Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; KSU Museum (1)
Higher Education; University Communications and Marketing (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU Museum (2)
Music (2)
Political Science (1)
Research (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
Brunch Bunch set for Kent Thanksgiving 'fun-raiser' 11/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Business (COB) (1)
Kent State University's College of Business Administration undergraduate (Wilson) 11/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Entrepreneurship (1)
Foundations' grants will help train entrepreneurs (Lefton) 11/23/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...want to work and live." On Nov. 18, the two foundations announced a three-year partnership to provide separate grants, the amounts not disclosed, to Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University and Lorain County Community College to expand Blackstone LaunchPad,...


Fashion Design and Merchandising; KSU Museum (1)
'Hope in a Handbag' benefits domestic violence shelter 11/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Higher Education; University Communications and Marketing (1)
Universities move to block their names from new .xxx online domain 11/22/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

By Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer "Fear the Roo," the University of Akron slogan tied to its marsupial mascot, could take on a totally different meaning if it became fair game for an X-rated website....


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
Scholars program offered to area schools 11/23/2011 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...seventh grade students interested in furthering education after high school. According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. If funding furthers with the program,...


KSU at Salem (1)
Research shows being thankful is good for your health (Toepfer) 11/22/2011 Mother Nature Network Text Attachment Email

...health. Earn Points If you don't want to voice your gratitude, writing a letter may do the trick, according to various studies by Steve Toepfer of Kent State University at Salem and his colleagues. "If you are looking to increase your well-being through intentional activities, take 15...


KSU Museum (2)
On With The Show 11/23/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...Acquisitions to the Collection," "Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox" and "Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido," KSU Museum, front campus, Kent State University.

Touring exhibit showcases Hollywood legend's performance clothes (Druesedow) 11/23/2011 Ocala.com Text Attachment Email

...Grim, curator of exhibits at the Appleton. “I think people will enjoy it; it takes you back to that era of filmmaking.” The exhibit belonging to the Kent State University Museum — perhaps the only museum that collects “performance clothing” — also includes photos, movie posters and other...


Music (2)
Holiday music, treats coming to KSU (MacPherson) 11/23/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts 11/23/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m. Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18 Contact: 330-672-2172 The Kent...


Political Science (1)
Analysts: Egyptian civil unrest to escalate despite military's efforts (Stacher) 11/22/2011 CNN.com Text Attachment Email

...said. "We're facing a bigger crisis than one could have imagined just two days ago." Said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt: "It is a tough one because we can't see what's coming. "They've reached a real impasse," he...


Research (1)
Coastal Services, November/December 2011 (Wilson) 11/23/2011 Coastal Services Center Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Brunch Bunch set for Kent Thanksgiving 'fun-raiser' | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 43RD ANNUAL CHARITY
EVENT SET THURSDAY AT
KENT AMERICAN LEGION

Members of the Brunch
Bunch committee are gearing
up for Portage County's
charity “fun-raiser” celebrating
its 43rd year.
The Brunch Bunch will
gather from 8 a.m. to noon
Thanksgiving Day at the
American Legion Hall, 1945
Mogadore Road in Kent for
the annual auction.
“Thanks to the generosity
and incredible support
from the community again
this year, we have many great
items up for auction, and
we are pleased to share that
Mike Tontimonia is joining
our team again as lead auctioneer,”
said Michelle Hartman,
event chairwoman.
Auction items include a
ride for two in the Goodyear
Blimp; an autographed item
by Josh Cribbs; eight tickets
to the football MAC championship
game; Chef's Table
for 4 at The Bistro in Kent;
specialty gift baskets; and an
original Crankshaft drawing
by Tom Batiuk.
Members of the Kent State
men's basketball team and
coach Rob Senderoff, will
serve as guest auctioneers as
well as Herb Page, men's golf
coach. Guest auctioneers will
take the stage at 10 a.m.
Admission to the event is
$3 for endless coffee, cider,
and doughnuts.
Charities to benefit from
the auction include Kent Social
Services hot meals, The
Center of Hope food cupboard,
Coleman Professional
Services Adult Day Food Program,
and The Lord's Pantry
emergency food cupboard.

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News Headline: Kent State University's College of Business Administration undergraduate (Wilson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of Business Administration undergraduate and graduate programs recently garnered top rankings in two major news publications.

The business school was ranked 154 out of 382 by the U.S. News and World Report. The undergraduate business programs were ranked solely on a peer assessment survey conducted in spring 2011. To appear in this ranking, the undergraduate business program must be accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Only 15 percent of business schools worldwide meet the rigorous standards of AACSB International accreditation.

Kent State's College of Business Administration undergraduate program shares the list with the top ranking University of Pennsylvania, University of California-Berkeley and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Kathryn Wilson, interim dean of Kent State's College of Business Administration, said the undergraduate program focuses on providing students with valuable learning experience that can be used in today's competitive marketplace.

"The ranking is important because it speaks to how we compare with other U.S. institutions' business schools," Wilson said. "Our managerial marketing major is unique and sought after in that it is one of the few undergraduate marketing programs in the country that gives students hands-on experience through the classroom."

Adding to its top-notch curricula, Kent State's College of Business Administration places emphasis on practical learning opportunities including internships and international exposure. The college currently has partnerships that allow students to study in the European cities of Florence, Geneva and London.

The second designation is for Kent State's Master of Business Administration (MBA)programs, which were recognized in the Princeton Review's Best 294 Business Schools: 2012 Edition.

"We chose the 294 business schools in this book based on our high opinion of their academic programs and offerings, as well as our review of institutional data we collect from the schools," said Robert Franek, Princeton Review senior vice president-publisher. "We also strongly consider the candid opinions of students attending the schools that rate and report on their campus experiences at their schools on our survey for the book."

Kent State's College of Business Administration offers both a full-time (FT-MBA) and a Professional (P-MBA) program. The former serves as a way for young professionals to either jump-start their careers or to change career paths. By contrast, the P-MBA attracts high-potential business people from the Northeast Ohio region who seek to propel their career advancement with their current employers, and who pursue their studies while working full-time. Both of these programs are included in Princeton Review's statistics.

The Princeton Review does not rank the business schools in a single hierarchical list from 1 to 294, or name one business school best overall. Instead, the book has 11 ranking lists of the top 10 business schools in various categories. Kent State's school was recognized for solid preparation in accounting and general management.

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News Headline: Foundations' grants will help train entrepreneurs (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: " onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Photo By Photos special to Record Publishing Co.Burton D. Morgan Foundation trustee Martin Erbaugh, Hudson Mayor William Currin and Foundation President Deborah Hoover.

" onclick="return hs.expand(this)" vocusinstance="0">

Burton D. Morgan Foundation President Deborah Hoover talks at Case Western Reserve University Nov. 18.

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by Laura Freeman | Reporter

Hudson -- The Burton D. Morgan Foundation and Blackstone Charitable Foundation are joining forces to donate $3.2 million to train Ohio's next generation of entrepreneurs.

Each foundation will provide $1.6 million to fund programs at four Northeast Ohio universities.

"Northeast Ohio has made great progress reinventing itself by returning to its entrepreneurial roots," said Deborah D. Hoover, president and chief executive officer of the Hudson-based Burton D. Morgan Foundation.

"We are investing in Blackstone LaunchPad to help demystify entrepreneurship as a career path, spur start-ups for Northeast Ohio, and build a vibrant regional economy where young people want to work and live."

On Nov. 18, the two foundations announced a three-year partnership to provide separate grants, the amounts not disclosed, to Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University and Lorain County Community College to expand Blackstone LaunchPad, a program for university students and alumni that provides the skills, knowledge, and guidance to start new companies.

"Our economy needs the kind of immediate, fast-growth activity that only comes from entrepreneurs. Fostering a new generation of entrepreneurs is critical to America's recovery, which is why we are investing in Blackstone LaunchPad to help young entrepreneurs harness their talents and transform creative ideas into viable companies," said Blackstone's Chairman and CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman.

Blackstone LaunchPad was developed at the University of Miami in 2008 where it created 65 start-up businesses, 120 new jobs, and attracted nearly 2,000 student participants. Blackstone LaunchPad programs are scheduled to be up and running in Northeast Ohio in early 2012.

"LaunchPad will bring new energy and hands-on support to Ohio's future entrepreneurs," said Gov. John Kasich.

The funding for the program is provided by the Blackstone Charitable Foundation's $50 million, five-year Entrepreneurship Initiative and The Burton D. Morgan Foundation, a private foundation established in 1967, whose mission is to strengthen the free enterprise system by investing in organizations and institutions that foster the entrepreneurial spirit.

Blackstone LaunchPad is open to all students, regardless of major, and engages local entrepreneurs to mentor students.

"Small businesses create almost two-thirds of new jobs in the American economy. That's why it's so important to give start-up support to our best and brightest young minds," said U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown.

"The Blackstone LaunchPad program will help provide the necessary resources to young entrepreneurs at Baldwin-Wallace, Case Western, Kent State, and LCCC to create 21st-century jobs and spur economic growth in Northeast Ohio."

Collectively, these four campuses reach more than 70,000 students. The Northeast Ohio LaunchPad could create 150 businesses over the next five years and generate over 3,000 direct jobs.

"This important new investment -- coupled with Kent State's eight-campus system -- will allow us to significantly enhance entrepreneurship opportunities throughout the region," said KSU President Lester A. Lefton in a statement. "Kent State is committed to fostering the next generation of Ohio entrepreneurs that will generate economic opportunities in the state, and we're grateful to The Blackstone Charitable Foundation and The Burton D. Morgan Foundation for this generous support."

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3150

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News Headline: 'Hope in a Handbag' benefits domestic violence shelter | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: More than 150 women from
across generations came to the
Kent State University School of
Fashion Atrium recently for the
first of what organizers hope will
be an annual event, “Hope in a
Handbag.” The event, which benefits
Safer Futures, the domestic
violence shelter in Portage County,
was held in October which
is national “Domestic Violence
Awareness Month.”
The event featured a silent auction
including an array of 100 new
and gently used handbags, purses
and clutches. All the items were
donated by area businesses and
individuals.
“When women in our community
heard about this event and
that it was to support and empower
victims of domestic violence,
the outpouring of support
was overwhelming,” said Bonnie
Wilson, director of business and
community relationships for Family
& Community Services.
Many of the donated items had
a story, like one bag, a family heirloom
that had been handed down
for several generations and others
that were hand-made by women
entrepreneurs in the community.
Adding to the evening were
hors d'oeuvres and beverages, including
a specialty drink concocted
just for the occasion.
A handmade Amish quilt, donated
by Middlefield Bank, was
raffled during the festivities.
The event raised more than
$8,000. Proceeds from the event
will help support Safer Futures.
During 2010, the shelter responded
to nearly 1,000 requests for
service and provided refuge in
a safe, confidential location for
more than 100 victims of domestic
violence.
“Domestic violence doesn't just
happen in big cities. That's why
we need to let people know that
our shelter is here for them, when
and if they need it,” said Anne
Lofaro Face, director of shelter
services. “Maintaining our shelter
24 hours a day, seven days a
week requires a lot of resources.
That's why we're so excited
that the community supported
this important event. Nearly every
woman who was at ‘Hope in
a Handbag' told us they're looking
forward to next year's event,”
said Face.

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News Headline: Universities move to block their names from new .xxx online domain | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas
News OCR Text: By Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer

"Fear the Roo," the University of Akron slogan tied to its marsupial mascot, could take on a totally different meaning if it became fair game for an X-rated website.

That's why the university has moved to block the slogan's use on the new .xxx online domain for adult entertainment and pornography. Other Ohio universities are taking similar steps to protect their brands.

Ohio State University is seeking to register a number of trademarks in addition to its name -- including mascot Brutus, Buckeyes, The Shoe and Scarlet and Gray. Oberlin College wants to protect Oberlin. And Kent State University, for obvious reasons, has filed to register its athletic teams' name - the Golden Flashes.

The .xxx domain will join .edu, .com, .gov and other suffixes that are part of online domain names and addresses.

ICM Registry, after 10 years of trying, received approval this year for the controversial domain from the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, the organization that administers Internet addresses.

The public can purchase .xxx domain names beginning Dec. 6.

ICM, located in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., already has banned the names of thousands of famous people and blocked 15,000 other names at the request of governments and agencies.

Businesses, universities and organizations not affiliated with adult entertainment had until Oct. 31 to purchase a .xxx domain name for their official registered trademarks through a registrar company, such as GoDaddy.com. Those names will be unavailable on ICM's .xxx registry when it opens in December. ICM reported that more than 80,000 applications were received to secure a domain so it could be used or blocked.

It was recommended that a trademark be registered if it is well-known, is highly visible in online searches or has a denotation that would make it desirable as an .xxx domain. It costs a few hundred dollars to file.

"I think everybody would associate that (a .xxx domain) with something related to pornography and you would just as soon not have that out there for an institution," said Rick Van Brimmer , director of trademark and licensing at Ohio State.

While Oberlin is a trademark and the college's application to shield that address is under review, the application to protect Oberlin College.xxx was denied since it is not an official trademark, said spokesman Scott Wargo.

"It is obvious that you want to protect your image and brand name," he said.

Kent State has applied for four domains, kentstateuniversity.xxx, kent.xxx, flashes.xxx and goldenflashes.xxx.

Cleveland State University decided not to buy any domains at this time, according to a spokesman.

Case Western Reserve University said it is exploring the issue and expects it will acquire domain names "in an attempt to prevent misrepresentation of the institution."

CWRU's trademarks include its name, "Think Beyond the Possible" and "Bold Ideas. Lasting Impact," according to trademarkia.

The University of Akron filed to protect 10 trademarks including Fear the Roo, Zip Mail, Rock The Roo and Go Zips.

"ICM is trying to be as responsible as possible," said spokeswoman Loren Pomerantz."It understands that not everyone will want their name associated with the .xxx."

After Dec. 6, universities can protect names or phrases that are not trademarked by purchasing an .xxx domain on the open market, she said. And if someone else buys that domain name and uses it a way that is objectionable to the university, ICM will take it down until a court determines who should be awarded the domain, she said.

"Everybody understands the sensitive nature of it all," she said. "We want to make it as easy as possible for people to participate or not with the understanding that a lot of organizations will not want to be associated. The thing is, the .xxx serves both sides. You know what you are getting when you go to a .xxx site so people can avoid it."

Van Brimmer said he has talked to colleagues at other universities and all agreed it was worth it to take a pre-emptive measure regarding the .xxx domain. He said it was the first time he was aware that companies had been allowed to block names in a given domain before it opened to the public.

"It's like a land grab," he said of people buying domain names. "We have had many of them try to sell us back the names through the years."

But registering to protect trademarks does not eliminate someone else registering a name that includes an extra letter, word or play on a name that makes it similar to yours, said Van Brimmer. There is a process to stop them, but it is time-consuming and expensive, he said.

"It's almost impossible to cover yourself," he said.

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News Headline: Scholars program offered to area schools | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: / News / Local News /
← and → arrow keys on your keyboard to activate these links ?');return false" onmouseout="hideBubbleTip()"> � Recount for village council,...
← and → arrow keys on your keyboard to activate these links ?');return false" onmouseout="hideBubbleTip()" class="txtRight"> CHESTER CHRISTMAS TREE>>
Scholars program offered to area schools
November 23, 2011
By LIZ MCKINNON - Wellsville Reporter ( lmckinnon@reviewonline.com )
,
The Review
A new scholarship program will offer two students from two local school districts the chance to receive a full ride to college. The "Rural Scholars Program" is meant for first-generation seventh grade students interested in furthering education after high school.
According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. If funding furthers with the program, Phrenger hopes to branch out to other schools in Columbiana County.
"This is basically a college access program to help students get into college and stay," explained Phrenger. "It's hard to keep them there, and this program will prepare students for college long before they get there." The program will start by selecting one seventh grade student from both Crestview and Southern, based on the performance of the student.
They must exemplify a successful record at school and their family potential income must be 200 percent of the federal poverty line. Once selected by members of their school, the student will go through workshops and several programs throughout the rest of their time in school up until 12th grade.
Phrenger explained the different workshops will focus specifically on preparing the students on the necessary curriculum for college. The subjects math and science will be the main focus of the sessions in which volunteers from Kent State will come in and tutor whomever is struggling with the material.
"Math and Science is so critical when it comes to the workplace," said Phrenger. "Periodically throughout the year college aged mentors will check in on the students. We'll do fun events to build that role model experience with them too." Once a student has gone through the workshops and financial advisory sessions, they can choose to attend a Kent State branch where they will receive a full scholarship.
If the student chooses not to attend a branch, they will not receive the scholarship, but Phrenger says they will still have all the tutoring sessions and financial meetings received throughout middle and high school. "We're hoping with this program to expand," said Phrenger. "The campus is interested in doing all of the county and other school districts but at this point we only have funding for the two schools." The program is set to start the beginning of next year.
Anyone with questions on the rural scholars program can contact Phrenger at wphrenger@kent.edu
The Review

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News Headline: Research shows being thankful is good for your health (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: Mother Nature Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Even by just writing a 'Thank you' note, participants showed increases in their levels of happiness and life satisfaction.

FAMILY GATHERING: Counting your blessings this Thanksgiving won't just cheer you up — it can improve your health and energy levels as well. (Photo: DeaPeaJay/Flickr)

Rather than rolling your eyes when it's your turn to bow your head and give thanks, try being grateful. The result just might be good for you. From boosting your mood to improving your relationships, research shows that being thankful is good for your health.

Earn Points

If you don't want to voice your gratitude, writing a letter may do the trick, according to various studies by Steve Toepfer of Kent State University at Salem and his colleagues.

"If you are looking to increase your well-being through intentional activities, take 15 minutes three times over three weeks and write letters of gratitude to someone," Toepfer said in a statement, referring to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Happiness Studies.

Toepfer and his colleagues had 219 students with an average age of 25 fill out questionnaires to gauge their well-being, returning to the lab to fill out the survey three more times, with each visit about a week apart. Some of the students wrote a letter of gratitude each time they returned to the lab, while the control group didn't write about being thankful.

"The letter writers were instructed to write a letter of gratitude to anyone they wanted, however, the letter couldn't be trivial and it couldn't be a 'thank you' note for a gift or 'thanks for saying hello to me this morning,'" Toepfer said. "The participants had to write about something that was important to them."

The results showed that the subjects' levels of happiness and life satisfaction improved after each letter they wrote. In addition, depressive symptoms decreased over time with the letter writing.

Similarly, in a study published in 2010, researchers from the University of California, Riverside, and Duke University in Durham, N.C., asked 220 participants ages 20 to 71 years to write letters of gratitude over a 6-week period, while the control group was asked to list their past experiences. The study found that participants who wrote letters of gratitude demonstrated larger increases in life satisfaction than the subjects in the control group.

Counting your blessings doesn't just cheer you up — it can improve your health and energy levels as well.

A 2007 study conducted by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and the Mississippi University for Women found that organ-transplant recipients who kept "gratitude journals" listing five things or people that they were grateful for each day scored better on measures of general health, mental health and vitality than those who only made routine notes about their days. The study was presented at an annual meeting of the American Psychological Association.

"We found that increased feelings of gratitude can cause people's well-being and quality of life to improve," study researcher Robert Emmons, a professor who specializes in the study of gratitude at UC Davis, said in a statement.

A successful relationship may depend on your gratitude, it seems. Research reported in 2010 looking at more than 65 couples who were in satisfying and committed relationships showed that each couple's relationship quality corresponded with one partner's feelings of gratitude. Researchers tracked the day-to-day fluctuations in relationship satisfaction among the couples and found that on the day that one partner expressed feelings of gratitude, both partners experienced a positive emotional response.

For some couples, these positive feelings lasted until the next day. The findings suggest that everyday gratitude serves as an important relationship-maintenance mechanism and can help to strengthen romantic bonds, according to the researchers.

"We are all walking around with an amazing resource: gratitude," said Toepfer, author of the Kent State University study. "It helps us express and enjoy, appreciate, be thankful and satisfied with a little effort. We all have it, and we need to use it to improve our quality of life."

You can follow LiveScience writer Remy Melina on @remymelina. Follow LiveScience for the latest in science news and discoveries on Twitter @livescience and on .

Related on LiveScience:

Copyright 2011 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "Collectors and Collecting," "Recent Acquisitions to the Collection," "Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox" and "Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido," KSU Museum, front campus, Kent State University.

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News Headline: Touring exhibit showcases Hollywood legend's performance clothes (Druesedow) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Ocala.com
Contact Name: Rick Allen
News OCR Text: Throughout her career, Katharine Hepburn was one of Hollywood's brightest stars.

In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked her the top woman on its “50 Greatest Movie Legends” list. Premiere Magazine ranks her the 14th Greatest Movie Star of all Time; Entertainment Weekly readers go several ranks better — the second Greatest Movie Star of All Time, according to Imdb.com.

Before her death in 2003, she owned four Oscars for Best Actress; one, for “The Lion in Winter,” was a tie with Barbra Streisand. She was nominated 12 times. Her on-and-off-screen romance with co-star Spencer Tracy is legendary, right up there with Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall's.

She embodied Hollywood's heydays, and her style and impact will be reflected at the Appleton Museum of Art. The traveling exhibit, “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen,” opens Saturday and runs through Jan. 22.

It features nearly 150 items from Hepburn's stage and screen career; most of the items are clothing she wore in roles through her career spanning more than half of the 20th century.

“It's a very colorful, dynamic, interesting show,” says Ruth Grim, curator of exhibits at the Appleton. “I think people will enjoy it; it takes you back to that era of filmmaking.”

The exhibit belonging to the Kent State University Museum — perhaps the only museum that collects “performance clothing” — also includes photos, movie posters and other costume bits. For every outfit there's a photo or poster from the film in which she wore it.

There likely will be a lot of “Oh, yeah, I remember” moments.

Because the pieces in the collection were not identified as to which performance they came from, a couple of undergraduate interns “spent their internship simply watching her movies,” says Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State museum and curator of this exhibit.

This is the first time this display has traveled outside of Ohio since its debut at Kent State a year ago. The exhibit is scheduled for a run in New York City late next year.

“We're excited,” Grim says. “We were lucky. The timing was perfect. We weren't in competition with any other venue.”

The Hepburn exhibit is a special project Druesedow's; she's been here all week setting up the display in the same Appleton gallery that hosted the exhibit of Princess Diana's gowns a few years back.

Druesedow explains that when Hepburn died, she directed her personal effects be auctioned for charity, “except her performance clothes, which were to be given to a public institution or museum.”

Many museums feature fashion, Druesedow says, but “most major museums don't collect performance clothes. They're not fashion. Performance clothes are always part of a context — part of a director's idea, a costume designer's idea.

“It's different from street fashion.”

The Hollywood garb ended up in Ohio mostly because of Shannon Rodgers, a founder and benefactor of the Kent State Museum, Druesedow says. He had connections with Hollywood and New York; in 1982 he and Jerry Silverman donated some 4,000 costumes and accessories to the museum.

“He helped with Hepburn costumes in ‘The Warrior's Husband,'” the 1932 Broadway show considered Hepburn's break-out role. It also brought Rodgers to Cecil B. DeMille's attention; DeMille hired him to work on his “Cleopatra,” notes the museum's website.

“Performance clothing is beginning to become an important part of American culture,” Druesedow says, “and needs to be collected seriously.” For instance, Debbie Reynolds' collection, she adds, was recently auctioned and is headed overseas.

But until recently, this type of fashion was “just not as interesting” as street fashion, notes Marilyn Wall, an Emmy Award-winning costumer with the Hippodrome Theatre in Gainesville.

“If it's done right, you don't notice,” she says. “But if it's not, you do.”

Wall, who plans to make the journey to Ocala for the exhibit, says Hepburn “was the kind of actress who totally surrendered herself to a part. And she wanted the costume to be just right.”

The actress typically was outfitted by the best costume designers Hollywood could boast, among them Oscar winners themselves.

“She insisted on the highest quality,” Druesedow says. “She knew what worked best for her character. I believe it was (Oscar-winning designer) Edith Head who once said, ‘You don't design for her, you design with her.'”

After all, outfitting a performer takes way more than a quick run to JCPenney.

“As a costumer, my job is to deliver a happy, well-adjusted actor to the set,” Wall says. “And the costume is a big part of that.”

In addition to movie and some stage clothing, this display also includes several pairs of slacks Hepburn was renowned for wearing. In fact, outside of work she rarely wore a dress or skirt — decades before women routinely wore slacks.

Adds Wall: “She's famous for making men's clothing feminine and sexy; even in blouses fully buttoned up, she exuded sensuality. Everything looks great on her.”

Yet one of the spotlight pieces in the display, Druesedow says, is a black silk evening gown designed for her by Walter Plunkett that she wore in “Adam's Rib” — one of nine films she starred in with Tracy.

“It's gorgeous,” she says, “and really shows off her amazing figure.”

Rick Allen can be reached at rick.allen@starbanner.com.

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News Headline: Holiday music, treats coming to KSU (MacPherson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Chorale
will perform an array of holiday
songs during “Carols and Confections”
at 2 p.m. Dec. 3 in University
Auditorium in Cartwright Hall
on Terrace Drive in Kent. Immediately
following the concert, guests
will be welcome to a variety of holiday
treats and beverages.
The event will serve as a fundraiser
for the Chorales and will include
an eclectic song list. Guests
can expect to hear a wide variety
of seasonal melodies ranging from
the Gregorian chant to Renaissance
songs and from contemporary
carol arrangements to Hanukkah
songs.
A long-standing “Yuletide Feast”
tradition will take a break to allow
“Carols and Confections”
to debut. The “Yuletide Feast”
is a medieval themed dinner
complete with a queen, live
medieval entertainment and
the voices of the Kent State
Chorale. Director, Scott
MacPherson, said the “Yuletide
Feast” would be “better
than ever” when it returns
next year.
Tickets are $12 for
adults, $10 for
seniors and $8
for students
with valid ID
or for children under 18 years
old. Call 330-672-2172 for tickets,
or purchase at the door, cash or
check only.
The Kent State University
Chorale is made up of
students across all majors
who dedicate themselves
to music and
work towards refining
their talents. Each year
the choral performs on campus
and throughout the region, state
and even toured Italy for eleven
days performing in Florence,
Rome, Venice and Greve.

IF YOU GO
WHAT: “Carols and Confections”
WHERE: University Auditorium, Cartwright
Hall
WHEN: 2 p.m. Dec. 3
COST: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8
students with valid ID and children
under 18 years old

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News Headline: Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: OF HOPE
News OCR Text: CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS

When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m.

Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University

Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18

Contact: 330-672-2172

The Kent State University Chorale will perform an array of holiday songs. The event will serve as a fundraiser for the Chorales . Guests can expect to hear a wide variety of seasonal melodies ranging from the Gregorian chant to Renaissance songs and from contemporary carol arrangements to Hanukkah songs. Immediately following the concert, guests will be welcome to a variety of holiday treats and beverages.

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News Headline: Analysts: Egyptian civil unrest to escalate despite military's efforts (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/22/2011
Outlet Full Name: CNN.com
Contact Name: Michael Martinez
News OCR Text: (CNN) -- The showdown between Egyptian street demonstrators and the military-led government will likely escalate in the countdown to next week's parliamentary elections despite the military council's pledge Tuesday to speed up the transition to civilian rule, analysts said.

The impasse bears upon how angry protesters -- gathered once again in Cairo's Tahrir Square as they were during the revolution earlier this year -- are demanding that the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) withdraw immediately from power, analysts said.

At stake is the military's longtime role in Egyptian society -- controlling swaths of the economy from agriculture to bottled water to silverware production -- as well as the integrity of next Monday's first parliamentary elections since the February revolution, analysts said.

On Tuesday, the military council accepted the resignations of the country's cabinet in the wake of protesters' demand for change. The council also said presidential elections will be held by June.

"I don't think the announcement (Tuesday) is the end of the story," said Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat professor for peace and development at the University of Maryland and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

"I think the demands (by protesters) will escalate over the next few days, and the military will have to go back to square one," Telhami said. "We're facing a bigger crisis than one could have imagined just two days ago."

Said Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University and an expert on Egypt: "It is a tough one because we can't see what's coming.

"They've reached a real impasse," he added.

If they continue through next week, the violent demonstrations will likely cast a pall over Monday's parliamentary elections, where two-thirds of the seats will be filled by parties and the other third by open candidates, analysts said.

Such civil unrest could scare away voters -- which in turn could "take away from the legitimacy of the elections and their integrity, and that's very troubling," said Samer Shehata, an assistant professor of Arab politics at Georgetown University.

Analysts credited the council's Field Marshall Mohamed Hussein Tantawi with making a politically savvy maneuver Tuesday when he suggested a national referendum could be held on whether the military-led government should surrender power immediately.

"It's a beautiful move," Stacher said.

If a referendum were held, "it's going to formalize who is rejecting SCAF and who is accepting SCAF and I think the overwhelming number is going to support SCAF," Stacher said. "It's going to take that public spectacle we're seeing, and it's going to expose them as not having many numbers.

"We might see 75-25, with 25% voting against SCAF hypothetically," Stacher continued about possible referendum results. "We can get this dynamic which would give SCAF a stamp of legitimacy and numerically categorizes the opposition. They can call them instigators, but that doesn't make them go away."

After four days of clashes with government forces in Cairo and elsewhere in the country, 30 Egyptians have died and some 1,950 more have been injured, the Health Ministry said.

In a further effort to satisfy protesters, Tantawi announced that a technocratic civilian cabinet will replace the one that resigned and that the caretaker military-led regime would hand over power after next June's presidential elections, analysts said.

But those declarations failed to placate the vast majority of demonstrators, the experts said.

Egyptians have been angered by the sort of human rights violations that were outlined Tuesday in an Amnesty International report that stated SCAF "has resorted to familiar patterns of abuse" as seen under former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade dictatorship, analysts said.

At the same time, civilians have been tried in 12,000 military tribunals since February -- while military personnel are tried in civilian courts for their offenses, such as breaking up labor discontent, Stacher said.

The military does "not want to give civilians oversight of their budget, and so you know what they're asking for is to be the unchecked power behind the throne," Stacher said. "They were one among equals in February, and now they are first among equals."

This week, Telhami of the University of Maryland released the results of an Egyptian opinion poll he took three weeks ago that showed only 20% of the public believed the military is trying to advance the goals of the revolution and 43% believed the armed forces are actually working against those goals, Telhami said.

Many leaders of the military, including Tantawi, were longtime members of Mubarak's regime, but the leadership threw Mubarak "under the bus" to save itself during the revolution, Georgetown University's Shehata said.

"The stakes are very high, and it's unlikely to see how these issues can be reconciled easily," Shehata said. "Essentially, the military is objecting to democracy and civilian control of the military, which is the objective of democracy.

"How can you hold elections in such a situation, with continuing instability and lack of security?" Shehata said. "That makes the transition more muddied and muddled."

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News Headline: Coastal Services, November/December 2011 (Wilson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Coastal Services Center
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ecosystem-Based Management: What Makes It a Success?

“It provides a lot of insights and guidance, or suggestions for people struggling with implementing ecosystem-based management.”
Jeff Reutter, Ohio Sea Grant

What are the characteristics that make up a successful ecosystem-based management effort? An Ohio researcher who recently set out to discover the answer to that question has come up with the top 10 requirements for effective ecosystem management.

“Planning is the straightforward part of managing an ecosystem,” says Greg Wilson, associate vice president for research at Kent State University. “Implementation is the difficult part because that's where you need to have all these pieces in place for success.”

To determine the key management characteristics that are important to success, Wilson surveyed aquatic ecosystem managers in Lake Erie, Puget Sound, Tampa Bay, Chesapeake Bay, and the Baltic Sea, all of which have adopted an ecosystem-based management approach.

“I think there are lessons to learn from the successes and struggles in these systems that can be applied more broadly,” says Wilson, who received funding from the Ohio Sea Grant College Program to conduct the research for his doctoral dissertation.

“It provides a lot of insights and guidance, or suggestions for people struggling with implementing ecosystem-based management,” says Jeff Reutter, director of Ohio Sea Grant.

More Accurate Reflection
Ecosystem-based management has long been cited as a solution to the combination of human activities on land, along the coasts, and in the ocean that are affecting marine ecosystems.

“For many years, we managed systems one species or one element at a time,” Reutter says, “but more and more we're learning you have to manage the entire ecosystem.”

“Ecosystem-based management is a more accurate reflection of the real world,” Wilson says. “Obviously, people are having a big impact on these systems, and resource management decisions based on science have economic, political, and social implications. All of that needs to be taken into consideration.”

As more managers implement an ecosystem approach, Reutter says, studies like Wilson's “will help us know what works and what doesn't work and will allow us to hone in on and replicate those characteristics that make ecosystem-based management a success.”

Survey Process
Wilson conducted a Web-based survey of ecosystem managers of various types in the five aquatic ecosystems he was studying.

Respondents included aquatic scientists, fisheries managers, watershed managers, and those focused on the entire ecosystem. They worked for a variety of organizations, including government agencies, universities, businesses, and nongovernmental organizations.

Survey questions focused on the respondents' involvement in ecosystem-based management, their area of focus, their perceptions of how the process was working in their area, and whether it was implemented voluntarily or was legislatively mandated. There were also questions about the condition of the ecosystem they were working in.

The survey was sent out to 985 people and had a 35 percent completion rate.

Public Engagement
According to survey results, the most important element of managing an ecosystem is public engagement.

“Environmental appreciation, even though it's difficult to measure, is an important factor in management. If people aren't up on the science or don't have a direct connection, they're not likely to get involved and help preserve the ecosystem,” Wilson says.

He adds that “once the public is engaged and they become more educated about what is going on in their system, it helps people get on the same page, and it enables the process to move faster.”

There were a range of scores for public engagement in the five ecosystems studied. Tampa Bay received the highest marks, and Lake Erie received lower marks than expected.

Reutter notes, “We saw across the board that there's still a pretty significant level of education that needs to be done.”

As a result of the survey, he's renewing Sea Grant's focus on explaining to people why Lake Erie needs to be managed as an ecosystem.

“What this really points out is that managing any of these resources has to start way up in the watershed,” Reutter says. “We can't manage Lake Erie from Lake Erie, or the Chesapeake Bay from the Chesapeake Bay. We have to have a management plan that focuses on the entire watershed and that informs all the users within that watershed what we're trying to accomplish and how their particular action impacts the entire watershed.”

Differences in Perspectives
Wilson categorized respondents in several ways to see if they had different perspectives of how ecosystem-based management was working. Across all the ecosystems, he found significant differences among groups of stakeholders about how successful they perceived the initiative.

Managers in government agencies and the watershed and ecosystem fields generally viewed ecosystem-based management as a success, but aquatic managers and those in academic and business fields didn't agree.

“That's an interesting insight,” Reutter says. “How might your background and profession change your opinion on whether ecosystem-based management is working or not? Again, that clearly shows the need for a lot more education and outreach.”

Size Matters
Another finding was that implementing ecosystem-based management in a large system is more difficult than doing so in a smaller one.

“This does provide some suggestions as to why ecosystem-based management worked better in certain locations,” Reutter says. “Some of it is simply the size and the complexity of the ecosystem.”

What was unexpected was that voluntary efforts were equally as effective as those that were legislatively mandated.

“I expected to see much more success for the regulatory programs,” Reutter says. “This may suggest that the best way for industries to avoid regulation is to take a lot of voluntary action to solve problems and avoid the need to be regulated.”

He adds, “There's tremendous logic in the elements that the survey found make up successful ecosystem-based management. The bottom line for us as managers is to focus on those 10 things and ask ourselves how we're doing and how we can improve.”

For more information on the Ecosystem-Based Management Survey, contact Greg Wilson at (330) 221-7296 or greg.wilson@kent.edu.

The top 10 characteristics of successful ecosystem-based management:

Public engagement
Strong leadership
Communication among stakeholders
Incentives for collaboration
Cross-boundary facilitators
Clear, measurable goals
Science-based decisions
Legislative mandates sometimes needed
Adaptive management
Sustainable funding

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