Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
Admissions (1)
Communication Studies (1)
English (1)
Higher Education; Tuition (1)
History (2)
KSU at Stark; Theatre and Dance (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences; Research (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Psychology (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
CollegeWeekLive Launches the World's Largest Virtual College Fair Today With 300 Leading Colleges 11/03/2011 NewsOK.com (Oklahoman) - Online Text Attachment Email

...University Azusa Pacific University Bay Path College Bay State College Bentley University Booth University College Boston University Bowling Green State University Brevard College Brown Mackie College Brunel University Bryant University Burlington College California...


Communication Studies (1)
After Grim Diagnosis, Parents Turn to Internet, Social Networks (Chung) 11/03/2011 Southern Maryland Online Text Attachment Email

..."Twenty to 30 years ago when we didn't have the Internet our parents probably had to go to the library," said Jae Eun Chung, an assistant professor at Kent State University who researches health communication in new media. "Now we are just one click away from medical information." A study...


English (1)
Kent State Prof. Yells 'Death to Israel' at Former Diplomat (Lefton) 11/04/2011 NewsMax - Online Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University history professor is under fire for shouting “Death to Israel” at a former Israeli diplomat after asking him heated questions...


Higher Education; Tuition (1)
West Side Education News & Notes( Lefton) 11/04/2011 Leader Online Text Attachment Email

...Discussion groups, prison visitation and other activities were soon added. KSU implements Forever Buckeyes Program for Ohio high school graduates KENT — Kent State University (KSU) President Lester Lefton has announced KSU has adopted the Forever Buckeyes program, established by the Ohio Board...


History (2)
Kent State slams 'death to Israel' (Lefton) 11/04/2011 Intermountain Jewish News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State slams ‘death to Israel' Thursday, 03 November 2011 11:39 JTA NEW YORK — The president of Kent State University decried...

Kent State president slams anti-Israel professor ( Lefton) 11/03/2011 Jewish Review - Online Text Attachment Email

article created on: 2011-11-01T00:00:00 The president of Kent State University decried the behavior of a professor who shouted “death to Israel” during a lecture given by a former Israeli diplomat....


KSU at Stark; Theatre and Dance (1)
Friends head to war in Kent Stark's 'Plumfield Iraq' (Williams, Newberg) 11/04/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...deeper understanding of the issues facing veterans when they are brought to life Friay at 8 p.m. at the Midwest premiere of "Plumfield Iraq," on the Kent State Stark Theatre stage. Performances also are set for Saturday, Thursday and Nov. 12 at 8 p.m. and Sunday and Nov. 13 at 2:30 p.m. in...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
WKSU News: Census: More young adults living with parents (Cichy) 11/04/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...percent. For women, the increase was slightly lower _ 8 percent to 10 percent. Kelly Cichy is a professor of Human Development and Family Studies for Kent State University. She said the economic recession contributed to the increase, but it's not the only factor. "The other thing that's going...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences; Research (1)
Worth Noting - Nov. 2 11/03/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...pam_machuga@nps.gov. Grandmothers needed for study at KSU A study entitled Project COPE (Caring for Others as a Positive Experience) is being lead by Kent State University. This study will compare different ways of helping grandmothers who are raising a grandchild between ages 4 to 12 in the...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Smart phone technology adapted for foodborne pathogen detection 11/04/2011 Food Production Daily Text Attachment Email

...technique, which offers significant time savings over current industry standard testing methods, is being developed by Crystal Diagnostics in conjunction with Kent State University and Northeast Ohio Medical University in the US. The Crystal Diagnostics MultiPath SystemTM, which has been in development...


Psychology (1)
Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett Develops Workshops to Train Professionals How to Use Intervention to Reduce (Neal-Barnett) 11/03/2011 pr-usa.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...disorder on business and other organizations is well documented," explained Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, award-winning psychologist and associate professor at Kent State University. "Based on my research with African American women dealing with anxiety, fear and panic, we have been able to use Sister...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Balanced-Budget Bollocks, The Price Tag of Transparency, and Tracking Government Collaborations (Hoornbeek) 11/04/2011 Governing - Online Text Attachment Email

...states you'd want to look at if you're interested in this topic. John Hoornbeek, director of the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State, tells the Beacon Journal that his group has identified about 250 collaborative efforts of some kind , half of which have actually...


Theatre and Dance (1)
'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) 11/03/2011 MapleHeightsPress Text Attachment Email

...appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes and...


News Headline: CollegeWeekLive Launches the World's Largest Virtual College Fair Today With 300 Leading Colleges | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsOK.com (Oklahoman) - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By: CollegeWeekLive via GlobeNewswire News Releases

60,000 High School Students to Connect with 2,000 Admissions Representatives -- Free Online November 2nd and 3rd at www.CollegeWeekLive.com

BOSTON, Nov. 3, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- CollegeWeekLive, the world's largest college fair and admissions website, is hosting the premier admissions event of the Fall season Wednesday November 2nd and Thursday November 3rd , with an estimated 60,000 teens expected to login and connect with admissions representatives from 300 colleges. High school students who to attend the free online college admissions event are invited to chat live with college admissions representatives as well as renowned admissions experts such as Ted Fiske, Gary Gruber and the Department of Education. Students who attend the event are also eligible to win $10,000 in CollegeWeekLive scholarships as well as a technology scholarship from HP Academy.

Students, counselors and parents interested in attending CollegeWeekLive can for free.

Participating colleges and universities include:

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Adelphi University

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Alderson Broaddus College

American University of Health Sciences

Angelo State University

Arizona Culinary Institute

Arizona State University

Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University

Azusa Pacific University

Bay Path College

Bay State College

Bentley University

Booth University College

Boston University

Bowling Green State University

Brevard College

Brown Mackie College

Brunel University

Bryant University

Burlington College

California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

California State University, Fresno

Carleton University

Castleton State College

Centennial College

Champlain College

Chatham University

Clayton State University

College America

Colorado Mesa University

Colorado State University

Colorado State University, Pueblo

Columbia College

Community College of Vermont

CUNY, Hunter College

Curry College

Cuyahoga Community College

Daemen College

Dakota College at Bottineau

Dallas Baptist University

Department of Education

DePaul University

DeVry University - Columbus

Dickinson State University

Dillard University

Drake University

D'Youville College

East Carolina University

East Tennessee State University

Eastern Kentucky University

Edison State College

EDMC - The Art Institute

Education Ireland

Emerson College

Emory University

Emory University Goizueta Business School

Ferris State University

FIDM

Florida A&M University

Florida Atlantic University

Florida Gulf Coast University

Florida Institute of Technology

Florida International University

Florida State University

Gannon University

Georgia State University

Georgia Tech

Global College of LIU

Grand View University

Great Lakes Maritime Academy

Green Mountain College

Grove City College

Hamline University

Herkimer County Community College

Hofstra University

Holy Names University

Humboldt State University

Illinois Institute of Technology

Illinois Wesleyan University

Indiana State University

Indiana Tech

Indiana Wesleyan University

Jamestown College

Jefferson College of Health Sciences

John Cabot University

Johnson and Wales University, Providence

Johnson State College

Kent State University

Kettering University

King's College London

Knox College

La Salle University

Landmark College

Laramie County Community College

Lasell College

Lesley University

Liberty University

LIM College

Lincoln College

Long Island University, Brooklyn

Loyola Marymount University

Lyndon State College

Manhattanville College

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

Massachusetts Maritime Academy

Mercy College

Meredith College

Miami Dade College

Michigan Technological University

Middle Georgia College

Mississippi State University

Mitchell College

Mount St. Mary's University

Multnomah University

Naropa University

Nazareth College

New Mexico Tech

New York Institute of Technology

Newbury College

Niagara County Community College

North Carolina A&T State University

North Carolina State University

North Central University

Northwest Nazarene University

Northwestern Michigan College

Notre Dame College

Nottingham Trent University

Oklahoma Baptist University

Oklahoma State University

Oregon Institute of Technology

Ouachita Baptist University

Pace University

Palmer College of Chiropractic

Paris Sorbonne University Abu Dhabi

Park University

Pensacola State College

Pepperdine University

Philadelphia University

Post University

Quinnipiac University

Regis College

Rivier College

Robert Morris University

Roger Williams University

Roosevelt University

Royal Holloway, University of London

Rutgers University

Saddleback College

SAE Nashville

Saint John's University, NY

Saint Joseph's College (Brooklyn)

Saint Joseph's University

Saint Louis University

Saint Thomas Aquinas College

Saint Thomas University

Sam Houston State University

Santa Fe College

Savannah College of Art & Design

Schenectady County Community College

Seton Hall University

Sonoma State University

South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

South Puget Sound Community College

Southern Vermont College

St. Stephen's University

Stony Brook University

Study in Scotland NARG

Suffolk University

SUNY, Alfred State College

SUNY, College at Brockport

SUNY, College at Cortland

SUNY, College at Oneonta

SUNY, Onondaga Community College

SUNYIT

Susquehanna University

Syracuse University

Tallahassee Community College

Texas A&M University

Texas Christian University

Texas Tech University

Transylvania University

United States Air Force Academy

United States Merchant Marine Academy

Universidad Central Del Este

University of Advancing Technology

University of Alabama, Huntsville

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

University of Alaska Anchorage

University of Alaska Fairbanks

University of Alaska Southeast

University of Alberta

University of Arizona

University of Bridgeport

University of British Columbia

University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Davis

University of California, Irvine

University of California, Los Angeles

University of California, Merced

University of California, Riverside

University of California, San Diego

University of California, Santa Barbara

University of California, Santa Cruz

University of Central Florida

University of Chicago

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University of Colorado, Denver

University of Dayton

University of Denver

University of East Anglia

University of Florida

University of Gloucestershire

University of Greenwich

University of Houston

University of Idaho

University of Louisville

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

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University of Melbourne

University of Minnesota Morris

University of New England

University of New Hampshire, Manchester

University of New Haven

University of North Carolina School of The Arts

University of North Carolina, Wilmington

University of North Florida

University of North Texas

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University of South Florida

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University of Tampa

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University of Tennessee

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University of Texas, Pan American

University of the Pacific

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University of the South

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University of Vermont

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University of Wisconsin, Stout

Upper Iowa University

USMA West Point

Utah State University

Utah Valley University

Villanova University

Virginia Military Institute

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Weber State University (UT)

Wentworth Institute of Technology

Wesleyan University

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THIS ARTICLE RAN IN ?? ADDITIONAL MEDIA OUTLETS

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News Headline: After Grim Diagnosis, Parents Turn to Internet, Social Networks (Chung) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Southern Maryland Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ANNAPOLIS (November 3, 2011) -- Julie Leach knew something was amiss during a routine check-up.

"At my 20-week sonogram the technician took an awful long time trying to get a shot of her jaw," Leach said.

Later, when she and her husband Matt Leach learned the rare diagnosis of their newborn daughter, a condition that puzzled doctors, they turned in desperation to the Internet.

The Internet often provides families like the Leach's unfiltered health information and access to specialists. It also has increasingly become the place where people connect with others who share similar diagnoses, through blogging, Facebook and other social media.

"Twenty to 30 years ago when we didn't have the Internet our parents probably had to go to the library," said Jae Eun Chung, an assistant professor at Kent State University who researches health communication in new media. "Now we are just one click away from medical information."

A study by the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that one in five Americans uses the Internet to find people with similar health concerns. For people with chronic illnesses, it's one in four.

When doctors asked Julie Leach, of Calvert County, to return for another sonogram to get a better measure of her baby's jaw, she scoured the Internet for "small jaw" and prepared for the worst.

"By the time we went in there, I knew pretty much all there was to know, because I needed to," Leach said. "I need to at least have some idea, to know the terminology, and to be able to carry on an educated conversation."

But the Internet provides more than basic medical information. For Leach, it offered a forum for sharing her story when it was too difficult to share face-to-face. Social networks, like Leach's blog, help families cope with the difficulties of chronic illness.

"Now we have social networking tools that allow people to connect with each other for emotional and informational support," said Dr. Gunther Eysenbach, of the Centre for Global eHealth Innovation. "For the patient, it is greatly empowering."

Leach was admitted to the University of Maryland Medical Center at just 29 weeks. Doctors spent the next five weeks monitoring her and the baby.

On October 22, 2010, shortly after midnight, Abigail "Abby" Leach was born at 4 pounds and 17 inches.

Two hours later, the Leach's went down to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), where a doctor showed them Abby's X-rays.

"The majority of her ribs were in pieces," Julie Leach said.

Abby has Cerebrocostomandibular Syndrome (CCMS), a rare condition most often resulting in infant death.

"In the beginning, they did not have a lot of hope for her," said Julie Leach. "They were just on eggshells."

Doctors gave the Leach's all the information they could.

"The geneticist gave us one piece of paper that she Xeroxed from a medical book from the 70s," Leach said. "It was basically a death sentence."

CCMS is characterized by deficiencies in cerebral development, cleft palate, and malformation of the ribs and jaw, according to the National Library of Medicine.

It is unclear how many confirmed cases have been reported worldwide. Most sources say the number is between 50 and 75.

"Once we found out her real diagnosis, we went right to the Internet again," Julie Leach said.

They found one researcher in Boston, but he couldn't provide much information.

Feeling helpless, Matt and Julie Leach found support in family, friends and prayer. After six weeks, Abby was transferred to Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital, where she spent another six weeks in the NICU, and her parents began training to care for her at home.

Learning that their daughter would need many surgeries to repair her ribs, jaw, cleft palate and spine, Matt and Julie Leach immediately began finding the best spinal surgeon, thoracic surgeon and pulmonologist in the area.

Abby, who is intubated and has a gastrostomy tube (g-tube) that allows her to get nutrition without requiring a tube in her nose, needs constant care.

"We learned how to do trach care, trach replacement, and to clear and change the g-tube," Julie Leach said. "We did take performance and written tests before we could even talk about going home."

Even with painstaking preparation and constant care-giving, Abby's odds were not good. Many infants with CCMS die from respiratory complications during the first few months of life. Many more are lost within the first year.

"Our geneticist who diagnosed it only knew what it was because she saw one case in residency 30 years ago," Julie Leach said. "We had to go to the Internet. We pored through online medical journals. I just kept researching."

Now, families touched by CCMS are reaching out to Leach through her blog (http://lifeasaleach.blogspot.com/p/abigails-journey.html), which she began shortly after Abby's diagnosis.

"One family in Chicago Googled and found me," she said. "And another family in New Jersey has a daughter who is 12. Her issues are a little different than Abby's, but she's been a real encouragement to me."

At Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital, the nursing staff gives the Leach's information to parents who need a little hope.

"I've been able to tell them, yes there is life after a ventilator and there is life after a trach," she said. "The more we see, the more we feel like God has given us Abby so we could share her story."

Leach said she still occasionally searches the Internet for CCMS.

"I want to see what comes up," she said. "I also want to search it to see if anyone else is blogging about CCMS."

Despite the benefit of social networking, doctors and other health professionals remain the primary source for personal health information and diagnoses.

"It's very difficult for parents to get an idea of what the future holds for these kids," said Dr. Manbir Singh, Abby's pediatrician. "It gets frustrating for a lot of parents when there is not a cut and dry answer."

This is particularly true with rare diagnoses because patients are inundated with complex, sometimes conflicting information. While the Internet can help parents sort through it all, Singh believes it can lead to worry and doubt.

"The Internet can be a very detrimental tool," Singh said. "It all depends on the parent."

But despite these concerns, communication scholars see the benefit of expanded access to health information.

"Those patients who are motivated have the tools to educate themselves," Chung said. "Doctors need to adjust to their patients who are now more empowered and educated."

Julie Leach said educating herself was the best way to prepare and push through the grim reality of CCMS.

"I strongly believe in the power of researching and tell every family that is facing a difficult diagnosis to research everything they can," said Julie Leach, 29. "You'll find the worst-case scenarios, and it won't be any worse than that."

But the young couple says they couldn't have made it on research alone, raving about the support they received from the NICU staff, the hospital chaplain, family, friends and especially from God.

"I'm convinced that prayer works, more than ever now," said Matt Leach, 33.

The Leach family recently celebrated Abby's 1st birthday, yet another milestone for this little girl who has far surpassed initial expectations.

"She has so much personality," Julie Leach said. "When we first got her diagnosis we were told she wouldn't be much more than a vegetable."

Not so for Abby, who plays, laughs and stands.

Leach updates her blog regularly and her posts automatically appear on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=771346616) to reach more people.

"We don't want people to have to walk this road alone," Julie Leach said. "And it's a very dark and scary road."

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News Headline: Kent State Prof. Yells 'Death to Israel' at Former Diplomat (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: NewsMax - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University history professor is under fire for shouting “Death to Israel” at a former Israeli diplomat after asking him heated questions about his country's role in the deaths of Palestinian children and babies during a Q&A session.

Professor Julio Pino, a tenured associate professor of history at Kent State, made his statement following an exchange with Ishmael Khaldi, former deputy consul general at the Israeli consulate in San Francisco, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Khaldi — a Muslim — was at Kent State Tuesday to speak about his rise from a small Bedouin village to the Israeli Foreign Service.

The atmosphere at the lecture became strained when Pino posed the first question after the speech, asking Khaldi how he and the Israeli government justify providing aid to countries with blood money that came from the deaths of Palestinian children and babies.

Khaldi reportedly tried to move on to another questioner but Pino made further comments against Israel then shouted "Death to Israel" as he left, a student leader said.

Kent State President Lester Lefton said Pino had a right to pose his provocative question, but said his decision to shout “death to Israel” at Khaldi was deplorable.

“We value critical thinking at this university and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable,” Lefton said. “We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values.”

Tuesday's incident wasn't Pino's first anti-Israeli activity while he has been working at Kent State. In 2003, he wrote a column in the Kent State newspaper exploring the motives of a Palestinian suicide bomber, and in 2007 was cited on websites as being linked to an extremist Islamic website that espouses a holy war, the Plain Dealer said Thursday.

Kent State officials have denied the extremist site has a connection to Pino or to the university.

Faculty Senate member Donald Hassler, who chairs the Kent State English department said Thursday Pino is very opinionated, but needs to speak with civility.

"What he said was pretty hateful,” said Hassler. “He realizes that he lost control."

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News Headline: West Side Education News & Notes( Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Leader Online
Contact Name: Stephanie Kist
News OCR Text: 10/27/2011 - West Side Leader

AECHS named ODE ‘School of Promise'

DOWNTOWN AKRON — Akron Early College High School (AECHS) recently was named a “School of Promise” by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) for its work to close achievement gaps for low-income and minority students.

The ODE recently named 122 Schools of Promise. These schools outperformed others statewide when comparing the number of indicators met on the state's annual report cards, which were released in August. The Schools of Promise demonstrated high achievement in reading and mathematics for all groups of students, despite 40 percent or more of their students coming from low-income families, according to Akron Public Schools officials.

Students in Schools of Promise also met or exceeded the state standard of 75 percent passage in reading and mathematics for the 2010-11 school year, and all student groups met yearly progress standards.

Sister Helen Prejean visiting Hoban

SOUTH AKRON — The debate over the death penalty will take center stage at Archbishop Hoban High School with the visit of social justice advocate Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ, to coincide with the school's production of “Dead Man Walking” by the Hoban Troubadours.

Hoban will host a dialogue after opening night Nov. 3 with Sister Prejean, whose 1994 book “Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States” was the basis for the play and a film. There will be a book sale and signing. The play runs Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. and Nov. 4 and 5 at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are $11 for reserved seats and $7 for general admission and can be ordered at www.hobantroubadours.org. Tickets also will be sold at the door.

The play portrays Sister Prejean's experiences and insights as she ministered with men facing execution, and then to the families of murder victims. The show is part of the national Dead Man Walking School Theater Project out of Boston. To learn more about the project, go to www.dmwplay.org.

Sister Prejean began her prison ministry in 1981 in New Orleans. While living in the St. Thomas housing project, she became pen pals with Patrick Sonnier, the convicted killer of two teenagers, sentenced to die in the electric chair of Louisiana's Angola State Prison. She has witnessed five executions in Louisiana and today educates the public about the death penalty by lecturing, organizing and writing.

For more on Sister Prejean, go to www.prejean.org.

According to Hoban officials, Tim Robbins, who wrote the stage play, required that any school producing the play must also agree to involve at least two other academic departments (law, sociology, criminal justice, etc.) to provide courses related to the death penalty and “Dead Man Walking.” Art and music departments also were encouraged to develop related creative projects. Discussion groups, prison visitation and other activities were soon added.

KSU implements Forever Buckeyes Program for Ohio high school graduates

KENT — Kent State University (KSU) President Lester Lefton has announced KSU has adopted the Forever Buckeyes program, established by the Ohio Board of Regents and the state of Ohio, beginning this fall semester.

The Forever Buckeyes program is a residency provision that extends the in-state resident tuition rate to any Ohio high school graduate who left the state but returns to enroll in an Ohio public institution of higher education and establishes a primary residence in the state.

“At Kent State, we see the need to make education more affordable and within reach of our students,” Lefton said. “By adopting the Forever Buckeyes program this fall, we want to help students in this category stay focused on the path to graduation and encourage future Kent State students by eliminating financial barriers to achieving quality higher education.”

According to KSU officials, the new law became effective in September after most Ohio public universities had already determined students' residency for fall 2011, but KSU has chosen to move forward with implementation to begin benefiting students immediately.

For more information, contact 330-672-3131 or ohioresidency@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Kent State slams 'death to Israel' (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Intermountain Jewish News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State slams ‘death to Israel' Thursday, 03 November 2011 11:39 JTA NEW YORK — The president of Kent State University decried the behavior of a professor who shouted “death to Israel” during a lecture given by a former Israeli diplomat. Ishmael Khaldi, the former deputy consul general at the Israeli Consulate in San Francisco, was confronted by Kent State University history professor Julio Pino during a question-and-answer session following Khaldi's speech at a campus eventlast week. Khaldi was speaking about his life as a Bedouin in Israel who rose through the ranks of the Foreign Ministry, as well as Middle East issues. Pino, a convert to Islam and a tenured professor, asked Khaldi how the Israeli government could justify providing aid to countries like Turkey — to which Israel recently sent earthquake aid — with “blood money” from the deaths of Palestinian children. After briefly arguing with Khaldi, Pino left the auditorium shouting “Death to Israel.” An audience member responded by shouting “Shame on you” after him. KSU President Lester Lefton said in a letter published on the university's website that Pino's behavior was “reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university.” Lefton wrote that he believed it as Pino's right to pose a provocative question to Khaldi, but that while it was also Pino's right to shout invective against Israel, “it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling.” “We value critical thinking at this university, and encourage students to engage with ideas that they find difficult or make them uncomfortable. We hope that our faculty will always model how best to combine passion for one's position with respect for those with whom we disagree. “Calling for the destruction of the state from which our guest comes (as do some of our students, faculty and community members) is a grotesque failure to model these values,” Lefton's statement said. “We welcome President Lefton's clear condemnation of Professor Julio Pino's deplorable conduct,” said Nina Sundell, the ADL's Ohio regional director. “Statements such as ‘Death to Israel' extend beyond legitimate political discourse. When the statement is shouted by a university professor at a university student organization event on campus, it is even more harmful.” Pino has courted controversy for years, writing an opinion column in 2002 in which he praised a suicide bomber. In 2007 he faced allegations that he was behind the website Global War, which bills itself as “a jihadist news service.” At the time, Pino refused to comment on the allegations, describing it as a freedom of speech issue. However, his department chair said that Pino had told him that he contributed articles to the site. Get the IJN's free newsletter! JTA News

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News Headline: Kent State president slams anti-Israel professor ( Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Jewish Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: article created on: 2011-11-01T00:00:00

The president of Kent State University decried the behavior of a professor who shouted “death to Israel” during a lecture given by a former Israeli diplomat.

Ishmael Khaldi, the former deputy consul general at the Israeli Consulate in San Francisco, was confronted by Kent State University history professor Julio Pino during a question-and-answer session following Khaldi's speech at a campus event last month. Khaldi is a Bedouin who rose through the ranks of the Foreign Ministry.

Pino, a convert to Islam and a tenured professor, asked Khaldi how the Israeli government could justify providing aid to countries like Turkey—to which Israel recently sent earthquake aid—with “blood money” from the deaths of Palestinian children. After briefly arguing with Khaldi, Pino left the auditorium shouting “Death to Israel.” An audience member responded by shouting “Shame on you” after him.

KSU President Lester Lefton said in a letter published on the university's website that Pino's behavior was “reprehensible, and an embarrassment to our university.”

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News Headline: Friends head to war in Kent Stark's 'Plumfield Iraq' (Williams, Newberg) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: IndeOnline.com staff writer Posted Nov 04, 2011 @ 12:00 AM JACKSON TWP. - It could be any town, anywhere in the United States. Two high school seniors join the U.S. Army and are deployed to Iraq. After returning from war, one friend struggles to adjust to normal life while the other suffers from post traumatic stress disorder. Their stories will provide a deeper understanding of the issues facing veterans when they are brought to life Friay at 8 p.m. at the Midwest premiere of "Plumfield Iraq," on the Kent State Stark Theatre stage. Performances also are set for Saturday, Thursday and Nov. 12 at 8 p.m. and Sunday and Nov. 13 at 2:30 p.m. in the Kent State Stark Theatre. American Sign Language interpretation will be provided for the Nov. 6 performance. The production has been generating interest among professors and students across campus, according to Cynthia Williams, Kent Stark's public relations coordinator. In fact, it has been turned into a campuswide event that will include a visit from playwright Barbara Lebow who will be Kent Stark's artist-in-residence for a week during the production. "They will get to have personal interaction and get insight with a playwright. This is a once in a lifetime event. It's very unusual," Williams said. Lebow will discuss "Plumfield Iraq" with the audience following the Sunday and Thursday performances and is scheduled to address several classes throughout the week, interacting with theatrical, English and journalism students, according to Williams. "There's been a lot of buzz around the topic, in general," Williams said. "Many of the professors are encouraging their students to attend." Typically, Kent Stark hosts a number of Veterans Day events but this is the first time a theater production dealing with veterans issues, such as PTSD, has been held, Williams said. "People are going to be able to get a better understanding (of issues) through a theatrical outlet. You are getting entertained but it's also something that you can take with you," Williams said. "Plumfield, Iraq" is directed by Brian Newberg, Kent Stark's assistant professor of theater, who became aware of the unpublished play several years ago while working on the West Coast. Newberg, whose 19-year-old son enlisted in the U.S. Army and will be deployed to Afghanistan in the next several weeks, has taken a personal interest in the drama. "Even before my son was in the Army, I've been interested in dramatic material that deals with issues of war, what veterans they go through and what happens when they return," Newberg said. The fictional town of Plumfield is representative of any small town in America, giving the story a universal quality, according to Newberg. The play deals with some "hard-hitting" material that would be unsuitable for young children, Newberg said. "It's a very edgy play and it's written in a style that we can go through what is happening in his (character's) mind. The character experiences flashbacks and travels back and forth in time," Newberg said. However, Newberg said the play does not communicate a political agenda. Newberg applauded the efforts of the production's eight cast members and technical crew, who have been rehearsing since the beginning of the semester. "It's a very complicated, multimedia production. The students have been learning a lot," Newberg said. "... They're doing a bang-up job with a tough play." Stage manager Olivia Durell, of Canal Fulton, said "Plumfield Iraq" is unique from other productions she's worked on in the past. "It shows the importance of community and family support for veterans coming home from this war. You really get to see that in this production," Durell said. Magan McLaughlin, of Massillon, the production's assistant stage manager, was surprised by the content of the drama when she read the script for the first time. "It swept me off my feet. It affected me so much more than what is portrayed by it," McLaughlin said. "It does not have a political agenda, which is really refreshing." Loading commenting interface... Thank you for the abuse report. We will review the report and take appropriate action. Ticket information • Several Veterans Day events will be held in conjunction with the production of Plumfield, Iraq, at the Kent State Stark campus at 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. All events are open and most are free to the public - with the exception of the drama. Tickets to "Plumfield, Iraq" are $10 for adults and $7 for students, children under 17 and senior citizens. All Kent State students are admitted free with a current student ID. Tickets can purchased online at www.stark.kent.edu/theatre or by calling the Kent State Stark Theatre box office at 330-244-3348 from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Schedule of events Tonight

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News Headline: WKSU News: Census: More young adults living with parents (Cichy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Census: More young adults living with parents An increased number of people ages 25-34 are moving back home by WKSU's ALISON RITCHIE Reporter Alison Ritchie The number of young adults living at home with their parents is rising. That's according to a Census report released Thursday. The study shows that over the last six years, the number of men ages 25-34 who live at home increased from 14 percent to 19 percent. For women, the increase was slightly lower _ 8 percent to 10 percent. Kelly Cichy is a professor of Human Development and Family Studies for Kent State University. She said the economic recession contributed to the increase, but it's not the only factor. "The other thing that's going on is increasingly more and more people are delaying marriage," said Cichy. "They're delaying having children. They're pursuing advanced education, you know, going on to graduate school or medical school. And that sometimes means in order to handle the financial obligations, a lot of people are choosing to stay at home." Cichy said it's likely the Census numbers reflect longer term changes to our society. She said it's become more socially acceptable for young adults to live with their parents longer.

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News Headline: Worth Noting - Nov. 2 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Children's author

visits library Nov. 3

Children's author Tony Abbott, a Cleveland native, will talk about his first young adult novel, "Lunch-Box Dream," at the Hudson library Nov. 3 at 7:30 p.m. Abbott is the author of the Secrets of Droon series, as well as other middle-grade fiction. "Lunch-Box Dream" is a historical novel, autobiographical in parts, about a family car trip from Cleveland into the South in 1959.

It is written for middle schoolers, but older teens and adults with an interest in the racial history of the time will also be interested.

After his presentation, Abbott will answer questions from the audience about all of his books.

The Learned Owl will have a selection of the author's books on hand for purchase and for signing. This program will take place in the South Meeting Room of the library.

It is free and open to the public. No registration is required. For more information, call 330-653-6658 ext. 1020.

Novelist, quilter returns

Jennifer Chiaverini will bring the latest in her New York Times Bestselling Elm Creek Quilts series to Hudson on Nov. 4 at 7 p.m. She will speak at Laurel Lake Retirement Community, 200 Laurel Lake Drive. In Chiaverini's new novel, "The Wedding Quilt," a daughter's wedding brings forth hopes and memories for the host McClure family and the friends and quilters who called Elm Creek Manor home. The event is free, but space is limited. Call The Learned Owl Book Shop at 330-653-2252 or 1-800-968-2685 to register for the event. Books will be available for sale at the talk.

Find out 'If Jack's In Love' at book shop

First time novelist Stephen Wetta will be at the Learned Owl Book Shop, 204 N. Main St. in Hudson, Nov. 12 from 4 to 5 p.m. Wetta's novel was inspired by memories of a socially ostracized family from his boyhood neighborhood.

"I wrote 'If Jack's In Love' after imagining myself at age 12, a sweet enough boy, living the marginal life of a kid who grew up several blocks away in my old neighborhood," Wetta said.

Wetta was born in 1955 in Richmond, Va. At age 28, he received his bachelor's degree in English from Virginia Commonwealth University. For a brief period he was hired to write speeches for politicians, a career that ended when someone noticed his candidates kept losing. Wetta later earned a Ph.D. from New York University. He lives in Brooklyn but his heart is in Queens.

For more information, call the Learned Owl Book Shop at 330-653-2252.

Casino Night to benefit women's shelter

The Battered Women's Shelter will present its first ever Casino Night Nov. 11 from 7 to 11 p.m. at the Hilton Akron/Fairlawn, 3180 West Market St. in Fairlawn. The evening will include Black Jack, Slots, Texas Hold'Em,

Poker, Craps and Roulette. In addition to a variety of games, there will be an open bar, a silent auction, and a private lounge to feature Vegas style entertainment.

Tickets are $75 per person, and "fun money" will be available for purchase throughout the evening.

Buy tickets at http://bwscasinonight.eventbrite.com or call at Dana Zedak 330-777-4723.

The Battered Women's Shelter relies heavily on the support of the community to provide emergency shelter and supportive services to survivors of domestic violence in Summit and Medina counties.

Peninsula library to show classic movie

The Peninsula Library, 6105 Riverview Road, will host another Classic Movie night on Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. A discussion on trivia and facts related to the movie will follow the showing. Call the library at 330-657-2291 for more information. This program is free and popcorn will be served.

Residents can make their own TV shows

Residents who would like to produce a video program to air on Hudson Cable TV can call the HCTV station at 330-653-2500. Program possibilities include taping an event, stand up comedy, band performances, increasing awareness about an organization, giving gardening tips or personal interviews. Those interested would fill out HCTV paperwork and get trained to use HCTV equipment.

Paving will close trails

Paving work will result in intermittent closures on the Bike and Hike and Towpath trails this fall. The following areas will be affected:

Bike & Hike Trail: between Brandywine Road and Highland Road in Boston Heights, and between Graham Road and Bunker Lane in Stow; and

Towpath Trail: between Portage Path and the Big Bend Trailhead in Akron, areas near the Manchester Road Trailhead in Akron and under two bridges in the Barberton Area.

Closures and updates are available on the Alerts page, under the News tab, at summitmetroparks.org. For more information, call 330-867-5511.

The paved 33.5-mile Bike & Hike Trail travels southeast from Sagamore Hills to Munroe Falls and Stow before traveling into Portage County. Metro Parks manages 22.4 miles of the Towpath Trail, which will be completed in Summit County by year's end.

Volunteers needed for CVNP Polar Express

The National Park Service at Cuyahoga Valley National Park and Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad are seeking volunteers to spread holiday cheer aboard The Polar Express. This holiday program, based on Chris Van Allsburg's book The Polar Express, is from Nov. 17 through Dec. 20.

Children, clad in pajamas, board the train in Akron or Independence and travel through Cuyahoga Valley National Park to hear the story of The Polar Express, enjoy hot cocoa and cookies, and sing carols on their way to the North Pole. Through the train's windows, children see holiday characters, the silhouettes of elves hard at work, and Santa.

Volunteers are needed to be Santa, read the story, assist in creating a festive atmosphere in the car, serve cookies and hot cocoa, and more. Training will be provided.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Park Ranger Pamela Machuga at 330-657-1914 or pam_machuga@nps.gov.

Grandmothers needed for study at KSU

A study entitled Project COPE (Caring for Others as a Positive Experience) is being lead by Kent State University. This study will compare different ways of helping grandmothers who are raising a grandchild between ages 4 to 12 in the absence of the grandchild's birth parents. This study is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Participation in this study will involve attending 10 weekly group meetings with other grandmothers and a professional leader at a safe and convenient location in the community. A light meal will be served at each session, and a supervised child care area for grandchildren will be available.

Participants will also be asked to complete six assessments over a two-year period, where grandmothers will complete a brief interview and also complete a simple task with their grandchild that will be videotaped. Grandparents who come to a study site will receive a $35 check after each assessment to cover any local travel expenses.

Call toll free at 855-260-2433 or email grandmothers@kent.edu to enroll.

Grant helps Community Support Services

Community Support Services has been awarded a four-year, $459,000 grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The funds will be used to improve the mental and physical health of people living with severe and persistent mental illnesses by creating a person-centered medical/health home at Community Support Services' Margaret Clark-Morgan Integrated Primary and Behavioral Healthcare Clinic. The program will provide nurse care management, screening for various health issues including substance abuse, women's health issues and past trauma utilizing evidenced-based practices. A large component of the grant will focus on wellness activities including smoking cessations programs, peer health mentors, healthy eating goals, nutritional counseling and other health management programs.

Community Support Services provides treatment, rehabilitation, advocacy and support for people with severe and persistent mental illnesses.

Community First sponsors Gift Shoppe

Hudson Community First will sponsor its annual Holiday Gift Shoppe Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hudson Middle School, 77 N. Oviatt St. Children can shop in a supervised environment with an escort for gifts for friends and family while waiting adults can enjoy the vendor/shopping area. Items for sale will include jewelry, children's accessories, glass wares and more. For more information, email Patty Ulmer at soularsisters@aol.com.

Pajama Program enters 'Danger Season'

The Pajama Program describes Oct. 1 through March 31 as "Danger Season" for children in need. The program aims to keep children warm as the temperatures drop by giving new pajamas and new books to children in need. The Eastern Ohio Chapter serves 33 receiving organizations and needs help to provide enough pajamas and books for all the children. Email patty@pajamaprogram.org or call 330-253-5109 to help.

Writing club for girls seeks members

The Case-Barlow Farm Creative Writing Club for girls is accepting new members ages 10 to 15. The club meets monthly at the historic farmhouse on Barlow Road. Those interested may call Barbara Bos at 330-554-4689.

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News Headline: Smart phone technology adapted for foodborne pathogen detection | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Food Production Daily
Contact Name: Mark Astley
News OCR Text: A new food safety testing method using liquid crystals – a technology traditionally used in smart phones and televisions – is being developed with the aim of detecting multiple harmful foodborne pathogens in a single test.

The technique, which offers significant time savings over current industry standard testing methods, is being developed by Crystal Diagnostics in conjunction with Kent State University and Northeast Ohio Medical University in the US.

The Crystal Diagnostics MultiPath SystemTM, which has been in development since 2006, uses liquid crystals to detect multiple harmful pathogens such as Listeria, E.coli and Salmonella in a single test.

The developer “expects the technology to become the standard of the food industry.”

Evaluates multiple pathogens

The company's chief scientist Dr. Gary Niehaus told FoodProductionDaily.com: “There is extensive interest by the food industry, with several negotiations currently on-going. Crystal Diagnostics' (CDx's) current interactions with the European market are limited but will significantly expand during the next few months.”

“Thus, the food industry (safety and production) have expressed a great deal of interest in the technology.”

The technology includes two pieces of equipment; a cassette containing five individual cells, two of which are control cells and three are test cells, and a reader.

A prepared sample is mixed with liquid crystals and an antibody or antibody cocktail, for the specific pathogens being sought, and applied to the cassette.

This is then inserted into the reader and if pathogens are present, the liquid crystal will be disrupted.

The reader recognises the disruption and “simultaneously evaluates a single sample for multiple pathogens.”

The nature of the technology significantly reduces false positives and negatives, which often require longer product holds while retesting is accomplished and a serious problem for food producers.

Faster, reliable method

Crystal Diagnostics CEO Paul Repetto said: “The need for faster yet highly reliable processes to detect pathogens has never been higher given the recent deadly food outbreaks.”

Recent foodborne contaminations such as the cantaloupe-related Listeria outbreak, which to date has killed 28 people in the US, and the E.coli outbreak in Germany earlier this year, have created a higher level of awareness in the food sector.

Repetto added: “This new technology can have a profound impact on public health.”

The company intends to test the equipment in the field this autumn with leading food processing companies and laboratories before introducing it to the market in 2012.

Dr. Niehaus added: “The beta testing will be conducted against Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, and Listeria. Subsequent work will focus on Campylobacter and other shiga-producing E. coli. The technology uses highly selective antibodies for detection and identification, thus any microbe can be detected by using an appropriate antibody.”

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News Headline: Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett Develops Workshops to Train Professionals How to Use Intervention to Reduce (Neal-Barnett) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: pr-usa.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett Develops Workshops to Train Professionals How to Use Intervention to Reduce Research on anxiety and fear among African American women has led Dr. Angela Neal Barnett to develop Sister Circle workshops for leaders in organizations who seek to reduce turnover and retain workers. "The economic burden of anxiety, fear and panic disorder on business and other organizations is well documented," explained Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, award-winning psychologist and associate professor at Kent State University. "Based on my research with African American women dealing with anxiety, fear and panic, we have been able to use Sister Circles to develop an intervention that can help to reduce the high cost of turnover for the organization." Anxiety, panic disorder, and the feeling of isolation are the most expensive and prevalent health problem in the United States, with annual costs estimated at more than $40 billion*. Anxiety lasts longer and has a higher perceived intensity among Black professional women due to the multiple roles undertaken by Black women and pressure to live up to those many roles. Neal-Barnett's Sister Circles workshop training sessions provide human resource professionals in corporations and organizations the opportunity to learn how to develop their own internal Sister Circle programs to help African American women who are dealing with anxiety, fear and panic issues and to ultimately reduce the high cost of recruitment and turnover. The workshops use the best-selling book written by Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, Soothe Your Nerves: A Black Woman's Guide to Overcoming Fear, Panic and Anxiety, published by Fireside/Simon and Schuster, as a resource. About Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett is a national award winning psychologist, professor, author, and leading expert on anxiety disorders among African Americans. Currently a tenured member of the psychology faculty at Kent State University, she directs the Program for Research on Anxiety Disorders among African Americans. Dr. Neal-Barnett's work focuses on fears and social anxiety in African American children as well as panic disorder and worry in African American adults. She is a sought-after workshop presenter and speaker, and the author of "Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman's Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, Panic and Fear." For more information, visit www.SootheYourNerves.com or call 330-608-1937. * R.L.DuPont, DP Rice, LS Miller, et al. Economic costs of anxiety. Anxiety 1996; 2:167-172. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/(SICI)1522-7154(1996)2:4%3C167::AID-ANXI2%3E3.0.CO;2-L/abstract SEMEBO.com - Add your site to the next generation of search - SEMEBO.com New Content

NOTE: THIS ARTICLE RAN IN TWO ADDITIONAL MEDIA OUTLETS

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News Headline: Balanced-Budget Bollocks, The Price Tag of Transparency, and Tracking Government Collaborations (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/04/2011
Outlet Full Name: Governing - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Balanced-Budget Bollocks, The Price Tag of Transparency, and Tracking Government Collaborations Plus: Questions about pension investments, and more management news BY: Katherine Barrett & Richard Greene | November 3, 2011 Commented 8 Hours Ago I enjoyed the article from St. Petersburg. We can all agree that transparency is a laudable goal. ... A little more about balanced budgets. We've repeatedly questioned the value - and even the reality - of balanced budgets in cities, counties and states. One of our major thrusts has been the idea that balanced budgets often become unbalanced mere weeks or months after they're passed, leaving the government entity with a shortfall. If you've doubted us, here's some dynamic proof: According to a recent survey done by the National Association of Counties , "Only 35 percent of responding counties (69 counties) report that they adopted balanced budgets this fiscal year with no anticipated shortfalls." That means about two-thirds of the counties passed budgets which they knew were essentially flawed on Day One. And we'll bet a dollar (that's as much as we ever bet) that the same is true with cities and states. There may be more to this story than we came to understand from the St. Petersburg Times article in which we found it. But we couldn't resist passing it along. Apparently, a Florida state senator, Mike Fasano, had requested some records about Florida pension fund investments, and received an invoice of nearly $11,000 from the State Board of Administration. The request had originally been made by the St. Petersburg Times, but it was rejected for reasons of confidentiality. But the senator, who has rights to view state documents like this, stepped in, and was told that it would cost a bundle just to cull the information and make sure there was no proprietary information shared. Feels to us like anytime a state senator - or a newspaper, for that matter - is interested in delving into matters of state investments, that's the time to fly the transparency banner. With all the hoopla about states' pension fund issues, this doesn't feel like the right time to tell the public and its representatives that the details are not particularly any of their business. What's more, we have an open question: If you can't reveal the details of what you're investing in, how is any meaningful oversight possible by legislators? Interested in stories about how governments that collaborate with one another - and with other entities - can deliver services more effectively and efficiently? Then take a look at the Akron Beacon Journal's online section dedicated to covering government efficiency . It's focusing right now on issues of collaboration. By the way, Ohio appears to be one of the first states you'd want to look at if you're interested in this topic. John Hoornbeek, director of the Center for Public Administration and Public Policy at Kent State, tells the Beacon Journal that his group has identified about 250 collaborative efforts of some kind , half of which have actually shown results. His study found a great many efforts in areas like vehicle maintenance, policy and fire functions, storm water management and economic initiatives. Not so long ago, only a small number of people were deeply interested in state and local pension liabilities. Now, that topic has become front-page news from coast to coast, and many authorities have weighed in about how to evaluate these liabilities. But that's only half the important equation. As a recent article in Pensions & Investments points out, there is growing "uncertainty about the value of their assets." That's true in large part because there has been an increase in allocations to alternative investments, "including hedge funds, private equity, real estate, timberland, mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities and distressed debt, as well as swaps and other derivatives strategies," says P&I. "In general," the article goes on to say, "these are all hard-to-value assets - whether physical assets like properties, or equity, or debt securities in non-publicly traded companies, or strategies based on non-exchange-traded derivatives - where prices are not readily and publicly available." How important is an educated population to the success of a city? Edward Glaeser takes a stab at answering that question in the September issue of Scientific American (which we recommend to you - it's a special issue specifically about cities). Consider some stats he shares : "In the metropolitan areas of the Northeast or Midwest, where fewer than 7.5 percent of adults had college degrees in 1970, the population grew by 8 percent between 1970 and 2000. Where more than 15 percent had college degrees, the population grew by 53 percent." But wait. Is it possible that fast-growing cities simply attract more educated people? Glaeser persuasively argues that's not the case. It turns out that cities' educational levels don't change much over time. So it's not as though the population growth could be raising the percentage of people with college degrees. Practically any elected official in the United States posits that education is the crucial key to the future. But the dramatic impact on the vigor of a city came as something of a surprise to us. After the tragic shootings at Columbine High School over a decade ago, many schools instituted so-called "zero tolerance policies." These policies often remove teachers' and administrators' capacity to judge individual issues on their merits. And the policies frequently lead to huge increases in the number of student suspensions. Is that good or bad? According to a new report from the Civil Rights Project at UCLA, if academic success is a measure, there are real problems with this policy. According to an Education Week article on the study, "The center's report argues that school discipline records are too often seen as a measure of how safe a school is and not often enough as a gauge of how healthy a school is academically. But [according to the report's author] there is no evidence that banishing some students will improve the education of classmates still in school, while studies have shown that punishing students increases their risk of dropping out." Not long ago, we had a revealing chat with a former state communications director (whose identity we promised to protect). He told us about the ways he used to work with the press in his old job. Now, however, in his new position as a government manager, "You [reporters] will never get me on the phone again!" His stance is emblematic of the growing tendency we've noticed for government officials to stay away from the press - but to a degree we haven't experienced in our careers. Don't misunderstand. We know the press can get things wrong, and can be unnecessarily tough on government leaders. But since the press functions as a primary source of information for taxpayers, we think that public servants should be responsive to inquiries. Careful, to be sure. But responsive. If you didn't think Rutherford B. Hayes had much to contribute, consider this quote from the 19th president of the United States: "Let every man, every corporation, and especially let every village, town, and city, every county and State, get out of debt and keep out of debt. It is the debtor that is ruined by hard times." Saving lives during natural (or unnatural) disasters is certainly a state mission with which few would disagree. Yet one road to this estimable goal appears to be full of potholes: a nationwide interoperable communications network. That's fancy talk for a system that will ensure that first responders within and across state lines can all talk to each other easily. Gov. Martin O'Malley of Maryland and Gov. Matt Mead of Wyoming recently wrote a piece for Roll Call in which they stated, "Firefighters, police officers and emergency medical personnel must be able to communicate with one another in real time if they are to preserve life and protect property." Right now, for example, most first responders on the East Coast use commercial networks, which can instantly become overloaded when there's a crisis, preventing "calls and text messages from getting through," according to the two governors. They add, "Requiring first responders to rely on these systems puts lives at risk and is simply unacceptable." Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick is arguing with a rule he calls "wacky." The rule has to do with federal stimulus dollars. And while we might not use exactly the governor's wording, we think he raises a really interesting issue. Turns out that the guidelines governing the spending of recovery dollars mandate that unspent money intended for transportation construction projects be sent back to Washington. According to the State House News Service , the governor said that "most of our projects, many of them have come in under budget," which means that cash will be siphoned out of state coffers. Were the stimulus intended to complete a prescribed list of projects, we'd think that Patrick was missing the boat. But it wasn't. It was designed to create jobs. Times being what they are, why would the federal government really want to take stimulus dollars back, dollars that could be used for projects that might serve that goal? "Look, this is about jobs," the governor told the news service. "Let's use it for other projects."

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News Headline: 'Chorus Line' choreographer once part of Broadway show (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/03/2011
Outlet Full Name: MapleHeightsPress
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Autos Jobs Classifieds Legals MarketplaceOhio Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011-12 production season with "A Chorus Line." Directed by Terri Kent and choreographed by MaryAnn Black, the show will run from Nov. 4 through 13 in the E. Turner Stump Theatre at 1325 Theatre Drive in the Music and Speech Center. Black offers an authentic point-of-view because she played the role of Maggie in the first national tour of A Chorus Line at the Schubert Theatre in Los Angeles and performed on Broadway when it became the longest running American show on Broadway. To order tickets call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu . The Pulitzer Prize-winning production, originally directed and choreographed by Michael Bennett, follows 17 Broadway dancers hoping to land a place in a chorus line. The dancers are asked to describe themselves to the director in order to get a role. This collection of background stories, hopes and dreams is told through 12 songs and 19 lead roles. The book is by James Kirkwood, Jr. and Nicholas Dante, lyrics by Edward Kleban and music by Marvin Hamlisch. The show will feature a special performance by professional actor Jim Weaver who has appeared on Broadway in "Marie Christine" and "Don't Call Back." Off-Broadway he appeared in "Anything Cole!" and "Mahalia." Locally, Weaver has performed at Porthouse Theatre's productions of "Guys & Dolls" (Sky Masterson) and "West Side Story" (Bernardo). "The audience will identify with the hopes and dreams of aspiring young professionals -- those hopes and dreams transcend all careers even though this is specific to Musical Theatre," said Kent. "What is interesting about our production is that MaryAnn Black was in ACL on Broadway. She was with the show originally in California. She is recreating the original choreography." Shows run Tuesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497. The box office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash. Tickets are $8 students, $14 faculty, staff and alumni association members, $12 for seniors 60 and older, and $16 for adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person. By Posting to this site, you agree to our Terms of Service Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed. Mapleheightspress.com doesn't necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Login above or Register to comment.

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