Report Overview:
Total Clips (46)
Aeronautics (1)
Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (1)
Athletics; University Communications and Marketing (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
Community Outreach (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Higher Education; Housing in Kent (1)
Hillel (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem; Scholarships (3)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Salem (2)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull (3)
KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
KSU Museum (2)
May 4 (1)
Music (6)
Political Science (1)
Research (1)
Students (2)
University Bookstore (1)
University Libraries (1)
University Press (1)
University Press; Wick Poetry Center (1)
University Relations (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics (1)
Kent State Flight Team Recognized at Statehouse 11/28/2011 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Local artist utilizes new technology to create illustrations 11/23/2011 Signal Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...learned how to draw. “Drawing is not taught,” he said. “It's something that comes out from inside.” He continued to develop his artistic abilities at Kent State University in Ohio, where he received a bachelor's of fine arts at 20. The working artist After college, Clatterbuck soon began...


Art, School of (1)
Instrument maker learns from teacher 11/25/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Nov. 25--CUYAHOGA FALLS -- Chance encounters can change everything. Joe Heindel walked into a Kent State University art classroom in 2001 ready to learn. The professor, Doug Unger, was captivating. "He had me locked in," Heindel recalled....


Athletics (1)
GALLERY: Brunch Bunch "fun-raiser' brings in $34,000 11/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Athletics; University Communications and Marketing (1)
Colleges learning ABCs of avoiding X-rated trouble Move to protect brands from new adult domain 11/23/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

"Fear the Roo," the University of Akron slogan tied to its marsupial mascot, could take on a totally different meaning if it became fair game for an X-rated website....


College of Business (COB) (1)
PHOTOS: TURN BACK THE CLOCK - RECALLING YANK'S GREATNESS 11/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Community Outreach (1)
Survivors of suicide loss gather for national event 11/26/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

...and understanding, dozens gathered at the 13th annual National Survivors of Suicide Day on Nov.19, with members of the Suicide Prevention Coalition at Kent State University helping the loss their loved ones. Some who lost someone 18 years ago, and some lost someone the week before. "It's unfortunate...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Going Places: Nov. 21, 2011 11/26/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...who's climbing the corporate ladder in Northeast Ohio. MID-AMERICA ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM PERSONNEL: Geraldine Hayes-Nelson (Kent State University) received the 2011 Trio Achiever Award.


Entrepreneurship (1)
Blackstone LaunchPad Expands to Northeast Ohio 11/25/2011 Foundation Center, The Text Attachment Email

...because of its critical need for new jobs and dedication to entrepreneurship, particularly at the collegiate level — three-year grants were awarded to Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, and Lorain County Community College. The four institutions...


Higher Education; Housing in Kent (1)
Real estate trends: College town real estate 11/23/2011 CBSNews.com Text Attachment Email

...State University ($650,111) and UC Berkeley ($636,958). At the same time, four of the least expensive campuses for home purchases can be found in Ohio: University of Akron ($139,711), Ohio University in Athens ($141,964), Kent State ($153,662) and University of Toledo ($155,286)....


Hillel (1)
AEPi, Hillel hold Latkepalooza 11/28/2011 Cleveland Jewish News - Online Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Young, budding journalist implored to listen with an open mind: Your Turn 11/27/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...man went on. “Today is Monday. On Thursday evening, I graduate from Mayfield High. In the fall, I will be studying journalism on a full scholarship to Kent State University.” “Listen,” I responded, “in your career . . . you are going to have the opportunity to write plenty of stories. Make...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem; Scholarships (3)
New Kent State program will target rural scholars 11/23/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...education after high school and would be first-generation college students. According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. Phrenger hopes to branch out to other...

New Kent State program will target rural scholars 11/25/2011 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...education after high school and would be first-generation college students. According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. Phrenger hopes to branch out to other...

New Kent State program will target rural scholars 11/25/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...education after high school and would be first-generation college students. According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. Phrenger hopes to branch out to other...


KSU at Geauga (1)
Job help, networking events: Business calendar 11/26/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

FRIDAY Geauga Growth Partnership Inc. Entrepreneurs breakfast: 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Kent State Geauga Campus, 14111 Claridon Troy Road, Burton. Registration by Dec. 2 recommended. Seating is limited. Email info@geaugagrowth.com...


KSU at Salem (2)
Thanksgiving DOES pay off: Why our bodies and brains pay us back for being grateful (Toepfer) 11/23/2011 Daily Mail, The - Online Text Attachment Email

...product.' 'It affects every major organ system.' Stress hormones such as cortisol are also reduced by the simple act of thanking someone. Another study at Kent State University, Salem, measured the effect. Steve Toepfer had a sample group of students write letters of gratitude to people they knew...

Thanksgiving DOES pay off (Toepfer) 11/26/2011 Sri Lanka Sunday Times Text Attachment Email

...product.' 'It affects every major organ system.' Stress hormones such as cortisol are also reduced by the simple act of thanking someone. Another study at Kent State University, Salem, measured the effect. Steve Toepfer had a sample group of students write letters of gratitude to people they knew...


KSU at Stark (2)
Events to mark World AIDS Day 11/26/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TWP. - To recognize World AIDS Day, Kent State University at Stark will host a series of events and lectures Thursday. Featured events include the presentation SEXED by standup...

KSU-Stark Concert Band to perform holiday favorites Dec. 6 11/25/2011 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TWP. - The Kent State University at Stark Music Department will present a concert of classic marches, big band music and holiday favorites performed by...


KSU at Trumbull (3)
Turkey Trot gobbles up title of largest Trumbull race 11/28/2011 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

Trottin' on Turkey Day 11/28/2011 Tribune Chronicle Text Attachment Email

Turkey Trot raises money for local charities 11/28/2011 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Personality profile: Dr. Donald G. Gerbig Jr. 11/28/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU plans program on domestic, sexual violence 11/28/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Service Learning Initiative at Kent State University at Tuscarawas will have a Domestic and Sexual Violence Awareness Program at 6 p.m. Dec. 8 in Founders Hall auditorium...

Holiday shows lined up at KSU Tusc (Morelli) 11/26/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, with four shows geared for the holiday. Straight off the recent sellout show by Amy Grant and Michael...

Traffic study underway for gateway to Kent State (Gritzan) 11/23/2011 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...to see a completed study by early next year for the University Drive NE/East High Avenue area. University Drive serves as gateway to the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas, its Performing Arts Center, Buckeye Career Center vocational school, Kent Cove residential housing development...


KSU Museum (2)
ENTERTAINMENT ON THE TENS 11/25/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

If you want to spend . . . <$5 In observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the Kent State University Museum hosts "On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life." This exhibit focuses on domestic life during the...

2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Nov. 25-Dec 1, 2011 11/23/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until...


May 4 (1)
West Side Education News & Notes - KSU May 4 Visitors Center accepting photos from 1960s (Davis) 11/23/2011 Leader Publications - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT — Members of the Kent State University (KSU) community and the general public are asked to contribute to the development of a new May 4 Visitors Center at KSU...


Music (6)
Favorite neighbor will be missed 11/26/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Men's Chorus will be giving two performances in Ottawa County on Tuesday, Nov. 10. The first is at 1:30 p.m. at Oak Harbor...

Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts 11/23/2011 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m. Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18 Contact: 330-672-2172 The Kent...

Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts 11/24/2011 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

...combine a heartwarming collection of both lively and moving songs. CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m. Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18 Contact: 330-672-2172 The Kent State...

Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts 11/24/2011 MapleHeightsPress.com Text Attachment Email

...combine a heartwarming collection of both lively and moving songs. CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m. Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18 Contact: 330-672-2172 The Kent State...

Hard work preceded arts grant approval 11/24/2011 Chagrin Valley Times Text Attachment Email

...Beach Boys, together with the Philharmonic Orchestra family concert celebrating the SCA's 10th anniversary in June. "La Traviata," in partnership with Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music opera workshop, will be offered in September, and the Solon Philharmonic Orchestra, fifth...

KENT STATE GOSPEL CHOIR CONCERT TAKES PLACE DEC. 9 11/23/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Nov.23 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Kent State University Gospel Choir will hold its fall concert on...


Political Science (1)
The Middle East Institute (MEI) - Discussion 11/25/2011 FIND Washington Daybook Text Email

...p.m. EVENT: The Middle East Institute (MEI) holds a discussion on "Insights from Egypt's First Round of Voting." PARTICIPANTS: Joshua Stacher of Kent State University; Mohamed Elmenshawy, columnist for Al Shorouk News; and Graeme Bannerman, scholar at the Middle East Institute DATE:...


Research (1)
Bioengineering Institute - Neuroprosthetics 2012 11/25/2011 O&P Edge - Online Text Attachment Email

...Advanced Prosthetic can be taken from the laboratory to the clinic. There will be contributions from the Universities of Florida, Central Florida, Utah, Kent State, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, the NIH and DARPA. Symposium speakers...


Students (2)
Knitting in the News: Helping Out, Yarn Bombing and Needling Public Figures 11/24/2011 About.com Text Attachment Email

This is another week packed full of knitting news! Let's get started, shall we? A knitathon at Kent State University aimed to produce 100 warm items for folks in need; as of the writing of the linked article, half that amount had been...

Unequaled Holiday Gift For Teens 11/23/2011 TransWorldNews - Online Text Attachment Email

...grades 9-12 and those entering or already in college . In 2011, SuperCamp will be held at eight schools across the U.S., including Stanford, UCLA, Brown, Kent State, UC Berkeley, Wake Forest and University of South Florida. Special savings are available to families that enroll during the holiday...


University Bookstore (1)
Dick Goddard will sign books at KSU bookstore 11/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Libraries (1)
NEOMED unveils new depository for libraries 11/28/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
New KSU Press series 11/27/2011 Civil War Books And Authors Text Attachment Email

For a long time, Kent State University Press has carried only one Civil War related series in their catalog, Lesley Gordon's Civil War in the North. However,...


University Press; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Stephen Frech authors fourth volume of poetry, "A Palace of Strangers is No City" 11/23/2011 Web Newswire Text Attachment Email

...also scheduled to give a reading in the Netherlands on August 6. Frech has published three volumes of poetry: “Toward Evening and the Day Far Spent” ( Kent State University Press ) won the 1995 Wick Poetry Chapbook Contest, “If Not For These Wrinkles of Darkness” won the White Pine Press Poetry...


University Relations (1)
Film review: The Ides of March 11/23/2011 The Queensland Courier-Mail Text Attachment Email

Governor Morris (George Clooney) delivers a major speech at Kent State University in a scene from the film The Ides of March. Picture: Supplied Source: Supplied DIRECTED and co-written by George Clooney,...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
Gallery hopping 11/25/2011 News-Herald, The Text Attachment Email

...Ave., Detroit, is featuring "Speak Peace," an exhibit of Vietnamese children's paintings of peace and war, through Dec. 17. The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University compiled the works.


News Headline: Kent State Flight Team Recognized at Statehouse | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Precision Flight Team was recognized on Nov. 16 by the Ohio House of Representatives during a session at the Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio. Representatives Kristina Roegner and Kathleen Clyde passed a resolution to acknowledge the team for being awarded the prestigious Loening Trophy in 2010.

Several members of the flight team attended the session, including Faculty Advisor Dr. Richard Mangrum, Head Coach Tim Palcho and Team Captain Myles Grimm.

“It's nice that Representatives Roegner and Clyde are aware of what we're doing here at Kent State and take the time to acknowledge our efforts,” Mangrum said. “They certainly didn't have to do it, but it's wonderful to be recognized.”

The Loening Trophy is awarded annually to the most outstanding all-around collegiate aviation program in the country. The Kent State Precision Flight team won the highly coveted award at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association's 2010 SAFECON (Safety and Flight Evaluation Conference) competition in Terra Haute, Ind.

“This recognition really represents everything we've been doing and what's great about Kent State's flight program and Kent State as a whole,” said Grimm, a senior flight technology major from Crystal Beach, Ontario. “It symbolizes how hard our team has worked and how much it paid off.”

During the competition, which took place in May 2010, more than more than 450 students representing 29 aviation colleges and universities from across the country competed against each other in 13 different flying and non-flying events. Events included landing, navigation, planning and aircraft recognition.

The Loening Trophy represents superb achievement in aeronautical skills and represents the current benchmark for an overall outstanding collegiate aviation program. Keys for selecting the award recipient include emphasis placed on academics, community involvement, aviation skills and their advancement, a comprehensive safety program and professionalism combined with a proactive enhancement of the future of aviation.

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News Headline: Local artist utilizes new technology to create illustrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Signal Tribune - Online
Contact Name: admin
News OCR Text: Local illustrator Charles Clatterbuck, 76, embraced computer programming to modernize his artistic capabilities and was able to publish a children's book, A Leprechaun Named Big Hat, in the process.
Clatterbuck attended Walden School of Multimedia (Walden) in Anaheim for graphic art and earned a degree at 65. At Walden, Clatterbuck learned how to upload his illustrations to Photoshop and now uses a tablet and a tablet-pen to colorize his pencil-drawn illustrations.
“This technique has taken over for me,” he said.
To publish the book, Clatterbuck collaborated with his daughter, Denise Beck. He created a new series of leprechaun illustrations, and Beck wrote the storyline behind all of the characters.
Clatterbuck's past collections of characters have been featured at art shows around Long Beach. During his shows, admirers of his work asked him what the back stories of the characters were, and that's when the idea for a children's book began.


The eBook cover for A Leprechaun Named Big Hat.

To develop back stories, Beck gave each leprechaun a name. Then, he began researching leprechaun myths, which snowballed into a story about the main character, Big Hat, who decided to “break the silence between humans and [leprechauns], risking everything,”Beck said.
Clatterbuck has several series of characters, including clowns, pirates, trolls, and his upcoming set of jesters. His method of drawing characters starts with one facial feature such as the nose and then continues from that focal point. He never knows what the final character will look like.
“Attitude is the most important aspect of a character,” Clatterbuck said, revealing that he gets many of his facial-feature ideas from watching people at the gym.

The inner artist
“My eighth-grade teacher just marveled over the dumbest pictures [I drew] of stick figures, but it evidently told a story, and she got a hold of my parents and said [my art] was just wonderful,” he said. “And that just set me off. I said, ‘Maybe I can do this; maybe I can draw.'”
Around that time, he spent many hours in study hall drawing pin-up girls from “cheesecake” calendars, which is how he learned how to draw.
“Drawing is not taught,” he said. “It's something that comes out from inside.”
He continued to develop his artistic abilities at Kent State University in Ohio, where he received a bachelor's of fine arts at 20.

The working artist
After college, Clatterbuck soon began working as an art director at a department store called O'Neil's, where he says he was highly paid to hire and manage 17 women artists who supplied 10 department stores with black-and-white pastel paintings of shoes.
“Most artists specialize in fields,” Clatterbuck said. “I can do just about any kind of drawing, like cartoon drawings, drawings of inventions and architectural drawings.”
One of Clatterbuck's less successful jobs was selling sculptures in the mall.
“These other women would come along with dainty [trinkets]. People would come by raving and ask, ‘how much is it?' and she'd say, ‘Oh, a dollar and a quarter, a dollar and a quarter.' She'd go home with like $200 at the end of the day,” Clatterbuck said. “And I was just standing there saying, ‘Hey, come here, man. Do you want to take a look at this?”
Clatterbuck worked in advertising for a short time, producing ad campaigns for Camel cigarettes and used car companies, but playing the drums with a house band at hotels was his most successful and long-term job. He learned how to play the drums at age 5 from a vaudevillian who was a strict mentor and insisted that there was only one right way to play the drums.
When Clatterbuck was drafted into the U.S. Army between World War ll and the Korean War, he played drums for funerals.
“I hated the Army with a passion, and they wouldn't let me go,” he said. “They said, ‘No, you're the head of the drum section, so you're not allowed to go.'”
But the real reason he hated the Army was that he wanted to be a pilot in the Air Force. He had trained to become a pilot in high school in Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), but ultimately wasn't permitted to fly because of bad eyesight. Instead, he became known to his peers as “the guy who could get you out of the Army,” Clatterbuck said. “I showed them how to write a letter to their congressmen.”
To view Clatterbuck's illustrations, visit artwanted.com and search for Charles Clatterbuck.
To purchase the book A Leprechaun Named Big Hat, visit blurb.com/books/784419.

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News Headline: Instrument maker learns from teacher | Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Carney, Jim
News OCR Text: Nov. 25--CUYAHOGA FALLS --

Chance encounters can change everything.

Joe Heindel walked into a Kent State University art classroom in 2001 ready to learn.

The professor, Doug Unger, was captivating. "He had me locked in," Heindel recalled.

But after class, Heindel checked his schedule and realized he was in the wrong room.

He liked Unger so much, he tried to change his schedule but wasn't allowed.

And unfortunately, this would be Unger's last year, so there were no other opportunities.

In the classroom, anyway.

Several years later, Heindel, who was doing computer design work, was dissatisfied with life's direction and was praying for change. He walked into Doug's Dinner Bucket in Boston Township one day in 2007.

There, eating breakfast, was the former art professor.

They struck up a conversation, and Heindel learned Unger had a new occupation: building banjos and mandolins. Sensing some interest, Unger invited Heindel to stop by his home studio in Peninsula.

When Heindel walked into Unger's house a few weeks later, he was transformed.

"I was blown away" by Unger's artistry and craftsmanship, Heindel said. "I thought. 'Man, I can get into this.' "

The seed was planted.

Heindel had played guitar since he was a boy, so he decided to "give wood a shot." He had a large chunk of oak from a tree that had fallen in his backyard in Stow.

With additional visits and encouragement from Unger, he made a slide guitar for local guitarist Freddy Hill.

Unger liked what he saw.

Heindel's next instrument was a violin for his girlfriend, Beth Canfield.

In 2008, he made four guitars while seeking tutelage from Unger.

"He taught me that everything is art, from art work, to your studio, to your relationships," Heindel said. "It's all art."

Heindel tried to pay Unger for the help, but the answer was always no. "He won't let me pay for a damn thing."

Unger was impressed with Heindel from the beginning.

"Joe has an amazing brain," he said. "He has an artist's skill, which is amazing, and he is a workaholic, and you can't beat that."

Unger took Heindel on a visit to Elderly Instruments in Lansing, Mich., a firm that sells Unger's instruments online. Now they sell Heindel's instruments, too.

Unger, 69, said that he retired after 35 years of teaching, and that that was his intention -- to retire -- but Heindel was "kind of hard to say 'no' to."

And as for being paid, he said: "I just want to help people who are interested."

Unger learned his instrument-making skills on his own. About 35 years ago, he borrowed a banjo from a friend. When the friend wanted the banjo returned, he challenged Unger: "You're an artist, make one."

So, he did.

Unger now is widely known in the music world for his intricately designed artistic wood carvings and engraved pearl inlays. He has won recognition for his work, including the Ohio Heritage Award from the state of Ohio in 2005 and a National Endowment for the Arts award in 1993.

His banjos and mandolins sell for $4,500 to $10,000.

"The thing about a banjo that is different than a painting is that when you make a banjo and somebody gets it, the journey starts for the banjo," he said. When someone purchases a painting, he said, "the journey is over for the painting."

He said he loves the idea that his instruments are played around the world.

"They are better than we are. They are more together than I am. They are more beautiful than I am. They are unlimiting. I am limiting," Unger said.

And the business of Unger's protege continues to flourish.

Heindel and Canfield were married last summer, and for the women who donated the wedding dress -- she plays the ukulele -- Heindel made her an instrument.

Now he has requests for ukuleles.

Heindel, 30, and his wife moved this year to Cuyahoga Falls, where he makes instruments full time in his garage.

He said he has made about 30 instruments since his journey began and sells guitars starting at $1,700 and ukuleles starting at $600. Both can sell for much more money, depending upon how much work is involved, he said.

And he is passing along the goodwill he received from Unger.

He is encouraging and helping his friend, Greg Guarneri, who is developing his own line of guitars. Guarneri visits Heindel's studio to watch and help.

Heindel said he believes God has been instrumental, so to speak, in taking him on this path.

"I am going to do what I think I am called to do, and where that leads me, I am going to let it lead me on," he said.

For more on Heindel Guitars, go to www.heindelguitars.com or email him at heindelj@yahoo.com or call 330-354-8396.

For more on Doug Unger go to www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSbhYImgCGQ.

Jim Carney can be reached at 330-996-3576 or at jcarney@thebeaconjournal.com.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: GALLERY: Brunch Bunch "fun-raiser' brings in $34,000 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There was no shortage of holiday spirit — or generosity — as the Brunch Bunch brought in about $34,000 during its 43rd annual Thanksgiving charity “fun-raiser” Thursday morning at the American Legion Hall in Kent.
Dozens of donated items, ranging from a Goodyear blimp ride to a stint as honorary coach of the KSU Golden Flashes' basketball team, drew spirited bidding as they were auctioned off for more than two hours by Mike Tontimonia and guest auctioneers Rob Senderoff and Herb Page.
“We were very pleased with the turnout and level of positive energy in the room,” said Michelle Hartman, Brunch Bunch committee chairwoman.
“It is not unusual for donations to come in after the event, so we should have a final fundraising total within the next week. However, based on the preliminary numbers, the committee is very excited to share that the preliminary totals show that Brunch Bunch raised about $34,000 this year,” she said. Last year's event raised about $30,000.
Proceeds benefit Kent Social Services hot meals program, Center of Hope food cupboard, Coleman Professional Services Adult Day program and The Lord's Pantry emergency food cupboard.
Among the high-bid items were several auctioned off by Senderoff, head coach of the KSU Golden Flashes basketball team, who brought in $3,000 for an “ultimate fan” package that included two season's tickets and a variety of promotional items.
Joining Senderoff were Devareaux Manley and Kris Brewer, two freshman members of the Golden Flashes, who assisted in auctioning items.
“You can have a picture with them for $2,500,” the coach said as the bidding on the fan package rose. “You can take them home with you for $3,000.”
Senderoff also auctioned off an honorary coaching position for an at-home game that included behind-the-scenes time with the team as well as a spot alongside the coach at the game.
“When the fans yell, they can yell at you instead of me,” he said. “You also get credit for the win if we win. I'll take the blame for the loss.” The bidding topped out at $1,750.
Herb Page, head men's golf coach at KSU, did a stint as honorary auctioneer, offering a variety of golf-themed items that proved popular.
Bidding for the Goodyear blimp ride for drew $1,000, prompting Tontimonia to offer a second ride for the same amount. A signed original “Crankshaft” comic by KSU alumnus Tom Batiuk brought $500. An autographed photo of another alumnus, Josh Cribbs of the Cleveland Browns, drew a $200 bid.
Dinner for eight catered by the Mark Frisone family, a popular item in recent years, brought a top bid of $1,200. A four-course chef's dinner for six at the Rusty Nail went for $300. Dinner for two at Laziza, the new Mediterranean restaurant set to open next month in Acorn Alley, drew a $170 bid.
Among the more unusual items on the auction block were two large sandstone fragments salvaged from demolition at the Crain Avenue Bridge site. Mayor Jerry Fiala and Record-Courier Editor Roger J. Di Paolo, who shared a table, went home with them after bidding $150 each.
The Brunch Bunch received a donation of $1,400 from Portage Community Bank, a partner organizer for the event. Bank president Rick Coe said the money was raised by bank employees who paid $2 every Friday for the right to wear jeans to work.
“It truly takes a team effort of volunteers and community support to make this event successful, and we are grateful for the overwhelming support we receive each year,” Hartman said.
“Although we never know what the final numbers will be when we start the day, we do know that we are helping to provide much needed funds to non-profit organizations within our community and for this, we will be back next Thanksgiving to do it all over again.”

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News Headline: Colleges learning ABCs of avoiding X-rated trouble Move to protect brands from new adult domain | Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Farkas, Karen
News OCR Text: "Fear the Roo," the University of Akron slogan tied to its marsupial mascot, could take on a totally different meaning if it became fair game for an X-rated website.

That's why the university has moved to block the slogan's use on the new .xxx online domain for adult entertainment and pornography. Other Ohio universities are taking similar steps to protect their brands.

Ohio State University is seeking to register a number of trademarks in addition to its name - including mascot Brutus, "Buckeyes," "The Shoe" and "Scarlet and Gray." Oberlin College wants to protect "Oberlin." And Kent State University has filed to register its athletic teams' name - the Golden Flashes.

The .xxx domain will join .edu, .com, .gov and other suffixes that are part of online domain names and addresses.

ICM Registry, after 10 years of trying, received approval this year for the controversial domain from the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, the organization that administers Internet addresses.

The public can purchase .xxx domain names beginning Dec. 6.

ICM, located in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., already has banned the names of thousands of famous people and blocked 15,000 other names at the request of governments and agencies.

Businesses, universities and organizations not affiliated with adult entertainment had until Oct. 31 to purchase an .xxx domain name for their official registered trademarks through a registrar company, such as GoDaddy.com.

Those names will be unavailable on ICM's .xxx registry when it opens in December. ICM reported that more than 80,000 applications were received to secure a domain so it could be used or blocked.

It was recommended that a trademark be registered if it is well known, is highly visible in online searches or has a denotation that would make it desirable as a .xxx domain. It costs a few hundred dollars to file.

"I think everybody would associate [a .xxx domain] with something related to pornography and you would just as soon not have that out there for an institution," said Rick Van Brimmer, director of trademark and licensing at Ohio State.

While "Oberlin" is a trademark and the college's application to shield that address is under review, the application to protect OberlinCollege.xxx was denied since it is not an official trademark, said school spokesman Scott Wargo.

"It is obvious that you want to protect your image and brand name," he said.

Kent State has applied for four domains – kentstateuniversity.xxx, kent.xxx, flashes.xxx and goldenflashes.xxx.

Cleveland State University decided not to buy any domains at this time, according to a spokesman.

Case Western Reserve University said it is exploring the issue and expects it will acquire domain names "in an attempt to prevent misrepresentation of the institution."

CWRU's trademarks include its name, "Think Beyond the Possible" and "Bold Ideas. Lasting Impact," according to Trademarkia.

The University of Akron filed to protect 10 trademarks, including "Fear the Roo," "Zip Mail," "Rock the Roo" and "Go Zips."

"ICM is trying to be as responsible as possible," said spokeswoman Loren Pomerantz. "It understands that not everyone will want their name associated with the .xxx."

After Dec. 6, universities can protect names or phrases that are not trademarked by purchasing a .xxx domain on the open market, Pomerantz said. And if someone else buys that domain name and uses it in a way that is objectionable to the university, ICM will take it down until a court determines who should be awarded the domain, she said.

"Everybody understands the sensitive nature of it all," Pomerantz said. "We want to make it as easy as possible for people to participate or not with the understanding that a lot of organizations will not want to be associated. The thing is, the .xxx serves both sides. You know what you are getting when you go to a .xxx site, so people can avoid it."

Ohio State's Van Brimmer said he has talked to colleagues at other universities and all agreed it was worth it to take a pre-emptive measure regarding the .xxx domain. He said it was the first time he was aware that companies had been allowed to block names in a given domain before it opened to the public.

"It's like a land grab," he said of people buying domain names. "We have had many of them try to sell us back the names through the years."

But registering to protect trademarks does not eliminate someone else registering a name that includes an extra letter, word or play on a name that makes it similar to yours, said Van Brimmer. There is a process to stop them, but it is time-consuming and expensive, he said.

"It's almost impossible to cover yourself," he said.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: kfarkas@plaind.com, 216-999-5079

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: PHOTOS: TURN BACK THE CLOCK - RECALLING YANK'S GREATNESS | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Original Publication Date: June 1, 1965
Ravenna golf standout Yank Heisler (standing center) is surrounded by his six sisters (from left to right) Anita, Sue, Dee Dee, Marcia,
Carol and Nancy.

Original Publication Date: May 31, 1966
Yank Heisler (far left) is greeted by Mark Miller (center) and his aunt, Mrs. Jim
Heisler, upon his return to the city after winning the state championship in 1966.
It was the standout's second consecutive state crown after winning it in 1965
as well. Heisler fired a 2-under par 70 in the final round to finish his 36-hole effort
at 145. The total was five strokes better than runner-up Phil Alkire of Washington
C.H. Heisler did not have a three-putt during the entire tournament.

Original Publication Date: May 29, 1969
Yank Heisler, who was a two-time state champion for the Ravenna Ravens, was elected captain during
his junior season on the Harvard golf team. Heisler was named captain of the 1967 freshman team and had
been a two-year star for the Crimson. As a sophomore, Heisler posted a 13-4 record, tying a Harvard record
for most victories in a season. “Yank is constantly setting a good example by his conscientious effort to improve
his game,” said Heisler's coach at the time Cooney Wiland. “He should make an excellent captain. He
is a tough competitor, extremely consistent and accurate, and a fine putter.”

Original Publication Date: July 19, 1963
Yank Heisler, shown here at age 15, won the Thunderbird Invitational golf tournament for the 13-to-15 age
division in an event that was held in Norwalk, Ohio. Heisler's first major youth tournament victories came
at the age of 12 when he won the Mid-America Junior Championship and also bested the field at the Great
Lakes Bantam Championship. Locally, Heisler won the Chestnut Hills Championship three years straight, dating
back to when he was 12 years old. Additionally in 1963, Heisler, alongside his father Robert Heisler, won
the father-son event at Twin Lakes.

Click here to view photos: http://www.recordpub.com/images/media/20111127/pdf/C04.pdf

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News Headline: Survivors of suicide loss gather for national event | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: At the Coleman Access building in Ravenna, a candle is lit.
"We're glad many people know and come to us for closure," said Emergency Services Coordinator Paul Dages. "At the same time, too many people are here for one horrific reason."
Another candle is lit.
Dr. Joel Mowrey, associate director of the Mental Health and Recovery Board in Portage County, helps set up a 90-minute broadcast to help people understand how they're not alone. He also prepares himself to help answer the question, "Why did this happen?"
One candle is blown out.
According to the Portage County Coroner's Office, 28 people completed suicide in 2010. For closure and understanding, dozens gathered at the 13th annual National Survivors of Suicide Day on Nov.19, with members of the Suicide Prevention Coalition at Kent State University helping the loss their loved ones. Some who lost someone 18 years ago, and some lost someone the week before.
"It's unfortunate how high the numbers are," Mowrey said. "We're just here to try and spread the word that suicide can happen to anyone."
Two candles are placed next to each other, lighting one then the other, but to represent pain and eventually acceptance to move forward, survivors blow out one candle while keeping another one lit.
Coleman Access was one of many conferences for survivors of suicide loss taking place throughout the U.S. and around the world. At each site participants watched a 90-minute DVD by the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention. The not-for-profit organization's purpose is to help people understanding suicide through research, education and to reaching out to people with mental disorders and those impacted by suicide.
"A lot of people just don't want to talk about it at first," Mowrey said. "I'm surprised to find those here who recently lost a loved one, but even though it's painful, it's a big step"
According to the AFSP, every 15 minutes, someone completes suicide. Ninety percent of those people are likely to be diagnosed with depression.
"Survivors deal with three things: Anger, guilt and shame," Dages said. "I'm just hoping with the amount of people we had, they all understand how to live through it."
Survivor Iris Angle asked herself the same questions after losing her son to suicide over 18 years ago. She helps others experiencing the same loss find comfort through her stories. She will soon sell her self-published book "Tell Your Story Walk: One Mother's Legacy" with proceeds going to the AFSP.
"My son Eric would've been 39 this year," Angle said. "This day as well as the coalition have helped me found peace in grieving for my son, I just hope it helpsothers who don't know what to do after it happens to them."

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News Headline: Going Places: Nov. 21, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Find out who's climbing the corporate ladder in Northeast Ohio.

MID-AMERICA ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM PERSONNEL: Geraldine Hayes-Nelson (Kent State University) received the 2011 Trio Achiever Award.

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News Headline: Blackstone LaunchPad Expands to Northeast Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Foundation Center, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Blackstone Charitable and Burton D. Morgan foundations have announced grants totaling $3.2 million to expand the Blackstone LaunchPad program to Ohio.

The program presents entrepreneurship as a viable career path and provides students, faculty, and alumni with tools and guidance needed to transform ideas into thriving businesses. To help train the next generation of entrepreneurs in Northeast Ohio — a region chosen because of its critical need for new jobs and dedication to entrepreneurship, particularly at the collegiate level — three-year grants were awarded to Baldwin-Wallace College, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, and Lorain County Community College. The four institutions will work to expand existing entrepreneurship programming and opportunities and provide students with access to an extensive network of mentors, experts, and services. Unlike traditional college programs available to a limited population, Blackstone LaunchPad is open to all students, regardless of major.

Modeled after a University of Miami program, the LaunchPad program debuted last year at Walsh College and Wayne State University in Detroit — a region that has long struggled economically — and after nine months boasted an enrollment of 319 students, 110 of whom had completed initial proposals.

"Northeast Ohio has made great progress reinventing itself by returning to its entrepreneurial roots," said Morgan Foundation president and CEO Deborah D. Hoover. "Blackstone LaunchPad will fill a gap by linking fledgling entrepreneurs to practical tools and experienced mentors to champion novel business ideas through venture formation and ultimately to the marketplace. We are investing in Blackstone LaunchPad to help demystify entrepreneurship as a career path, spur start-ups for Northeast Ohio, and build a vibrant regional economy where young people want to work and live."

“Blackstone Charitable Foundation and Burton D. Morgan Foundation Commit $3.2 Million to Train Ohio's Next Generation of Entrepreneurs.” Blackstone Charitable Foundation Press Release 11/18/11.

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News Headline: Real estate trends: College town real estate | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: CBSNews.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If your child is on his or her way to college, you're already thinking about the big checks you'll have to write. There's little you can do about tuition at a top college or university, but what about the "room and board" part of the equation?

One of the hottest real estate trends is college students who opt out of living in the dorms and instead are paying "room and board" to their parents in the form of a mortgage payment.

For those with the right amount of cash and a viable credit score, college town real estate might be a really interesting idea - whether your child is going to school there or not.

The folks at Coldwell Banker are on top of this real estate trend, focusing on middle-aged parents with college-bound children. According to the website scholarships.com, the average cost of room and board fees at a four-year college or university runs nearly $10,000 per year. Off-campus apartment housing can strain your budget even further, and in either case, there is no return on your investment. Once spent, that money is simply gone. With these figures in mind, a growing number of savvy parents are selecting another option.

With the comparatively low cost of buying a home (Coldwell Banker reports that almost two-thirds of the nation's top college towns boast a median sale price of less than $250,000 for a four-bedroom, two-bath property), a growing number of concerned parents are opting to purchase a home for their students to live in while completing their education. Labeled "parent investors" by Coldwell Banker's network of real estate agents, 64 percent of the agents surveyed reported encountering this type of buyer.

"Our survey suggests two types of investors see value in college towns," said Jim Gillespie Chief Executive Officer of Coldwell Banker Real Estate. "Long-term investors take advantage of the steady stream of renters, including students, professors and university officials. 'Parent investors' buy homes for their child to live in while attending college. Roommates provide rental income for the mortgage, and the hope is that students care for the home and it appreciates over time."

Of course not all college towns are created equal when it comes to housing inventory or price appreciation (or depreciation), and some are certainly more affordable than others. Last week, Coldwell Banker released its College Home Listing Report (College HLR).

At the most affordable end of the spectrum were homes on and around the Ball State University campus in Muncie, Ind. Judged to be the least expensive locale to buy a single-family home, a four-bedroom, two-bedroom property carried an average listing price of just $105,000 in 2010. If you think about room and board running an average of $10,000 per year, purchasing a property that can be rented or sold after the kids have graduated seems like an attractive prospect.

At the other end of the spectrum, buying a home with the same dimensions near the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, Calif. runs a cost prohibitive (for most of us anyway) average of more than $1.3 million. That seems like an awful lot to cough up for what is basically temporary housing. Of course, the property could be leased or sold once the kiddies have graduated, but an expense like this would give most parents pause.

In fact, five of the top 10 most expensive college town markets can be found in the state of California: The aforementioned Stanford, UCLA in Los Angeles (average cost $833,087), USC in L.A. (again, $833,087), San Jose State University ($650,111) and UC Berkeley ($636,958).

At the same time, four of the least expensive campuses for home purchases can be found in Ohio: University of Akron ($139,711), Ohio University in Athens ($141,964), Kent State ($153,662) and University of Toledo ($155,286).

If the home is cheap enough and the return on investment is there, buying a home makes more sense to many parents than throwing money away on renting an apartment or dorm.

More on MoneyWatch:

-- Foreclosure victims get new help from feds

-- New mortgage rules offer help for struggling homeowners -- Housing market stumbles, again

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News Headline: AEPi, Hillel hold Latkepalooza | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Jewish News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity and Hillel at Kent State holds Latkepalooza Thurs., Dec. 1 from 6-9 at Cohn Jewish Student Center, 613 Summit St.
Cost is $5 for students and $10 for non-students for all-you-can-eat latkes. An eating contest for $20 also will be held.
Proceeds benefit Sharsharet, which helps to fight breast cancer; Save a Child's Heart, which works to prevent heart disease in Third World countries; and Keshet, which builds programing for adults and children with developmental disabilities.
To make a donation, click this link: http://www.giveforward.com/latkepalooza

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News Headline: Young, budding journalist implored to listen with an open mind: Your Turn | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Sun News Readers
News OCR Text: Earlier this year, as May was turning into June — I was waiting for an RTA bus near Chardon Road in Richmond Heights. All of a sudden, there appeared before me a young man, who behind his dark framed glasses, looked to be about 17. He was sporting a white dress shirt and an attractive neck tie. At his side, he carried a briefcase.

Without any hesitation, this stranger started a conversation. “Hello sir,” he said. “I just came from a courtroom trial in Lake County. It was the last assignment for my journalism class at Mayfield Heights High School. I have to write about what I observed . . . you know, the words and actions of the accused, the lawyers, the judge and the jury. All those helping to decide the fate of the person standing trial.”

The young man went on. “Today is Monday. On Thursday evening, I graduate from Mayfield High. In the fall, I will be studying journalism on a full scholarship to Kent State University.”

“Listen,” I responded, “in your career . . . you are going to have the opportunity to write plenty of stories. Make sure you write some good news. There is so much tragedy, war and violence in this world. We need to read something positive. We need some really good news.”

“Tell me about you,” said the young man (already sounding like a professional journalist).

I answered: “Well, I have lived most of my life in Lyndhurst, but along the way I was a high school teacher . . . including three years in Honolulu, Hawaii. As an actor, I have been in over 40 plays, including one which we were invited to perform at Her Majesty's Theatre in Melbourne, Australia. I then became a clown and traveled to all 50 states on a 10-month tour. I had the privilege of sharing faith, hope and hilarity with Americans in hospitals, schools, rehab centers and residences for senior citizens. What a wonderful gift of joy! Currently, I am working on writing two books and I do a one-man show as a storyteller sharing “Stories from the Road.”

“Well,” said my new young friend, “you've been very successful. I hope that in my lifetime — I am half as successful as you have been.”

“What's your name?” I asked.

“Bruce,” was his reply.

“Listen Bruce,” I said. “You're going to surpass me. You are going to do far greater things than I ever dreamed of doing. You are going to be successful at whatever you attempt. And how do I know that? Because I can sense that you are a very grateful person. And when we show our appreciation and thank the Lord for all the gifts and blessings He bestows on us, guess what? In His great abundance, He gives us more!

Bruce thought for a moment before saying quietly: “I have been blessed. I come from a wonderful family . . . I have truly good friends. I got an excellent education at Mayfield High School and now I have a future of opportunities waiting for me at Kent State.”

When Bruce finished answering, I smiled in amazement and thanksgiving. Our bus came — and once on board, we continued our conversation. “Bruce,” I asked, “if you had to sum up your life in just a few sentences, what would they be?”

Without skipping a beat, he answered: “Oh, I can do that in one sentence: “I am a very happy Christian.” He got off at Wilson Mills and headed home.

Well, Mr. Bruce, there you are finishing your first semester at Kent State. As you sit there in your journalism class, listen with an open mind . . . absorb and learn all the knowledge that is offered to you. Because in the future, with real anticipation, we will be anxious to read your good news.

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News Headline: New Kent State program will target rural scholars | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - A new scholarship program will offer two students from two local school districts the chance to receive a full ride to college. The "Rural Scholars Program" is meant for seventh-grade students who are interested in furthering their education after high school and would be first-generation college students. According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. Phrenger hopes to branch out to other schools in Columbiana County. "This is basically a college access program to help students get into college and stay," explained Phrenger. "It's hard to keep them there, and this program will prepare students for college long before they get there." The program will start by selecting one seventh grade student from both Crestview and Southern, based on the performance of the student. They must exemplify a successful record at school and their family potential income must be 200 percent of the federal poverty line. Once selected by members of their school, the student will go through workshops and several programs throughout the rest of their time in school up until 12th grade. Phrenger explained the different workshops will focus specifically on preparing the students on the necessary curriculum for college. The subjects math and science will be the main focus of the sessions in which volunteers from Kent State will come in and tutor whomever is struggling with the material. "Math and science (are) so critical when it comes to the workplace," said Phrenger. "Periodically throughout the year college-aged mentors will check in on the students. We'll do fun events to build that role model experience with them too." Once a student has gone through the workshops and financial advisory sessions, they can choose to attend a Kent State branch where they will receive a full scholarship. If the student chooses not to attend a branch, they will not receive the scholarship, but Phrenger says they will still have all the tutoring sessions and financial meetings received throughout middle and high school. "We're hoping with this program to expand," said Phrenger. "The campus is interested in doing all of the county and other school districts but at this point we only have funding for the two schools." The program is set to start the beginning of next year. Anyone with questions on the rural scholars program can contact Phrenger at wphrenger@kent.edu

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News Headline: New Kent State program will target rural scholars | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - A new scholarship program will offer two students from two local school districts the chance to receive a full ride to college. The "Rural Scholars Program" is meant for seventh-grade students who are interested in furthering their education after high school and would be first-generation college students.
According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. Phrenger hopes to branch out to other schools in Columbiana County.
"This is basically a college access program to help students get into college and stay," explained Phrenger. "It's hard to keep them there, and this program will prepare students for college long before they get there."
The program will start by selecting one seventh grade student from both Crestview and Southern, based on the performance of the student.
They must exemplify a successful record at school and their family potential income must be 200 percent of the federal poverty line. Once selected by members of their school, the student will go through workshops and several programs throughout the rest of their time in school up until 12th grade.
Phrenger explained the different workshops will focus specifically on preparing the students on the necessary curriculum for college. The subjects math and science will be the main focus of the sessions in which volunteers from Kent State will come in and tutor whomever is struggling with the material.
"Math and science (are) so critical when it comes to the workplace," said Phrenger. "Periodically throughout the year college-aged mentors will check in on the students. We'll do fun events to build that role model experience with them too." Once a student has gone through the workshops and financial advisory sessions, they can choose to attend a Kent State branch where they will receive a full scholarship.
If the student chooses not to attend a branch, they will not receive the scholarship, but Phrenger says they will still have all the tutoring sessions and financial meetings received throughout middle and high school. "We're hoping with this program to expand," said Phrenger. "The campus is interested in doing all of the county and other school districts but at this point we only have funding for the two schools." The program is set to start the beginning of next year.
Anyone with questions on the rural scholars program can contact Phrenger at wphrenger@kent.edu

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News Headline: New Kent State program will target rural scholars | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - A new scholarship program will offer two students from two local school districts the chance to receive a full ride to college. The "Rural Scholars Program" is meant for seventh-grade students who are interested in furthering their education after high school and would be first-generation college students.
According to Wendy Phrenger of Ohio Campus Contacts, this is the first time Kent State is offering this program and will initially only focus on Crestview and Southern Local Schools. Phrenger hopes to branch out to other schools in Columbiana County.
"This is basically a college access program to help students get into college and stay," explained Phrenger. "It's hard to keep them there, and this program will prepare students for college long before they get there."
The program will start by selecting one seventh grade student from both Crestview and Southern, based on the performance of the student.
They must exemplify a successful record at school and their family potential income must be 200 percent of the federal poverty line. Once selected by members of their school, the student will go through workshops and several programs throughout the rest of their time in school up until 12th grade.
Phrenger explained the different workshops will focus specifically on preparing the students on the necessary curriculum for college. The subjects math and science will be the main focus of the sessions in which volunteers from Kent State will come in and tutor whomever is struggling with the material.
"Math and science (are) so critical when it comes to the workplace," said Phrenger. "Periodically throughout the year college-aged mentors will check in on the students. We'll do fun events to build that role model experience with them too." Once a student has gone through the workshops and financial advisory sessions, they can choose to attend a Kent State branch where they will receive a full scholarship.
If the student chooses not to attend a branch, they will not receive the scholarship, but Phrenger says they will still have all the tutoring sessions and financial meetings received throughout middle and high school. "We're hoping with this program to expand," said Phrenger. "The campus is interested in doing all of the county and other school districts but at this point we only have funding for the two schools." The program is set to start the beginning of next year.
Anyone with questions on the rural scholars program can contact Phrenger at wphrenger@kent.edu

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News Headline: Job help, networking events: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: FRIDAY
Geauga Growth Partnership Inc. Entrepreneurs breakfast: 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Kent State Geauga Campus, 14111 Claridon Troy Road, Burton. Registration by Dec. 2 recommended. Seating is limited. Email info@geaugagrowth.com or call 440-564-1060.

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News Headline: Thanksgiving DOES pay off: Why our bodies and brains pay us back for being grateful (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Daily Mail, The - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The meaning of Thanksgiving: Why our bodies and brains pay us back for being grateful

Saying thanks releases 'reward' chemicals in the brain
Body can't be 'fooled' - insincere thanks have no effect
Study of students found that even writing a thank you note increased wellbeing
Levels of stress hormone cortisol plunge
For many of us Thanksgiving - and the other festivals throughout the year - offer a good excuse to catch up with family and friends, and indulge in our favourite foods.
But actually 'giving thanks' - expressing gratitude to another person, whether verbally, physically, or even in the form of a letter - has profound effects on us, not just mentally but physicallly.
Ungrateful people are actually cheating themselves, scientists believe.
The simple act of giving thanks causes release of 'reward' chemicals such as serotonin and dopamine in our brains - but the thanks have to be sincere to trigger the effect
The mere act of thanking people releases chemicals within the body including 'reward' chemicals such as dopamine and serotonin - a neurotransmitter that makes us feel serene and happy - and oxytocin, the 'cuddle' hormone that loving couples release when together.
'If thankfulness were a drug,' says Dr P Murali Doraiswamy, of Duke University, ' It would be the world's best selling product.'
'It affects every major organ system.'
Stress hormones such as cortisol are also reduced by the simple act of thanking someone.
Another study at Kent State University, Salem, measured the effect.
Steve Toepfer had a sample group of students write letters of gratitude to people they knew - thanking them for something that was important to them.
Our brains are adept at filtering out 'thanks' that we have to offer out of social obligation - so to release 'feel-good' chemicals, our thanks have to be sincere
Toepfer ensured the 'thanks' weren't for trivial events such as a gift, but for genuine, meaningful events.
One group of students didn't write letters, one did.
The group that wrote the letters found that their levels of life satisfaction increased - and that those who were experiencing mild depression found that their symptoms abated.
The key, it seems, is genuine gratitude: your body has to 'know' that a positive event has occurred, and that you've responded.
The effects on brain chemistry are so profound that saying 'thank you' causes levels of stress hormone cortisol to plunge - and can even affect mild cases of depression
'Taking 15 minutes to write a letter can instantly increase your well-being'
Our bodies' 'reward' systems are conditioned to ignore a lot of events - to dismiss them as 'noise'.
'If you're looking to increase your well-being, take 15 minutes to write letters of gratitude to someone,' said Toepfer, who published his study in the Journal of Happiness Study.
By thanking someone, you draw your conscious mind's attention to the fact that something good has happened - provoking a neurotransmitter release.
The effect is so measurable, it can even be used to help people with mild depression, says Doraiswamy. Simply being polite can 'trigger' the brain to release 'reward' chemicals and make people feel happier.
'I find the strategy can be particularly helfpul for some people with mild depression and for those with poor psychosocial coping skills,' he says.
Toepfer advises that gratitude isn't just a strategy - it's a resource that we shouldn't ignore.
'We are all walking around with an amazing resource, gratitude,' Toepfer told Livescience. 'We all have it, and we need to use it to improve our quality of life.'

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News Headline: Thanksgiving DOES pay off (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Sri Lanka Sunday Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For many of us Thanksgiving - and the other festivals throughout the year - offer a good excuse to catch up with family and friends, and indulge in our favourite foods.
But actually 'giving thanks' - expressing gratitude to another person, whether verbally, physically, or even in the form of a letter - has profound effects on us, not just mentally but physicallly.
Ungrateful people are actually cheating themselves, scientists believe.
The mere act of thanking people releases chemicals within the body including 'reward' chemicals such as dopamine and serotonin - a neurotransmitter that makes us feel serene and happy - and oxytocin, the 'cuddle' hormone that loving couples release when together.
'If thankfulness were a drug,' says Dr. P Murali Doraiswamy, of Duke University, ' It would be the world's best selling product.'
'It affects every major organ system.'
Stress hormones such as cortisol are also reduced by the simple act of thanking someone.
Another study at Kent State University, Salem, measured the effect.
Steve Toepfer had a sample group of students write letters of gratitude to people they knew - thanking them for something that was important to them.
Toepfer ensured the 'thanks' weren't for trivial events such as a gift, but for genuine, meaningful events.
One group of students didn't write letters, one did.
The group that wrote the letters found that their levels of life satisfaction increased - and that those who were experiencing mild depression found that their symptoms abated.
The key, it seems, is genuine gratitude: your body has to 'know' that a positive event has occurred, and that you've responded.
Our bodies' 'reward' systems are conditioned to ignore a lot of events - to dismiss them as 'noise'.
'If you're looking to increase your well-being, take 15 minutes to write letters of gratitude to someone,' said Toepfer, who published his study in the Journal of Happiness Study.
By thanking someone, you draw your conscious mind's attention to the fact that something good has happened - provoking a neurotransmitter release.
The effect is so measurable, it can even be used to help people with mild depression, says Doraiswamy. Simply being polite can 'trigger' the brain to release 'reward' chemicals and make people feel happier.
'I find the strategy can be particularly helfpul for some people with mild depression and for those with poor psychosocial coping skills,' he says.
Toepfer advises that gratitude isn't just a strategy - it's a resource that we shouldn't ignore.
'We are all walking around with an amazing resource, gratitude,' Toepfer told Livescience. 'We all have it, and we need to use it to improve our quality of life.'

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News Headline: Events to mark World AIDS Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -
To recognize World AIDS Day, Kent State University at Stark will host a series of events and lectures Thursday.
Featured events include the presentation SEXED by standup comic River Huston; free, private HIV testing; and a fundraising party.
Described as blunt and irreverent, Huston will present an interactive multimedia presentation about self-esteem, sexuality, alcohol abuse and HIV/AIDS, addressing her experience living with terminal illness. She will speak at 4 p.m. Wednesday in the Main Hall auditorium.
The free HIV testing is open to students, faculty, staff and community members from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. Study rooms on the library's second floor will be temporarily remodeled to give each person requesting a test an individual room. The test results will be given within 20 minutes, and a qualified counselor will be available to discuss the results.
Bead for Life jewelry will be on sale in the Campus Center Monday to Thursday, benefiting HIV-positive or displaced Ugandan women. Panels of the AIDS Memorial Quilt will be on display from Monday to Friday in the Main Hall lobby and Campus Center lobby.
The RED Party fundraiser will be from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in the Campus Center and will feature games, music, food and a chance to win gift cards. Admission is $2 per person, or free for those who wear red, bring a friend or a personal care item to donate to CHAPS Connection.
For a full schedule of events, contact Cynthia Williams at 330-244-3262 or cdwillia@kent.edu, or visit stark.kent.edu/about/events/world-aids-day.cfm.
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News Headline: KSU-Stark Concert Band to perform holiday favorites Dec. 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -
The Kent State University at Stark Music Department will present a concert of classic marches, big band music and holiday favorites performed by the Kent State Stark Concert Band at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 6 in the Kent State Stark Fine Arts Theatre, 6000 Frank Ave. NW in Jackson Township.
The concert is free and open to the public; however, tickets are required and may be obtained by calling the Kent State Stark Theatre Box Office at 330-244-3348, Monday through Friday, from 1 to 5 p.m.
The award-winning ensemble, comprised of talented high school and college students, faculty and community members, is now under the direction of Richard Kibler, who took over for Dr. Patricia Grutzmacher, founding conductor of the 26-year-old band. Kibler's first concert will include selections by composers Pietro Yon and John Stafford Smith, as well as arrangements by Chip Davis and John Higgins. Dr. Grutzmacher will be highlighted as the guest conductor during the program.
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News Headline: Turkey Trot gobbles up title of largest Trumbull race | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHAMPION

Every year for about the past seven years, participants in the Warren Kiwanis Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot at Kent State Trumbull could say they were part of the largest run/walk in Trumbull County history.

That's because the event has grown larger every year. No other run/walk has more than about 1,000 participants, say the organizers.

This year's Turkey Trot kept the streak alive, as 2,380 people took part — about 200 more than last year, said Ted Rupe, event director.

Much of the attention is focused on the elite runners at the front of the pack, but Rupe says he believes that the event continues to draw record numbers because it gives extra meaning to the holiday, especially when it draws people closer to family and friends.

“It cuts clear across the population,” said Rupe, a recently retired Maplewood school district teacher and running coach who now organizes about 50 run/walks per year.

“So many people walk. So many families participate together,” Rupe said, adding that he's aware of some family members who tailgate at the event.

“It's taking a lot of unique twists,” he said. “It's evolving into a festival, not just a race.”

One festive aspect of the Turkey Trot is the number of people dressing in turkey outfits, carrying stuffed turkeys and other Thanksgiving-related costumes.

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News Headline: Trottin' on Turkey Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About 2,400 run the race before Thanksgiving feast

CHAMPION - It may have seemed more "Groundhog Day" than Thanksgiving day for Tyler Ames and Eric Rupe, who finished in first and second places in the two-mile portion of the 33rd annual Turkey Trot at the Kent State University at Trumbull.

The two men were in the same position in last year's two-mile run.

Ames, 21, of Cortland, won Thursday with a time of 9 minutes, 20 seconds. Rupe finished in 9:32.

"I run this every year," Ames said while catching his breath. "I think I won it three times."

While the fastest runners view the annual run as a competition to be won or lost, for most of the 2,400 people who run, walk or stroll, it is more about beating personal times, getting a little exercise before feasting, and spending time with family and friends.

Paul Spletzer of Newton Falls began running about three years ago. He said he hopes to make running the Turkey Trot a family tradition.

"I didn't do it last year because we went to my daughter's home in Chicago," he said. "We went shopping."

Warren native Jackie Cullins says running the two miles early in the morning allows her to have an extra portion during the evening's Thanksgiving meal.

Cullins, who now lives in Columbus, recently ran her first marathon and wants to keep running.

"Running a marathon was on my bucket list," she said.

Liberty resident Anthony Costa, 16, decided to run the five-miler - the other Turkey Trot race - in order to keep in practice.

"Our cross country season ended early," Costa said. "I want to keep running and see if I can place in my age group."

He did not, but with a time of 30:45.5, Costa came in 40th overall out of 664 people who ran the five miles.

Matt Marlowe, 20, of Warren, said his goal was to finish the two-miler in less than 12 minutes. At 12:24.3, Marlowe was slightly behind his anticipated rate, but it was fast enough to earn him third place in his age group.

Sean Fremon, 45, of Akron, said the Turkey Trot is one of his favorite races because it it a big race and it is well run.

Kinsman resident Justin Hornbeck, 38, has run the turkey trot for three years and last year ran his first marathon.

"I began running because I wanted to lose a few pounds," he said. "Now it is a way for me to get together with a few family a friends. My daughters, Madyson and Myrisa Hornbeck, also run it. This is a bonding activity for us."

Rebecca Mazur returned to Trumbull County from Tucson, Ariz., with her friend, Matt Ford, in part to run in the five-mile run.

"There are turkey trots all over," she said. "Coming here, I get visit home."

"I run because she tells me to," Ford said.

Greg Yurko, the event's chairman, says the annual Turkey Trot is the Warren Kiwanis Club's biggest fundraiser.

"We had pre-registration of about 2,000 people," he said. "Adding day of registrations, we probably will have about 2,400 people running in one of the two races."

That would give them about 150 more people participating this year than in 2010.

The club expects to gross about $40,000, with most of the proceeds going to a dozen preselected local charities, including The Children's Rehabilitation Center, Inspiring Minds, Western Reserve Council Boy Scouts, Cortland Cares, Champion High School Robotics team, the Trumbull County YMCA, the Trumbull County YWCA, Summer Enrichment Program, First Book Trumbull County, Camelot Center, the Kent State University Trumbull Campus Scholarship Fund, and Valley Counseling.

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News Headline: Turkey Trot raises money for local charities | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CHAMPION, Ohio - A record number of people turned out for the 33rd annual Turkey Trot at Kent State Trumbull on Thanksgiving day.

The walk and race attracted a over 2,400 people.

The Warren Kiwanis Club hosts the event every year, which raises money for 13 local charities.

"It's been a tradition and we find families and friends just make it a habit to come here, get a little exercise, raise money for charities," said event co-chair Greg Yurco. "It seems like the event grows every year."

Kent State's Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) team also collected food at the race for the Second Harvest Food Bank.

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News Headline: Personality profile: Dr. Donald G. Gerbig Jr. | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA — Name: Dr. Donald G. Gerbig Jr.

Hometown: Barberton, Ohio

Education: I have a bachelor's degree in biology from the University of Akron, a master's degree in microbiology and doctorate in comparative and experimental medicine from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. After graduate school, I spent two years as a postdoctoral research associate at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and two years at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Prior to coming to Kent State, I was a project manager at a Cleveland biotechnology company.

What do you do for a living? I am an associate professor in the biological sciences at Kent State University. I have been at Kent State since 1996. I spent the first six years at Kent State East Liverpool and the last nine years at Kent State at Tuscarawas.

Who influenced your decision to become an educator? I never really thought I would become an educator. I was being groomed for medical research through the traditional post-doctoral process. I decided that the grant-driven research world was not what I wanted to do once I had a family. Looking back, my time managing laboratories and instructing undergraduates and graduates in laboratory procedures was a training ground for higher education. However, I can identify one teacher, Elroy McMannes, my calculus teacher at Barberton High, who influenced me as an educator. Mr. McMannes had a content knowledge of mathematics that was astounding. He demanded excellence in the classroom and was available every morning before school started for questions. Half of the calculus class was there before school asking questions about the homework we didn't understand. In all my years of education, I have never encountered anyone with that kind of patience. When I finished my Ph.D., I was invited to a Barberton High teacher luncheon to see some of my former teachers. Fortunately, Mr. McMannes was there and I had a chance to tell him how much I admired his patience and teaching style and told him if I ever taught, I hoped I could be as good as he was. A few weeks after the luncheon, Mr. McMannes passed away. I've always been grateful I had the chance to thank him for being such a great role model. Little did I know that five years later, I would be in front of a college classroom.

How good of a job are schools doing today in educating students when it comes to science?
Last year, an article was published that measured reading, science and math scores in 34 countries from students around the world. The U.S. was average in reading and science and below average in math. Those trends are similar to what I have encountered here locally in the classroom.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
When students come back about a year later and tell me my class prepared them for the next level.

What is the most challenging part?
Dealing with students who are not ready for college, but think they are. Studying at the university level is far different than studying at the high school level.

Recent studies have indicated that students spend less time studying and more time socializing. I tell students they must be competent in the subject, not just know enough to pass a test. In addition, there is the aspect of interacting with people with different ideas and backgrounds. That can be challenging but is an integral part of the university experience as well.

What activities are you involved in during your spare time?
Most of my spare time is filled with family activities.

My kids are involved with the band, volleyball and church activities. My children volunteer for various organizations, which means I get involved and volunteer as well. My daughter, Layne, with her friend Emily Mock, started a nonprofit organization called Sole Purpose through Dover First Moravian Church that provides shoes for local children. Our family has assisted in various activities throughout the past year.

What's the title of the last book you read? The last book I read was “Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through His Private Letters,” by Elizabeth Brown Pryor. I bought the book while visiting Lexington, Va.

What's your favorite TV show? “Seinfeld”

What would your dream job be? I'm living the dream.

People would be surprised to know ... I experiment with cheesecake recipes. I think it's from all the years perfecting lab protocols.

Family: My wife, Frances, works for Personal and Family Counseling Services as a prevention specialist. I have three children, Kelsey, a senior at Kent State majoring in biological sciences; Layne, a junior at Dover High; and Gracen, an eighth-grader at Dover Middle School. My parents, Donald and Clara Gerbig, live in the area, as well.

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News Headline: KSU plans program on domestic, sexual violence | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Service Learning Initiative at Kent State University at Tuscarawas will have a Domestic and Sexual Violence Awareness Program at 6 p.m. Dec. 8 in Founders Hall auditorium and lobby.

The program is free and open to the public.

Students from communication studies, biological science and business management courses partnered with COMPASS — The Crisis Rape Center — on this service-learning project.

Program speakers include Gregg Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of Kent State Tuscarawas; Dr. John Pleshinger, a Union Hospital emergency physician; Dr. Nicole Willey, a volunteer at the Crisis Rape Center; Lisa Beltz, assistant professor of biology; Dean Porr, assistant professor of management and information systems; and Alice Crume, assistant professor of communication studies.

The program also will include poster and research presentations on domestic and sexual violence, and a student skit about friends and domestic and sexual violence in relationships.

Volunteers from local agencies involved in domestic and sexual violence shelters and care providers will be available to answer questions. Refreshments will be served following the program.

Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Dr. NE.

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News Headline: Holiday shows lined up at KSU Tusc (Morelli) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Joe Wright
News OCR Text: It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, with four shows geared for the holiday.

Straight off the recent sellout show by Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith comes “Natalie McMaster, Christmas in Cape Breton;” “Yuletide Celebration: Through the Eyes of a Child;” Tuscarawas Dance Center — “The Nutcracker” and The Backstage Studio Performance Company's presentation “Believe,” based on “The Polar Express.” McMaster visits the Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3. The Cape Breton fiddler is considered to be one of the most versatile and exciting young musicians on both the folk music and Celtic music scenes.

The Greater Tuscarawas Children's Chorus will be performing during the second half of the show.

Some of her projects have seen her collaborate and perform with Alison Krauss, The Chieftains, Paul Simon and Luciano Pavarotti.

General Manager Mike Morelli said he has been trying to get McMaster for some time and said the international sensation is fantastic.

He also said it will be a great experience for those performing in the chorus.

“It gives 15 kids a chance to perform with a great talent,” said Morelli.

McMaster's performances are filled with energy, featuring foot-tapping rave-ups, heart-rending ballads and world-class step dancing.

There are still tickets available. Cost (including facility fee and service charge) is $37 to $42 for the mezzanine, $49 to $54 for orchestra area, $37 to $42 for dress circle and $33 to $38 for balcony seating.

The Yuletide Celebration: Through the Eyes of a Child will be at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10. The show is based on the old ritual of going to the attic to get the Christmas decorations, and discovering a box of treasured old Christmas cards. And so begins a trip down memory lane with legendary northeast Ohio singer/songwriter Alex Bevan and the Tuscarawas Philharmonic Children's Chorus. The Philharmonic premiered this program of original music in 2004 and reprises it with new songs and a new sound for the Performing Arts Center. Joining the chorus will be the Greater Tuscarawas Children's Chorus and the Dover High School Women's Chorus.

“It is an extraordinary orchestra by itself,” said Morelli. “And there is a wonderful kind of quality here (at Performing Arts Center).”

Only a few tickets remain. Cost is $18 to $25 for orchestra seating, $11 to $20 in the mezzanine, and orchestra sections and $25 to $34 dress circle and $11 to $20 for balcony seating.

The Tuscarawas Dance Arts Center will perform the Nutcracker on Dec. 15 through 18. Shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday's show is at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8 and there is orchestra-only seating. There are still a few tickets available. Blossoms Fine Flowers also will be selling bouquets for $18 to $38. All bouquets are composed of red and white seasonal flowers with winter berry theme and gold accents.

The Backstage Studio's “Believe” will be at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 20 and features dancers from the Dover studio, who take the classic tale of The Polar Express and transform it into a modern day dance production. The production features all kinds of dance styles including jazz, hip-hop, tap, lyrical, modern and ballet.

“Believe” is choregraphed by Julie DeBois and Ashley Ledezma.

Tickets to the show are $8. There are still a few tickets available for this show.

Morelli said the holiday shows are popular and are in line with goals for the Performing Arts Center.

“We want to bring in acts and all kinds of stuff that is about the community,” he said. “Everybody wants to celebrate and get together. It's fun to come out to a show and also see the tremendous talent we have right here in our community.”

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News Headline: Traffic study underway for gateway to Kent State (Gritzan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Joe Mizer
News OCR Text: Field work for a traffic engineering study is completed for one of the city's fastest-growing, high-volume traffic areas in the city.

Mayor Mike Taylor hopes to see a completed study by early next year for the University Drive NE/East High Avenue area.

University Drive serves as gateway to the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas, its Performing Arts Center, Buckeye Career Center vocational school, Kent Cove residential housing development and the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park.

It also is the route to “Trumpet in the Land,” the county's outdoor historical drama, the Multi-County Juvenile Attention Center and the county dog pound.

Taylor recently announced that discussions will be held with Kent State, Buckeye Career Center, Tuscarawas County Community Improvement Corp. officials and a few others to determine their growth and vision for the future.

Information from those discussions will be provided to the engineering firm and used to finalize the study.

Taylor said the field work has been performed by TMS Engineers of Stow at a cost of $7,110. The city received a state grant of $3,555 to pay its half of the cost. Kent State and Buckeye split the other half, each contributing $1,777.

The study was begun during the fall, when traffic volumes were at their highest as classes resumed at Buckeye Career Center and Kent State Tuscarawas. “We wanted to have accurate traffic counts, at full use as it is today,” Taylor said.

Kent State has a new master plan in place that addresses the north side of University Drive for possible development, Taylor said. Buckeye also has some plans in mind, and “projected growth in the Tech Park over the next five to 10 years would have a bearing on the traffic volumes there,” he noted.

Taylor added that purpose of the study is not only to address the traffic issue of today, but to also take into consideration projected growth.

“I would anticipate that we'll have a completed study presented sometime the first of the year,” Taylor said.

Once recommendations are known, city officials will have to decide when, if at all, to move forward, how they will do it and who will participate.

Taylor believes the major challenge will be financing the project.

University Drive is a former township, two-lane road that extends from East High Avenue to the corporation, where it resumes as a township road. A bridge on University Drive that crosses Beaverdam Creek within the corporation is owned by Tuscarawas County.

Therefore, if the road were to be widened, the bridge also would have to be widened or replaced.

Officials at Kent-Tuscarawas, when the study was announced in January, also were pleased that it was beginning.

“We think the traffic study will be valuable to us as we address traffic and safety concerns regarding the volume of traffic on University Drive,” Walter Gritzan, director of administrative and business services, said.

Gritzan also had noted that Kent State Tuscarawas officials expect traffic to increase in the near future because of the university's increasing enrollments, business developments at the Regional Technology Park and the yet-to-be-determined use of the former county home.

Enrollment at Kent State Tuscarawas has jumped dramatically over the last four years. In 2007, it had 2,039 students, in 2008 there were 2,065, followed by 2,395 in 2009 and 2,802 in 2010.

Tuscarawas County Commissioner Chris Abbuhl said he sees the overall importance of the project as benefiting the county in many ways, not only in assisting the flow of traffic, but also aiding the economic development of the area.

Abbuhl, who also speaks as a CIC board member, said there are many good things going on in that area, and noted that the CIC and commissioners also are looking forward to the vision that Kent State Tuscarawas board of trustees has for the campus and surrounding area.

Regarding the traffic study, “I think that we would be interested when the final results come out to see what type of infrastructure that the study says needs to be put in there, and then hopefully move forward from that point and look forward to watching that area grow — economically, educationally and culturally,” Abbuhl said.

In announcing the study earlier this year, Taylor said that preceding any widening project the city would have to do some underground water and sanitary sewer line upgrades.

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News Headline: ENTERTAINMENT ON THE TENS | Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If you want to spend . . .

<$5

In observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the Kent State University Museum hosts "On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life." This exhibit focuses on domestic life during the Civil War and in the years that followed. A display of women's and children's costumes is supplemented with related photographs, decorative arts and women's magazines. Hours: 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum.

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer

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News Headline: 2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Nov. 25-Dec 1, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: John Gruner
News OCR Text: Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5. Exhibit: On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life. An exhibit about the material circumstances and domestic life during the Civil War and in the years that followed. Display of women's and children's costumes, which is supplemented with related photographs, decorative arts and women's magazines. In observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Through Sunday, Aug. 26. Exhibit: A Day at the Beach. A selection of garments worn near and at the beach between the 1860s and 1910s. Through Sunday, Oct. 7.

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News Headline: West Side Education News & Notes - KSU May 4 Visitors Center accepting photos from 1960s (Davis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Leader Publications - Online
Contact Name: Stephanie Kist
News OCR Text: KENT — Members of the Kent State University (KSU) community and the general public are asked to contribute to the development of a new May 4 Visitors Center at KSU by uploading pictures that show what people looked like, what they experienced and what they cared about in the 1960s.

On May 4, 1970, members of the Ohio National Guard fired at demonstrators, wounding 13 KSU students, four of them fatally. According to KSU officials, many consider May 4 a turning point in the course of the Vietnam War and the Richard Nixon presidency. The 10-year legal battle that followed May 4 raised Constitutional questions and set precedent in the U.S. Supreme Court. The event also led to reform in military policy, according to KSU officials.

The May 4 Visitors Center will tell the May 4 story, set against the political and cultural changes of the 1960s. The center will be located in Taylor Hall, adjacent to the May 4 Memorial.

“Selected photos will be displayed in the May 4 Visitors Center's first gallery, which sets the May 4 story in its time,” said Laura Davis, professor of English and faculty coordinator for May 4 initiatives at KSU. “We're looking for home photos taken between 1950 and 1970. We'd like to show people from all walks of life, engaging in their everyday lives in the '60s.”

Photos will be reviewed weekly, and a prize will be awarded for the favorite photo of the week. The winner will receive a T-shirt from the 40th commemoration of May 4, which was designed by a student.

The deadline to submit photos is Dec. 21.

For guidelines and to upload a picture, visit www.kent.edu/about/history/may4/virtualtour/photos.

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News Headline: Favorite neighbor will be missed | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/26/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Angela
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Men's Chorus will be giving two performances in Ottawa County on Tuesday, Nov. 10. The first is at 1:30 p.m. at Oak Harbor High School. The second will be at 7 p.m. at the Port Clinton High School Performing Arts Center. Twelve students from Port Clinton will be traveling to Kent State the following Friday for a Men's Chorus Workshop.

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News Headline: Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name: OF HOPE
News OCR Text: CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS

When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m.

Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University

Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18

Contact: 330-672-2172

The Kent State University Chorale will perform an array of holiday songs. The event will serve as a fundraiser for the Chorales . Guests can expect to hear a wide variety of seasonal melodies ranging from the Gregorian chant to Renaissance songs and from contemporary carol arrangements to Hanukkah songs. Immediately following the concert, guests will be welcome to a variety of holiday treats and beverages.

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News Headline: Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Well-loved carols and holiday favorites combine a heartwarming collection of both lively and moving songs.

CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS
When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m.
Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University
Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18
Contact: 330-672-2172
The Kent State University Chorale will perform an array of holiday songs. The event will serve as a fundraiser for the Chorales . Guests can expect to hear a wide variety of seasonal melodies ranging from the Gregorian chant to Renaissance songs and from contemporary carol arrangements to Hanukkah songs. Immediately following the concert, guests will be welcome to a variety of holiday treats and beverages.

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News Headline: Sounds of the Season: Holiday Concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: MapleHeightsPress.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Well-loved carols and holiday favorites combine a heartwarming collection of both lively and moving songs.

CAROLS AND CONFECTIONS
When: Dec. 3, 2 p.m.
Where: Cartwright Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent State University
Cost: $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 students with ID or children under 18
Contact: 330-672-2172
The Kent State University Chorale will perform an array of holiday songs. The event will serve as a fundraiser for the Chorales . Guests can expect to hear a wide variety of seasonal melodies ranging from the Gregorian chant to Renaissance songs and from contemporary carol arrangements to Hanukkah songs. Immediately following the concert, guests will be welcome to a variety of holiday treats and beverages.

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News Headline: Hard work preceded arts grant approval | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Chagrin Valley Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Solon Center for the Arts Executive Director Karen Prasser pushed the "send" button to submit a grant application to Cuyahoga Arts and Culture back in September, it was 4:29 p.m., she recalled.
That was just one minute before the submission deadline of 4:30 p.m. that day.
Ms. Prasser's submission on behalf of the Solon Center for the Arts followed hours upon hours of preparation in which she and her staff told a compelling story, she said.
The story was of the successes of the center and its Signature Series, for which the grant's funds would be used to continue in 2012. The series provided for the community exposure to orchestra, musical theater and opera, as well as provided educational opportunities while celebrating the arts in Solon.
Ms. Prasser and her staff told this story through the use of video, photographs and reviews, where the center and its Signature Series were brought to the forefront.
As a result, Solon was one of just five municipalities to receive grant funding, only topped by the Cleveland Municipal School district, in the amount they received.
The art center was awarded $32,433. This will be the third Signature Series funded by Cuyahoga Arts and Culture.
"SCA understands through experience that orchestra and opera have the greatest impact demonstrated by previous audience attendance and financial support," Ms. Prasser said. "This project, in addition to SCA's core business of arts education, will bring added value through quality performances promoting public access and encouraging the breadth of arts programming in Solon."
Ms. Prasser explained that the grant, which is from the cigarette tax in Cuyahoga County, will only fund up to 50 percent. As part of the grant application, she had to show how the SCA would match that. Grant money and a contribution from the Friends of the Solon Center for the Arts, as well as arranging for other funding makes certain that "none of this touches our operating budget," she noted.
This year's series began with "Kiss Me Kate," a musical theater production; "Madame Butterfly," which sold out at the center and "The Christmas Carol Rag," a modern off-Broadway production slated for Dec. 9-11.
With the funding now in place for 2012, the series will kick off with Phil Dirt and the Dozers, a premiere rock ‘n' roll band celebrating the music of the Beach Boys, together with the Philharmonic Orchestra family concert celebrating the SCA's 10th anniversary in June. "La Traviata," in partnership with Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music opera workshop, will be offered in September, and the Solon Philharmonic Orchestra, fifth anniversary season premiere featuring opera soprano Kelly Cae Hogan, from the Metropolitan Opera, will take place in November.
The funding mission for this grant is for "public benefit," Ms. Prasser noted. She said she believes the SCA was successful in obtaining the grant because it has demonstrated that it will do just that - benefit the public with offerings.
"We've shown how we have amazing tentacles in the community, supporting what we are presenting," Ms. Prasser said. "We have a good story to tell."
[ back ]
Chagrin Valley Times The Solon Times, The Geauga Times Courier

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News Headline: KENT STATE GOSPEL CHOIR CONCERT TAKES PLACE DEC. 9 | Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Nov.23 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Kent State University Gospel Choir will hold its fall concert on Friday, Dec.9, at 7:30 p.m.in Cartwright Hall.Doors open at 7 p.m.No tickets are required to attend the concert, but donations will be accepted.

The concert will feature the Kent State Gospel Choir Step Team and special guest artists Djoser Garrison and the Ralston Purkiss Family and Friends.

For more information about the Dec.9 concert, contact Linda Walker at 330-672-2431 or lwalker@kent.edu.

More information about the Kent State University Gospel Choir is available at http://www.kent.edu/music/ensembles/gospelchoir.cfm.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: The Middle East Institute (MEI) - Discussion | Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: FIND Washington Daybook
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Middle East Institute (MEI)

**New

TIME: 1 p.m.

EVENT: The Middle East Institute (MEI) holds a discussion on "Insights from Egypt's First Round of Voting."

PARTICIPANTS: Joshua Stacher of Kent State University; Mohamed Elmenshawy, columnist for Al Shorouk News; and Graeme Bannerman, scholar at the Middle East Institute

DATE: December 2, 2011

LOCATION: MEI, 1761 N Street NW, Washington, D.C.

CONTACT: 202-785-1141; http://www.mei.edu/

Copyright © 2006 Federal Information & News Dispatch, Inc.

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News Headline: Bioengineering Institute - Neuroprosthetics 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: O&P Edge - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Neuroprosthetics 2012
Neural Interfaces as Enablers for Advanced Prosthetic Function
On February 23, 2012 WPI's Bioengineering Institute will host the third Neuroprosthetic's Symposium. The symposium will bring together scientists engineers and advocates focused on the ultimate development of an Advanced Neurally Integrated Prosthetic. Presentations will discuss issues concerned with biomaterials, bioelectronics and biointerfaces that are necessary to be addressed before the concept of an Advanced Prosthetic can be taken from the laboratory to the clinic. There will be contributions from the Universities of Florida, Central Florida, Utah, Kent State, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, the NIH and DARPA.
Symposium speakers include...
Hugh Herr, PhD, Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, MIT
COL Geoffrey Ling, M.D, Ph.D., Program Manager, Defense Sciences Office, DARPA
James J. Hickman, PhD, Professor, Chemistry, Biomolecular Science and Electrical Engineering, Director, Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida
Bruce Wheeler, PhD, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida
W. Grant McGimpsey, PhD, Vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs, Professor of Chemistry, Kent State University
Gerwin Schalk, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Public Health, Biomedical Sciences , Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health
Florian Solzbacher, PhD, Director Utah Nanofabrication Laboratory, University of Utah
Kip Ludwig, PhD, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity, National Institutes of Health / National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Ted Clancy, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Registration
Maintained by webmaster@wpi.edu

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News Headline: Knitting in the News: Helping Out, Yarn Bombing and Needling Public Figures | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: About.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This is another week packed full of knitting news! Let's get started, shall we?

A knitathon at Kent State University aimed to produce 100 warm items for folks in need; as of the writing of the linked article, half that amount had been reached.

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News Headline: Unequaled Holiday Gift For Teens | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: TransWorldNews - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Unequaled Holiday Gift for Teens
Rather than the expensive electronic gadgets that have no enrichment value, families are looking at gifts that provide value and growth opportunities for their kids and grandkids.

Summer academic programs for students in middle school and high school are the hot new gift idea for many parents and grandparents this holiday season, according the head of a leading teen summer enrichment camp.
Families are seeing that the gift of personal growth through enrichment is one of the most valuable presents a young person can receive. Consequently, parents have been enrolling their sons and daughters in SuperCamp at a record pace this holiday season. SuperCamp is a learning and life skills academic summer camp that provides students with growth opportunities academically and in such areas as communication, interpersonal relationships, motivation, leadership, confidence and self esteem.
"What parents and grandparents are doing this year is they're spending their holiday dollars wisely," said SuperCamp President Bobbi DePorter. "They're taking some money that may normally go to the latest video game or cell phone and investing in their kids' futures by locking up a spot in SuperCamp for next summer."
SuperCamp has proven its worth to parents for over 30 years. Major research studies with over 6,000 grads report significant gains in grades, confidence, motivation, participation and self esteem following attendance in the summer program.
Parents echo these results. Karen Shoemaker, a school counselor, says, "I am a huge fan of SuperCamp. My son Mark went for 4 years. It had a huge impact on his life. SuperCamp helped him understand himself as a learner. It also helped him see himself as successful and a leader."
Each student gets something different from the SuperCamp experience, which is why it appeals to the full range of students from 6th grade through college. SuperCamp offers specific programs for students entering grades 6-8 , those entering grades 9-12 and those entering or already in college .
In 2011, SuperCamp will be held at eight schools across the U.S., including Stanford, UCLA, Brown, Kent State, UC Berkeley, Wake Forest and University of South Florida. Special savings are available to families that enroll during the holiday season. More information is available at www.SuperCamp.com and by calling 800-285-3276.

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News Headline: Dick Goddard will sign books at KSU bookstore | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Legendary Cleveland TV personality
and pioneering meteorologist
Dick Goddard will visit the University
Bookstore at Kent State University
from 1 to 2 p.m. Friday to
sign his book, “Six Inches Of Partly
Cloudy.”
Goddard is donating his income from
this book to animal charities.

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News Headline: NEOMED unveils new depository for libraries | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University librarians from the University of Akron, Cleveland State University, Kent State University, Northeast Ohio Medical University and Youngstown State University have worked together to build a singular catalog for their shared book depository, the Northeast Ohio Regional Library Depository.

This catalog is called the Ohio Depository shared catalog.

Representatives from all of the university libraries were on hand recently to celebrate its release at the depository, located on the campus of NEOMED.

Officials from NEOMED say the move is in keeping with Gov. John Kasich's call for continued collaboration and efficiencies in Ohio's university system

"This project took 18 months to complete, and we are very excited about the results and the impact it can have on our partner libraries," said Judy Scalf, manager of the depository. "Combining the catalog has resulted in much greater efficiencies for the depository staff and faster service to its patrons."

The shared catalog has improved patron service as materials are requested from the depository and sent directly to the patron, rather than being routed through individual library inter-library loan departments. This allows requests to be received two to three days faster.

The catalog also allows for more efficient processing, since material stored at the facility can be viewed as a whole entity, rather than five separate university catalogs.

"We are pleased to be able to contribute to efficiencies within the University System of Ohio," said John Magill, executive director of OhioLINK, the state's online catalog system that helps oversee the management of the state's five depositories. "Phase Two of the shared catalog project involves the Northwest Depository holdings of The University of Toledo and Bowling Green University, and Phase Three will involve transferring the Southwest Depository holdings of Wright State University."

Built on the campus of NEOMED in 1993, the depository was the first of its kind in Ohio and was built to alleviate the space crisis in the five university libraries by allowing libraries to remove and store seldom-used materials.

The depository has a storage capacity of 1.5 million volumes. The construction of the facility, at $2.6 million, was approximately one-quarter of the cost of new library construction and other comparable storage alternatives and was praised for its effective use of space and cost efficiencies.

The Northeast Ohio Regional Library Depository, with the leadership of a highly skilled Kent State University systems department, began the initial phase of the Ohio Depository shared catalog by loading the holdings of its five contributing libraries.

The project, in collaboration with OhioLink, itself a cooperative venture of university libraries and the Ohio Board of Regents, is the leading the way for others to join as a state-wide depository cataloging system.

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News Headline: New KSU Press series | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Civil War Books And Authors
Contact Name: Drew@CWBA
News OCR Text: For a long time, Kent State University Press has carried only one Civil War related series in their catalog, Lesley Gordon's Civil War in the North. However, the first volume from a new military focused series Civil War Soldiers and Strategies (edited by Brian Steel Wills) will be published in 2012. This inaugural study will be Hampton Newsome's Richmond Must Fall: The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign, October 1864. Brett should be excited about that.

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News Headline: Stephen Frech authors fourth volume of poetry, "A Palace of Strangers is No City" | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Web Newswire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “A Palace of Strangers Is No City” tells the story of two lovers on either side of an occupied city. The male character, having narrowly escaped the random police arrests, is now officially a fugitive and decides to flee to his fiancée's house by going through Old Town. That medieval city center, with its tangle of streets, becomes the primary setting of the story and the meditative landscape of the character's flight. Full of questions about whom to trust and what to believe, the sequence asks these larger questions: How do we know what's real? What recourse do we have when we feel isolated from the world around us? Where and to whom do we go to feel safe?

“Ultimately, the book is a love story, not in the naïve belief that love can answer all these questions, but in the hopes that love can provide solace and rest in our efforts to sort them out,” remarked Frech.

“Stephen Frech in his sequence of prose poems called ‘A Palace of Strangers Is No City' gives us a Kafkaesque world, signaled by the very first poem that ends with the frightening uncertainty of whether an unknown ‘you' is having a carrousel maker's dream, or whether the carrousel maker is having a dream of the ‘you,'” commented Peter Johnson, Laughlin award-winning poet and professor at Providence College. “There are of course many fine works that have dealt with imaginary and oppressive landscapes, but what makes Frech's book wonderfully creepy is that the oppression is so deeply existential. […] Another prose sequence, Italo Calvino's ‘Invisible Cities' comes to mind, and with Frech's mastery of the prose poem, it's not an exaggeration to say ‘A Palace of Strangers Is No City' ranks with that masterpiece,” he concluded.

“‘A Palace of Strangers Is No City' is a one-of-a-kind experience. In just twenty-two elegant pages it contains an epic journey across an imagined city. The happenings in this city are surreal, ominous, funny and vivid. The circumstances may be dreamlike, but the longing and the wisdom are entirely real,” said John Dalton, author of “Heaven Lake.”

The book has been identified as a finalist for the international Italo Calvino Prize.

Frech will be a featured speaker at the Midwest Writing Centers David R. Collins Writers Conference, to be held June 23-25 in Davenport, Iowa. He will give a presentation of his work on June 24. He is also scheduled to give a reading in the Netherlands on August 6.

Frech has published three volumes of poetry: “Toward Evening and the Day Far Spent” ( Kent State University Press ) won the 1995 Wick Poetry Chapbook Contest, “If Not For These Wrinkles of Darkness” won the White Pine Press Poetry Prize, published in 2001, and “The Dark Villages of Childhood” won the 2008 Mississippi Valley Poetry Chapbook Prize. He has received the Elliston Poetry Writing Fellowship, the Milton Center Post-Graduate Writing Fellowship, and grants from the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation and the Illinois Arts Council.

He is founder and editor of Oneiros Press, the publisher of limited edition, letterpress poetry broadsides. Oneiros broadsides have been purchased by special collections libraries around the world, among them the Newberry Library ( Chicago ), the Beinecke Library at Yale, and the University of Amsterdam Print Collection.

A graduate of Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Cincinnati, Frech currently serves as an associate professor of English at Millikin.

For more information on the publication or to order a copy, contact Gloria Mindock at editor@cervenabarvapress.com or visit www.thelostbookshelf.com.

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News Headline: Film review: The Ides of March | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: The Queensland Courier-Mail
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Governor Morris (George Clooney) delivers a major speech at Kent State University in a scene from the film The Ides of March. Picture: Supplied Source: Supplied
DIRECTED and co-written by George Clooney, The Ides of March is a flip-sided companion piece to Good Night, and Good Luck, the star's award-winning drama from 2005.
Set in the Commie-spooked 1950s, Good Night, and Good Luck was a work of indignation. It railed against the corrupt and misguided who had found a happy home in US politics. Don't let them win, the film seemed to say. The game isn't over as long as someone, somewhere is prepared to get angry.
Set in the present day, The Ides of March is a work of resignation. The corrupt and misguided have settled on Washington as their permanent address. So there can be no mistaking what The Ides of March has to say: They've won. The game is up. What's the use of getting angry? Get with the program.
The film's jaundiced take on modern politics does not mean we are in for a lethargically cynical drama. No, The Ides of March is a sharp, edgily intelligent affair, a gilt-edged guessing game that knows how to keep the mind involved and inquiring throughout.
Clooney plays Mike Morris, a state governor nearing the end of a campaign that could see him become the next Democratic candidate for president.
Morris is slick, sly and a Southerner. The camera loves him. So does the public. In other words, he's another Bill Clinton. Does that also mean our (married) man loves him a young female intern once in a while? Let's not get ahead of ourselves. But do not discount the possibility, OK?
Again, like Clinton, Governor Morris is the frontman for a backroom operation that does all the dirty work a clean-skin candidate cannot be associated with.
The rising star - and the most ruthless foot soldier - in the Morris army is Stephen Meyers (Ryan Gosling), a media strategist with all the answers. And most of the questions in advance as well. Together with campaign chief-of-staff Paul Zara (Philip Seymour Hoffman), Meyers will do anything to bump his man up the queue to the White House.
But, as good as he is at his job, he may be in it for the wrong reasons. Meyers still has a conscience. Zara ditched his many years ago. Don't even bother asking if Morris has his conscience on standby.
You can probably see where The Ides of March will be going from here. But you may not be able to confidently pick the twisty, turny route Clooney the filmmaker has in store.
This is a fine example of topical, intelligent and compelling mainstream cinema. Better still, it is entertaining. And really, with the exemplary cast Clooney has brought in, how could it not be?
The smudged snapshot of politicking presented here stings to look at, but sticks to the truth.
The Ides of March (M)
Director: George Clooney (Good Night, and Good Luck)
Starring: Ryan Gosling, George Clooney, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Paul Giamatti
Husting loose
Rating: 4 Stars

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News Headline: Gallery hopping | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/25/2011
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Swords into Plowshares Peace Center & Gallery, 33 E. Adams Ave., Detroit, is featuring "Speak Peace," an exhibit of Vietnamese children's paintings of peace and war, through Dec. 17.
The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University compiled the works.

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