Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Alumni (3)
Alumni; Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Athletics (3)
Business and Finance; Global Education (1)
Career and Community Studies Transition Program (1)
Higher Education (1)
History (4)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Theatre and Dance (2)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (3)
Two motorists spot fire at Kent house, pull burned woman to safety 11/02/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...their way to visit Mellott at the hospital when they paused to share their story. "We weren't trying to be heroes, by any means," said Atkins, a 2010 Kent State University graduate. "We were just in the moment. We knew we were the first ones there and if someone was in that house, we needed to do...

Two motorists spot fire at Kent house, pull burned woman to safety 11/02/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...their way to visit Mellott at the hospital when they paused to share their story. "We weren't trying to be heroes, by any means," said Atkins, a 2010 Kent State University graduate. "We were just in the moment. We knew we were the first ones there and if someone was in that house, we needed to do...

Devo 11/03/2011 KGOR 99.9 Text Attachment Email

...of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead...


Alumni; Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
VIDEO: Kent: Two brave flames to rescue retired KSU prof 11/03/2011 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email


Athletics (3)
Media select Kent State as MAC's best in men's basketball (Senderoff) 11/03/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

MAC basketball notebook: Kent State picked to win league basketball title; UA second (Senderoff) 11/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Media picks KSU to win MAC men's basketball title (Senderoff) 11/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Business and Finance; Global Education (1)
Business notes: Nov. 2, 2011 - LOCAL BUSINESS IRS offers program in Kent 11/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Career and Community Studies Transition Program (1)
DISABLED YOUNG ADULTS GAIN INDEPENDENCE THROUGH KENT STATE'S TRANSITION PROGRAM 11/02/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Nov.2 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: This past August, a new program was implemented at Kent State University...


Higher Education (1)
Kent State, medical college could merge 11/02/2011 BizJournals.com Text Attachment Email

A private medical school in northeast could be on the verge of a merger with Kent State University, Crain's Cleveland Business reports. The Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine is entertaining the possibility of a merger...


History (4)
Legal scholars say KSU professor was harsh but exercised right to free speech (Lefton, Bindas, Vincent) 11/02/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Nov. 02--Kent State has received dozens of calls and emails urging it to fire or curb a faculty member who shouted "Death to Israel" at a public meeting last...

Offensive words 11/03/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Offensive words November 02,2011 10:52 PM GMT Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Julio Pino plays the role of provocateur. The associate professor of history at Kent State University performed recently at a public lecture delivered by a former Israeli diplomat. The two sparred, an angry Pino charged...

SPME Commends Kent State President, Admonishes AAUP President (Lefton) 11/02/2011 PR Newswire - Online Text Attachment Email

.../PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, an international grass roots academic network of more than 50,000 academics on 4,000 campuses, commends Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton but admonishes American Association of University Professors (AAUP) President Cary Nelson for...

SPME Commends Kent State President, Admonishes AAUP President (Lefton) 11/02/2011 Digital Journal Text Attachment Email

.../PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, an international grass roots academic network of more than 50,000 academics on 4,000 campuses, commends Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton but admonishes American Association of University Professors (AAUP) President Cary Nelson for...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Atwood Lodge terms called "favorable" (Andrews) 11/03/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...he told The Times-Reporter on Wednesday. The MWCD has offered to donate the facility, which has been closed for more than a year, to Carroll County, Kent State University at Tuscarawas or the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. ODNR has already formally declined the offer. Carroll County...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
PROJECT SEEKS PRIMARY-CAREGIVING GRANDMOTHERS FOR KENT STATE STUDY (Feldman, Smith) 11/02/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Nov.2 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Project C.O.P.E.(Caring for Others as a Positive Experience) is looking for grandmothers...


Pan-African Studies (1)
My Town: African Community Theatre Presents Comedy Folktale at Kent State 11/02/2011 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

7:19 p.m. EDT, November 2, 2011 Kent State's African Community Theatre presents its first production of the 2011-2012 season, Stagolee, November 11-13 and 18-20 in Oscar Ritchie...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Get in LINE (Kent) 11/03/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) 11/03/2011 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes and...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
Vietnamese children's art touches Valley children 11/02/2011 AZCentral.com Text Attachment Email

...for Vietnam vets, so he started working closely with the museum to see if he could borrow the work and create a traveling exhibition," Hales said. Kent State University, site of anti-war protests where four students were shot fatally in 1970 by the Ohio National Guard, was chosen as the...


News Headline: Two motorists spot fire at Kent house, pull burned woman to safety | Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: Nov. 02--An 81-year-old Kent woman was rescued from her blazing house Monday night by a couple of motorists who spotted the flames and stopped to investigate.

Kent Fire Chief Jim Williams said it is likely that Jared Atkins and Paul Marschik saved the life of Constance Mellott when they pulled the badly burned woman through a door that had been blocked by debris.

"Although [the house] was close to the station, even the two to three minutes it took us to get there, she could have been in much worse condition," said Williams, who hopes to recognize the men at a Kent City Council meeting this month.

Mellott is being treated in the burn unit of Akron Children's Hospital. Williams said he has been unable to speak to her.

"We typically investigate with the insurance company, but at this point we don't even know who her insurance company is," Williams said, "so it will be a while before we have a cause or damage estimate."

Mellott has no known relatives in the area, which is also slowing the investigation, Williams said.

Tuesday afternoon, Atkins and Marschik were on their way to visit Mellott at the hospital when they paused to share their story.

"We weren't trying to be heroes, by any means," said Atkins, a 2010 Kent State University graduate. "We were just in the moment. We knew we were the first ones there and if someone was in that house, we needed to do something right now or they weren't going to get out."

Atkins and Marschik, both 23, had spent the evening at the movies and had just dropped a friend off in Kent and hopped in their respective cars for the drive home about 9 p.m.

They hadn't driven far when Marschik spotted flames through the second-floor windows at 221 Columbus St. and waved for his friend to pull over.

The pair ran to the home, Marschik dialing 911 while Atkins pounded on doors and windows while calling out to see if there were occupants inside.

Atkins said glass windows started popping from the heat and he had to dodge falling debris as he rounded the house looking for other entry points.

At a side door, he found Mellott half way out of the house but wedged in the frame because something was stopping the door from opening far enough for her to escape.

"She was calling for help. I could see she was badly burned," Atkins said.

Atkins called to Marschik and the pair kicked the door open. Atkins then took over the 911 call while Marschik carried the woman across the street to safety.

As soon as the door was opened, oxygen fueled the fire and the house was engulfed, Marschik said.

"We just wanted to get her as far away as we could," Marschik said.

Marschik ran to his friend's house to get blankets to cover Mellott while Atkins flagged down the firetrucks to help them pinpoint the house on a street now filled with black smoke.

Coincidentally, Marschik has an associate's degree in fire protection from the University of Akron, is a certified EMT and has signed up for medic classes as he works toward his paramedic certification.

"All the training I've had, I've been around certain situations," Marschik said, "but nothing that personal, and not being a first responder."

Mellott told the men she had several cats. Their fate is unknown, but Atkins said he spotted a couple of cats hanging around the house when he stopped there again on Tuesday.

KentWired, an online KSU publication, said Mellott is emeritus professor of the School of Library and Information Science.

Paula Schleis can be reached at 330-996-3741 or pschleis@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/paulaschleis.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Two motorists spot fire at Kent house, pull burned woman to safety | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 Two motorists spot fire at Kent house, pull burned woman to safety By Paula Schleis Beacon Journal staff writer Published: November 2, 2011 - 12:46 AM Two motorists spot fire at Kent house, pull burned woman to safety November 02,2011 12:46 AM GMT Paula Schleis Beacon Journal Publishing Co. An 81-year-old Kent woman was rescued from her blazing house Monday night by a couple of motorists who spotted the flames and stopped to investigate. Kent Fire Chief Jim Williams said it is likely that Jared Atkins and Paul Marschik saved the life of Constance Mellott when they pulled the badly burned woman through a door that had been blocked by debris. "Although [the house] was close to the station, even the two to three minutes it took us to get there, she could have been in much worse condition," said Williams, who hopes to recognize the men at a Kent City Council meeting this month. Mellott is being treated in the burn unit of Akron Children's Hospital. Williams said he has been unable to speak to her. "We typically investigate with the insurance company, but at this point we don't even know who her insurance company is," Williams said, "so it will be a while before we have a cause or damage estimate." Mellott has no known relatives in the area, which is also slowing the investigation, Williams said. Tuesday afternoon, Atkins and Marschik were on their way to visit Mellott at the hospital when they paused to share their story. "We weren't trying to be heroes, by any means," said Atkins, a 2010 Kent State University graduate. "We were just in the moment. We knew we were the first ones there and if someone was in that house, we needed to do something right now or they weren't going to get out." Atkins and Marschik, both 23, had spent the evening at the movies and had just dropped a friend off in Kent and hopped in their respective cars for the drive home about 9 p.m. They hadn't driven far when Marschik spotted flames through the second-floor windows at 221 Columbus St. and waved for his friend to pull over. The pair ran to the home, Marschik dialing 911 while Atkins pounded on doors and windows while calling out to see if there were occupants inside. Atkins said glass windows started popping from the heat and he had to dodge falling debris as he rounded the house looking for other entry points. At a side door, he found Mellott half way out of the house but wedged in the frame because something was stopping the door from opening far enough for her to escape. "She was calling for help. I could see she was badly burned," Atkins said. Atkins called to Marschik and the pair kicked the door open. Atkins then took over the 911 call while Marschik carried the woman across the street to safety. As soon as the door was opened, oxygen fueled the fire and the house was engulfed, Marschik said. "We just wanted to get her as far away as we could," Marschik said. Marschik ran to his friend's house to get blankets to cover Mellott while Atkins flagged down the firetrucks to help them pinpoint the house on a street now filled with black smoke. Coincidentally, Marschik has an associate's degree in fire protection from the University of Akron, is a certified EMT and has signed up for medic classes as he works toward his paramedic certification. "All the training I've had, I've been around certain situations," Marschik said, "but nothing that personal, and not being a first responder." Mellott told the men she had several cats. Their fate is unknown, but Atkins said he spotted a couple of cats hanging around the house when he stopped there again on Tuesday. KentWired, an online KSU publication, said Mellott is emeritus professor of the School of Library and Information Science. Paula Schleis can be reached at 330-996-3741 or pschleis@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/paulaschleis. Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

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News Headline: Devo | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: KGOR 99.9
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving, mankind has actually regressed, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society. Their music echoed this view of society as rigid, repressive, and mechanical, with appropriate touches -- jerky, robotic rhythms; an obsession with technology and electronics (the group was among the first non-prog rock bands to make the synthesizer a core element); often atonal melodies and chord progressions -- all of which were filtered through the perspectives of geeky misfits. Devo became a cult sensation, helped in part by their concurrent emphasis on highly stylized visuals, and briefly broke through to the mainstream with the smash single "Whip It," whose accompanying video was made a staple by the fledgling MTV network. Sometimes resembling a less forbidding version of the Residents, Devo's simple, basic electronic pop sound proved very influential, but it was also somewhat limited, and as other bands began expanding on the group's ideas, Devo seemed unable to keep pace. After a series of largely uninteresting albums, the band called it quits early in the '90s, and Casale and Mothersbaugh concentrated on other projects.

Read more: http://www.fox951.com/iplaylist/artist/4080/bio.html#ixzz1ce4ZjtUi

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent: Two brave flames to rescue retired KSU prof | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Click here to view video: http://www.wkyc.com/news/article/213459/45/Kent-Two-brave-flames-to-rescue-retired-KSU-prof

They would be the last ones to call themselves heroes, but two young men certainly deserve that title tonight, after they saved the life of a retired college professor.

Her house is on Columbus Street. It caught fire Monday night and the only way she survived is because two young men -- who both graduated from Kent -- risked their lives to save her.

They rushed into the burning house to save her and really hoped nobody would make a big deal of it. They are

In fact, Jared Atkins, 23, was back at work in Hudson 12 hours after he and his friend, Paul Marschik, also 23, ran into that house and rescued Connie Mellott, Professor Emeritus at Kent State University.

Mellott, 81, would probably have died in that burning house had Jared and Paul not just happened to be driving by. They saw smoke coming from the second floor.

Paul called 911 while Jared ran up to the burning house.

They kicked in the door of the house and Mellett was trying to get out. She inhaled a lot of smoke, so she was lying down, trapped in the door.

Firefighters said the two got her safely down the street.

Jared said that "Everybody keeps using and throwing the word 'hero' around and, to me and Paul, that doesn't seem to be the case. We weren't trying to be heroes, we just kind of acted.

Mellott did survive, although she's still in the hospital because she was burned so badly.

And another thing the guys would not tell you themselves, the next day they bought some flowers and went up to the hospital and visited the lady they had just rescued.

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News Headline: Media select Kent State as MAC's best in men's basketball (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Experience matters, and in the Mid-American Conference men's basketball poll, that means Kent State sits at the top of the heap.

The Golden Flashes, who are going for their third straight regular-season conference title, were picked Wednesday in voting by league media members to win the East Division and the conference tournament.

KSU picked up 16 first-place votes from media members, double the eight awarded to second-place Akron. The Flashes went 25-12 last season, including 12-4 in conference. Akron, the defending postseason tournament champion, was 23-13, 9-7.

"I've been around the league long enough to know who is picked at the beginning of the season and what happens at the end aren't always the same thing," first-year Kent coach Rob Senderoff said.

"We have a ton of work ahead of us, just like everybody else. It's complimentary for our players and our program, but it doesn't guarantee anything."

True enough. But with four of five starters back, the Flashes can counter talent-laden rosters like the Zips. Nine players return, including the reigning league MVP in senior center Justin Greene; the Defensive Player of the Year in senior guard Mike Porrini; and the top sixth man in Carlton Guyton.

Akron will be led by returning MAC Tournament MVP Zeke Marshall. The 7-0 center enters his junior year with 6-8 senior Nick Cvetinovic at his side. They will be joined by a pair of newcomers -- 6-7 Nick Harney from Benedictine and 6-7 Demetrius Treadwell from Euclid -- who have head coach Keith Dambrot excited.

"If we win, it's going to be because we have better big people than everybody else has," Dambrot said. "That's how I see it. We have five big kids who can all play."

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News Headline: MAC basketball notebook: Kent State picked to win league basketball title; UA second (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An emblazoned bull's-eye has been affixed to the collective backs of the Kent State men's basketball team.

The Golden Flashes are now a viable target for the rest of the Mid-American Conference after being selected by a panel of conference media members Wednesday to win both the East Division and the MAC Tournament.

Rob Senderoff, who succeeded Geno Ford as KSU coach, was given the news in the morning by sports information director Todd Vatter and had a light-hearted — and appropriate — response.

“The first thing I said to my SID when he said we were picked to win it was ‘Does that mean we win? Do we have to play now?' I don't think it really matters that much,” Senderoff said during a MAC coaches teleconference held in connection with the poll announcement. “It's obviously complimentary to our team, our players and our staff. I have been an assistant in this league long enough to know it really doesn't matter where you are picked.

“It's nice to be recognized … but I don't think it will have an impact on how we do going forward.”

The 24-member panel gave the Golden Flashes 16 first-place votes in the East and a total of 132 points. The University of Akron was given eight first-place votes and was second with 104 points.

Western Michigan (14 first-place votes and 128 points) was picked first in the West Division, and Ball State was second (six and 111).

The panel also picked a tournament champion, and Kent State got 12 votes to lead the way. Others receiving votes were UA (six), Ball State (three), Western Michigan (two) and Central Michigan (one).

Kent State, which won the regular-season title for the second consecutive time in 2010-11, returns four starters, including MAC player of the year Justin Greene and MAC defensive player of the year Michael Porrini (Massillon). Also back is MAC sixth man of the year Carlton Guyton.

The Zips, who defeated KSU 66-65 in the 2011 title game, were given such media support despite losing four valuable seniors. Still, the Zips have as much potential as anyone because of having five experienced returnees and a bevy of young players with talent.

UA coach Keith Dambrot knows that predictions are merely conversation pieces.

“Whenever we have been picked first, we never won the tournament,” Dambrot said. “I always think Kent is good and obviously the East is very good.”

The media also selected All-MAC preseason teams in the East and West. Greene and Zeke Marshall of the Zips made the East team.

Other highlights

Ohio: The Bobcats led the MAC in scoring last season (74.4) but were hindered by placing 11th in points allowed (72.8) and sixth in rebounding margin (plus 0.4). That helped contribute to a final record of 19-16 and a quarterfinal loss in the MAC Tournament. Coach John Groce vows that will change in 2011-12. “You have got to be able to play defense and rebound. We have had that battle cry since the spring when last year ended. I think our guys have done a better job of embracing it. We seem to have more of a commitment level on that end,” Groce said.

Buffalo: Forward Javon McCrea was a force as a freshman last season, working inside to lead the MAC in shooting percentage (63.1) and finishing eighth in rebounding (6.5) and 19th in scoring (11.8). Coach Reggie Witherspoon said the 6-foot-7, 245-pound McCrea will be a more complete player this season. “He is obviously stronger. He has been here the entire summer. His endurance has also gotten better. But the biggest thing that would jump out is that he is a better shooter. He is able to face the basket now and isn't as reluctant to shoot it,” Witherspoon said.

Western Michigan: The Broncos are the only team in the conference that has all five starters returning, led by All-MAC preseason selections Flenard Whitfield, a forward, and Demetrius Ward, a guard. Still, Coach Steve Hawkins said there are no guarantees for his team, which won the West last season and is favored this season. “It's a much-improved conference because so many teams have a lot of players back,' Hawkins said. “It's a league that is full of parity… another grind.”

Miami: The RedHawks have been hit by injuries and suspensions in the preseason. Guard Orlando Williams was suspended indefinitely for what coach Charlie Coles said was “a problem he had on campus that I can't comment on now because of student confidentiality.” In addition, guard Allen Roberts might be out the entire season with a knee injury. Also, Penn State transfer Bill Edwards, a forward, will be out for a long spell with a wrist injury.

Bowling Green: The Falcons are more than ready to leave Anderson Arena behind and open the Stroh Center, even though it guarantees nothing in the win-loss column. “It's definitely created a buzz. Our guys are excited about it. Our campus and community is excited. At the end of the day, what will excite your guys is a positive. But what you do on the court between the lines, whether it is Anderson Arena or the new Stroh Center, is up to us,” coach Louis Orr said.

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News Headline: Media picks KSU to win MAC men's basketball title (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Mid-American Conference Men's Basketball Preseason Poll was released on Wednesday, with two-time defending regular-season champion Kent State picked to finish first in the East Division and win the 2012 MAC Tournament as voted upon by a 24-member MAC News Media Panel.

In addition, Golden Flashes senior forward Justin Greene was named to the preseason All-Conference Team.

“To be picked first is a compliment to our team and our staff for what they accomplished last year,” said Rob Senderoff, who is beginning his first year as head coach after being a member of the Golden Flashes' coaching staff for seven seasons, including the last three as the associate head coach. “Unfortunately it doesn't matter where you get picked in the preseason because you still have to go out and prove yourself on the court. The league is really good and there could be an argument made for any team to be picked in any order. We just hope that at the end of the year we are in position to be at the top of the league.”

As the only team in the country to return three of its conference's major award winners, Kent State's 2011-12 season is shaping up to be one of the most anticipated in school history. This year's team returns a core group of nine returning lettermen that accounted for nearly 85 percent of the offensive production and 80 percent of the team's rebounding from a year ago.

Last year, the 2010-11 squad went 25-12 and 12-4 in the MAC to become the first MAC team in 21 years and just the second in 48 years to win back-to-back regular-season titles outright. All this with a team that featured just one senior and 10 newcomers to the lineup.

The inexperienced group at the beginning of the year was anything but come time for the postseason as the Golden Flashes stormed their way to the MAC Tournament championship game and then on to the quarterfinals of the postseason NIT.

Kent State was followed in the East Division poll by Akron, Ohio, Miami, Buffalo and Bowling Green.

On the West Division side, Western Michigan is predicted to win the division. The Broncos are followed by Ball State, Central Michigan, Toledo, Northern Illinois and Eastern Michigan.

The reigning MAC Player of the Year, Greene returns to the post where he has led the team in scoring (15.4 ppg), rebounding (8.3 rpg) and blocked shots (1.4 bpg) for two second consecutive years. The 6-foot-8 senior forward is one of nine players in the country returning this season as a reigning conference player of the year.

In 2010-11, he was named an AP Honorable Mention All-American while ranking sixth in the MAC in scoring, third in rebounds and fifth in blocks, making him the only player in the league ranked in the top six in all three categories.

Joining Greene on the East Division preseason team are Akron's Zeke Marshall, Miami's Julian Mavunga, Ohio's D.J. Cooper and Buffalo's Javon McCrea.

The West Division preseason All-MAC representatives are Ball State's Jared Jones and Randy Davis, Flenard Whitfield and Demetrius Ward of Western Michigan, and Trey Zeigler of Central Michigan.

Kent State fans can get their first look at the team on Monday when the Golden Flashes host Rochester College at 7 p.m. at the M.A.C. Center. Admission is free.

The season officially gets underway on Nov. 15 at West Virginia. Tip-off time is at 10 a.m. for the game, which will be televised live on ESPN as part of the network's fourth annual College Hoops Tip-Off Marathon

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News Headline: Business notes: Nov. 2, 2011 - LOCAL BUSINESS IRS offers program in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The IRS and Ohio State University are offering two-day tax institutes in November and December in Ohio to prepare tax practitioners on changes in tax law for the upcoming filing season.

Kent State University will host one of the programs from 8:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 21-22 at the Student Center on Summit Street.

The cost is $330 through Nov. 4 and $355 for registrations afterward. The cost includes lunch, refreshments, workbooks and reference materials and more.

For more information, go to Ohio State University's web site, http://incometaxschools.osu.edu. Additional offerings can be found at the IRS web site, www.irs.gov. Dates and locations are subject to change.

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News Headline: DISABLED YOUNG ADULTS GAIN INDEPENDENCE THROUGH KENT STATE'S TRANSITION PROGRAM | Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Nov.2 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

This past August, a new program was implemented at Kent State University for young adults with disabilities.Twenty-one students participate in the Career and Community Studies Transition Program, which allows youth with intellectual disabilities, who would otherwise not be eligible to live on a campus, to use the university setting along with their peers without disabilities to become independent while developing and refining their career goals.

The program focuses on rigorous academic enrichment while providing peer socialization and reinforcing independent living skills.Throughout the individualized coursework, students acquire self-advocacy and career skills that will lead to employment in the community.Upon completion of this innovative career development program, students will receive significant credentials documenting their achievement and career experience and skills.

Kent State is one of 27 universities nationally to receive funding from the U.S.Department of Higher Education to develop a program known as "Transition in Postsecondary Settings for Students with Intellectual Disabilities" (TPSID).

The university is recognized as a model site for providing postsecondary options for students with intellectual disabilities.This program will benefit students with intellectual disabilities and also provide valuable preparation and experience to students who are preparing for a career in disability-related fields.

For more information, contact Yvonne Michali at yhale@kent.edu or Tom Hoza at thoza@kent.edu, co-directors of the program at Kent State.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State, medical college could merge | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: BizJournals.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A private medical school in northeast could be on the verge of a merger with Kent State University, Crain's Cleveland Business reports. The Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine is entertaining the possibility of a merger with several different universities, including Kent State, the newspaper reports. The medical school currently is affiliated with Case Western Reserve and Cleveland State universities. A merger would need to be approved by boards of trustees at both schools, though no vote has been set, the newspaper reports.

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News Headline: Legal scholars say KSU professor was harsh but exercised right to free speech (Lefton, Bindas, Vincent) | Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Nov. 02--Kent State has received dozens of calls and emails urging it to fire or curb a faculty member who shouted "Death to Israel" at a public meeting last week.

But Julio Pino's views are protected by the First Amendment and are not considered hate speech. Plus he has tenure, a status of employment in higher education that confers virtual lifetime employment.

Pino's view of Israel is "harsh, and I completely disagree with it, but it's not illegal," said Wilson Huhn, a specialist in constitutional law at the University of Akron.

Pino, 50, an associate professor of history, distributed anti-Israel fliers and verbally sparred with a former Israeli diplomat in a question-and-answer session. Pino left the auditorium with the shout about Israel.

It is the most recent public action by the KSU activist.

For example, over the last decade, he has written a column in the KSU student newspaper eulogizing a suicide bomber. He told the KSU administration that he contributed to a jihadist website called Global War. The FBI searched Pino's Kent home in 2009.

Last week, Kent State President Lester Lefton said Pino's words were "deplorable" and his behavior "deeply troubling" -- the university's strongest denouncement of Pino to date.

However, the university apparently is not taking action to censor Pino, according to Kara Robinson, president of the Kent chapter of the American Association of University Professors.

In fact, it is unusual for a tenured faculty member to lose his or her job for any reason.

Some faculty nationwide have been fired for "saying something inappropriate, but that was usually in the classroom," said Sara Kilpatrick, executive director of the Ohio Conference of the American Association of University Professors.

"Outside the classroom, it's a grayer area of whether this was a faculty member acting as a faculty member or a private citizen."

No AAUP faculty member statewide lost a tenured job last year in Ohio, she said. In the last three years, Kent State has fired only one faculty member with tenure, according to the university.

In the case of Pino, students have not complained about his teaching or for "taking his politics into the classroom," said Ken Bindas, chairman of the KSU history department.

Pino also has protections under the First Amendment right to free speech.

In addition, his language would not be considered hate speech, because he did not make a credible threat to the speaker, said Jonathan Entin, a professor of law and political science at Case Western Reserve University.

"It is a point of view, as controversial as it may be, about policy. That will afford it pretty broad latitude," he said.

Those arguments do not appeal to the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America, or CAMERA, based in Boston. It co-sponsored the KSU speech by former Israeli diplomat Ishmael Khaldi, a Bedouin who rose to the top rank of the Israeli government.

Aviva Slomich, director of student programming for CAMERA, said the organization had not reached out directly to the KSU administration but that many of the organization's 60,000 members had.

She said members shared their responses from Tom Neumann, KSU associate vice president for communications and marketing.

His reply "wasn't substantive but was a clear attempt to gloss over the seriousness of the matter by misrepresenting it as a First Amendment issue," Slomich said. Neumann could not be reached for comment.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said all communications about Pino are getting "personal attention." She said she didn't know how many communications the university had received.

Pino joined KSU in 1992. The KSU website says his specialties are Latin American history, the history of race and the Third World.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Offensive words | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thursday, November 3, 2011 Offensive words November 02,2011 10:52 PM GMT Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Julio Pino plays the role of provocateur. The associate professor of history at Kent State University performed recently at a public lecture delivered by a former Israeli diplomat. The two sparred, an angry Pino charged out of the room, shouting, "Death to Israel." No surprise, his words have triggered fury, calls for the university to punish him, even revoke his tenure. Critics point to the record, among other things, Pino eulogizing a Palestinian suicide bomber, championing the jihadist cause, the Secret Service in 2009 seeing the need to interview him. Be outraged at Pino's words and conduct. Know, too, that this reaction is what he seeks, in part. Punish Pino for his speech? That runs counter to the protection of the First Amendment. That protection presents a test. As justices, judges and scholars long have noted, the hard aspect of free speech is reading or listening to those words that grossly offend or greatly infuriate. It is easy to applaud in agreement. Tolerate the likes of a Julio Pino? That can be difficult. Yet that tolerance is just what so many admire about this country, the freedom to speak without fear of a crackdown. So, yes, harshly criticize his words. Respect the right to say them.

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News Headline: SPME Commends Kent State President, Admonishes AAUP President (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: PR Newswire - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: See more news releases in: Advocacy Group Opinion, Domestic Policy, Foreign Policy & International Affairs

CHICO, Calif., Nov. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, an international grass roots academic network of more than 50,000 academics on 4,000 campuses, commends Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton but admonishes American Association of University Professors (AAUP) President Cary Nelson for their respective responses to the October 25, 2011 incident in which a faculty member verbally attacked a visiting foreign lecturer at Kent State.

Kent State Professor Julio Pino allegedly accused guest speaker Ishmael Khaldi of condoning the killing of Palestinian children, and shouted "Death to Israel," as he left the lecture hall. Khaldi was speaking about his background as a Bedouin shepherd who became a deputy consul of Israel and an advisor to Israel's foreign minister.

Although conceding that it "may have been Professor Pino's right to" shout at Kent State's foreign guest in this manner, President Lefton asserted that "it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling."

President Lefton commendably explained why Professor Pino's behavior was inconsistent with basic values of academic discourse: "We value critical thinking at this university, and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable. We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values."

However, SPME deplores Professor Cary Nelson's comment (in Inside Higher Ed) on President Lefton's statement: "Calling out a political slogan during a question period falls well within the speech rights of any member of a university community," he said. "Expressive outbursts do not substitute for rational analysis, but they have long played a role in our national political life. More surprising, to be sure, is President Lefton's invention of an absurd form of hospitality: you must not question the moral legitimacy or the right to exist of a guest's home country. Awareness of history would suggest such challenges are routine elements of international life."

Professor Nelson's reported remarks contradict his own organization's classic 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, which recommended that professors "should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that they are not speaking for the institution." Professor Nelson appears to have forgotten that although freedom of speech is vital to the functioning of a democratic society, a standard of civil discourse is vital to the functioning of universities, as well as other institutions. ("Expressive outbursts" that include genocidal incitement may not lead to arrest, but in most workplaces those who direct such remarks at an honored guest endanger their jobs.)

In response to the degradation of civil discourse on the campus, especially with regard to debate on Israel, and to the increasingly frequent harassment and intimidation of pro-Israel and Jewish students and faculty, the SPME Legal Taskforce has produced a Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and the Freedom of Speech. It can be viewed at http://spme.net/cgi-bin/articles.cgi?ID=8339.

Available Topic Expert(s): For information on the listed expert(s), click appropriate link.

Sam Edelman:

http://www.profnetconnect.com/sam-edelman

SOURCE Scholars for Peace in the Middle East

http://www.spme.net

Next in Advocacy Group Opinion News

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News Headline: SPME Commends Kent State President, Admonishes AAUP President (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Digital Journal
Contact Name: PR Newswire
News OCR Text: CHICO, Calif., Nov. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, an international grass roots academic network of more than 50,000 academics on 4,000 campuses, commends Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton but admonishes American Association of University Professors (AAUP) President Cary Nelson for their respective responses to the October 25, 2011 incident in which a faculty member verbally attacked a visiting foreign lecturer at Kent State.

Kent State Professor Julio Pino allegedly accused guest speaker Ishmael Khaldi of condoning the killing of Palestinian children, and shouted "Death to Israel," as he left the lecture hall. Khaldi was speaking about his background as a Bedouin shepherd who became a deputy consul of Israel and an advisor to Israel's foreign minister.

Although conceding that it "may have been Professor Pino's right to" shout at Kent State's foreign guest in this manner, President Lefton asserted that "it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling."

President Lefton commendably explained why Professor Pino's behavior was inconsistent with basic values of academic discourse: "We value critical thinking at this university, and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable. We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values."

However, SPME deplores Professor Cary Nelson's comment (in Inside Higher Ed) on President Lefton's statement: "Calling out a political slogan during a question period falls well within the speech rights of any member of a university community," he said. "Expressive outbursts do not substitute for rational analysis, but they have long played a role in our national political life. More surprising, to be sure, is President Lefton's invention of an absurd form of hospitality: you must not question the moral legitimacy or the right to exist of a guest's home country. Awareness of history would suggest such challenges are routine elements of international life."

Professor Nelson's reported remarks contradict his own organization's classic 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, which recommended that professors "should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that they are not speaking for the institution." Professor Nelson appears to have forgotten that although freedom of speech is vital to the functioning of a democratic society, a standard of civil discourse is vital to the functioning of universities, as well as other institutions. ("Expressive outbursts" that include genocidal incitement may not lead to arrest, but in most workplaces those who direct such remarks at an honored guest endanger their jobs.)

In response to the degradation of civil discourse on the campus, especially with regard to debate on Israel, and to the increasingly frequent harassment and intimidation of pro-Israel and Jewish students and faculty, the SPME Legal Taskforce has produced a Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and the Freedom of Speech. It can be viewed at http://spme.net/cgi-bin/articles.cgi?ID=8339.

Available Topic Expert(s): For information on the listed expert(s), click appropriate link.

Sam Edelman:

http://www.profnetconnect.com/sam-edelman

SOURCE Scholars for Peace in the Middle East

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News Headline: Atwood Lodge terms called "favorable" (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Jon Baker
News OCR Text: Carroll County commissioners have “responded favorably” to the terms of donation from the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District for the Atwood Lake Resort & Conference Center.

“We're really trying to iron out the details,” said Curt Schneider, vice president of the Chartwell Group, a Cleveland firm of real estate consultants and brokers retained by the MWCD.

“It's a matter of getting the language together,” he told The Times-Reporter on Wednesday.

The MWCD has offered to donate the facility, which has been closed for more than a year, to Carroll County, Kent State University at Tuscarawas or the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. ODNR has already formally declined the offer.

Carroll County commissioners and other leaders from the county met in private Tuesday with MWCD officials to discuss the donation.

There is no exact timeline for when a deal would be put into effect. “We're hoping for something by the end of the year,” Schneider said.

No action was taken during Tuesday's session.

“It was a positive meeting, and progress was made,” added Darrin Lautenschleger, public affairs administrator for the conservancy district. “Hopefully, a final resolution will come soon.”

Kent State Tuscarawas wants to be a part of that resolution, Dean Gregg Andrews said Wednesday. “Our approach has always been to build partnerships.”

He said officials are willing to use the strengths of the campus to help make the lodge economically viable again.

“We've had discussions with the Carroll County commissioners, and are continuing discussions with them on the future of the lodge,” he said.

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News Headline: PROJECT SEEKS PRIMARY-CAREGIVING GRANDMOTHERS FOR KENT STATE STUDY (Feldman, Smith) | Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Nov.2 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Project C.O.P.E.(Caring for Others as a Positive Experience) is looking for grandmothers in Northeast Ohio to participate in a research study.The study will compare different ways to support grandmothers raising grandchildren between the ages of four to 12 in the total absence of the child's birth parents.

"Custodial Grandparents are a really under served population," said Karie Feldman, project director of Kent State's School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences."There aren't a lot of resources for this rapidly growing population, and to have Kent State's name attached to the study is a really positive thing."

During the 10-week program, grandmothers will receive a curriculum-based program aimed to support grandparents raising grandchildren.At each session, participants will be provided with a meal and childcare.Grandmothers also will be asked to complete a total of six assessments over a two-year period.After each assessment, the participant will receive a $35 check to cover any local travel expenses.

Funded through the National Institute for Nursing Research, the study is also being conducted at the University of North Texas, the University of Maryland and the University of California.

"It not only advances our scientific understanding of custodial grandparents but the important theoretical findings that will increase our understanding of how these interventions work across the board," said Gregory Smith, principal project investigator and Kent State professor and director of the Human Development Center."The response from the community is overwhelming."

Kent grandmother Linda Cremen Bouchonville said she looks forward to leading a Project C.O.P.E.support group.Bouchonville has cared for her grandson since his mother died 13 years ago.When she took him in, he was five years old.

"When my daughter died, we didn't have these kinds of resources available," Bouchonville said."Project C.O.P.E.would have helped me immensely at that time.I've gone through challenges in my life, and I'd like to help others.I want to let people know that they aren't alone and that raising a grandchild is a courageous endeavor."

If you are a grandmother raising a grandchild ages four to 12, or know of someone who is, please call 855-260-2433 or contact Feldman at grandmothers@kent.edu.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: My Town: African Community Theatre Presents Comedy Folktale at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jacque Jovic Web Producer
News OCR Text: 7:19 p.m. EDT, November 2, 2011

Kent State's African Community Theatre presents its first production of the 2011-2012 season, Stagolee, November 11-13 and 18-20 in Oscar Ritchie Hall Theatre on the Kent Campus. Stagolee is a comedy folktale about the episodes of a modern-day black hero.

Friday and Saturday performances begin at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday performances begin at 3:00 p.m. Tickets are $10 per person. Students and seniors pay just $7.

To make reservations, call 330-672-2300.

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News Headline: Get in LINE (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY THEATER AND DANCE
PRODUCTION OF ‘A CHORUS LINE

Kent State University's School of Theatre and
Dance will continue its 2011-12 production season
with 1975's box office smash, “A Chorus Line.”
Directed by Terri Kent and choreographed by
MaryAnn Black, the show will run from Friday
through Nov. 13 in
the E. Turner Stump
Theatre, 1325 Theatre
Drive in the Music and
Speech Center.
The Pulitzer Prizewinning
production
follows 17 Broadway
dancers hoping to
land a place in a chorus
line. The dancers
are asked to describe
themselves to the director
in order to get
a role. This collection
of background stories,
hopes and dreams is told through 12 songs and 19
lead roles.
“The audience will identify with the hopes and
dreams of aspiring young professionals — those hopes
and dreams transcend all careers even though this
is specific to Musical Theatre,” Kent said. “What is
interesting about our production is that MaryAnn
Black was in ACL on Broadway. She was with the
show originally in California. She is recreating the
original choreography.”
Kent is the director of the musical theatre program,
as well as serving as the artistic director of Porthouse
Theatre, the professional summer theatre affiliated
with the School of Theatre and Dance.
Shows run at 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday,
and at 2 p.m. Sunday. The box office is open weekdays
from noon – 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each
performance. Tickets are $8 for students, $14 for faculty,
staff and Alumni Association members, $12 for
seniors (60 and older) and $16 for adults.
To order tickets call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.
kent.edu.

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News Headline: 'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Autos Jobs Classifieds Legals MarketplaceOhio Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011-12 production season with "A Chorus Line." Directed by Terri Kent and choreographed by MaryAnn Black, the show will run from Nov. 4 through 13 in the E. Turner Stump Theatre at 1325 Theatre Drive in the Music and Speech Center. Black offers an authentic point-of-view because she played the role of Maggie in the first national tour of A Chorus Line at the Schubert Theatre in Los Angeles and performed on Broadway when it became the longest running American show on Broadway. To order tickets call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu . The Pulitzer Prize-winning production, originally directed and choreographed by Michael Bennett, follows 17 Broadway dancers hoping to land a place in a chorus line. The dancers are asked to describe themselves to the director in order to get a role. This collection of background stories, hopes and dreams is told through 12 songs and 19 lead roles. The book is by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban and music by Marvin Hamlisch. The show will feature a special performance by professional actor Jim Weaver who has appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes and dreams of aspiring young professionals -- those hopes and dreams transcend all careers even though this is specific to Musical Theatre," said Kent. "What is interesting about our production is that MaryAnn Black was in ACL on Broadway. She was with the show originally in California. She is recreating the original choreography." Shows run Tuesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497. The box office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash. Tickets are $8 students, $14 faculty, staff and alumni association members, $12 for seniors 60 and older, and $16 for adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person. By Posting to this site, you agree to our Terms of Service Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed. Bedfordtimesregister.com doesn't necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Login above or Register to comment.

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News Headline: Vietnamese children's art touches Valley children | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/02/2011
Outlet Full Name: AZCentral.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Vietnam War ended more than 35 years ago, but a Scottsdale art exhibit about the conflict surprisingly resonates with Valley children.

"Speak Peace: American Voices Respond to Vietnamese Children's Paintings" runs through next Wednesday at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. The show features drawings created by Vietnamese children, along with poetry from veterans, established poets, and students from the Phoenix Union High School District.

"I think you will see some pretty profound insights coming from the children's art," said Laura Hales, the museum's associate curator of education. "Through this work, people are going to understand how the children are still affected in a significant way by a war that ended more than three decades ago."

The exhibit includes 35 oil pastel paintings created by Vietnamese children during the past 10 years, after they viewed images from the War Remnants Museum in Ho Chi Minh City formerly Saigon, In Vietnam.

One painting features an origami crane with four hands reaching toward the bird and a symbol of a peace sign. The exhibit showcases Valley and national poetry and videos of American children reciting verses they created for the show.

The paintings came to the U.S. via a veteran who traveled to Vietnam in a program provided by the New York-based organization Soldier's Heart. The non-profit is dedicated to the emotional and spiritual healing of veterans. When the former soldier went to the War Remnants Museum and saw the art, he was so inspired and touched that he felt compelled to create a show and bring it back to the U.S.

"Edward Tick (the soldier, and founder of Soldier's Heart) recognized the potential for healing that the art would have for Vietnam vets, so he started working closely with the museum to see if he could borrow the work and create a traveling exhibition," Hales said.

Kent State University, site of anti-war protests where four students were shot fatally in 1970 by the Ohio National Guard, was chosen as the venue for a show. The school's nationally known Wick Poetry Center conducted a workshop related to the work, and renowned poets that include Ellen Bass, Dorianne Laux and Alberto Ríos participated. Each painting in the exhibit is paired with a poem.

The show is traveling to 13 cities, including Detroit, Washington D.C., and Chicago. Students from each city will add their poetic touch to the program.

In the Valley, students participated from Alhambra, Bostrom, Camelback, Carl Hayden, Central, Cesar Chavez, Maryvale, Metro Tech, North and South Mountain high schools. Many of the students related to the exhibit because they have family members serving in Afghanistan or Iraq.

"The poetry that was done was, and always is, better than we expect," said Sean Nevin, director of the Young Writers Program at Arizona State University.

Nevin conducted poetry classes in various high schools throughout the Valley.

"The kids are natural artists," he said. "They are able to grabble with these big issues of war and peace in ways that we never see coming."

Reach Dolores Tropiano at dtropiano@cox.net.

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