gateway is an excellent pathway to jobs right now.” The college operates the Valley Center at the Northside Medical Center on Gypsy Lane, but because of growing class demand, that center will be moved in January to the Choffin Career and Technical Center. Eastern Gateway's partnerships with the Choffin Center, Columbiana County Career and Technical Center, Mahoning County Career and Technical Center and Trumbull Career and Technical Center will remain active, EGCC said. Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content. © 2011 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator. 107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503 Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565

Return to Top



News Headline: McGraw-Hill Education Expands Educational Services Offerings Through Groundbreaking College Readines | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With 63 percent of students at two-year colleges and 40 percent at four-year institutions in need of remediation nationally and statistics showing that those who take remedial courses are more likely to drop out, it is critical that students have options to prepare for college. Through the Bridging to College Success remedial education program launched today, McGraw-Hill Higher Education is offering a scalable solution that seeks to reduce the alarming percentage of students who enter college academically unprepared.

Bridging to College Success is a first-of-its kind program offering summer "bridge" classes for students that have tested below college-ready standards and need to rebuild their foundational knowledge before freshman year begins. The program couples adaptive learning tools with a mix of in-person and online instruction so that participants will enter college on-pace with their peers, and will be more likely to graduate. McGraw-Hill Education partnered with the Ohio Board of Regents to pilot the program at six Ohio campuses this summer. The successful pilot program graduated several hundred students that are now enrolled in four- and two-year colleges with the skills they need to succeed, as opposed to spending additional money and time completing developmental courses that are required to begin college level work. In fact, more than nine out of 10 participants said they are more prepared to be successful in their next math class as a result of completing this program.

"Institutions across the country are spending billions of dollars annually on remediation, and we are placing an additional financial burden on our students when they are required to take remedial courses. Finding a way to decrease the extreme rates of remedial education is critical if we want to truly solve the nation's education crisis," said Beth Mejia, executive director of developmental education at McGraw-Hill Higher Education. "We are confident that the Bridging to College Success program is taking us in that direction, and we are excited to continue working with partners like the Ohio Board of Regents to ensure we are giving our students every opportunity for success."

As part of the Bridging to College Success program, McGraw-Hill Education analyzes the profile of a student that is most likely to successfully complete an accelerated hybrid program and be ready for college level work. By examining student data, such as the ideal mix of online and in-person instruction and average number of hours spent studying, and correlating to demographic and other qualitative information, McGraw-Hill Education will guide schools in student recruitment and how to build and deliver programs that make students ready to succeed in their college credit bearing courses.

"In order to remain competitive with other major economies and meet the President's 2020 goal of ensuring that all American children are prepared for at least one year of higher education or job training after high school, the U.S. must sharply increase its supply of educated workers over the coming decade," said Jim Petro, chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents. "We all have a commitment to making this happen, and McGraw-Hill Education's investment in finding ways to reduce the remediation rates across the country is an important step toward meeting this goal."

The program utilizes McGraw-Hill's industry-leading adaptive tools, ALEKS (math), Connect Reading and Connect Writing, to offer a personalized learning program for each student, pinpointing knowledge and skill gaps and providing instruction and guided study based on areas where that individual student needs improvement.

The pilot took place at six schools in Ohio this summer including the University of Akron, Cleveland State University, Edison Community College, Ohio University, Reynoldsburg High School and Kent State (Salem).

About McGraw-Hill Education:

McGraw-Hill Education is a content, software and services-based education company that draws on its more than 100 years of educational expertise to offer solutions, which improve learning outcomes around the world. McGraw-Hill is the adaptive education technology leader with the vision for creating a highly personalized learning experience that prepares students of all ages for the world that awaits. The company has offices across North America, India, China, Europe, the Middle East and South America, and makes its learning solutions available in more than 65 languages. For additional information, visit http://www.mheducation.com/.

Return to Top



News Headline: Lefton calls KSU prof's outburst 'deplorable' (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PINO YELLED ‘DEATH TO ISRAEL' AT GUEST SPEAKER

Kent State University
President Lester Lefton
criticized the outburst of a
university professor during
a public speech by a former
Israeli diplomat Tuesday.
In a statement released
Thursday, Lefton called Julio
Pino's outcry “deplorable,”
during the question
and answer portion of the
speech.
KentWired.com reported
Wednesday that Pino asked
former Israeli diplomat Ishmael
Khaldi how he and his
country could justify providing
aid to countries like
Turkey with “blood money”
that came from the deaths
of Palestinian children and
babies. After Khaldi rebuked
the question, calling
it a lie, Pino left the Bowman
Hall auditorium and
shouted “Death to Israel.”
On Thursday, Lefton's released
the following statement:
“This past Tuesday, a
guest lecturer at our campus
was treated in a way
which I find reprehensible,
and an embarrassment to
our university.
“Ishmael Khaldi, a former
deputy counsel general
at the Israeli consulate
in San Francisco, spoke on
our campus about his experiences
as a Bedouin in
Israel, and on other matters
involving the Middle
East.
“During the question and
answer period Kent State
University professor Julio
Pino posed a provocative
question to Mr. Khaldi,
which was his right. But
then Professor Pino shouted
‘Death to Israel,' as he
left the auditorium.
“It may have been Professor
Pino's right to do so, but
it is my obligation, as the
president of this university,
to say that I find his words
deplorable, and his behavior
deeply troubling.
“We value critical thinking
at this university, and
encourage students to engage
with ideas that they
find difficult or make them
uncomfortable. We hope
that our faculty will always
model how best to combine
passion for one's position
with respect for those
with whom we disagree.
Calling for the destruction
of the state from which our
guest comes (as do some of
our students, faculty and
community members) is a
grotesque failure to model
these values.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Lefton: KSU prof Pino's 'Death to Israel' outburst 'deplorable' (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University President Lester Lefton criticized the outburst of a university professor during a public speech by a former Israeli diplomat Tuesday.

In a statement released Thursday, Lefton called Julio Pino's outcry “deplorable,” during the question and answer portion of the speech.

KentWired reported Wednesday that Pino asked former Israeli diplomat Ishmael Khaldi how he and his country could justify providing aid to countries like Turkey with blood money that came from the deaths of Palestinian children and babies.

After Khaldi rebuked the question, calling it a lie, Pino left the Bowman Hall auditorium and shouted “Death to Israel.”

Here is Lefton's response the situation:

“This past Tuesday, a guest lecturer at our campus was treated in a way which I find reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university.

Ishmael Khaldi, a former deputy counsel general at the Israeli consulate in San Francisco, spoke on our campus about his experiences as a Bedouin in Israel, and on other matters involving the Middle East.

During the question and answer period Kent State University professor Julio Pino posed a provocative question to Mr. Khaldi, which was his right. But then Professor Pino shouted ‘Death to Israel,' as he left the auditorium.

It may have been Professor Pino's right to do so, but it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling.

We value critical thinking at this university, and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable. We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Professor's 'Death to Israel' Rant Sparks Controversy at Kent State University (Lefton, Neumann, Hassler, Bindas) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fox News Channel
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University professor allegedly with former ties to a jihadist website shouted “Death to Israel” at a public lecture delivered on the Ohio campus by a former Israeli diplomat.

The outburst came during a presentation this week by Ismael Khaldi, a former deputy counsel general at the Israeli consulate in San Francisco. During the question and answer period, KSU history professor Julio Pino launched a series of provocative questions at Khaldi.

At some point, the professor shouted “Death to Israel” and then stormed out of the building. The event was first reported by the KSU student news site KentWired.

KSU president Lester Lefton, who is Jewish, denounced Pino's outburst, calling it “reprehensible and an embarrassment to our university.”

At the same time, he defended Pino's free speech rights.

“It may have been professor Pino's right to do so, but it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable and his behavior deeply troubling,” his statement read.

Pino, who is originally from Cuba and a convert to Islam, did not return calls for comment.

A Kent State spokesman confirmed the professor was once investigated by federal authorities. The university said they were also aware of allegations that Pino wrote stories for a now-defunct jihadist website.

And according to the Akron Beacon Journal , the professor eulogized an 18-year-old Palestinian suicide bomber in the Daily Kent Stater, the student-run newspaper.

And yet, the tenured history professor still remains employed by the university.

University spokesman Tom Neumann told Fox News that Pino remains employed and has not been removed from the classroom. He declined to say whether an investigation had been launched into his latest outburst, citing privacy issues.

The professor's outburst has generated criticism and debate across the campus.

“I don't think it's appropriate for a professor, an employee of the university, to engage in such hate speech,” student Evan Gildenblatt told the Cleveland Jewish News.

Ken Jacobson, the deputy national director of the Anti-Defamation League, said the university should consider taking disciplinary action.

“This kind of language is inappropriate,” Jacobson told Fox News. “It's vitriolic, it's violent – it undermines the sense of safety for Jewish students on campus to have a professor use such outrageous language.”

Jacobson said he was especially concerned about Jewish students who might be students of Pino.

"It's a real problem,” Jacobson said. “If he's doing that in his classroom, he shouldn't be teaching there.”

Newmann said the university has received a number of calls and emails, and the president had been in touch with many of the local Jewish organizations near the university.

“Whether you are a Jewish student or not, we find it very troubling,” he said. “That's the point we want to get across. Dr. Pino doesn't speak on behalf of the university, and that's not the type of behavior we expect.”

But Pino does have some supporters – among faculty members at the public university.

Donald Hassler, a member of Kent State's Faculty Senate, told Fox News that Pino is a “colleague whom I respect.”

“We believe in freedom of expression and civil discourse,” Hassler said. “And those sometimes come in conflict – as they did in this case.”

Hassler said Pino must have lost control at the lecture.

“It lacked civility,” he said. "It was an example of hate speech. He knows better than to use hate speech. He has definitely strong opinions. He needs to state them in a civil way.”

Ken Bindas, the chair of the KSU history department, told the Cleveland Jewish News that Pino was not attending the program as a professor, but “as a human being.”

“I don't agree with his comments, but at the same time, I can't not defend his right to free speech,” he told the newspaper.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State professor yells 'Death to Israel' at Israeli diplomat (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Haaretz.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Professor Julio Pino asks Ishmael Khaldi, the first Bedouin to serve in Israel's foreign service, 'how can the Israeli government justify providing aid with blood money from deaths of Palestinian children?'

A Kent State professor stormed out of a lecture given by an Israeli diplomat on Tuesday evening, shouting "Death to Israel" after an exchange with the diplomat, the Kent State University news website reported.

Ishmael Khaldi, the first Bedouin to serve in Israel's foreign service, spoke at Bowman Hall at Kent University on Tuesday, opening the floor to questions after he finished his speech, the report said.

The first question was from history Professor Julio Pino, who reportedly asked Kahilidi how he and the Israeli government could justify providing aid to countries like Turkey with blood money that came from the deaths of Palestinian children and babies.

Israel has recently provided Turkey with aid and assistance in dealing with the earthquake that has claimed the lives of over 400 people and injured over 1,000.

Khaldi, taken aback, reportedly told Pino that his question was "not respectful".

Pino reportedly retorted that the diplomat was not being respectful to him, after which he accused the Israeli government of killing people.

“I do respect you, but you are wrong,” Khaldi reportedly said. “It's a lie.”

Pino then stormed out of the auditorium, yelling, "Death to Israel". Someone from the audience yelled back at the history professor, "Shame on you."

This is not the first time Pino has stirred up controversy with his extremist views, the report said. In 2002, he wrote an opinion piece for the Daily Kent Stater, in which he praised a suicide bomber, and in 2007 Drudge Report featured a story that claimed he contributed to a blog called "Global War", which refers to itself as a "jihadist news service".

The president of Kent State University, Lester A. Lefton, slammed Pino for his behavior, saying the way Khaldi was treated was "reprehensible" and "an embarrassment to our university".

Lefton said that although it may have been Pino's right to state his views, his words were deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling.

"We value critical thinking at this university, and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable. We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree," Lefton said in a statement.

"Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values," he added.

When asked to comment, Pino told Haaretz, "What I spoke was for the sake of the children of Palestine, and no other reason. The only politics I have are, 'There is no God but God, and Mohammed is His Messenger.' Peace be upon you."

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State president lambasts Israel bashing professor (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Jerusalem Post - US
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Julio Pino yelled ‘Death to Israel' at campus event; University President described Pino's behavior as “reprehensible, and an embarrassment."

WASHINGTON – A university in Ohio won kudos from the Anti-Defamation League on Friday for censuring a faculty member who yelled “Death to Israel” during a speech on its campus.

Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton lambasted history professor Julio Pino for heckling Ishmael Khaldi, Israel's former deputy consul in San Francisco, during a talk on the school's campus.

Lefton described Pino's behavior as “reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university.

Khaldi, the first Beduin to serve in the Foreign Service, finished his speech on Tuesday night, and opened the floor to questions. According to Kentwired, an independent news site at the university, the first question came from Pino, who said that Israeli humanitarian aid was funded by blood money gained from the deaths of Palestinian children.

Khaldi told Pino that his comments were “not respectful to me,” and Pino responded that Khaldi was not respectful to him, and that “your government killed people.”

After the exchange, Pino stormed out of the silent auditorium yelling “Death to Israel.”

As criticism of Pino's comment spread, Lefton issued an official statement, in which he wrote that “it may have been Prof. Pino's right to do so, but it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling.

“We value critical thinking at this university and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable,” Lefton said. “We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values.”

On Friday, the Anti- Defamation League praised the Lefton “for his clear statement condemning the behavior of a professor who interrupted a speech by a guest lecturer, a former Israeli government official, with the cry “Death to Israel!” “We welcome President Lefton's clear condemnation of Professor Julio Pino's deplorable conduct,” said Nina Sundell, ADL Ohio Regional Director. “Statements such as ‘Death to Israel' extend beyond legitimate political discourse. When the statement is shouted by a university professor at a university student organization event on campus, it is even more harmful.”

The National Conference on Jewish Affairs issued a statement.

“We are appalled that such a man should remain in a position of leadership, especially one that molds the minds of young people and our future citizens. Such blood-curdling, inciting rhetoric — calling for the death of an entire people — may be acceptable in certain countries in the Middle East, but is unacceptable here in America,” the organization said in its statement.

Pino, who is a tenured professor at the northeastern Ohio campus, cultivates a revolutionary image. On his Facebook page, he says that he is inspired by, among others, former Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and the late Red Army Faction co-founder Ulrike Meinhof, alongside philosophers Rosa Luxemburg and Friedrich Engels.

In April 2002, Pino wrote a guest column in the campus newspaper in which he praised Ayat al-Akhras, a teenage Palestinian suicide bomber who had murdered Rachel Levy, 17, and security guard Haim Smadar, 55, at a supermarket in Jerusalem's Kiryat Hayovel neighborhood the previous month.

The column was titled “Singing out Prayer for a Youth Martyr,” and in it, Pino wrote that Akhras “died a martyr's death... in occupied Jerusalem, Palestine.”

Return to Top



News Headline: ADL Praises Kent State President For Clear Statement Rejecting Faculty Member's Anti-Israel Outburst (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: ADL on the Frontline - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland, OH, October 28, 2011 … The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) today praised the president of Kent State University for his clear statement condemning the behavior of a professor who interrupted a speech by a guest lecturer, a former Israeli government official, with the cry "Death to Israel!"

Kent State President Lester A. Lefton called the behavior of the professor, Julio Pino, "deeply troubling," adding that his interruption of the lecture by Ishmael Khaldi, former deputy consul general at the Israeli consulate in San Francisco, was "reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university."

"We welcome President Lefton's clear condemnation of Professor Julio Pino's deplorable conduct," said Nina Sundell, ADL Ohio Regional Director. "Statements such as 'Death to Israel' extend beyond legitimate political discourse. When the statement is shouted by a university professor at a university student organization event on campus, it is even more harmful."

In his October 25 lecture at Kent State University, Mr. Khaldi spoke about his experiences as a Bedouin and an Israeli civilian, and other issues involving the Middle East.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State University president slams anti-Israel professor (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: JTA Daily News Bulletin
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (JTA) -- The president of Kent State University decried the behavior of a professor who shouted "death to Israel" during a lecture given by a former Israeli diplomat.

Ishmael Khaldi, the former deputy consul general at the Israeli Consulate in San Francisco, was confronted by Kent State University history professor Julio Pino during a question-and-answer session following Khaldi's speech at a campus event last week. Khaldi was speaking about his life as a Bedouin in Israel who rose through the ranks of the Foreign Ministry, as well as Middle East issues.

Pino, a convert to Islam and a tenured professor, asked Khaldi how the Israeli government could justify providing aid to countries like Turkey -- to which Israel recently sent earthquake aid -- with “blood money” from the deaths of Palestinian children. After briefly arguing with Khaldi, Pino left the auditorium shouting “Death to Israel.” An audience member responded by shouting “Shame on you” after him.

KSU President Lester Lefton said in a letter published on the university's website that Pino's behavior was "reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university."

Lefton wrote that he believed it as Pino's right to pose a provocative question to Khaldi, but that while it was also Pino's right to shout invective against Israel, "it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling."

"We value critical thinking at this university, and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable. We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values," Lefton's statement said.

“We welcome President Lefton's clear condemnation of Professor Julio Pino's deplorable conduct,” said Nina Sundell, the Anti-Defamation League's Ohio regional director. “Statements such as ‘Death to Israel' extend beyond legitimate political discourse. When the statement is shouted by a university professor at a university student organization event on campus, it is even more harmful.”

Pino has courted controversy for years, writing an opinion column in 2002 in which he praised a suicide bomber. In 2007 he faced allegations that he was behind the website Global War, which bills itself as “a jihadist news service.” At the time, Pino refused to comment on the allegations, describing it as a freedom of speech issue. However, his department chair said that Pino had told him that he contributed articles to the site.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU, Jewish community react to prof's anti-Israel outburst (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Jewish News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University president Lester A. Lefton called the actions of KSU professor Julio Pino "deplorable" after Pino shouted "Death to Israel" as he walked out of a program by Ishmael Khaldi, former deputy consul general at the Israel Consulate in San Francisco.

"This past Tuesday (Oct. 25), a guest lecturer at our campus was treated in a way which I find reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university," Lefton wrote in a statement.

Khaldi was speaking on the Middle East and his experiences as a Bedouin in Israel. During the question-and-answer period, Pino posed what Lefton described as "a provocative question" to Khaldi, before making his comment and leaving the auditorium.

"It may have been Prof. Pino's right to do so, but it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling," Lefton wrote.

"We value critical thinking at this university and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable," he continued in his statement. "We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values."

Evan Gildenblatt, a Kent State junior, witnessed Pino's outburst. "He proceeded to ask a line of questioning that I consider to be imprudent, inappropriate and very disrespectful toward our speaker," Gildenblatt said. Pino's abrupt exit came "when the speaker rebuffed him and refused to engage in this low level of dialogue."

"Dr. Pino was standing in the back of the auditorium and during the presentation had been handing out material encouraging students to boycott Israel," Jennifer Chestnut, executive director of Hillel at Kent State, told the CJN. She said she was sitting next to Pino during the presentation in Bowman Hall on campus.

Pino's actions raised a question about First Amendment rights, both on KSU's campus and in the Cleveland Jewish community.

CNN weekend legal analyst and Cleveland-based civil rights attorney Avery Friedman said Pino was fully within his rights to express himself.

"The beauty of the First Amendment is that this dialogue occurred," he said. "What's the alternative? That we shut people down from expressing themselves whether they're wrong or right? As Americans, we're supposed to be sorting out the value of what each person is saying so we can make an informed decision. That's the reality.

"The first part of the Bill of Rights is freedom of expression, and by its nature, freedom of expression tends to be offensive to some. It tends to be inflammatory, outrageous, offensive behavior. If the democracy works, we're supposed to be able to sort this stuff out," Friedman said.

Ken Myers, also a Cleveland-based civil rights attorney, said he has represented a number of people in disputes similar to Pino's in the past.

"(Pino) does not have an absolute right to say whatever he wants," he said. "That's a misnomer, that he's got a right to free speech and you can't touch it. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that whether or not a person has a First Amendment right to speak, it has to be balanced with the employer's right to maintain its work force. If this was a private college, it would be a different story."

Myers said courts look at two things in these types of cases: the overall context of the situation and whether the person in question was speaking on a matter of public concern.

"You can't punish the guy for being anti-Israel," he said. "You certainly could punish him for advocating to overthrow our government, but he's not doing that. He's advocating the destruction of another government that's an ally of the U.S."

"While Dr. Pino has every right to his views, his outburst was morally reprehensible.," wrote Warren L. Wolfson, chair of the community relations committee at the Jewish Federation of Cleveland, in a statement to the CJN. "Dr. Pino's actions flew in the face of the spirit of respectful diaglogue and efforts to promote peace in the Middle East."

"The university does not speak for Dr. Pino, nor defend any views he might have, and conversely he does not speak on behalf of the university," Emily Vincent, director of university media relations at KSU, told the CJN. "He spoke his own personal views. As a university, we are obligated by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to recognize that political speech is strongly protected."

But KSU student Gildenblatt said he thinks most people view Pino as a representative of Kent State by virtue of him being an employee of the school.

"I don't think it's appropriate for a professor, an employee of the university to engage in such hate speech," he said. "His views do not represent the university. However, when he identifies himself as a professor of the university, it's taken that he is a representative of the university. That's where we encounter problems.

"It is free speech, and essentially short of inciting violence he can say and think what he wants," Gildenblatt said. "Regardless of that, the question is ought he say these things? And ought he preach these things? I think the answer is no."

This isn't the first time Pino's actions have been called into question.

In 2002, Pino wrote a controversial guest column in the Daily Kent Stater student newspaper praising an 18-year-old female suicide bomber who killed herself, an Israeli teenager and a guard outside a Jerusalem grocery store.

In 2007, Mike Adams, a criminology professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, accused Pino of contributing to a Jihadist blog, which Pino denied associating with.

Several of Pino's students lodged formal complaints to the history department in the past, said Chestnut.

"My bigger concern is if this is what he's willing to say in a public forum, what is he willing to say in his private classroom?" she said. "Students see their faculty members as guiding their intellectual development and their academic experience. So when their professors speak, students take them at their word and trust that what they're saying is true, whether they're in the classroom or at a private event."

Ken Bindas, chair of the KSU history department, said he wasn't aware of any student complaints against Pino.

"The complaints I receive have to do more with a student's desire for a higher grade," he said. Pino, who teaches Latin American history, "teaches his courses without inflicting his political opinions on" students.

Pino wasn't attending the program as a professor, but "as a human being," Bindas said. "Because the volume of mail that's coming in, (Pino and I) have had conversations.Just about what transpired. I wasn't there, so I'm only going by what I heard, read in the paper and have heard from reporters."

The reaction from students, parents and other professors has been overwhelming, Bindas said.

"I think the number of phone calls and emails I've been getting speak for themselves," he said. "People are upset. They want to know how could this person say these things? I don't agree with his comments, but at the same time, I can't not defend his right to free speech."

Gildenblatt hopes the message of the presentation wasn't lost amid the controversy.

"Ishmael Khaldi grew up in a Bedouin tent and is now a high-ranking officer in the foreign service," he said. "His message was twofold: If you're in a democracy, you can do anything, and if you respect one another, you can have thoughtful and productive dialogue - you have to accept humanity."

Pino told the CJN by telephone Oct. 27: "I appreciate you calling, but I really don't feel like being interviewed, I'm sorry."

Khaldi's presentation was co-sponored by the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America (CAMERA) and KSU's Undergraduate Student Government.

Return to Top



News Headline: Area entertainment events | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jewish klezmer music  Di Tsvey: The Greenman/Rushefsky Duo will perform a free concert of Jewish klezmer music at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Main Hall Auditorium at Kent State University Stark Campus. The duo of Steven Greenman and Pete Rushefsky features the traditional pairing of the violin and tsimbl, the Jewish hammered dulcimer.

Nov. 4 through Nov. 13 Dramatic play about Iraq at Kent The experiences of two high school seniors who join the Army and are deployed to Iraq are examined in the dramatic play "Plumfield, Iraq," opening Nov. 4 in the Kent State Stark Theatre. Written by Barbara Lebow, the play shifts poetically between past and present, fantasy and reality. Performances will run through Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. American Sign Language interpretation will be provided for the performance at 2:30 p.m. Nov. 6. Tickets, $10 for adults and $7 for ages 17 and younger and senior citizens, may be ordered at www.stark.kent.edu/theatre and 330-244-3348 weekdays from 1 to 5 p.m. The playwright will discuss "Plumfield, Iraq" with the audience following the performances on Nov. 6 and 10.

Return to Top



News Headline: Program at KSU Tusc offers boost to businesses | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With the economy experiencing ups and downs in the Tuscarawas Valley, the Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas is offering aid to individuals in starting, sustaining and growing their businesses.

The OSBDC is receiving funding from the federally sponsored Jobs Act Program to boost its efforts.

According to Steve Schillig, director of the OSBDC, earlier this year the district received $125,000 from the Ohio Jobs Act program for counseling and training through its 10 counties.

“Our district includes Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Coshocton, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, Jefferson, Muskingum and Tuscarawas counties,” Schillig said. “We did so well that we asked the state for additional funds so that we could continue through the end of this year, which was the initial expiration date. We received a 50 percent increase to carry us through the end of the year.”

Moreover, Schillig said the center has been fortunate enough to assemble some talented and experienced advisers to assist its clients.

“Our roster of advisors now includes two CPAs, a human-resource specialist, former business owners, a retired executive of a Fortune 500 company, ex-bankers and the list goes on,” he said. “All told, we now have 16 advisers that are able and willing to provide guidance for virtually any issue a client may have.”

Barb Green, of Leesville, and Brenda Eckstein, of Roswell, are two such clients. When they decided to open a new business, they went to the OSBDC for business counseling and advising.

Two months ago, the pair opened Honey B's Janitorial Service in Leesville.

“We came to Kent State Tuscarawas for professional advice,” Eckstein said. “We met with Pat Matchett in the OSBDC office and attended an OSBDC New Business Start-Up workshop given by Business Advisor Joe Belinsky. Pat helped us fill out the necessary paperwork. Her expertise was really appreciated, especially since everything has changed so much — with everything computerized and the different legal aspects.”

Green pointed out that the knowledge they've gained from the professional advice and the workshops will improve the way they do business.

Eckstein and Green would like to get cleaning jobs for the government.

“It's amazing the guidelines you need to know to get government jobs,” added Green.

Pat Matchett is a new OSBDC counselor who was hired through the Jobs Act Program funding.

“Barb and Brenda are ideal OSBDC clients as they followed through with each requirement in setting up their business,” he said. “I am so impressed with their enthusiasm, passion and commitment as they move forward to reinvent themselves with education and a business they love.”

Schillig pointed out that Green and Eckstein attended a business start-up classes several years ago and turned to the center when they decided to re-start their business this year.

Green and Eckstein also are receiving financial recordkeeping advice to properly track their business progress. The two have been encouraged to consider a membership with the local Chamber of Commerce as a way to further market their services.

Green and Eckstein, who have known each other for more than 20 years, opened a successful residential cleaning business in 2000. They were in business for six years, but as their families grew, they closed the business to concentrate on their families. They missed working together, and when a new opportunity arose, they decided to start a business together again, but on the commercial level.

“This is for us,” said Green, a 55-year-old a mother of three, grandmother of five and great-grandmother to one. “It's time for us to do our own thing.”

Both women are married. Eckstein has four children and five grandchildren.

“We are dedicated to every ounce of our being for our business,” Eckstein said. “Currently, we have several commercial businesses as clients. And we hope to hire additional workers soon.”

They will continue to take business classes and meet with advisers at Kent State Tuscarawas to keep them on track with their business plan.

Schillig noted that the center has recorded 16 business starts since the Jobs Act program got underway in March, with two months still to go before the end of the year.

“In addition, we are at 57 percent of the capital infusion goal of $750,000 and 82 percent of the goal of to create and save 45 jobs,” he said. “This has been a very efficient use of tax payers' dollars evidenced by the tangible results from our clients.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Small Business Development Center ready to assist local entrepreneurs | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Free Press
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Assisting individuals in the starting, sustaining and growing of their businesses is the mission of the Ohio Small Business Development Center (OSBDC) at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. They have been able to assist more entrepreneurs since receiving funding from the federally sponsored Jobs Act Program. “In March, our district received $125,000 from the Ohio Jobs Act program for counseling and training through our 10 counties. Our district includes Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Coshocton, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, Jefferson, Muskingum and Tuscarawas counties,” stated Steve Schillig, director of the OSBDC. “We did so well that we asked the State for additional funds so that we could continue through the end of this year which was the initial expiration date. We received a 50 percent increase to carry us through the end of the year. We were fortunate enough to assemble some very talented and experienced advisors to assist our clients. Our roster of advisors now includes two CPA's, a human resource specialist, former business owners, a retired executive of a Fortune 500 company, ex-bankers and the list goes on. All told, we now have 16 advisors that are able and willing to provide guidance for virtually any issue a client may have.” Barb Green, of Leesville, and Brenda Eckstein, of Roswell, are two such clients. When they decided to open a new business they immediately went to the OSBDC for business counseling and advising. In August they opened Honey B's Janitorial Service, LLC, which is located in Leesville and can be reached at 740-269-2407 and 330-343-5346. “We came to Kent State Tuscarawas for professional advice,” commented Eckstein. “We met with Pat Matchett in the OSBDC office and attended an OSBDC New Business Start-Up workshop given by Business Advisor Joe Belinsky. Pat helped us fill out the necessary paperwork. Her expertise was really appreciated, especially since everything has changed so much – with everything computerized and the different legal aspects.” According to Green, “The knowledge we gain from the professional advice and the workshops will improve the way we do business and help us climb the ladder.” Eckstein and Green would like to get cleaning jobs for the government. “It's amazing the guidelines you need to know to get government jobs,” added Green. Pat Matchett is a new OSBDC counselor who was hired through the Jobs Act Program funding. “Barb and Brenda are ideal OSBDC clients as they followed through with each requirement in setting up their business,” said Matchett. “I am so impressed with their enthusiasm, passion and commitment as they move forward to reinvent themselves with education and a business they love. Most people are looking to relax once their children are raised, but these ladies are now burning their candles at both ends to fulfill their dreams. They are an inspiration.” “Barb Green and Brenda Eckstein attended one of our business start-up classes several years ago and turned to us when they decided to re-start their business this year,” stated Schillig. “One of our business advisors, Pat Matchett worked closely with the two entrepreneurs, guiding them through the critical start-up phase. She provided general assistance with developing a much needed business plan. From there, the clients were offered assistance with obtaining the proper licenses, registering their business, completing the required tax forms and securing adequate insurance coverage.” Green and Eckstein are also receiving financial recordkeeping advice in order to properly track their business progress. The two have been encouraged to consider a membership with the local Chamber of Commerce as a way to further market their services. Green and Eckstein, who have known each other for more than 20 years, opened a successful residential cleaning business in 2000. They were in business for six years, but as their families grew they closed the business to concentrate on their families. They missed working together and when a new opportunity arose they decided to start a business together again but on the commercial level. “This is for us,” said Green, a 55-year-old a mother of three, grandmother of five and great- grandmother to one. “It's time for us to do our own thing.” Both women are married. Eckstein has four children and five grandchildren. “We are dedicated to every ounce of our being for our business,” commented Eckstein. Currently, we have several commercial businesses as clients. And we hope to hire additional workers soon.” They will continue to take business classes and meet with advisors at Kent State Tuscarawas to keep them on track with their business plan. Success stories like that of the Honey B's are the goal of the Jobs Act program. “I would like to believe that we received the second allocation from the State due in a large part to the success we have enjoyed thus far,” Schillig said. “We have met or exceeded three of our goals set with the initial funding. The goal of eight new business starts has been the most encouraging statistic. We have recorded 16 business starts since the Jobs Act program got underway in March and we still have several months until the first year comes to an end. In addition, we are at 57 percent of the capital infusion goal of $750,000 and 82 percent of the goal of to create and save 45 jobs. This has been a very efficient use of tax payers' dollars evidenced by the tangible results from our clients.” The OSBDC at Kent State Tuscarawas is the District 10 Lead Center. The office can be reached by calling 330-308-7522 or online at www.tusc.kent.edu/businesscommunityservices. Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Dr. N.E. in New Philadelphia. Before You Post The Free Press Standard invites you to post your thoughts on the story in the box below. However, before you post, please read these few basic rules. Be appropriate. Posts with obscene, explicit, sexist or racist language will be deleted. Be polite. Posts containing personal attacks, insults, or threats will be deleted. Be honest. Potentially libelous statements will be deleted. Don't 'spam'. Posts advertising or promoting commercial products will be deleted. Help monitor your community. Click "Report Abuse" on any entry that violates these guidelines. This is your forum, with your opinions. These posts do not reflect the views of the The Free Press Standard or its employees. ©2010 The Free Press Standard

Return to Top



News Headline: Allure Of The Ink: A Date With Kate | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Ocala Style - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Every so often an actor, actress, athlete or musician has such an impact on society that their influence is felt for generations. Katharine Hepburn, also known as “The Great Kate,” is one such figure. During her eight-decade-long career, she not only set and continues to hold the record for Academy Award-winning performances by an actress, but she also set a new standard for women's fashions with her outspoken, and often fiery, behavior both on and off the set. Though women today may take their clothing options for granted, women of the ‘40s and ‘50s did not. Katharine broke the mold by feminizing traditionally masculine attire.Trousers and jackets became her signature style. And while many of her starring roles were filmed in black and white, Katharine was concerned with and intricately involved in the design of her characters' costumes. Katharine's passion for fashion led her to purchase many of the famous costumes she donned over the span of her career. Before her death in 2003, she requested that her treasured outfits be given to an educational institution and never be sold at auction. In 2008, Kent State University acquired many of the legendary actress's costumes and publicity outfits from her estate. Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen was unveiled on October 2, 2010 and was featured at Kent State University through September 4, 2011. The one-of-a-kind exhibit not only features clothing, including her trademark beige trousers, but also film posters and memorabilia from such films as Stage Door, Adam's Rib and Long Day's Journey Into Night. Beginning on November 19, Ocala's Appleton Museum of Art will showcase this renowned collection. The museum will also host several exciting events to accompany it, including lectures and film viewings. “We are so excited to have this opportunity,” says Dr. John Lofgren, Appleton's museum director. “This is not a fashion show. It's a costume show that showcases the art of costume design, and it's appropriate that the exhibit be featured in an art museum.” Katharine was instrumental in the design of her costumes, working with designers to ensure that her costumes really made her feel as though she really were a Russian officer, an Amazon woman or even the legendary Coco Chanel. “She played so many different characters but yet maintained her personality in each role,” says Ruth Grim, curator of exhibitions for the Appleton. “Her costumes helped her get into character, yet she was still always Katharine.” To help give a thorough understanding of the artistry and technique of costume design, stills and film posters will accompany the featured costumes. “We want viewers to understand the context of each costume so they can appreciate the era it is depicting,” says Ruth. And she, along with the staff at the Appleton, have been hard at work creating the perfect setting to showcase the collection. “It's going to look completely different in here. We're all having a lot of fun with this, and it's really going to be a stunning show,” says Dr. Lofgren. “We've wanted to expand our offerings here at the Appleton, and with Ocala's rich film history, we think a lot of people will be able to relate to this.” Yet there is more to the exhibit than Katharine's costume collection. Also featured are outfits Katharine wore to public events. “She was such a trailblazer for women's fashions,” says Ruth. “We don't even realize what she did for today's generation of women. She was one of the first women to use her persona to change the face of fashion.” The exhibit is first and foremost an art exhibit with the intention to highlight the art of costume design and fashion. However, one can't help but appreciate the historical aspect of the costumes and film memorabilia, too. The Appleton Museum will also offer a special package tour called “Date with Kate.” The package is being offered four times over the course of the exhibit and combines a docent tour of the exhibit, a special lunch in the café and the viewing of a classic Hepburn film in the auditorium. “The special afternoon package really will be like a date with Kate in all aspects, as viewers will see some of Katharine's most treasured attire and dine on some of her very own recipes. “She was known for her burgundy chicken and for making brownies for everyone on the set, so it's only fitting that we have both dishes on the menu,” says Dr. Lofgren, who is optimistic that this exhibit will be a success. Some who grew up in Katharine's era may feel a spark of nostalgia, while younger fans of fashion might be interested in Katharine's daring influence on the evolution of women's trends. One thing is certain, Katharine Hepburn's fiery and larger-than-life persona made waves decades ago, and even years after her death, she manages to keep people talking today. If You Go: The Appleton Museum

Return to Top



News Headline: 10/31/11 Business Briefs: Innovation and Venture Capital' discussion set | Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Yakima Herald-Republic
Contact Name: Hoang, Mai
News OCR Text: ELLENSBURG -- The Central Washington University College of Business and the Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship will present a panel discussion, "Innovation and Venture Capital -- Where and How They Meet," at 3:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at the theater of the university's Student Union and Recreation Center, 400 E. University Way.

John West, a Kent State University chemistry professor and a Liquid Crystal Institute senior research fellow, will speak on innovation. West has 13 U.S. patents related to liquid crystal materials. Dennis Weston, senior managing director for Fluke Venture Partners in Bellevue, will speak on venture capital. Weston's firm has a venture capital fund that focuses on early stage, high-growth companies in the Pacific Northwest.

The panel is free and open to the public.

Return to Top



News Headline: Broomfield company launches food safety technology | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Broomfield Enterprise - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Broomfield company launches food safety technology Crystal Diagnostics hopes to commercialize tests to detect E. coli, listeria, other pathogens By Alicia Wallace The Camera Posted: 10/29/2011 12:59:27 PM MDT Broomfield-based Crystal Diagnostics on Wednesday launched a technology that, officials say, could potentially help in the prevention of some food-borne illnesses. The liquid crystal-based diagnostics test is designed to simultaneously detect multiple -- and possibly deadly -- pathogens such as E. coli, salmonella and listeria in less than 30 minutes. Such a test could be extremely vital in a time when food processors and regulators alike are looking to increase food safety efforts, officials say. "The technology, and particularly as it's related to the food business, is of stunning significance," said Paul Repetto, chief executive officer of Crystal Diagnostics. Crystal Diagnostics unveiled its liquid crystal-based diagnostics test at a press briefing held at Kent State University, the Ohio-based institution where the technology was developed in partnership with Northeast Ohio Medical University five years earlier. Crystal Diagnostics is the exclusive licensee of the schools' patented liquid crystal biosensor technologies. Crystal Diagnostics hopes to commercialize the technology in the form of providing test kits to food producers and processors of all sizes, Repetto said. He added his firm has been in discussions with several undisclosed companies that have agreed to bring in the equipment and run the tests in tandem with other existing testing efforts -- some of which can take hours or days. If all goes as planned, Crystal Diagnostics could sell its first product by the third quarter of next year, he said. "We will focus on providing a very powerful new tool for processors to test with, while at the same time supporting what we believe will be an increase in the number and types of tests that might be required," he said.

Return to Top



News Headline: Smart phone technology adapted for foodborne pathogen detection | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Food Production Daily
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Breaking News on Food and Beverage Processing and Packaging Smart phone technology adapted for foodborne pathogen detection Post a comment By Mark Astley, 28-Oct-2011 A new food safety testing method using liquid crystals – a technology traditionally used in smart phones and televisions – is being developed with the aim of detecting multiple harmful foodborne pathogens in a single test. The technique, which offers significant time savings over current industry standard testing methods, is being developed by Crystal Diagnostics in conjunction with Kent State University and Northeast Ohio Medical University in the US. The Crystal Diagnostics MultiPath SystemTM, which has been in development since 2006, uses liquid crystals to detect multiple harmful pathogens such as Listeria, E.coli and Salmonella in a single test. The developer “expects the technology to become the standard of the food industry.” Evaluates multiple pathogens The company's chief scientist Dr. Gary Niehaus told FoodProductionDaily.com: “There is extensive interest by the food industry, with several negotiations currently on-going. Crystal Diagnostics' (CDx's) current interactions with the European market are limited but will significantly expand during the next few months.” “Thus, the food industry (safety and production) have expressed a great deal of interest in the technology.” The technology includes two pieces of equipment; a cassette containing five individual cells, two of which are control cells and three are test cells, and a reader. A prepared sample is mixed with liquid crystals and an antibody or antibody cocktail, for the specific pathogens being sought, and applied to the cassette. This is then inserted into the reader and if pathogens are present, the liquid crystal will be disrupted. The reader recognises the disruption and “simultaneously evaluates a single sample for multiple pathogens.” The nature of the technology significantly reduces false positives and negatives, which often require longer product holds while retesting is accomplished and a serious problem for food producers. Faster, reliable method Crystal Diagnostics CEO Paul Repetto said: “The need for faster yet highly reliable processes to detect pathogens has never been higher given the recent deadly food outbreaks.” Recent foodborne contaminations such as the cantaloupe-related Listeria outbreak, which to date has killed 28 people in the US, and the E.coli outbreak in Germany earlier this year, have created a higher level of awareness in the food sector. Repetto added: “This new technology can have a profound impact on public health.” The company intends to test the equipment in the field this autumn with leading food processing companies and laboratories before introducing it to the market in 2012. Dr. Niehaus added: “The beta testing will be conducted against Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, and Listeria. Subsequent work will focus on Campylobacter and other shiga-producing E. coli. The technology uses highly selective antibodies for detection and identification, thus any microbe can be detected by using an appropriate antibody.” This content is copyright protected However, if you would like to share the information in this article, you may use the headline, summary and link below: Copyright - Unless otherwise stated all contents of this web site are 2011 - William Reed Business Media SAS - All Rights Reserved - Full details for the use of materials on this site can be found in the Terms & Conditions Get more articles like this in your mailbox:

Return to Top



News Headline: USDA Announces Economic Development Funding | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Carolina-Virginia Farmer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: USDA Announces Economic Development Funding Grants will help create jobs in rural communities in 26 states. Compiled by staff Published: Oct 28, 2011 Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced the selection of 36 organizations in 26 states and the District of Columbia for grants to help rural cooperatives and small businesses expand, create jobs and strengthen their capacity to serve rural citizens and communities. Rural Housing Service Administrator Tammye TreviÑo announced the recipients on behalf of Secretary Vilsack. "These grants help cooperatives support local projects and initiatives that create jobs and improve rural economic conditions," Vilsack said. "As we celebrate National Cooperative Month, USDA is proud to continue its support of local and regional efforts to bolster these cooperatives and help them bring increased value and economic opportunity to rural residents." The grants are being provided through USDA Rural Development's Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. Under this program, grants of up to $225,000 may be awarded to colleges, universities and non-profit groups to create and operate centers that help individuals or groups establish, expand or operate rural businesses, especially cooperatives and mutually-owned businesses. Grants may be used to conduct feasibility studies, create and implement business plans, and help businesses develop new markets for their products and services. More than $7.9 million in economic development loans and grants were announced. A complete list of projects that were selected for funding is below. Funding for each project is contingent upon the recipient meeting the terms of the grant agreement. Alabama Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund: $191,504 grant to provide technical assistance, training and other business development services to minority farmers, ranchers, fisherman and rural communities throughout Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana to help develop new cooperatives and credit unions. Alaska University of Alaska-Anchorage: $225,000 grant to improve economic conditions in Alaska by working to establish new cooperatives and providing technical assistance to strengthen existing ones. Arkansas Winrock International: $224,993 grant to bolster the Arkansas Rural Enterprise Center by focusing on technical assistance, training, market development, business planning and innovation for cooperatives. California California Center for Cooperative Development: $225,000 grant to improve the business and economic conditions of targeted rural areas in California. Colorado Rocky Mountain Farmers Union Educational and Charitable Foundation: $225,000 grant to fund activities that focus on improving economic opportunities of rural communities in Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming. District of Columbia Cooperative League of the USA, dba National Cooperative Business Association: $225,000 grant to provide guidance, resources and technical assistance for organizing and operating successful cooperatives. Hawaii The Kohala Center: $224, 860 grant to provide technical services and education to stimulate rural economic development by strengthening the development of cooperatives. Indiana Indiana Cooperative Development Center, Inc.: $225,000 to support the efforts of the center to provide technical assistance to cooperatives and mutually-owned businesses, with an emphasis on local food systems, renewable energy development and child care cooperatives. Iowa Iowa State University: $225,000 grant to provide support to the Iowa Alliance for Cooperative Business Development, which focuses on developing alternative economic development strategies through applied research and outreach programs. Kentucky Kentucky Center for Agriculture and Rural Development: $225,000 to foster business success and growth in the state through technical assistance and educational opportunities. Massachusetts Cooperative Development Institute: $225,000 to build a cooperative economy in New England and New York by creating and developing cooperative enterprises and networks in the northeast region of the country. Michigan Michigan State University: $225,000 grant to provide financial support to comprehensive business development training and educational services to individuals and groups in rural areas seeking to organize or expand business cooperatives. Minnesota Latino Economic Development Center: $225,000 grant to provide cooperative development assistance to Latino residents in rural communities in the state. North Country Cooperative Foundation: $225,000 grant to support training and technical assistance that focuses on transforming the manufactured housing sector in the upper Midwest by replacing investor ownership with resident cooperative ownership. Food Co-Op Initiative: $225,000 grant to provide support that will enable faster and more efficient start-ups of new retail grocery cooperatives. Mississippi Mississippi Association of Cooperatives: $225,000 grant to improve the economic vitality of small and socially disadvantaged producers in economically distressed areas of Mississippi. Montana Lake County Community Development Corporation: $131,812 grant to help provide technical assistance and access to capital for new and expanding businesses in a four-county region and to the Flathead Indian Reservation in northwest Montana. Montana Cooperative Development Center, Inc: $225,000 grant to expand the capacity and geographical reach of the center as it provides assistance to rural communities in the state. New Mexico Capacity Builders, Inc.: $225,000 grant to establish the National Center for Rural and Tribal Cooperative Development, which will work to improve economic conditions of tribal areas. Center of Southwest Culture: $191,504 grant to provide technical assistance, training and instruction to preserve historical and cultural Indo-Hispanic communities. Nebraska University of Nebraska: $224, 995 grant to deliver customized technical assistance to groups that are developing cooperatives. North Carolina North Carolina State University: $225,000 grant to coordinate and facilitate technical and financial assistance to help farmers in North Carolina. North Dakota Common Enterprise Development: $225,000 grant to provide assistance and guidance to rural businesses for start-up, expansion and operational improvement, with an emphasis on tribal housing, health care, value-added agriculture, local and regional food systems and business conversions. North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives: $225,000 grant to provide technical assistance to new and expanding cooperatives, with an emphasis on rural cooperative housing, dairy production, processing, marketing and information sharing among cooperatives and external partners. Ohio Kent State University: $225,000 grant to provide assistance to small communities by transitioning small businesses to worker-owned cooperatives. National Network of Forest Practitioners: $225,000 grant to provide technical, business planning and development assistance to cooperatives that are working in wood-to-energy businesses. The Ohio State University Research Foundation: $224,783 grant to provide cooperatives with technical assistance, grants and training as they work to enhance economic development through cooperatives in Appalachian and rural areas of Ohio and west-central West Virginia. Pennsylvania Keystone Development Center, Inc.: $225,000 grant to support the formation and sustainability of rural-based cooperatives. South Dakota Value-Added Agriculture Development Center: $225,000 grant to improve economic conditions in rural South Dakota through the formation and expansion of cooperatives. Texas University of Texas-Pan American: $225,000 grant to improve economic conditions in rural Texas and New Mexico by helping new and expanding cooperatives. Virginia Cooperative Development Foundation: $225,000 grant to conduct research and outreach to meet the needs of senior citizens in rural areas of the country. Virginia Foundation for Agriculture, Innovation & Rural Sustainability: $225,000 grant to support the center in its work to help rural Virginians develop and advance their agricultural, economic and social interests. Washington Northwest Agriculture Business Center: $225,000 grant to improve the economic vitality of the agriculture industry within Island, San Juan, Skagit, Snohomish, and Whatcom counties through the development of business and cooperative services. Northwest Cooperative Development Center: $225,000 grant to improve the capacity of the center to provide responsive, consistent, quality assistance to cooperatives as they work to address economic needs of rural citizens. Wisconsin Cooperative Development Services, Inc.: $225,000 grant to continue to provide assistance to develop cooperatives in rural areas, with an emphasis on value-added agriculture, forestry, renewable energy, energy efficiency, senior housing and food co-op development services. Cooperative Network: $225,000 grant to establish the Great Lakes Cooperative Center to help develop new cooperative s in the upper Midwest. Permalink: Click here Tagged:

Return to Top



News Headline: Issue 2 affects all of us (Yantek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cincinnati Enquirer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Issue 2 affects all of us SB 5 could lower taxes, increase job competition 2:22 AM, Oct. 17, 2011 | Issue 2 directly affects 359,000 state, education and local government workers, or 6.5 percent of Ohio's 5.5 million work force. About 48 percent of them are covered by a labor agreement. But why should the rest of us, the vast majority of whom are not government workers, care? Here are some ways Issue 2 will affect you: • State and local taxes could decrease, giving you more money to spend or save. "Senate Bill 5 is a tool to lower (everyone's) taxes," said Matt A. Mayer, president of The Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions, a conservative think tank. • More Elections 2011 coverage That will happen, he and others have said, because Issue 2 gives local governments and school districts greater control over their budgets via labor negotiations, which will lower their costs. That, in turn, means they will not have to go to taxpayers as often seeking additional property or income taxes. SB 5 opponents counter that people's safety will be put at risk because the terms that can be negotiated by firefighters and police will be limited. They also contend taxes will go up because Republican legislators who passed SB 5 already added to Ohioans' tax burden by cutting state funding to education and local governments in the two-year state budget. That will force schools, counties, townships and municipalities to seek more money from local residents to maintain services. SB 5 has a "reasonable and relatively indirect effect on households through taxes," said Bruce Weinberg, a professor of economics at Ohio State University. "What is happening in Ohio, Wisconsin and many places is an assault on the middle class," said Jeffrey D. Sachs, a Columbia University economist and author of the recently released book The Price of Civilization. "What they are trying to do is everything possible to free up taxes on the richest people." • Competition for already scarce jobs could increase because of government layoffs. "It's a reshuffling of the cards," Weinberg said. "It could spill into the private sector, and there could be an effective weakening of bargaining rights for other (non-government) people. There could be a trickle-down or a trickle-up effect." The trickle-down effect occurs if there are fewer government employees, making competition for private sector jobs keener. A trickle-up effect occurs if government outsources more functions to the private sector, which could create jobs. For example, Butler County this week announced the layoff of 50 union and non-union employees from its Department of Job and Family Services. Thom Yantek, an associate professor of political science at Kent State University, said history shows that when workers in the private sector have more rights to negotiate contracts, the income disparity between the rich and poor is less. He called SB 5 "heavy-handed." • Local businesses could see their income decline if government workers have less to spend. There could be positive or negative consequences on private businesses that supply materials to government, depending on whether they receive more or fewer orders. Those businesses that benefit from having government employees nearby, such as eateries, could lose business if the number of public employees or their buying power declines. "There's a consumption side of the story here if state employees have less to spend and whether that is offset by the savings reduction that goes to taxpayers," Weinberg said. "Hopefully, taxpayers have a little bit more money that they can spend." • Private sector jobs could increase if state and local governments outsource work they used to handle. There will be winners and losers, Weinberg said. "My sense is that government employees are a bit nervous. It won't be just a redistribution (of money) between one group of state employees to another group of state employees. There is some concern that the size of the pie to government employees is going to shrink." The end result of how Issue 2 will affect Ohioans will come only after voters decide which way they want to go. "If you get a bunch of public economists together, they will debate until everyone is blue to what extent, if and when do you cut taxes," Weinberg said. "It's an unresolved issue. You get the academic equivalent of (the) Jerry Springer (show)." More In News Email this article

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Professor Speaks | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Author, Kent State University professor and psychologist Paula Hartman-
Stein spoke recently to the Kent Area Orthographic Society and community
members at the Kent Free Library. Hartman-Stein founded KAOS, which is
a group of seniors who meet to discuss vocabulary words and practice to compete
in local and national spelling bees. Her latest book, “Enhancing Cognitive Fitness
in Adults,” includes a chapter about the group and about the benefits of mental
exercises, such as spelling. From left are Dr. Paula Hartman-Stein with original
KAOS members Dotty Kosinski and Barbara Richards. KAOS meets the second
Friday of each month at the Kent Free Library.

Return to Top



News Headline: 14 Health Worries Not to Fret Over | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Everyday Health
Contact Name: Jill Provost
News OCR Text: Facebook addiction! Germs lurking on every public surface! Pesticides on your favorite produce! These health threats sound scary, but top experts reveal why they're not worth freaking out over.

One day, you hear that vitamin D protects against cancer. The next, researchers say the supplement could increase the risk of death. Some doctors advocate a few minutes of unprotected sun exposure every day. Others say don't even think about stepping outside without sunscreen. It seems like every day we're bombarded by information that makes healthy living sound harder than it needs to be. According to Alice Domar, MD, co-author of Live a Little! Breaking the Rules Won't Break Your Health, healthy habits should contribute to — not distract you from — your enjoyment of life.

That's why Dr. Domar believes in being “pretty healthy” instead of perfectly so. If you're damned if you do, and damned if you don't, you're more likely to just throw your hands in the air and say, “Why bother? I might as well leave my health up to chance.” Or you might go in the opposite direction and become a bit of a hypochondriac. But neither is a good, long-term health strategy. Here, experts reveal 15 common health worries that you really shouldn't sweat — and how to approach them more sanely.

Germs Are Everywhere!

Don't worry: You slather yourself in hand sanitizer and shoot dirty looks at anyone who sneezes in your direction. But all the hand washing in the world won't keep you entirely germ-free. According to Philip Tierno, PhD, author of The Secret Life of Germs, microbes are everywhere — and they're supposed to be. Although headlines may scream about dirty toilet seats or keyboards, Dr. Tierno says that only 1 to 2 percent of the microorganisms you encounter on a regular basis are potentially harmful. Many even help keep you healthy.

Be healthy: According to Tierno, you don't have to wash your hands every time you touch a doorknob. Clean them — ideally with soap and water, or an alcohol-based sanitizer if you can't get to a sink — after using the bathroom, before eating, and before touching your face, he says.

My Family Tree Is Riddled With Disease

Don't worry: With recent headlines linking faulty genes to diabetes and skin cancer — two diseases that we associate with bad health habits — it might feel like there's nothing you can do to outsmart your DNA. But your genes play little or no role in 95 percent of all diseases, according to Muin Khoury, MD, PhD, director of the National Office of Public Health Genomics at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And your lifestyle and environment play a major role in whether certain genes — like the genetic variant 9p21, a major marker for heart disease — get activated or remain dormant. In general, one immediate family member with heart disease, cancer, or type 2 diabetes doubles your own risk for that condition, but that's not a guarantee you'll get it yourself.

Be healthy: A 2009 study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that maintaining a healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes by a whopping 80 percent. Not smoking, having a healthy weight, exercising regularly, and eating a diet rich in whole grains, fruits and veggies, and lean protein, and low in saturated fat, red meat, and refined grains and sugar can go a long way to keeping you healthy.

I Can't Stand My Saddlebags

Don't worry: A little padding might actually be good for you, says Domar, who points to studies that suggest women who live the longest are those whose BMIs are in the "overweight" category. And all fat is not created equal. A review in the International Journal of Obesity found that extra weight in the rear or thighs might actually protect against heart disease and diabetes. Superficial fat that causes cellulite isn't as dangerous as belly fat that accumulates around organs, which produces hormones that can boost blood pressure and bad cholesterol.

Be healthy: There's skinny and then there's healthy. Researchers found that as long as your BMI is under 27.4, your weight isn't likely to cause health problems that could steal years from your life. If you're more apple- than pear-shaped, shed that extra layer by getting active. Vigorous exercise, like running 15 to 20 miles a week, is best for burning belly fat, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center. As for the stubborn ripples on your thighs? “You will never love your cellulite,” says Domar. “Instead, remember that we all have flaws. Focus on the parts of your body you do like.”

I'm Afraid of Bed Bugs

Don't worry: Thinking about canceling your trip to the Big Apple because of bed bug infestations? Though there has been a resurgence of the creepy critters, it is absolutely no reason not to travel, insists Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for the National Pest Management Association. “The overwhelming majority of people who travel don't encounter bed bugs,” she explains. Even though bed bugs have a huge ick factor, an infestation is treatable. And, unlike other pests, there's no evidence that they're able to spread disease.

Be healthy: Taking a few precautions while traveling can greatly reduce your risk. Before booking a hotel, call ahead and ask about their bed bug policy. “A hotel that's proactive with a regular inspection program will offer some level of protection,” says Henriksen. Upon arriving, put your belongings in the bathroom while you poke around. Pull back the sheets and look for the bugs (they look like apple seeds) or flecks of dried blood and excrement, which resemble pepper flakes.

I Can't Afford Fancy Superfoods. How Will I Get Antioxidants?

Don't worry: According to the American Dietetic Association, it's more important to eat a super overall diet than any particular superfood. And all the acai, goji berries, and pomegranates in the world won't protect you from cancer and heart disease if your plate is also loaded with burgers, hot dogs, and pizza. “You can't expect one particular nutrient to give maximum protection,” explains Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of Eat to Live. “Foods work together to maximize immune function, improve health, and prevent chronic disease.”

Be healthy: As long as you're eating a diet that's rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, it doesn't matter how many exotic antioxidant superstars are in your cupboard. Some of the healthiest foods around also happen to be some of the cheapest — think brown rice, black beans, garlic, oatmeal, and leafy greens.

I Have a (Water) Drinking Problem!

Don't worry: You dutifully tote yourwater bottle from your house to your car to your office — it's a more loyal companion than your dog. Even though you may gulp down 64 ounces of water a day, bladder be damned, there is no scientific evidence that you need at least eight glasses of agua, according to Heinz Valtin, MD, a retired Dartmouth Medical School professor who spent 45 years studying human hydration. Though you do need close to 64 ounces of water daily, you get much of it from food and other liquids.

Be healthy: Most healthy people will stay hydrated by using thirst as a guide. Those with certain conditions, like recurrent kidney stones or bladder infections, may need more water. Soaring temperatures, high humidity, and physical activity can also up your need for liquid. A telltale sign that you're well-hydrated: the color of your urine. If it's light yellow or clear, consider yourself healthy.

I'll Look Like an Idiot if I Mess Up

Don't worry: Perfectionist thinking can make you reluctant to try new things or take risks, which may ultimately keep you from getting what you really want, says psychologist Robert Leahy, PhD, author of Beat the Blues Before They Beat You. Just ask Noelle Hancock, who says she used to spend every day saying no until she decided to embark on a year-long project to overcome her fears by doing one thing a day that scared her. She chronicled her experience in the book My Year With Eleanor, named for Eleanor Roosevelt, who once said “Do one thing every day that scares you.”

“There's very little that I'm afraid to try now,” says Hancock. “If I had to choose the top 10 best moments of my life so far, five or six of them occurred during that one year. I think about how easily I could've missed those moments, and that inspires me to keep going when I'm afraid,” she explains.

Be healthy: If fear of failure has you in a rut, Hancock recommends taking small risks first. “Overcoming a fear doesn't have to be a life-threatening, adrenaline-pumping event. It can be as simple as speaking up in a work meeting. Taking on little challenge gives you the confidence to face bigger ones later on,” she says.

I Have an Unhealthy Relationship With Facebook

Don't worry: According to technology psychologist Larry Rosen, PhD, author of Rewired, social media is not rotting your brain or ruining your or your kids' relationships. “ and Twitter help us interact with the world. They make us less shy and more honest,” he says. Rather than keeping us from reaching out to our friends, they simply provide another avenue of communication. Research from Kent State University found that having a lot of Facebook friends and posting regularly boosts people's self-esteem and mental health.

Be healthy: Using social media frequently isn't a cause for concern, but checking your pages constantly is. “We found that some people are on Facebook literally all the time. No matter what they're doing, they have to check Facebook. If you are always thinking about Facebook, and checking it on your phone every time someone comments on your status, it's going to consume you,” says Rosen, who likens it to obsessive-compulsive behavior. Rather than having it in the background at all times, set aside dedicated Facebook time, like once every couple of hours.

My Veggies Are Coated With Pesticides

Don't worry: Don't shun vegetables just because you can't afford to buy organic — the health benefits of produce far outweigh risks of pesticide exposure. In fact, according to University of California, Berkeley biochemistry professor Bruce N. Ames, PhD., who developed a tool that detects carcinogens in chemicals, there are more natural carcinogens in a cup of coffee than there are in a year's worth of pesticide-treated produce. That's not to say that pesticides are good for you. But the amount of pesticides that you ingest from 5 to 10 servings of veggies a day are not likely to cause cancer. On the other hand, eating a diet completely devoid of produce could.

Be healthy: Whether produce is organic or not, you should always clean it before eating. Not only will this remove a fair share of pesticide residue, it can also help reduce the risk of food-borne illnesses, like salmonella and E. coli. Wash produce under running water; soaking it could actually spread bacteria to other areas of the fruit or vegetable. Scrub firm produce like apples and cucumbers with a clean produce brush.

Brain-Eating Amoebas Might Kill Me

Don't worry: In case you missed the headlines this past summer, a fresh-water parasite known as Naegleria fowleri infected and killed three people. Found in warm water, the amoeba doesn't seek out humans, but if it does get inside someone, the amoeba acts as a parasite and destroys the person's brain. A 9-year-old Virginia boy and a 16-year-old Florida girl contracted it while swimming, while the third victim — a Louisiana man in his early twenties — got the parasite when he used tap water to rinse his sinuses with a neti pot. These killer amoebas are not new. In fact, they claim a handful of lives every year. But your chances of contracting one are incredibly rare — about 1 in 10 million. In other words, you stand a greater chance of getting hit by lightning and almost as good a chance at winning the lottery.

Be healthy: First, know where these parasites live: in warm (80 degrees or higher), stagnant, freshwater ponds, rivers, and lakes. Second, the parasites have to be forced up into the nasal cavity — where they gain access to the brain — to be dangerous. There's no risk associated with getting them in your eyes, on your skin, or swallowing them. The best way to avoid them is to wear a nose plug. For those who use neti pots, use bottled, distilled water.

High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Making Me Sick

Don't worry: The super-sweetener has been blamed for everything from obesity, heart disease, and diabetes to cancer and even autism. While it's a good idea to limit your intake of added sugars like high-fructose corn syrup, well-respected hospitals and health experts at the Mayo Clinic and the American Heart Association and Marion Nestle, PhD, professor of nutrition and public health at New York University, say there is little evidence to suggest high-fructose corn syrup is worse for you than any other type of sweetener. In fact, it's almost identical in chemical composition to table sugar, and many studies suggest that the body breaks them down in exactly the same way.

Be healthy: Don't be fooled into thinking organic cookies made with evaporated cane juice are any better for you than conventional ones made with high-fructose corn syrup. It's best to cut back on all types of added sugar — high-fructose corn syrup included. AHA guidelines advise women to keep added sugar under 6 teaspoons (or 25 grams) daily. By comparison, one can of soda contains roughly 9 teaspoons. But it's not just junk food you have to look out for. Sneaky sources of added sugar include pasta sauce, cereal, condiments like barbecue sauce and ketchup, and flavored yogurt.

My Biological Clock Is Ticking Like a Time Bomb!

Don't worry: Fretting over headlines like, “Women urged to freeze eggs before 30,” and “Blood type linked to earlier decline in fertility,” won't do any good, says Domar, a pioneer in mind-body medicine for infertility. Although age is one of the biggest factors that affects infertility, especially in women, medical interventions have come a long way. According to Domar, the majority of couples with infertility will have a baby with professional treatment. A 2009 study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that women under 40 who were treated with up to six cycles of in vitro fertilization had a success rate between 65 percent and 86 percent. For those age 40 and older, the birth rate was 23 percent to 42 percent.

Be healthy: “If you're seeing a top-notch fertility specialist and your health habits are good, worrying about everything else won't help,” says Domar. In fact, managing stress could improve your ability to get pregnant. According to a recent study Domar authored in the journal Fertility and Sterility, mind-body stress reduction programs more than doubled pregnancy rates in couples undergoing IVF. To boost your odds of conceiving, don't smoke, limit your alcohol and caffeine intake, exercise regularly (which will also help with stress), and stay within a normal body weight (being overweight and underweight can make getting pregnant harder).

Wheat and Gluten Will Give Me Celiac Disease

Don't worry: Blamed for everything from bad skin to poor concentration, gluten — a protein found in wheat, barley and rye — is getting a bad rap these days. For the 2 million Americans with celiac disease, even a tiny amount of gluten can trigger an immune system attack on the intestines, which can result in malnutrition, osteoporosis, and other serious health problems. Certain other people have gluten sensitivity, which isn't as serious, but can lead to uncomfortable symptoms like abdominal cramping, bloating, and headaches. But gluten is perfectly safe for everyone else, and gluten-free diets are not healthier. In fact, many gluten substitutes, like tapioca and starch, are virtually devoid of nutrients. Banishing wheat, rye, and barley from your diet deprives you of healthful whole grains.

Be healthy: If you suspect that gluten is to blame for your intestinal woes, see your physician to rule out other conditions that may mimic celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. In order for your doctor to run tests for these conditions, you must have gluten in your system. If you stop eating gluten beforehand, the test could yield a false negative result.

I'm Not Burning Enough Calories

Don't worry: You love speed walking on the treadmill, but feel guilty because the runners around you are dripping sweat and torching a gazillion calories. No wonder you can't lose weight! “This kind of thinking can make exercise feel like a chore,” says trainer Harley Pasternak, bestselling author of Five Factor Diet and host of The Revolution on ABC. What's more important is finding a workout that you enjoy, so you'll do it regularly, says Pasternak, who is not a fan of what he describes as “all-out yelling, screaming boot-camp cardio. You feel exhausted afterward, you burn yourself out, and it's not something that can be part of your daily routine.”

Be healthy: Choose a recreational hobby, like tennis, biking, or walking. Pasternak's mantra: Make it meditative or make it enjoyable. Grab a fitness partner, zone out to the TV, or walk on nature trails or in a cute shopping district. Remember, 30 minutes of daily walking will burn more calories overall than a class that you can handle only once a week.

Return to Top



News Headline: Research on Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety Recently Featured (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name: About Dr. Angela Neal
News OCR Text: Many times described as a case of bad nerves, the issues of anxiety and fear among Black women have a social stigma that has made treatment more difficult. A recent article, Sister Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious Black Women, describes the research of Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett and her team on the healing effect of Sister Circles. The article was featured in CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE in the September, 2011* issue.

"We outline the countless studies and research proving a correlation between anxiety and performance and the benefit of community as an intervention tool," explained Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, award-winning psychologist and associate professor at Kent State University. "Through the use of Sister Circles in my research with African American women dealing with anxiety, fear and panic, we have been able to develop an intervention that can help offer an answer for this problem."

Particularly effective in the treatment of professional African American women, Sister Circle interventions address key elements with culturally infused aspects that include the use of song, community support and faith combined with cognitive behavior therapy. A Sister Circle is defined as a "subset of women embedded within an existing Black women's organization who share an existing concern related to anxiety and fear."

The article explains two exercises developed by Dr. Neal-Barnett and her team using music and a call and response method already prevalent in African American communities which are used as a form of cognitive restructuring. The So What Chorus and the Build Your Own Theme Song (BYOTS), work as a musical intervention in decreasing anxiety symptoms in members of the Sister Circle.

Often Black women avoid addressing their anxiety issues out of a fear of appearing less productive or valuable both in the work environment and within their own community. The article offers valuable information proving the benefits of participating in a supportive environment like a Sister Circle as a means of invention in a culturally relevant way.

Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett is a national award winning psychologist, professor, author, and leading expert on anxiety disorders among African Americans. She is a sought-after workshop presenter and speaker, and the author of the best-selling book "Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman's Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, Panic and Fear," published by Fireside/Simon and Schuster. Currently a tenured member of the psychology faculty at Kent State University, she directs the Program for Research on Anxiety Disorders among African Americans. Dr. Neal-Barnett's work focuses on fears and social anxiety in African American children as well as panic disorder and worry in African American adults. For more information, visit http://www.SootheYourNerves.com or call 330-608-1937.

* Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett et al. Sister Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious Black Women http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-2850.2011.01258.x/abstrac

Return to Top



News Headline: Students sentenced for KSU robbery: Pair admit their role in hold-up on campus | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two Kent State University students recently were sentenced in Portage County Common Pleas Court for their roles in the armed robbery of two fellow students in February.
Paris O. Millberry and Andrew R. Scott, both 20, admitted this summer they helped University of Akron student John R. Blackmon, 21, rob two other KSU students in the parking lot of Harbourt Hall near the campus Ice Arena.
Millberry, a Canton resident, will serve no more time behind bars after being sentenced by Judge John Enlow to 120 days in the Portage County jail, with credit for 120 days already served awaiting trial. He faced a maximum of three years in prison.
Enlow imposed three years probation on Millberry, with monitoring transferred to Stark County. Enlow also ordered Millberry to undergo random substance abuse testing, treatment if necessary and find a full-time job.
Scott, a Norton resident, pleaded guilty to complicity to robbery, a third-degree felony. Enlow recently ordered him to serve 90 days in the Portage County jail starting Friday with work release privileges. Following that, Enlow said Scott will spend three years on probation and undergo random substance abuse testing and treatment if necessary.
Millberry, Scott and Blackmon — who brandished a .40-caliber handgun at the victims — took a cell phone worth $150, a wallet and $10 in cash, according to KSU police.
Blackmon pleaded guilty in July to aggravated robbery, a first-degree felony, and was sentenced by Enlow to four years in prison.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Students Plead Guilty to Forgery Charges | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The trial of two former Kent State University students charged in a fake ID sting came to an end Friday.

Antonino Bucca, 21, and Drew Patenaude, 21, both pleaded guilty to three counts of misdemeanor forgery charges in the Portage County Court of Common Pleas Friday morning.

The two were each originally charged with three counts of felony forgery, three counts of felony identity fraud and three counts of telecommunications fraud. All were fifth degree felonies, which means both men were facing maximum sentences of up to three years in prison.

Bucca and Patenaude were arrested in March by the Kent Police for trying to bring 90 fake IDs from China into the country. Federal Border Patrol Officers caught the package coming through customs. According to Kent Police, the two students intended to distribute the IDs to other students at the university. At the time, both students were 20 years old.

In April, Kent State threw both students out of college and banned them from entering campus. Bucca now attends the University of Akron but continues to reside in Kent.

Portage County Common Pleas Judge Laurie Pittman told the defendants that the maximum possible sentence for each of the first degree misdemeanors they are now convicted of is 180 days in jail and a $1,000 fine.

They were not sentenced Friday, and how much time, if any, will be served by either student has yet to be determined.

Before their hearing started, Bucca and Patenaude sat quietly in the courtroom dressed in suits with their families. They each signed documents confirming their intent to plead guilty and waited for the judge.

Patenaude plead first. Pittman ordered his case be turned over for an investigation and sentencing reccommendation from the Portage County Adult Probation Office in Ravenna. She continued his bond, allowing him to remain free.

After Patenaude left the courtroom, Bucca stood before Pittman and, in a quiet voice, pleaded guilty to all three counts. He was also ordered to have an investigation into appropriate sentencing.

Bucca learned of his plea agreement earlier this month, and tweeted, "Just got some amazing news. Now I know how Casey Anthony felt. Happiest day of my life."

The court will set a date for sentencing in the next few days. It is anticipated to be in about four to five weeks.

Return to Top



News Headline: KENT, Ohio - Halloween party Saturday night | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Most of the arrests were the result of fighting and there was only one hospitalization reported.

Officials were expecting around 20,000 people at the annual Halloween celebration near the Kent State Campus.

Police were in full force patrolling the area and watching out for underage drinkers.

Return to Top



News Headline: Fewer Assaults, No Felony Arrests at KSU Halloween Bashes | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Maria Scali Fox
News OCR Text: 8:42 p.m. EDT, October 30, 2011

It was a Halloween good time over the weekend at Kent State.

While there was some trouble, police said there were not as many arrests as years past.

An estimated 20,000 people converged on the college town Saturday night.

Kent Police said they were assisted by neighboring departments, the Portage County sheriff's office and the Ohio Highway Patrol, putting more than a hundred officers on the street for crowd control.

From his home on College Avenue near the campus, Kent State senior Scott Martin said the Halloween revelers got crazy at times.

"People everywhere. Really wild. People just walking all around through the front yards and the streets. It was crazy," Martin said.

Twenty-one people were arrested, but Kent Police Sgt. Sam Todd said there were twice as many arrested last year. He said there were fewer assaults and no felony arrests this year. Those arrested are facing charges of underage drinking and disorderly conduct.

But the fire department had to respond to several alcohol related incidents.

"Kids excessive drinking, possible alcohol poisoning, those type of things. They did take a few people, I believe, to the hospital," Sgt. Todd said.

Those arrested are to be arraigned in Kent Municipal Court later this week.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent: Fewer arrests at this year's Halloween bash | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- Fewer arrests were made this year at Kent's Halloween party, according to Kent Police.

They tell us not as many people showed up at this year's Halloween bash. Kent Police expected and prepared for anywhere around 20,000 people.

Police only made 21 arrests, down from last years 53. Most of the arrests this year were due to fights. One person was taken to the hospital

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011-12 production season with "A Chorus Line."

Directed by Terri Kent and choreographed by MaryAnn Black, the show will run from Nov. 4 through 13 in the E. Turner Stump Theatre at 1325 Theatre Drive in the Music and Speech Center.

Black offers an authentic point-of-view because she played the role of Maggie in the first national tour of A Chorus Line at the Schubert Theatre in Los Angeles and performed on Broadway when it became the longest running American show on Broadway.

To order tickets call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning production, originally directed and choreographed by Michael Bennett, follows 17 Broadway dancers hoping to land a place in a chorus line. The dancers are asked to describe themselves to the director in order to get a role. This collection of background stories, hopes and dreams is told through 12 songs and 19 lead roles. The book is by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban and music by Marvin Hamlisch.

The show will feature a special performance by professional actor Jim Weaver who has appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo).

"The audience will identify with the hopes and dreams of aspiring young professionals -- those hopes and dreams transcend all careers even though this is specific to Musical Theatre," said Kent. "What is interesting about our production is that MaryAnn Black was in ACL on Broadway. She was with the show originally in California. She is recreating the original choreography."

Shows run Tuesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497. The box office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash.

Tickets are $8 students, $14 faculty, staff and alumni association members, $12 for seniors 60 and older, and $16 for adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011-12 production season with "A Chorus Line."

Directed by Terri Kent and choreographed by MaryAnn Black, the show will run from Nov. 4 through 13 in the E. Turner Stump Theatre at 1325 Theatre Drive in the Music and Speech Center.

Black offers an authentic point-of-view because she played the role of Maggie in the first national tour of A Chorus Line at the Schubert Theatre in Los Angeles and performed on Broadway when it became the longest running American show on Broadway.

To order tickets call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning production, originally directed and choreographed by Michael Bennett, follows 17 Broadway dancers hoping to land a place in a chorus line. The dancers are asked to describe themselves to the director in order to get a role. This collection of background stories, hopes and dreams is told through 12 songs and 19 lead roles. The book is by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban and music by Marvin Hamlisch.

The show will feature a special performance by professional actor Jim Weaver who has appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo).

"The audience will identify with the hopes and dreams of aspiring young professionals -- those hopes and dreams transcend all careers even though this is specific to Musical Theatre," said Kent. "What is interesting about our production is that MaryAnn Black was in ACL on Broadway. She was with the show originally in California. She is recreating the original choreography."

Shows run Tuesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497. The box office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash.

Tickets are $8 students, $14 faculty, staff and alumni association members, $12 for seniors 60 and older, and $16 for adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011-12 production season with "A Chorus Line."

Directed by Terri Kent and choreographed by MaryAnn Black, the show will run from Nov. 4 through 13 in the E. Turner Stump Theatre at 1325 Theatre Drive in the Music and Speech Center.

Black offers an authentic point-of-view because she played the role of Maggie in the first national tour of A Chorus Line at the Schubert Theatre in Los Angeles and performed on Broadway when it became the longest running American show on Broadway.

To order tickets call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning production, originally directed and choreographed by Michael Bennett, follows 17 Broadway dancers hoping to land a place in a chorus line. The dancers are asked to describe themselves to the director in order to get a role. This collection of background stories, hopes and dreams is told through 12 songs and 19 lead roles. The book is by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban and music by Marvin Hamlisch.

The show will feature a special performance by professional actor Jim Weaver who has appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo).

"The audience will identify with the hopes and dreams of aspiring young professionals -- those hopes and dreams transcend all careers even though this is specific to Musical Theatre," said Kent. "What is interesting about our production is that MaryAnn Black was in ACL on Broadway. She was with the show originally in California. She is recreating the original choreography."

Shows run Tuesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497. The box office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash.

Tickets are $8 students, $14 faculty, staff and alumni association members, $12 for seniors 60 and older, and $16 for adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

Return to Top



News Headline: Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/30/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will stage “A Chorus Line” Nov. 4 through 13. Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011-12 production season with "A Chorus Line." Directed by Terri Kent and choreographed by MaryAnn Black, the show will run from Nov. 4 through 13 in the E. Turner Stump Theatre at 1325 Theatre Drive in the Music and Speech Center. Black offers an authentic point-of-view because she played the role of Maggie in the first national tour of A Chorus Line at the Schubert Theatre in Los Angeles and performed on Broadway when it became the longest running American show on Broadway. To order tickets call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu . The Pulitzer Prize-winning production, originally directed and choreographed by Michael Bennett, follows 17 Broadway dancers hoping to land a place in a chorus line. The dancers are asked to describe themselves to the director in order to get a role. This collection of background stories, hopes and dreams is told through 12 songs and 19 lead roles. The book is by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban and music by Marvin Hamlisch. The show will feature a special performance by professional actor Jim Weaver who has appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes and dreams of aspiring young professionals -- those hopes and dreams transcend all careers even though this is specific to Musical Theatre," said Kent. "What is interesting about our production is that MaryAnn Black was in ACL on Broadway. She was with the show originally in California. She is recreating the original choreography." Shows run Tuesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497. The box office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash. Tickets are $8 students, $14 faculty, staff and alumni association members, $12 for seniors 60 and older, and $16 for adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus