Report Overview:
Total Clips (37)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (3)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
English; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
Higher Education (3)
KSU at Salem (6)
KSU at Stark (1)
LGBTQ (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Living in Kent (2)
Office of the Provost (1)
Safety (1)
Sustainability (2)
Town-Gown (1)
Undergraduate Student Government (2)
University Libraries (2)
University Press (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)
WKSU-FM (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (3)
Adjusting to college can pose special challenges for veterans 12/12/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

New GI Bill attracts growing number of veterans to colleges (Rider) 12/12/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

New GI Bill a generous 'thank you' to veterans (Rider) 12/11/2011 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...Cleveland VA Medical Center, where veterans can take classes via computer. A Veterans Today Club, a social group, was formed at all Tri-C campuses. At the University of Akron, 1,400 student-veterans can use the new $220,000 Musson Military Veterans Lounge in the InfoCision Stadium for socializing or...


Alumni (1)
Devo still whippin' things up 12/09/2011 Fairfax County Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...to a trivialized corner.” They may not have achieved the respect they felt they had earned, but nearly 40 years after Casale hooked up with fellow Kent State art student Bob Lewis to form the group, Devo fans still love the band's smart, irreverent music. On Dec. 15, Devo, which includes...


Alumni; Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
HONORED: KSU library school names alumna of year 12/10/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email


Board of Trustees (1)
Advisory: Kent State University Board of Trustees Meeting, Dec. 13 12/09/2011 Targeted News Service Text Attachment Email

Advisory: Kent State University Board of Trustees Meeting, Dec. 13 Advisory: Kent State University Board of Trustees Meeting, Dec. 13 KENT,...


College of Business (COB) (1)
THS business students take second at competition 12/11/2011 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

...after their PowerPoint presentation at the third annual High School Business Innovation Competition sponsored by the College of Business Administration at Kent State University Dec. 3. Students from Tallmadge High School Business, Software Tech and Marketing career programs took home second-place...


English; Wick Poetry Center (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Mars probe has link to Kent 12/12/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
KSU fashion students build creative designs for Habitat for Humanity show 12/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A sold-out crowd of more than 800 people came to the Kent State Student Center Ballroom on Saturday night for the Hard Hats and Heels fashion show. The show was a collaboration between students...


Higher Education (3)
EGCC enrollment up 42 percent in five years 12/10/2011 Steubenville Herald-Star - Online Text Attachment Email

...Technical Center, Mahoning County Career and Technical Center, Trumbull Career and Technical Center, Humility of Mary Health Partners, Trinity Health System, Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses and Youngstown State University. The board selected John Gilmore of Jefferson County...

EGCC enrollment increases 42 percent over five years 12/10/2011 Weirton Daily Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Technical Center, Mahoning County Career and Technical Center, Trumbull Career and Technical Center, Humility of Mary Health Partners, Trinity Health System, Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses and Youngstown State University. The board selected John Gilmore of Jefferson County...

EGCC enrollment up 42 percent in five years 12/10/2011 Weirton Daily Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Technical Center, Mahoning County Career and Technical Center, Trumbull Career and Technical Center, Humility of Mary Health Partners, Trinity Health System, Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses and Youngstown State University. The board selected John Gilmore of Jefferson County...


KSU at Salem (6)
Success of horticulture students' project grows ... For the love of peat 12/12/2011 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

Real-world training (Ferranto) 12/10/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...students, along with two faculty members, visited Switzerland and Tanzania before the start of the semester. “We live in a global society, and the goal of Kent State University's college experience is to help prepare students to function in this society,” said Mary Lou Ferranto, assistant professor...

KSU professor says happiness comes with writing (Toepfer) 12/12/2011 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...paper required. "We're communicating a lot, but the quality is low," Toepfer said. An assistant professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University Salem, he said he's always been fascinated by writing. His latest research project showed that writing letters of gratitude...

KSU professor says happiness comes with writing (Toepfer) 12/12/2011 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...paper required. "We're communicating a lot, but the quality is low," Toepfer said. An assistant professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University Salem, he said he's always been fascinated by writing. His latest research project showed that writing letters of gratitude...

KSU professor says happiness comes with writing (Toepfer) 12/11/2011 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...paper required. "We're communicating a lot, but the quality is low," Toepfer said. An assistant professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University Salem, he said he's always been fascinated by writing. His latest research project showed that writing letters of gratitude...

Santa Has Busy Night at Valley Events (McCullagh) 12/09/2011 WYTV - Online Text Attachment Email

...jolly old elf showed up in Salem, Boardman, Warren and Struthers, posing for pictures and even helping out with a fundraiser. The nursing club at the Kent State University Salem campus hosted a "pictures with Santa" event to raise money for orphanages and HIV clinics in Tanzania. Each picture...


KSU at Stark (1)
'Dickens Christmas' on Dec. 18 at St. Jacob's 12/09/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

... The program will be conducted by Mark Alan Schulz, St. Jacob's music director, and accompanied by Karen Gay. Schulz is an adjunct faculty member at Kent State University's department of music. Gay has been the church organist for more than three decades. For more information contact...


LGBTQ (1)
Gay Community Endowment Fund awards grants totaling almost $30,000 12/11/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...violence. • Friends of 91.3, $3,500 to broadcast anti-bullying messages on KIDJAM!, an online children's radio station. • Fusion Magazine, $1,300 for Kent State University's student-produced publication that strives to unify people of different backgrounds and orientations. • Jewish Family Service...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (2)
KSU profs ask Ohio House to recognize youth author (Brodie, Sandmann) 12/09/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS -- Two Kent State University professors are urging lawmakers to name native Ohioan Virginia Hamilton as the state's official children's and youth literature...

Name Hamilton as a state author, 2 KSU profs urge (Brodie, Sandmann) 12/09/2011 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Two Kent State University professors are urging lawmakers to name native Ohioan Virginia Hamilton as the state's official children's and youth-literature...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Grandmothers sought for Kent State research project (Feldman) 12/11/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...the total absence of the child's birth parents. "Custodial Grandparents are a really underserved population," said Karie Feldman, project director of Kent State's School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences. "There aren't a lot of resources for this rapidly growing population,...


Living in Kent (2)
OUR VIEW: Remedy for congested Summit St. in Kent 12/12/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Traffic plan would transform Summit Street near Kent State 12/11/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Office of the Provost (1)
Scene | Heard: Five and counting down at UNM 12/09/2011 BizJournals.com Text Attachment Email

...Douglas D. Baker, provost and executive vice president, University of Idaho; Robert G. Frank, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, Kent State University (Ohio); Meredith Hay, special advisor to the chair for strategic initiatives, Arizona Board of Regents; Elizabeth Hoffman,...


Safety (1)
KSU to help sex assault victims (Tondiglia, Smith) 12/12/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Sustainability (2)
KSU, other sites open lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) 12/09/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Got milk? At a growing number of companies, the answer is yes. Kent State announced this week it has joined the ranks of employers providing "lactation rooms" for breast-feeding employees. For KSU sustainability...

KSU, other sites open lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) 12/09/2011 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

Got milk? At a growing number of companies, the answer is yes. Kent State announced this week it has joined the ranks of employers providing "lactation rooms" for breast-feeding employees. For KSU sustainability...


Town-Gown (1)
Kent revitalization lauded by OEDA 12/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Green Bee. Laziza's Mediterranean Restaurant and Tree City Coffee will open in about a week. Among the dignitaries at that August groundbreaking were Kent State University President Lester Lefton, Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala, executives from Davey Tree, and other city and state officials. The mix of...


Undergraduate Student Government (2)
Hundreds cram for exams at KSU Study-a-Thon 12/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University junior Rebecca Spott of Solon (face in hand) studies a nursing text while hitting the books during a study-a-thon in the...

Hundreds cram for exams at KSU Study-a-Thon - Local - Ohio.com 12/12/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...normally don't think of Grand Forks, N.D., as cutting edge, but a tradition at the University of North Dakota has migrated southeast and found a home at Kent State University. The third Kent State Study-a-Thon drew more than 450 students to the Student Center on Sunday for an all-day...


University Libraries (2)
HONOR 12/11/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

Kent's best in business recognized 12/12/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
Noteworthy books for music fans 12/10/2011 Gazette (Montreal) - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...adulthood, nails an aspect of the rock 'n' roll experience too often overlooked. 1950s Radio in Color: The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards (Kent State University Press, 254 pages, $51) is pop culture scholarship at its very best. For years, a Cleveland disc jockey and concert...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
Gallery hopping 12/09/2011 News-Herald, The Text Attachment Email

...Ave., Detroit, is featuring "Speak Peace," an exhibit of Vietnamese children's paintings of peace and war, through Dec. 17. The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University compiled the works.


WKSU-FM (1)
WKSU raises $5 million in capital fund campaign 12/12/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Adjusting to college can pose special challenges for veterans | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Going from mortars to mortarboards isn't always a seamless transition when it comes to veterans on campus.

They're students in their 20s "with the life experience of 50-year-olds," noted Rick DeChant, executive director for veterans services and programs at Cuyahoga Community College. "Sometimes they don't always see eye-to-eye, maturity-wise, with nonveterans."

One Tri-C student-veteran, Maria Popow, said she tends to gravitate toward other vets on campus. "I relate better to veterans, because we get it," she said. "But I have no problems with civilians, either."

Kent State University student Cat Hofer, 29, of Cuyahoga Falls, noted, "A lot of people in my classes are 18 or 19. Coming back from a combat deployment, and having two kids, at times it makes you feel old."

"The military is like a family -- in relationships and how you are cared for," she added. "Once you come out of deployment, you lose that camaraderie and are on your own."

The challenges facing veterans returning to school can be particularly daunting if they served in a combat zone, and come home with symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) -- as an estimated 27 percent of veterans are, nowadays.

They're former combatants who've "seen the elephant," as Civil War troops once described the initiation to battle.

Cleveland State University psychology professor John Wilson, an early and continuing researcher of PTSD among Vietnam veterans, said veterans are transitioning from a highly structured and regimented military world to a looser academic environment.

"For many of them it's a learning process, and there's a certain amount of apprehension on getting to know how the system works, and secondly, the whole question of socialization," he said.

"They're very intense people, they carry a certain edge to them which you certainly see in vets with PTSD, in particular, and also those who've had combat exposure," he added. "There's a state of hyper-arousal and intensity that doesn't dissipate upon coming home."

Dr. Edgardo Padin-Rivera, chief of psychological services at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, knows the challenges of transitioning from battlefield to blackboard firsthand -- from both his experiences as a soldier in Vietnam and treating veterans nowadays.

"It's almost as if they've been in another world, and now they have to find a way to come back to this civilian life," he said. "They're carrying stuff with them, whether PTSD or not, and even though they understand they're in a safe environment, their body hasn't quite adjusted to that. It's still acting as if anything could happen at any minute, and that gets in the way, cognitively and behaviorally, on a college campus."

Adjustment difficulties can range from minor to extreme. The PEW Research Center reported in October that a poll of 1,853 veterans found that 44 percent described their transition to civilian life as difficult (51 percent of combat vets).

A University of Utah study released in August showed that nearly half of 525 veteran-students surveyed said they thought about suicide, and 20 percent said that at one time they had planned to kill themselves -- rates significantly higher than college students in general.

Colleges have responded with a variety of programs and veterans centers designed to help vets facing transition problems.

Kent State University offers online courses to veterans suffering from PTSD and a peer mentor suicide prevention program for veterans, created by a school psychology counselor and Army vet.

At Tri-C, some staff and faculty members wear a "Buddies in Boots" lapel pin to identify themselves as a veterans resource for assistance or just someone to talk to. "If you see that lapel pin, that's a buddy," said DeChant, who wears one himself.

Wilson and Padin-Rivera provided advice for schools, veterans and nonveterans as far as welcoming former and current combatants to campus.

They recommend that schools have a defined veterans center where vets can go for help and to support each other. Colleges also should assist these students in locating resources and benefits for veterans.

"What's really important is not finding a way to get them there [to school], but to find a way to make sure they get through the system and graduate," Padin-Rivera said.

For veterans, Wilson and Padin-Rivera suggest looking for ways to get support, and not just from fellow vets. Join school groups or clubs. Seek out family support.

And start with a small course load, then add more classes as adjustment problems ease.

For civilian students, they suggest that you don't engage vets in a public forum, ask them if they killed anyone, or try to get them to open up about the war.

Thank them for their service, and try not to pass judgment, Wilson added.

"These veterans did serve their country, did serve voluntarily, and most paid a price for it. That needs to be recognized and appreciated."

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News Headline: New GI Bill attracts growing number of veterans to colleges (Rider) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- When Anthony Gooden had to end a planned career in the Marines because of a medical disability in 2006, he knew there weren't a lot of jobs in the civilian world for a machine-gunner.

That's why he joined thousands of other veterans who have taken advantage of the most generous package of government education-assistance benefits since the original GI Bill of World War II.

To Gooden, 24, of Cleveland, who's studying recording arts and technology at Cuyahoga Community College, the Post-9/11 GI Bill "really helps you to get yourself back on track."

The bill, which took effect in 2009, is one of several education-assistance programs offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Honorably discharged veterans, or those discharged due to a service-related disability, who have served since 2001 are eligible to receive up to full college tuition -- set according to the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition, or $17,500 per year in Ohio.

They also receive a housing allowance ($673.50 per month in 2011), $1,000 a year for books and supplies, and have the ability to transfer these benefits to a spouse or child (after 10 years' service).

The benefit also is available for business, technical or trade schools, correspondence courses and online classes.

Under the previous Montgomery GI Bill, created in 1984, veterans attending college were paid a monthly rate based on the amount of active duty service completed, and generally required to contribute $1,200 to the program while serving on active duty.

An estimated 2 million veterans who have served since 2001 could be eligible to collect Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.

Nationally, the number of veterans receiving Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits has gone from 34,393 in 2009, to 555,329 in 2011. Since its inception, the bill has provided $13.8 billion for the education of 622,000 veterans.

In Ohio, the number of veterans receiving VA education benefits went from 13,176 in 2001 to 20,625 last year (including 8,994 under the Post-9/11 GI Bill).

At a time of declining or flat enrollment at Ohio colleges due to the economy, the financial impact of this growing group of students can be substantial.

A study last year by John Schupp, a consultant to colleges as director of the Supportive Education for the Returning Veteran (SERV) program, estimated that veterans pumped $77 million into Ohio colleges and communities in the 2009-2010 academic year.

Colleges reaching out to the veterans

Increasingly, colleges are creating programs and services specifically geared for veterans. A 2009 survey by the American Council on Education and other groups found that 70 percent of public colleges and 57 percent of private institutions surveyed had increased their veteran-specific programming since 2001.

At Cuyahoga Community College, where one in every 34 students is a vet and the number of student-veterans (now 1,000) more than doubled from 2007 to 2011, "the Post-9/11 GI Bill, without question, had a huge impact," said Rick DeChant, executive director of veterans services and programs.

In response to that enrollment surge, Tri-C created veterans' outreach programs offering individual tutoring, career and personal counseling, peer mentoring and other assistance.

The college also established a Tri-C Veterans Education Connection Center at the newly expanded Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, where veterans can take classes via computer. A Veterans Today Club, a social group, was formed at all Tri-C campuses.

At the University of Akron, some 1,400 student-veterans can use the new $220,000 Musson Military Veterans Lounge in the InfoCision Stadium for socializing or study, and receive transition assistance there, or at the school's Military Services Center.

Some schools are looking at veterans-only housing. A former fraternity house at Ohio State University opened this fall as a residence for up to 17 veterans (of the 1,400 attending OSU).

"It's a place where veterans can get their bearings straight and figure out the next step," said Jim Miller, a university associate vice president. "It approximates a USO." A similar residence hall for 16 vets is planned to open next year at Kent State University, which established a Center for Adult and Veterans Services in 2010 and has seen an increasing number of veterans at its main campus (615 this fall) with another 450 at branch campuses.

"It was the perfect storm of events," said Joshua Rider, assistant director of the center. "The GI Bill is the most robust since World War II. The jobs aren't there and they can come to school and get trained."

He also noted that most veterans at school seem more focused and goal-oriented than traditional college students. "There is a sense of immediacy," he said. "They want to move on and get a job."

Cleveland State University's Veterans Student Success Program is one of only eight in the nation offering a fulltime Veterans Affairs VetSuccess counselor to assist veterans in transitioning from barracks to campus.

Bob Shields, coordinator of the Veteran Student Success Center, said the number of veterans at CSU (now 550 plus 50 veteran dependents) has grown too large to continue veterans-only, entry-level classes once offered at the university.

The veteran center, also staffed by student-veteran employees, provides practical and peer support for incoming vets, and hosts a chapter of Student Veterans of America. "When they come in here they know they're looking at somebody who understands," he said.

Eric Patterson, director of veterans affairs at John Carroll University, said the number of veterans on campus has more than doubled since passage of the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Vets now represent 28 of nearly 3,000 students.

Additions have sweetened the Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits, including the VA's Yellow Ribbon program. If a private college -- such as John Carroll -- charges tuition that exceeds the public maximum allowed for GI Bill assistance, Yellow Ribbon will cover half the excess if the school picks up the remainder.

In Ohio, a GI Promise program was established that allows all veterans, regardless of their home state -- along with their spouses and dependants --to attend Ohio colleges at in-state tuition rates. Some 1,340 vets used the program last year.

"The tremendous range of benefits that 9/11 brings to the table, really resonates with younger veterans," said John Carroll's Patterson.

He said the university participates in the Yellow Ribbon program to cover a veteran's tuition and fees, and additionally offers these students discounted housing, a free on-campus lunch program and academic credit for military training.

He expects that the nation's colleges will see an increasing number of student-veterans as troops are phased out of Iraq and Afghanistan.

Nearly 8 million World War II veterans (51 percent of those eligible) took advantage of the original GI bill, which also offered tuition and cost-of-living benefits. By 1947, these veterans represented half of all college admissions nationally.

"There were not quite 30 of us in my civil engineering class (at Case Institute of Technology), and only one fellow who wasn't a veteran," recalled John Simonetti, 86, of Brunswick, the son of Italian immigrants who became the first in his family to ever go to college, thanks to the GI Bill.

"It made this country," said Simonetti, who went on to help build interstates across Ohio.

The original bill was no less than a "pivotal moment in American history," according to Glenn Altschuler, a Cornell University professor and co-author of the recent book, "The G.I. Bill: A New Deal for Veterans."

The authors noted in the book, "The higher-education provisions of the bill were indeed the keys to a prosperous middle-class life for large numbers of veterans and were a major force in a postwar expansion of higher education that made college part of the life experience of vast numbers of young Americans, veterans and nonveterans alike, in subsequent generations."

Altschuler said government educational aid for veterans has reflected the nation's political climate, as benefits for Korean and Vietnam vets -- plus those serving in the all-volunteer military -- weren't as generous as the original GI Bill.

But he noted that the latest GI Bill reflects the nation's enthusiastic support of current veterans. "This is one where people can agree across ideologies and party, which we haven't seen since World War II," he added.

Veterans adapting to school environment

Local vets appreciate the extra efforts to make them feel at home on campus.

"The biggest problem is the transition," said two-year KSU student Cat Hofer, 29, of Cuyahoga Falls, whose Ohio National Guard unit has been deployed twice. "Coming from the military environment to a civilian environment is a huge and drastic change for people. It is a big bump in the road for most of us.

"I almost dropped out my first semester at Kent because I wasn't ready for a big environment," she added. "But one guy got me involved in the Kent State vets club and I found the camaraderie I had missed. I found my niche and a place where I fit in."

Kyle Lindemann, 27, of Kent, who served in the Marines from 2005-2010, said that without the GI Bill he would have had to take out loans for his education at KSU. "It has been a great experience," he said. "They really have taken care of me."

Gooden credited Tri-C's Veterans Center with helping him find the documents he needed to apply for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits, particularly the housing allowance which helps support his family, including four children, while he's attending classes.

Fellow Tri-C veteran-student Maria Popow, 23, of Lakewood, whose Ohio National Guard unit was deployed twice overseas, said that when she started college two years ago, "It was good to be normal, back in the real world, but at first it's very, very frustrating. You're distracted, and you want to do 500 other things.

"Now I'm on a roll," added Popow, who plans to graduate in 2013 with a degree in information technology networking and software.

Local college officials say student-veterans tend to be focused, goal-oriented and successful.

Last month the Pat Tillman Foundation reported that a national sampling of nine colleges with "robust veteran-specific support services," attended by some 6,000 veterans, service members or dependents, found that these students "are progressing toward degrees consistently or more rapidly than their traditional peers. . . .

"Veteran students had, on average, higher GPAs and retention rates than their traditional student peers," the report added.

CSU veteran center coordinator Bob Shields noted, "The vets come in understanding service. As a group they tend to be more serious, a lot more focused, with a maturity beyond their chronological age.

"They know what hard work is, and they understand the concept of a mission," he added.

University officials are hoping that schools and communities will benefit from student-veterans in ways beyond the short-term infusion of GI Bill tuition and housing money.

Tri-C's DeChant said the role of student-veterans is "critical to the rejuvenation of this area."

And Patterson, at John Carroll, also noted, "We need to bring veterans back to Cleveland in significant enough numbers to help re-invigorate this community. These people are already trained leaders."

But given their limited number, it's unlikely that these veterans will have the same impact on America's future as the vets who benefited from the original GI Bill, according to author Altschuler.

"That doesn't mean the impact on their individual lives is not going to be profound," he added.

More important is the continued willingness of this country to lend veterans an educational hand, Altschuler said.

"In 2011, it's worthwhile remembering that there is a profoundly important role of the government in our society, and the GI Bill is a sterling example of how that role can and should be played," he said.

"Every once in a while, we get it right."

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News Headline: New GI Bill a generous 'thank you' to veterans (Rider) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name: Ben Marrison Commentary
News OCR Text: When Anthony Gooden had to end a planned career in the Marines because of a medical disability in 2006, he knew there weren't a lot of jobs in the civilian world for a machine-gunner.

That's why he joined thousands of other veterans who have taken advantage of the most-generous package of government education-assistance benefits since the GI Bill of World War II.

To Gooden, 24, of Cleveland, who's studying recording arts and technology at Cuyahoga Community College, the Post-9/11 GI Bill “really helps you to get yourself back on track.”

The bill, which took effect in 2009, is one of several education-assistance programs offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Honorably discharged veterans, or those discharged because of a service-related disability, who have served since 2001 are eligible to receive up to full college tuition — set according to the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition. That is $17,500 per year in Ohio.

They also receive a housing allowance ($673.50 per month in 2011) and $1,000 a year for books and supplies. They also can transfer the benefits to a spouse or child after 10 years' service.

The benefit is available for business, technical or trade schools, correspondence courses and online classes.

Under the previous Montgomery GI Bill, created in 1984, veterans attending college were paid based on the amount of active-duty service completed, and they were generally required to contribute $1,200 to the program on active duty.

About 2 million veterans who have served since 2001 could be eligible to collect Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.

Nationally, the number of veterans receiving Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits has gone from 34,393 in 2009 to 555,329 in 2011. Since its inception, the bill has provided $13.8 billion for 622,000 veterans.

In Ohio, the number of veterans receiving VA education benefits went from 13,176 in 2001 to 20,625 last year (including 8,994 under the Post-9/11 GI Bill).

The financial impact of this growing group of students can be substantial.

A study last year by John Schupp, director of the Supportive Education for the Returning Veteran (SERV) program, estimated that veterans pumped $77 million into Ohio colleges and communities in the 2009-10 academic year.

Increasingly, colleges are creating programs and services specifically geared for veterans. A 2009 survey by the American Council on Education and other groups found that 70 percent of public colleges and 57 percent of private institutions surveyed had increased their veteran-specific programming since 2001.

At Cuyahoga Community College, where 1 in 34 students is a vet and the number of student-veterans (now 1,000) more than doubled from 2007 to 2011, “the Post-9/11 GI Bill, without question, had a huge impact,” said Rick DeChant, executive director of veterans services and programs.

In response, Tri-C created veterans' outreach programs offering tutoring, career and personal counseling and peer mentoring.

The college also established a Tri-C Veterans Education Connection Center at the newly expanded Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, where veterans can take classes via computer. A Veterans Today Club, a social group, was formed at all Tri-C campuses.

At the University of Akron, 1,400 student-veterans can use the new $220,000 Musson Military Veterans Lounge in the InfoCision Stadium for socializing or study, and receive transition assistance there, or at the school's Military Services Center.

Some schools are looking at veterans-only housing. A former fraternity house at Ohio State University opened this fall as a residence for up to 17 veterans (of the 1,400 attending OSU).

“It's a place where veterans can get their bearings straight and figure out the next step,” said Jim Miller, a university associate vice president. “It approximates a USO.”

A similar residence hall for 16 vets is planned to open next year at Kent State University, which established a Center for Adult and Veterans Services in 2010 and has seen an increasing number of veterans at its main campus (615 this fall) with another 450 at branch campuses.

“It was the perfect storm of events,” said Joshua Rider, assistant director of the center. “The GI Bill is the most robust since World War II. The jobs aren't there, and they can come to school and get trained.”

In Ohio, a GI Promise program was established that allows all veterans, regardless of their home state — along with their spouses and dependants — to attend Ohio colleges at in-state tuition rates. Some 1,340 vets used the program last year.

Nearly 8 million World War II veterans (51 percent of those eligible) took advantage of the original GI bill, which also offered tuition and cost-of-living benefits. By 1947, these veterans represented half of all college admissions nationally.

“There were not quite 30 of us in my civil engineering class (at Case Institute of Technology), and only one fellow who wasn't a veteran,” recalled John Simonetti, 86, of Brunswick, the son of Italian immigrants who was the first in his family to go to college, thanks to the GI Bill.

“It made this country,” said Simonetti, who went on to help build interstates across Ohio.

Given their limited number, it's unlikely that the new veterans will have the same impact on America's future as the vets who benefited from the original GI Bill, said Glenn Altschuler, a Cornell University professor and co-author of The G.I. Bill: A New Deal for Veterans.

“That doesn't mean the impact on their individual lives is not going to be profound,” he added.

More important is the continued willingness of this country to lend veterans an educational hand.

“In 2011, it's worthwhile remembering that there is a profoundly important role of the government in our society, and the GI Bill is a sterling example of how that role can and should be played,” he said.

“Every once in a while, we get it right.”

balbrecht@plaind.com

kfarkas@plaind.com

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News Headline: Devo still whippin' things up | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Fairfax County Times - Online
Contact Name: Dave Seminara
News OCR Text: Legendary ‘80s group to perform in Falls Church on Dec. 15

Photo from Devo Devo, an ‘80s-era rock band best known for its hit song “Whip it” and for its early-generation MTV videos, will perform Dec. 15 at the State Theater in Falls Church.

They were influential New Wave rockers and early pioneers of the music video. But you might just remember them for their geometric red hats and their hit 1980 single, “Whip it.” They are Devo, the band of brothers from Akron who often find themselves unfairly lumped in with one-hit-wonder bands from the ‘80s like A-Ha, Nena and Big Country, despite their longevity and critical acclaim.

“We were like the Rodney Dangerfields of music,” said Gerald Casale, Devo's co-founder. “We got no respect ever. MTV hardly even acknowledged that we were the pioneers of music videos. We re-wrote history and they relegated us to a trivialized corner.”

They may not have achieved the respect they felt they had earned, but nearly 40 years after Casale hooked up with fellow Kent State art student Bob Lewis to form the group, Devo fans still love the band's smart, irreverent music. On Dec. 15, Devo, which includes nearly all of the members of the original group, returns to the area for a show at the State Theater in Falls Church.

Casale was present at the May 4 Massacre at Kent State in 1970, when National Guard troops opened fire on unarmed student demonstrators, killing four, two of whom were his friends. He said it was a “transformative experience” that made him abandon his hippie ideals and embrace the concept of “de-evolution,” a theory that posits that mankind is essentially regressing. Casale and Lewis named the band Devo based upon the concept and later joined forces with Casale's brother, Bob, who played guitar, and fellow Akron natives brothers Mark, Bob and Jim Mothersbaugh.

“What we noticed about society was that it was falling apart and that people were actually getting dumber,” said Casale, who sings and plays bass guitar and synthesizers. “These days, we realize that the concept was even more real than we thought.”

In their first gig in Akron, the band was pelted with beer bottles and offered $100 to leave the premises after they refused to play Foghat covers as promised.

But Casale said the band began to command more positive attention from record companies after releasing a short film that won an award at the Ann Arbor Film Festival in 1976. The following year they did a cover of the Rolling Stones' hit “Satisfaction,” which Mick Jagger reportedly dug, and by ‘78 they landed a record deal with Warner Brothers.

Shortly after they were signed, Casale sketched an idea for the band's iconic “energy-dome” hats on a piece of graph paper, and found some bright yellow reactor-attendant suits in a janitorial supply catalog for $3. An influential British rock critic called them a “thinking man's Kiss,” and their look was born.

“The hats became completely iconic,” Casale recalled. “People who never bought a Devo record wanted one. I think because they're so stupid, they're cool.”

(The band now sells them for $32 on their website and you can even see how they're made on YouTube.)

The band convinced Warner Brothers to use $15,000 that had been earmarked for promotional efforts on a music video for the single “Whip It.” At the time the concept of using music videos to promote a song was still new, but Devo already had made five videos.

“MTV was desperate for our videos, because they had no programming,” Casale recalled. “They were running our videos day and night and everybody was talking about us. But as soon as MTV went national, they tied their playlist to the top 40 charts and started using our stuff as filler.”

After “Whip It” made it to No. 14 on the Billboard charts, Warner Brothers was hungry for more hits, but Devo had no intention of compromising artistically. They were dubbed “nerd rockers” and they were OK with that.

“People wanted to make us nerds and we were fine with that,” Casale said. “Devo was guilty of engaging in the same kind of sex and drugs that hair bands were but no one was paying attention to us because we were ‘nerds.'”

After releasing eight studio albums in their first twelve years, the band played together only sporadically in the ‘90s and 2000s and in 2010 released “Something for Everybody,” their first new album in nearly 20 years. The band made extensive use of focus groups of Devo fans in preparing the album and even let the band's fans choose what color energy domes they'd wear: “U.N. blue.”

Casale said the band never broke up, but he drifted into the world of advertising. He directed television commercials and created ad campaigns, but continued to ruffle feathers. He took flack from Miller beer, one of his clients, after being quoted in the press admitting that Miller Lite didn't taste good; referred to Disney executives as the “Disney Taliban” for their efforts to censor some Devo songs they planned to release on a children's album; and threatened legal action against McDonald's, after it came out with “New Age Nigel,” a Happy Meal toy that appeared to be an obvious ripoff of their energy dome hats.

Casale is content with the band's legacy and says that performing live is “as good as sex,” even at 63. He said Devo still wants to make a musical and a documentary, write a book, and even open a Devo store.

“I think we'd like to be remembered as what was new about New Wave,” he said. “New Wave was a lot of recycled ideas with some big shoulders and eyeliner. We sounded different, we looked different, we were differen

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News Headline: HONORED: KSU library school names alumna of year | Email

News Date: 12/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Library and Information Science recently name Andrea Muto, class of 1998, as Alumna of the Year. Muto has made significant contribution to the profession and she's a senior legal adviser for a USAID project in Pristina, Kosovo.

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News Headline: Advisory: Kent State University Board of Trustees Meeting, Dec. 13 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Targeted News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Advisory: Kent State University Board of Trustees Meeting, Dec. 13
Advisory: Kent State University Board of Trustees Meeting, Dec. 13
KENT, Ohio, Dec. 8 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:
The Kent State University Board of Trustees will hold its next regular business meeting Tuesday, Dec. 13. The Board will convene at 1:30 p.m. in the George Urban Board of Trustees Conference Room, which is located on the second floor of the Kent Campus Library.
Trustees will retire into executive session at 10 a.m. in the Urban Conference Room to consider specific topics as provided for u . . .
Targeted News Service Information Request Form

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News Headline: THS business students take second at competition | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ryan Gonzales, Michael Moon, Jake Klemm, Donald Spencer and Kody Stauffer, from left, were questioned by a panel of judges after their PowerPoint presentation at the third annual High School Business Innovation Competition sponsored by the College of Business Administration at Kent State University Dec. 3.

Students from Tallmadge High School Business, Software Tech and Marketing career programs took home second-place honors in the third annual High School Business Innovation Competition sponsored by the College of Business Administration at Kent State University Dec. 3.

Each team was required to create one innovative board game for 15- to 18-year-olds. The purpose of the board game was to promote interest and education in science or math. The game could also combine elements of science and math.

Teams designed a physical artifact and presented the innovation to a panel of judges. Each team was also required to create a business plan surrounding their innovation. Each business plan had to consist of the following:

* A company name, innovation name and a brief introduction and overview of the innovation.

* A differentiation strategy for building a brand.

* A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis of the product.

* A marketing strategy for the innovation focusing on the four P's -- product, price, place and promotion.

* A plan to finance the innovation.

* An operations plan.

* A break even analysis with sales forecast and pricing strategy.

Students were required to submit a 200-word abstract explaining their game idea.

Tallmadge team members (seniors Ryan Gonzales, Jake Klemm, Michael Moon, Donald Spencer and junior Kody Stauffer from Joni Giles' Software Tech program, Lisa Haller's Marketing program and Kim Brendel's Business program) were selected to present their plan. The team, dubbed "Team Mad Money" called its game innovation "Super Mega Cash Flow" -- based on questions about financial literacy. The premise and rationale of the game was based on the belief that in today's economic times, increasing the financial knowledge and skills of American youth is critical to their futures and to the future financial stability of the country.

In addition to finishing in second place, Team Mad Money received a cash prize of $250.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Mars probe has link to Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: That $2.5 billion spacecraft that NASA sent
hurtling toward the planet Mars on Nov. 26 is carrying
a radiation detection device whose design
and construction was headed up by former Kentite
Donald M. Hassler III.
Hassler, whose father and younger brother are
faculty members in the English Department at
Kent State University, is a research physicist with
a doctorate from the University of Colorado. He is
the Science Program Director at the Southwest
Research Institute in Boulder and the principal
investigator of the Radiation Assessment Detector
Investigation, which aims to determine the radiation
environment on the surface of Mars.
“The idea is to determine how radiation
might affect the potential
for life on Mars, which may reveal
to what extent radiation might imperil
humans if they were sent to explore
that planet,” his father, Professor
Donald “Mack” Hassler, said
when we spoke this past week.
Professor Hassler and his wife,
Sue, journeyed to Cape Canaveral
to witness liftoff from the Kennedy
Space Center. The spacecraft, powered
by an Atlas rocket, is expected to arrive on
the surface of Mars in early August.
One of America's foremost authorities in the
field of science fiction, Professor Hassler and his
course in science fiction are popular among Kent
State students and surely his subject matter had
to make witnessing the liftoff and his son's role in
the space journey even more meaningful.
“It was beautiful to watch,” he said, but, he added,
the Atlas rocket is a much smaller craft than
the Apollo Saturn rockets that were designed to
send America's astronauts to the moon.
The NASA spacecraft that's heading for Mars is
carrying a six-wheeled craft called Curiosity. It will
traverse the Red Planet's surface in Gale Crater,
a 103-mile diameter depression that is believed
to have been caused by a meteor that slammed
into Mars more than 2 billion years ago. Scientists
chose it as the site for exploration because they
hope its exposed sedimentary rocks will enable
them to mine useful information about the planet
and its geological history.
An expert on solar activity
Dr. Hassler, the
research physicist,
is an expert on solar
activity and much
of his research has
delved into the nature
and effects of
solar flares, those
enormous eruptions
from the sun that
send huge quantities
of radiation out
into the solar system.
Earth's magnetic
fields, including
the Van Allen Radiation
Belt, plus our
atmosphere trap
much of that radiation
and protect
life on earth from
its exposure. Smaller
Mars lacks the atmospheric
protection
that Earth affords humans. Thus, any humans
sent to explore Mars would confront much greater
levels of radiation, and Dr. Hassler's RAD or radiation
detection device will more accurately measure
the exposure while traveling on Curiosity as
it explores Gale Crater.
Dr. Hassler's younger brother is David Hassler,
the director of the Wick Poetry Center at Kent
State and, in a way, their father's field of the science
fiction genre of English literature gives him
a bridge between the physics of the older brother
and the poetry and literature that are the passion
of the younger.
When I asked Dr. Hassler about influences that
got him interested in space studies and physics,
he quickly responded, “the Apollo program,” the
one that enabled humans to walk on the moon.
“It stands as one of mankind's great achievements
and Americans should take pride in the role
they played in making it possible,” he said.
Dr. Hassler said he was disappointed when the
decision was made to de-emphasize human spaceflight
and hopes it will soon be reversed. He was a
youngster in the 1960s when the Americans were
reaching for the moon, “but I would cut out articles
and save them and it got me interested in
physics,” he said.
Dr. Hassler graduated from Roosevelt High
School in 1980. He credits Dr. Jon Secaur, the retired
physics teacher at Roosevelt, who's now a
professor at Kent State, for fueling his interest. He
credits his physics teacher, Professor John Idoine
at Kenyon, for his encouragement, too. Dr. Hassler
is a 1984 graduate of Kenyon.
Unforgettable trip ‘Down Under'
Elsewhere, Kent's Don Schjeldahl, the industrial
relocation expert with the Austin Co.,
of whom I have often written, travels the globe
for his clients to identify the best possible locations
for businesses and industries, but once a
year this globetrotter and his son, Caleb, a firefighter
with the Streetsboro Fire Department,
take a trip together, to enjoy some father-son
quality time.
They've sought out locations far and near for
their travels. This past year, they spent two weeks
exploring in Australia where in Wagga Wagga, a
thriving community of 45,000 people on the edge of
the Outback and approximately 350 miles southwest
of Sydney, Don and Caleb had an experience
they'll never forget.
There, the two men came across two community-
sponsored museums with a full-time curator,
one to exhibit space for local artists and host
a performing arts center, the other, the Museum
of Riverina, with a series of revolving exhibits. The
one they saw included a series of fabricated metal
signs, some 100 years old, that in their day stood
designating large Australian farms that the Aussies
refer to as “Stations.”
But while looking over the fabricated signs, Caleb
spotted another exhibit, “Fully Sick,” dedicated
to various air sick bags and within that exhibit,
found credit for the invention of the first Air
Sick Bag given to Gilmore Schjeldahl, Caleb's
grandfather and Don's father, who invented the
air sick bag in 1949.
“Dad, come here,” Caleb called out.
Upon seeing, halfway around the world, this
credit given his father, who among his many other
inventions also created the mass-produced
plastic sandwich bag many of us still use, Don
said he teared up.
“He didn't like being remembered as the inventor
of the airsick bag, although it is often one
of the first credits mentioned in articles about
him,” Don said.
Inventor created Echo satellites
His father, he said, loved to invent. His inventions
earned him scads of money, which Don said
his father did not do a good job of holding onto
as “he was more of an inventor than a businessman.”
His father, he said, also created the Echo satellites
for NASA, those balloon satellites that were
built during the Sputnik-inspired space race, to
redirect telephone, radio and television signals.
These helped make possible the global communication
systems we all enjoy today.
When his father had a heart attack in the late
1970s, Don said, he became interested in angioplasty
surgery and redesigned and patented the
angioplasty balloon that is used to inflate clogged
arteries.
“He sold his patent rights to that,” Don said.
With his father no longer living, Don said his
mother moved from her home in Minnesota to
Lennox, Mass. to be near her three daughters.
Don's older brother, Peter, resides with his wife,
an actress, in the New York City area, where he
is the art critic for The New Yorker

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News Headline: KSU fashion students build creative designs for Habitat for Humanity show | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A sold-out crowd of more than 800 people came to the Kent State Student Center Ballroom on Saturday night for the Hard Hats and Heels fashion show. The show was a collaboration between students in the Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising and Habitat for Humanity of Portage County.

Fashion design professor Barbara Rhodes said students produced handmade garments from recycled materials and purchases from Habitat's ReStore.

Katie Carter and Daniel Graska greeted guests at the event, which was hosted by the Kent State Habitat for Humanity. Ryan Carr said students in the Kent State chapter work with the Portage County nonprofit in building and remodeling homes.

Like the scene from Gone With the Wind, when Scarlett O'Hara made a gown out of drapes, these innovative students used wallpaper, curtains, drapes, place mats, lampshades, door handles, and nuts and bolts to make wearable fashions.

Behind the scenes, Leah Foster and Jada Stoudemire waited to model. "I'm a finance major," Foster said, "so I had no idea the number of fittings this took." Tremica Odom said the fittings were easy since she and her designer, Keama Garrett, are roommates.

Tom and Cathy Poremba said they came to see their niece Jessica Poremba model.

Each design had a story behind it. Hannah Bartch said designer Laura Brewster used donated flowers from the ReStore for her skirt, while Michaela Neu said designer Shiyae Peng used curtains from Goodwill.

Tyler Dodley said designer Shaneka Turner went through trash cans to find bolts for his belt. Kate Hatker used Capri Sun drink pouches in her design, modeled by Taylor Christy.

Jackson McGreevy, president of the Kent State Habitat for Humanity, welcomed everyone and introduced professor Sherry Nagy, who was commentator for the show.

Jennifer Fagert, Lydia Hoppman, Katelyn McClain and Portage County Municipal Judge Barbara Oswick chose the winning designs.

First-place winner Ellen Freeborn cut up old T-shirts and wove them on a cardboard loom to make fabric for Controlled Chaos, worn by Taylor Shiley. Second-place winner Kaitlynn Fenstermaker was inspired by Vogue Magazine for her design, modeled by Julia Titus. Both winners received sewing machines donated by Vince Quevedo, associate professor of fashion design.

Rounding out the top 10 were designers Donovan Pikus, Kate Hatker, Kevin Moran, Kimberly Geither, Laura Brewster, Shiyae Peng, Daniel Flading and Julie Roden.

Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

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News Headline: EGCC enrollment up 42 percent in five years | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Steubenville Herald-Star - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STEUBENVILLE - Enrollment at Eastern Gateway Community College grew 42 percent during the last five years.

This growth is the third highest among the 23 community colleges in Ohio for the reporting period of fall 2007 to fall 2011. Only Stark State College of Technology and Clark State Community College had larger percentage changes at 82 and 52 percent, respectively.

Patty Sturch, dean of enrollment management and student information, also told the college's board of trustees during its regular meeting Wednesday night that the college's record 16 percent growth this fall contributed to the five-year boost.

Registration for the spring semester is ongoing, Sturch said, and more than 1,700 students have registered.

"That is the most students we have ever had to register this early in the enrollment period. We instituted additional steps to get the current students to re-enroll before they left campus for the holiday break. We believe these actions are paying off and will help with retention," Sturch explained.

In another report, Project Hope had a successful first semester, said Shari Prichard, project administrator.

"With one term, we exceeded our goal of 500 students with 596 health students being served throughout the college's district," Prichard noted.

Project Hope student coaches have weekly discussions with individual students and monthly group meetings as well as helping students to form study groups and to work through life problems blocking their education progress, she said.

Through the $14 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Department of Job and Family Services, Eastern Gateway and its partners offer a variety of certificate and associate degree programs in the health care field to residents in the four-county region.

Project Hope will expand the college's course offerings to include three new career bridge pathways which can all transfer to a four-year registered nurse program, including a one-year paramedic certification, a one-year medical assistant certification and a one-year nurse's aid certification, officials said. All three of the certificates also can serve as a bridge to an associate degree in healthcare information technology, a certificate in practical nursing or an associate degree in nursing.

Eastern Gateway's grant was the only one chosen in the state of Ohio and was one of 17 awarded nationally.

Eastern Gateway's Project Hope partners include Choffin Career and Technical Center, Columbiana County Career and Technical Center, Mahoning County Career and Technical Center, Trumbull Career and Technical Center, Humility of Mary Health Partners, Trinity Health System, Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses and Youngstown State University.

The board selected John Gilmore of Jefferson County as chairman for the new year. William Mullane of Trumbull County was selected vice chairman, and Marilyn Montes of Mahoning County was chosen as secretary.

Board meetings will be held on a bi-monthly basis with the 2012 meetings set for Jan. 11, March 7, May 2, July 11, Sept. 5 and Nov. 7. The meetings will start at 4:30 p.m.

In other business, President Laura Meeks reported the college is renting two classrooms in the IBEW facility in Warren to offer developmental education courses during the day. The building is located near the Trumbull Career and Technical Center, where the college offers classes during the evening.

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News Headline: EGCC enrollment increases 42 percent over five years | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Weirton Daily Times - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From staff reports , Weirton Daily Times

STEUBENVILLE - Enrollment at Eastern Gateway Community College grew 42 percent during the last five years.

This growth is the third highest among the 23 community colleges in Ohio for the reporting period of fall 2007 to fall 2011. Only Stark State College of Technology and Clark State Community College had larger percentage changes at 82 and 52 percent, respectively.

Patty Sturch, dean of enrollment management and student information, also told the college's board of trustees during its regular meeting Wednesday night that the college's record 16 percent growth this fall contributed to the five-year boost.

Registration for the spring semester is ongoing, Sturch said, and more than 1,700 students have registered.

"That is the most students we have ever had to register this early in the enrollment period. We instituted additional steps to get the current students to re-enroll before they left campus for the holiday break. We believe these actions are paying off and will help with retention," Sturch explained.

In another report, Project Hope had a successful first semester, said Shari Prichard, project administrator.

"With one term, we exceeded our goal of 500 students with 596 health students being served throughout the college's district," Prichard noted.

Project Hope student coaches have weekly discussions with individual students and monthly group meetings as well as helping students to form study groups and to work through life problems blocking their education progress, she said.

Through the $14 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Department of Job and Family Services, Eastern Gateway and its partners offer a variety of certificate and associate degree programs in the health care field to residents in the four-county region.

Project Hope will expand the college's course offerings to include three new career bridge pathways which can all transfer to a four-year registered nurse program, including a one-year paramedic certification, a one-year medical assistant certification and a one-year nurse's aid certification, officials said. All three of the certificates also can serve as a bridge to an associate degree in healthcare information technology, a certificate in practical nursing or an associate degree in nursing.

Eastern Gateway's grant was the only one chosen in the state of Ohio and was one of 17 awarded nationally.

Eastern Gateway's Project Hope partners include Choffin Career and Technical Center, Columbiana County Career and Technical Center, Mahoning County Career and Technical Center, Trumbull Career and Technical Center, Humility of Mary Health Partners, Trinity Health System, Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses and Youngstown State University.

The board selected John Gilmore of Jefferson County as chairman for the new year. William Mullane of Trumbull County was selected vice chairman, and Marilyn Montes of Mahoning County was chosen as secretary.

Board meetings will be held on a bi-monthly basis with the 2012 meetings set for Jan. 11, March 7, May 2, July 11, Sept. 5 and Nov. 7. The meetings will start at 4:30 p.m.

In other business, President Laura Meeks reported the college is renting two classrooms in the IBEW facility in Warren to offer developmental education courses during the day. The building is located near the Trumbull Career and Technical Center, where the college offers classes during the evening.

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News Headline: EGCC enrollment up 42 percent in five years | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Weirton Daily Times - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STEUBENVILLE - Enrollment at Eastern Gateway Community College grew 42 percent during the last five years.

This growth is the third highest among the 23 community colleges in Ohio for the reporting period of fall 2007 to fall 2011. Only Stark State College of Technology and Clark State Community College had larger percentage changes at 82 and 52 percent, respectively.

Patty Sturch, dean of enrollment management and student information, also told the college's board of trustees during its regular meeting Wednesday night that the college's record 16 percent growth this fall contributed to the five-year boost.

Registration for the spring semester is ongoing, Sturch said, and more than 1,700 students have registered.

"That is the most students we have ever had to register this early in the enrollment period. We instituted additional steps to get the current students to re-enroll before they left campus for the holiday break. We believe these actions are paying off and will help with retention," Sturch explained.

In another report, Project Hope had a successful first semester, said Shari Prichard, project administrator.

"With one term, we exceeded our goal of 500 students with 596 health students being served throughout the college's district," Prichard noted.

Project Hope student coaches have weekly discussions with individual students and monthly group meetings as well as helping students to form study groups and to work through life problems blocking their education progress, she said.

Through the $14 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Department of Job and Family Services, Eastern Gateway and its partners offer a variety of certificate and associate degree programs in the health care field to residents in the four-county region.

Project Hope will expand the college's course offerings to include three new career bridge pathways which can all transfer to a four-year registered nurse program, including a one-year paramedic certification, a one-year medical assistant certification and a one-year nurse's aid certification, officials said. All three of the certificates also can serve as a bridge to an associate degree in healthcare information technology, a certificate in practical nursing or an associate degree in nursing.

Eastern Gateway's grant was the only one chosen in the state of Ohio and was one of 17 awarded nationally.

Eastern Gateway's Project Hope partners include Choffin Career and Technical Center, Columbiana County Career and Technical Center, Mahoning County Career and Technical Center, Trumbull Career and Technical Center, Humility of Mary Health Partners, Trinity Health System, Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses and Youngstown State University.

The board selected John Gilmore of Jefferson County as chairman for the new year. William Mullane of Trumbull County was selected vice chairman, and Marilyn Montes of Mahoning County was chosen as secretary.

Board meetings will be held on a bi-monthly basis with the 2012 meetings set for Jan. 11, March 7, May 2, July 11, Sept. 5 and Nov. 7. The meetings will start at 4:30 p.m.

In other business, President Laura Meeks reported the college is renting two classrooms in the IBEW facility in Warren to offer developmental education courses during the day. The building is located near the Trumbull Career and Technical Center, where the college offers classes during the evening.

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News Headline: Success of horticulture students' project grows ... For the love of peat | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Christmas wreaths decorated in red, silver or purple decorate the walls in the horticulture classroom at the Mahoning County Career and Technical Center. Centerpieces sit on the tables, waiting to be taken into the horticulture store. Rows of poinsettias adorn tables in the greenhouse as students take home order forms for the Christmas season.

Creativity abounds in the horticulture classroom at MCCTC. From corsages, wedding flowers and Christmas poinsettias for the juniors to landscaping, pesticides and Bobcat machinery for the seniors, the students in Mary June Emerson's class are learning firsthand how to make their own creations. And then they learn the business aspect of horticulture, too.

“I made a wreath with a red ribbon,” Michele Grandon of Sebring said. “I took the silk flowers and used a glue gun to put silver bulbs on. When I was done putting all the decorations on, I put a wire on it for hanging.”

“Once we get done,” Grandon added, “we have to price our items according to a pricing sheet of the individual pieces.”

“My favorite thing is making corsages, but I'd like to use what I learn to help my dad in the summer,” she said. “I'd like to try to use this as a profession, too.”

Grandon is one of several students who have created wreaths and centerpieces for the full-service flower shop MCCTC has opened for the Christmas season. The store, which operates from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily, opened Nov. 29 and will close at the end of the school day Dec. 21. It will reopen later in the school year when spring flowers are ready.

“We'll have fresh wreaths and centerpieces at a variety of prices,” Emerson said. “We do really nice wreaths with a mix of greens. We've had a lot of compliments on them.”

“We bring the kids in and get them excited about creating,” she added. “Some have never created before.”

Emerson herself is a graduate of the MCCTC program in the class of 1975, its third year.

“I told the teacher I had when I graduated from this horticulture class in 1975, jokingly of course, that someday I would have his job teaching this same program,” she said. “Who knew it would actually happen?”

It didn't right away. She left high school, managed a flower shop, and then worked for 11 years answering home horticulture calls for The Ohio State University Agricultural Extension Center.

“I had to research everything,” Emerson said, “lawn, insects, tree projects. That's what really sparked my diversity in horticulture.”

She later received her associate degree in horticulture from Kent State-Salem and was hired as an environmental educator for the Mahoning County Soil and Water Conservation District.

“I did lesson plans and taught all over the county,” she said. “I fully expected to retire from that job.”

Yet, Emerson said she left that job and was out of work for about a year when she ran into a former MCCTC administrator while getting a tire changed.

“It was meant to be,” she said. “He told me of the possibility of an opening and said I needed to pursue it. I did, and after several interviews, I was hired as a full-time substitute. Then right before school started in 2005, I got the job.”

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News Headline: Real-world training (Ferranto) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of their coursework, 10 nursing students, along with two faculty members, visited Switzerland and Tanzania before the start of the semester.

“We live in a global society, and the goal of Kent State University's college experience is to help prepare students to function in this society,” said Mary Lou Ferranto, assistant professor of nursing and the program director for the Kent State at Salem's bachelor of science in nursing. “An excellent way to do this is to provide experiential learning experiences.”

Ferranto said experiential learning experiences are important for health-care practitioners.

“This type of experience is especially important for nurses because they care for individuals from all cultural, racial, socioeconomic, political and religious groups, as well as individuals of all ages and sexual orientation,” she said.

The goal of the class, Transcultural Nursing and Healthcare, was to provide students the opportunity to explore global-health issues, intercultural concepts, self-awareness of personal discrimination, stereotyping and issues of racism and privilege.

The experience was led by Ferranto and Sarah Smiley, professor of geography at Kent State at Salem. The group began its trip in Geneva, Switzerland, where it attended private pre-arranged seminars at the World Health Organization, the International Refugee Center and the United Nations. While in Tanzania, the students provided nursing care to patients in orphanages and HIV clinics. They also spent time at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center.

Junior nursing student Pam Mackos described how the students used their skills: “We performed basic health assessments, and I was so excited to use some of my nursing skills. I felt like it was a great learning experience on so many levels — emotionally, socially and physically,” she said. “I was given the opportunity to work with children and a different culture — two things I have not experienced in my nursing education. It was tragic to bond with some of these children and later find out that three were HIV-positive.”

The students experienced a variety of emotions after time at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, one of the best medical facilities in Tanzania and surrounding countries. Premature babies were kept in wooden boxes heated by light bulbs for warmth. Mattresses, lying side by side on the floor, held mothers who had just given birth. Rooms were overflowing with patients and families supporting their loved ones.

“The lack of equipment and shortage of nurses were only part of what was so upsetting. However, what impressed me was that the nurses were unconditionally gracious, bright, loving, cheerful and doing the absolute best they could in their situation,” Mackos said.

In addition to volunteering at clinics and orphanages, the students visited a village of the Maasai people. They also were invited by Tanzanian friends to attend a wedding celebration in Moshi, Arusha. “In Rombo Village, we observed Chagga people and a traditional bride homecoming ceremony,” said native Tanzanian and senior nursing student Lillian Kavishe.

Reflecting on her experience, Mackos said, “We are so fortunate to have what we have in the United States. Even people living in poverty here are more fortunate than most of the people in Tanzania. The trip single-handedly confirmed the direction in which I want to go with my life. I want to be a nurse, travel internationally and holistically improve the lives of everyone I encounter.”

Ferranto said future national and international experiences are planned. Domestic trips will focus on Indian Health Services in South Dakota and Alaska. Future international trips are being planned for Guatemala, Tanzania, Eastern Europe and Asia. These study-abroad trips are open to all Kent State University students regardless of their majors.

For more information about Kent State at Salem's bachelor's degree in nursing, call Ferranto at 330-337-4273.

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News Headline: KSU professor says happiness comes with writing (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - In this hustle and bustle world of e-mails, texts and tweets, a local professor said people can get happier and more satisfied with life by taking 15 minutes to write a meaningful letter of gratitude.

"The idea is to slow yourself down in a reflective way and write about something non-trivial," Dr. Steve Toepfer said.

Not long ago, letter writing used to be the only means of written communication, with handwritten letters a treasured keepsake. Handwritten letters remain a keepsake, but the most popular modes of written communication now involve some type of electronic device with no paper required.

"We're communicating a lot, but the quality is low," Toepfer said.

An assistant professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University Salem, he said he's always been fascinated by writing. His latest research project showed that writing letters of gratitude can increase happiness and life satisfaction while decreasing depressive symptoms, such as the "sky is falling" mentality.

The study involved a group of 219 undergraduate students (31 men and 188 women) ranging in age from 18 to 65 years old from the Salem, Kent and Stark County campuses. They filled out questionnaires regarding gratitude, life satisfaction, happiness and depressive symptoms three times, each time one week a part. One group only filled out questionnaires, while another group was instructed to write a letter of gratitude to anyone they wanted. The letter writers ended up writing three letters, each time to a different person.

Toepfer explained the letter could not be a thank-you note for some material good or regarding something trivial. As part of the deal, he read each letter to make sure they did the assignment as instructed. At the end of the project, the letters were mailed out to their intended recipients.

Mothers topped the list of letter recipients, along with siblings and significant others. He said a couple of students wrote to deceased family members. One letter was written to talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres to say how much her show made the student feel better. In most cases, the letter topics dealt with gratitude for emotional support.

The average letter took 15 minutes to write and could be handwritten or typed. He said it was actually surprising how many chose to write by hand.

The paper written by Toepfer and two colleagues from the Kent campus explaining the study and its results gave a brief outline about the questionnaires. Students answered questions using a scale method, such as ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree for the gratitude section.

An example of a question dealing with gratitude, which didn't go up significantly as a result of the process, was "I have so much in my life to be thankful for."

For life satisfaction, they answered questions based on statements such as "I am satisfied with life" or "In most ways my life is close to my ideal." For happiness, one question said "Compared to most of my peers, I consider myself...," then they had to answer either "a very happy person" or "not a very happy person."

The section on depressive symptoms looked at how the student felt during the previous week, answering on a scale from 1 (rarely or none at all) to 4 (most of the time) about such statements as "My sleep was restless" or "I was bothered by things that usually don't bother me."

The results indicated the level of happiness and life satisfaction increased for the students who wrote the letters, while it remained the same for those who did not write letters. Depressive symptoms decreased for the letter writers and stayed the same for the others.

"We all have the ability to help ourselves," Toepfer said.

In this project, he said he liked the fact that both sides of the letter would likely gain something, both the writer and the receiver. He also said that doing a project like this can remind someone of what's really important.

Most of the participants enjoyed the process and said they would do it again.

"We have a store of gratitude that we carry with us all the time," Toepfer said. "This process makes you till the soil."

In the future, he would like to take the study further and look at whether a writing process like this one could prove therapeutic for people with depression. He mentioned that "exercise is a magic bullet," but not everybody exercises. He said it's the same with gratitude.

"If you don't do something with resources, then they just sit stagnant," he said.

Mary Ann Greier can be reached at mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: KSU professor says happiness comes with writing (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - In this hustle and bustle world of e-mails, texts and tweets, a local professor said people can get happier and more satisfied with life by taking 15 minutes to write a meaningful letter of gratitude.

"The idea is to slow yourself down in a reflective way and write about something non-trivial," Dr. Steve Toepfer said.

Not long ago, letter writing used to be the only means of written communication, with handwritten letters a treasured keepsake. Handwritten letters remain a keepsake, but the most popular modes of written communication now involve some type of electronic device with no paper required.

"We're communicating a lot, but the quality is low," Toepfer said.

An assistant professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University Salem, he said he's always been fascinated by writing. His latest research project showed that writing letters of gratitude can increase happiness and life satisfaction while decreasing depressive symptoms, such as the "sky is falling" mentality.

The study involved a group of 219 undergraduate students (31 men and 188 women) ranging in age from 18 to 65 years old from the Salem, Kent and Stark County campuses. They filled out questionnaires regarding gratitude, life satisfaction, happiness and depressive symptoms three times, each time one week a part. One group only filled out questionnaires, while another group was instructed to write a letter of gratitude to anyone they wanted. The letter writers ended up writing three letters, each time to a different person.

Toepfer explained the letter could not be a thank-you note for some material good or regarding something trivial. As part of the deal, he read each letter to make sure they did the assignment as instructed. At the end of the project, the letters were mailed out to their intended recipients.

Mothers topped the list of letter recipients, along with siblings and significant others. He said a couple of students wrote to deceased family members. One letter was written to talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres to say how much her show made the student feel better. In most cases, the letter topics dealt with gratitude for emotional support.

The average letter took 15 minutes to write and could be handwritten or typed. He said it was actually surprising how many chose to write by hand.

The paper written by Toepfer and two colleagues from the Kent campus explaining the study and its results gave a brief outline about the questionnaires. Students answered questions using a scale method, such as ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree for the gratitude section.

An example of a question dealing with gratitude, which didn't go up significantly as a result of the process, was "I have so much in my life to be thankful for."

For life satisfaction, they answered questions based on statements such as "I am satisfied with life" or "In most ways my life is close to my ideal." For happiness, one question said "Compared to most of my peers, I consider myself...," then they had to answer either "a very happy person" or "not a very happy person."

The section on depressive symptoms looked at how the student felt during the previous week, answering on a scale from 1 (rarely or none at all) to 4 (most of the time) about such statements as "My sleep was restless" or "I was bothered by things that usually don't bother me."

The results indicated the level of happiness and life satisfaction increased for the students who wrote the letters, while it remained the same for those who did not write letters. Depressive symptoms decreased for the letter writers and stayed the same for the others.

"We all have the ability to help ourselves," Toepfer said.

In this project, he said he liked the fact that both sides of the letter would likely gain something, both the writer and the receiver. He also said that doing a project like this can remind someone of what's really important.

Most of the participants enjoyed the process and said they would do it again.

"We have a store of gratitude that we carry with us all the time," Toepfer said. "This process makes you till the soil."

In the future, he would like to take the study further and look at whether a writing process like this one could prove therapeutic for people with depression. He mentioned that "exercise is a magic bullet," but not everybody exercises. He said it's the same with gratitude.

"If you don't do something with resources, then they just sit stagnant," he said.

Mary Ann Greier can be reached at mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: KSU professor says happiness comes with writing (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - In this hustle and bustle world of e-mails, texts and tweets, a local professor said people can get happier and more satisfied with life by taking 15 minutes to write a meaningful letter of gratitude.

"The idea is to slow yourself down in a reflective way and write about something non-trivial," Dr. Steve Toepfer said.

Not long ago, letter writing used to be the only means of written communication, with handwritten letters a treasured keepsake. Handwritten letters remain a keepsake, but the most popular modes of written communication now involve some type of electronic device with no paper required.

"We're communicating a lot, but the quality is low," Toepfer said.

An assistant professor in Human Development and Family Studies at Kent State University Salem, he said he's always been fascinated by writing. His latest research project showed that writing letters of gratitude can increase happiness and life satisfaction while decreasing depressive symptoms, such as the "sky is falling" mentality.

The study involved a group of 219 undergraduate students (31 men and 188 women) ranging in age from 18 to 65 years old from the Salem, Kent and Stark County campuses. They filled out questionnaires regarding gratitude, life satisfaction, happiness and depressive symptoms three times, each time one week a part. One group only filled out questionnaires, while another group was instructed to write a letter of gratitude to anyone they wanted. The letter writers ended up writing three letters, each time to a different person.

Toepfer explained the letter could not be a thank-you note for some material good or regarding something trivial. As part of the deal, he read each letter to make sure they did the assignment as instructed. At the end of the project, the letters were mailed out to their intended recipients.

Mothers topped the list of letter recipients, along with siblings and significant others. He said a couple of students wrote to deceased family members. One letter was written to talk-show host Ellen DeGeneres to say how much her show made the student feel better. In most cases, the letter topics dealt with gratitude for emotional support.

The average letter took 15 minutes to write and could be handwritten or typed. He said it was actually surprising how many chose to write by hand.

The paper written by Toepfer and two colleagues from the Kent campus explaining the study and its results gave a brief outline about the questionnaires. Students answered questions using a scale method, such as ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree for the gratitude section.

An example of a question dealing with gratitude, which didn't go up significantly as a result of the process, was "I have so much in my life to be thankful for."

For life satisfaction, they answered questions based on statements such as "I am satisfied with life" or "In most ways my life is close to my ideal." For happiness, one question said "Compared to most of my peers, I consider myself...," then they had to answer either "a very happy person" or "not a very happy person."

The section on depressive symptoms looked at how the student felt during the previous week, answering on a scale from 1 (rarely or none at all) to 4 (most of the time) about such statements as "My sleep was restless" or "I was bothered by things that usually don't bother me."

The results indicated the level of happiness and life satisfaction increased for the students who wrote the letters, while it remained the same for those who did not write letters. Depressive symptoms decreased for the letter writers and stayed the same for the others.

"We all have the ability to help ourselves," Toepfer said.

In this project, he said he liked the fact that both sides of the letter would likely gain something, both the writer and the receiver. He also said that doing a project like this can remind someone of what's really important.

Most of the participants enjoyed the process and said they would do it again.

"We have a store of gratitude that we carry with us all the time," Toepfer said. "This process makes you till the soil."

In the future, he would like to take the study further and look at whether a writing process like this one could prove therapeutic for people with depression. He mentioned that "exercise is a magic bullet," but not everybody exercises. He said it's the same with gratitude.

"If you don't do something with resources, then they just sit stagnant," he said.

Mary Ann Greier can be reached at mgreier@salemnews.net

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News Headline: Santa Has Busy Night at Valley Events (McCullagh) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: WYTV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It's the time of year when Santa Claus pays a visit to children all over the Valley in anticipation of his big night of deliveries on Christmas Eve.

On Thursday, the jolly old elf showed up in Salem, Boardman, Warren and Struthers, posing for pictures and even helping out with a fundraiser.

The nursing club at the Kent State University Salem campus hosted a "pictures with Santa" event to raise money for orphanages and HIV clinics in Tanzania. Each picture was $5.

Fifteen students visited the African country this past summer and the campus nursing coordinator said the trip opened up the world view for the students.

"They see people now very differently. They really value diversity. They value different cultures. I think they went excited but were really touched by the people they met in Tanzania," said Ruth McCullagh, college of nursing campus coordinator

While in Tanzania, the students delivered health care to three orphanages and an HIV Clinic. They were able to do assessments and examine patients.

In Warren, the Jefferson K-8 School hosted its annual Christmas family event, kicking things off with popular Christmas carols. Kids then moved to various work stations, where they decorated ornaments and cookies, listened to stories and posed for pictures with Santa Claus.

Some students also took home raffle items donated by teachers and staff.

In Struthers, Santa and Frosty the Snowman were at Mauthe Park. The children got to visit with Santa and were given a bag of goodies compliments of Aqua Water.

Supper with Santa was held at Boardman Park. The young children and their parents got to enjoy dinner in the company of Santa. Afterwards, they took family portraits with him and had some fun making holiday crafts.

Also in Boardman, Akron Children's Hospital Mahoning Valley celebrated its third anniversary by lighting the Christmas tree.

Children gathered around the tree and once the lights were turned on, the crowd started singing Christmas carols. Santa also made an appearance for the kids, who got the chance to tell jolly old St. Nick just what they wanted under the tree this Christmas.

Also part of the festivities was decorating and eating holiday cookies.

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News Headline: 'Dickens Christmas' on Dec. 18 at St. Jacob's | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LAKE TWP. -

The "Joyful Noise Choir" of St. Jacob's Lutheran Church will present a free Christmas cantata, "A Charles Dickens Christmas," at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 18 at 1460 State St.

The program will feature music of the 18th and 19th centuries, predominately English carols as well as German, American and French selections.

The program will be conducted by Mark Alan Schulz, St. Jacob's music director, and accompanied by Karen Gay. Schulz is an adjunct faculty member at Kent State University's department of music. Gay has been the church organist for more than three decades.

For more information contact the church at (330) 877-2676

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News Headline: Gay Community Endowment Fund awards grants totaling almost $30,000 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sunday, December 11, 2011

Gay Community Endowment Fund awards grants totaling almost $30,000 December 11,2011 04:02 AM GMT

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

The Gay Community Endowment Fund recently awarded grants totaling almost $30,000 to 10 nonprofit organizations in the Akron area.

Grants were awarded to projects that increase awareness of domestic violence in same-sex couples and that focus on support groups and outreach for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youths and older adults in the region.

Receiving grants were:

• Akron Area Pride Collective, $1,700 for its LGBT youth support group.

• Akron Film + Pixel Festival, $1,218 for the premiere of Hit So Hard, a documentary about the life of Hole drummer Patty Schemel and her marriage to Christina Soletti.

• Battered Women's Shelter, $1,500 for a community outreach program that educates people about same-sex domestic violence.

• Friends of 91.3, $3,500 to broadcast anti-bullying messages on KIDJAM!, an online children's radio station.

• Fusion Magazine, $1,300 for Kent State University's student-produced publication that strives to unify people of different backgrounds and orientations.

• Jewish Family Service of Akron Ohio, $5,000 for counseling and support groups for older LGBT individuals.

• Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Union, $5,608 to send Kent State, Stark State, Mount Union and University of Akron students to the 2012 National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Creating Change Conference.

• Mobile Meals Inc., $1,250 to promote Mobile Meals' free food and supplement services to LGBT individuals in Greater Akron.

• Summa Foundation, $5,085 to educate forensic nurses about same-sex domestic violence and assault.

• Verb Ballets, $3,000 for the creation and local performance of a work that depicts tango from a same-sex perspective.

The Gay Community Endowment Fund is a permanent philanthropic endowment of the Akron Community Foundation. It has reinvested more than $156,000 in the community since its inception in 2001.

Contributions of any amount are welcome and support future grants. Checks may be sent to Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation, 345 W. Cedar St., Akron, OH 44307-2407.

For information, call 330-376-8522 or visit www. gaycommunityfund.org.

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News Headline: KSU profs ask Ohio House to recognize youth author (Brodie, Sandmann) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS -- Two Kent State University professors are urging lawmakers to name native Ohioan Virginia Hamilton as the state's official children's and youth literature author.
Carolyn Brodie and Alexa Sandmann provided testimony to the Ohio House's State Government and Elections Committee this week as proponents of the selection, which would be codified if House Bill 190 is approved and signed into law.
The legislation would also designate Hamilton's book, "M.C. Higgins, the Great," as Ohio's official youth literature novel.
Brodie and Sandmann are co-directors of the annual Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth at KSU. Hamilton attended the event until her death in 2002, and her family continues to be involved. Next year's conference is set for April 12 and 13.
"Virginia Hamilton is a most distinguished literary voice who wrote for young readers (and) is known as America's most honored writer of children's literature," Brodie said. "Virginia's accomplishments over her 35-year career in youth book publishing resulted in 41 books and countless awards."
Hamilton was born in Yellow Springs, near Dayton. She published her first book in 1967 and received numerous awards for her work, said Rudine Sims Bishop, professor emerita at Ohio State University.
"M.C. Higgins, the Great" received the John Newbery Medal, "the most coveted award given to American children's book writers," Bishop said, calling it a "classic Ohio story richly deserving of the honor of being named the official Ohio youth novel."
Hamilton's work is "so deeply rooted in the soil of Ohio and because she has brought honor and attention to the state through the numerous national and international honors and recognitions she has earned, deserves, more than any other writer, to be the official Ohio author of youth literature."

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News Headline: Name Hamilton as a state author, 2 KSU profs urge (Brodie, Sandmann) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two Kent State University professors are urging lawmakers to name native Ohioan Virginia Hamilton as the state's official children's and youth-literature author.
Carolyn Brodie and Alexa Sandmann provided testimony to the Ohio House's State Government and Elections Committee this week as proponents of the selection, which would be codified if House Bill 190 is approved and signed into law.
The legislation would also designate Hamilton's book, “M.C. Higgins, the Great” as Ohio's official youth-literature novel.
“Virginia Hamilton is a most distinguished literary voice who wrote for young readers [and] is known as America's most honored writer of children's literature,” Brodie said. “Virginia's accomplishments over her 35-year career in youth-book publishing resulted in 41 books and countless awards.”
Hamilton was born and spent much of her life in Yellow Springs, near Dayton. She published her first children's book in 1967 and received numerous accolades for her work, said Rudine Sims Bishop, professor emerita at Ohio State University.
“M.C. Higgins, the Great” received the John Newbery Medal, “the most coveted award given to American children's book writers,” Bishop said. “It is a classic Ohio story, richly deserving of the honor of being named the official Ohio youth novel. Furthermore, its author, Virginia Hamilton, because of the exceptional quality of her work, because her work is so deeply rooted in the soil of Ohio and because she has brought honor and attention to the state through the numerous national and international honors and recognitions she has earned, deserves, more than any other writer, to be the official Ohio author of youth literature.”
Brodie and Sandmann are co-directors of the annual Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth at KSU. Hamilton attended the event until her death in 2002, and her family continues to be involved.
Next year's conference is April 12 and 13.

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News Headline: Grandmothers sought for Kent State research project (Feldman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Project C.O.P.E. (Caring for Others as a Positive Experience) is looking for grandmothers in Northeast Ohio to participate in a research study. The study will compare different ways to support grandmothers raising grandchildren between the ages of 4 to 12 in the total absence of the child's birth parents.

"Custodial Grandparents are a really underserved population," said Karie Feldman, project director of Kent State's School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences. "There aren't a lot of resources for this rapidly growing population, and to have Kent State's name attached to the study is a really positive thing."

During the 10-week program, grandmothers will receive a curriculum-based program aimed to support grandparents raising grandchildren. Grandmothers will be asked to complete a total of six assessments over a two-year period.

After each assessment, the participant will receive a $35 check to cover any local travel expenses.

To participate, call 855-260-2433 or contact Feldman at grandmothers@kent.edu .

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Remedy for congested Summit St. in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TRAFFIC ROUNDABOUTS COULD BE
PART OF $13.7 MILLION OVERHAUL

ONE OF THE MOST HEAVIly
used streets in Kent is slated
for a major transformation that
ought to improve traffic flow and, even
more importantly, make it safer for motorists
and pedestrians to use.
East Summit Street
from Lincoln Street to
Loop Road, an area
that is a major artery
for Kent State University
traffic, is set for a
$13.7 million overhaul, which is expected
to begin within the next two or three
years.
The area in question ranks as the fourth
most-congested traffic corridor in Portage,
Summit and Wayne counties, according
to an Akron Metropolitan Area
Transportation study survey.
That should come as no surprise to any
driver who uses Summit Street while KSU
is in session. The two-lane stretch is used
by about 17,000 vehicles per day, which is
about 7,000 more vehicles more than nearby
S.R. 261, a four-lane state highway.
The AMATS study also found that four
of the top six accident-prone intersections
in Kent are located within the one-mile
stretch slated for improvements. There is
no question that traffic safey issues need
to be addressed there.
Suggested improvements include widening
the roadway to incorporate two 18-
foot-wide medians with crosswalks, one
at Risman Drive, the entrance and exit
for traffic to the Kent State Center, and
another at Ted Boyd Drive, which serves
the KSU Student Recreation and Wellness
Center. Those improvements ought
to help pedestrian safety.
Another suggestion is the construction
of two traffic “roundabouts” at both intersections,
an improvement that is supposed
to increase traffic flow as well as
traffic safety.
The roundabouts, which are included
in one of two proposed plans for Summit
Street, would be a first for Kent. Roundabouts
have proven controversial in some
areas, but one recently installed at the intersection
of Howe Avenue and Northeast
Avenue in Tallmadge appears to be
successful.
Public hearings are being held before a
decision on the project is finalized. Most
of the $13.7 million cost will be funded by
state and federal grants, with KSU and
the city of Kent each paying slightly less
than 10 percent of the cost.
The improvements do not encompass
the East Summit Street area from Lincoln
to South Water streets, which once was
the focus of a plan that called for widening
the roadway to four lanes. That area,
which includes Kentway Retirement Center,
remains largely residential. The arguments
that were raised in the 1970s
against widening it remain valid.
The widening of East Summit near
the KSU campus will bring considerable
changes without question, but the plans
under discussion now seem like a good
remedy.

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News Headline: Traffic plan would transform Summit Street near Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Kent has two alternative plans for a $13.7 million overhaul of the stretch of East Summit Street with the intention to alleviate vehicle and pedestrian traffic woes. And, while the biggest question is whether roundabout intersections should be utilized at two points of the strip, changes are in store at every intersection from Lincoln Street to Loop Road.
Kent City Engineer Jim Bowling presented the two options during a public meeting Thursday, to give a walk-through of the full scope of the project and gain input through questions and comments from the community.
“If you've driven down Summit street, you've seen the congestion that happens along the corridor,” Bowling said.
According to a study by Akron Metropolitan Area Transportation Study, the corridor is the fourth most congested area in Portage and Summit counties and the part of Wayne County AMATS studies, with 17,000 cars per day traveling the two-lane road. That's 7,000 more cars per day than S.R. 261, which has four lanes and higher speed limits.
Four of the top six most accident-prone intersections are in the corridor, a direct cause of the high congestion, Bowling said.
In addition to the high amount of car traffic, the one-mile stretch of East Summit Street experiences a high amount of pedestrian traffic because it borders Kent state University.
The high volume of traffic makes redesigning the street “extremely unique and extremely challenging,” Bowling said.
Some proposed features to ease traffic problems throughout the corridor include:
n adding 18-foot wide medians with mid-block pedestrian crossing and an accented apron for emergency vehicles to use to get around traffic
n extending the sidewalk on the south side past Loop Road
n adding bike lanes
n adding a state-of-the-art traffic signal system with pedestrian-actuated crossing and controls for emergency vehicles
n adding turn lanes and modifying/extending existing ones.
The intersection of Risman and Campus Center drives will move slightly east. Risman Drive will also be scaled down to one intersection and no longer loop near the MAC Center and Risman Plaza, which will eliminate one traffic light.
Roundabouts are proposed at Risman/Campus Center drives and Ted Boyd Drive, but there is also an alternative proposal with normal intersections.
Bowling said the pros of roundabouts include reductions in crashes and fatalities, reduce vehicle speeds and have an average delay time of 13 seconds, compared with 29 seconds in an average intersection.
Bowling said roundabouts can reduce pedestrian crashes by 73 percent and pedestrian injury crashes by 89 percent, but is unsure how the high volume of pedestrian traffic will fare with the high vehicle traffic.
During peak time, about 500 people cross Summit Street at Risman Drive in one hour, he said.
Kent Fire Chief James Williams said he's concerned how roundabouts will affect emergency response time.
The tower truck, he said, weighs 40 tons, is top-heavy and will take additional time to speed up after slowing down through a roundabout.
Williams said the fire department changes drivers every four years, and new drivers may not be familiar with roundabouts and which direction they're supposed to go.
Bowling acknowledged during the meeting that it's not clear how roundabouts will affect emergency response times.
“We don't know, with a fire truck was coming through, whether the lost time of getting through the roundabout would offset the gain time with having less congestion,” he said.
The intersections at Lincoln Street and Terrace Drive also will be adjusted.
East Summit Street will be realigned at Lincoln Street because it currently points toward Lincoln Street. Dedicated turn lanes to turn left and right will be added and the hill grade will be reduced.
Terrace Drive will receive a left-turn lane at East Summit Street and the grade of the hill will also be reduced by two feet.
Bowling said there is still work to be done, and public comments and questions will influence the final plans.
The $13.7 million project is expected to begin between 2014 and 2015. Eighty percent of the project's funding will come through state and federal grants, and the remaining 20 percent local match will be split between KSU and the city of Kent.

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News Headline: Scene | Heard: Five and counting down at UNM | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: BizJournals.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Five and counting down. The University of New Mexico 's presidential search committee has narrowed its hunt for a new president to five finalists.

The winning candidate will assume the top UNM post when President David Schmidly, who has held the job since June 2007, steps down in June.

The five finalists are Douglas D. Baker, provost and executive vice president, University of Idaho; Robert G. Frank, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, Kent State University (Ohio); Meredith Hay, special advisor to the chair for strategic initiatives, Arizona Board of Regents; Elizabeth Hoffman, executive vice president and provost, Iowa ...

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News Headline: KSU to help sex assault victims (Tondiglia, Smith) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University hopes a new initiative on campus will let victims of sexual assault know that help is available on campus from a wide variety of staff and faculty members.
KSU launched its Sexual Assault Response Team, or SART, recently after more than a year of development.
Dean Tondiglia, associate director of public safety at KSU and co-chair of the KSU SART, said the program was not developed in response to any specific problem identified on campus.
“We decided we wanted to take a more proactive (stance) rather than waiting for people to come to us,” Tondiglia said.
The purpose of the team is to help educate students, faculty and staff about how to prevent and respond to sexual assault situations, and also, how to help guide victims to local support services. The team will also remind employees that KSU policy and state law requires employees with knowledge of a sexual assault to report the crime.
The SART includes staff from the College of Public Health, Residence Services, University Health Services, the Athletic Department among other departments on campus.
Sheryl Smith, KSU dean of students and SART member, said it was important to get employees from various departments on the team, or at least educated by the team, in order to better serve students. She said students may be initially more open to approaching a staff member they're familiar with after an assault than police or health services.
“More and more students will do that, approach a faculty member they trust,” she said.
According to KSU crime statistics, the KSU Police Department received seven reports of sexual assaults on campus from 2006 until the end of 2010.
Tondiglia said university officials realize crimes of a sexual nature are often not reported to the police, something the school hopes to prevent.
“(The SART) wasn't created because we saw a spike in assaults on campus,” Tondiglia said. “It's in response to a national trend that many incidents go unreported.”
Smith said she thought the university saw the creation of the SART as an opportunity to improve its procedures on sexual assault by including more people.
“We have historically done a good job at being responsive,” Smith said. “What the SART has allowed us to do is develop a more cohesive response.”
Students and staff at KSU can contact the SART at 330-672-8016 or visit kent.edu/sart to see a list of SART members and phone numbers.

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News Headline: KSU, other sites open lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) | Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Got milk?

At a growing number of companies, the answer is yes.

Kent State announced this week it has joined the ranks of employers providing "lactation rooms" for breast-feeding employees.

For KSU sustainability manager Melanie Knowles, this means she only has to walk down a hall and into a private room to express milk for her 15-month-old son, Arran.

"It's great. Knowing it's there takes one thing off my mind," she said.

The federal Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 requires companies with more than 50 workers to provide a private place with a lockable door for mothers to express and refrigerate breast milk. Dee Keith, a board-certified lactation consultant in Cincinnati and co-chair of the Ohio Breastfeeding Alliance, said employers seem to be complying with the new regulation.

"People are doing their best to come online as word gets out," she said. "It's a cost benefit to them."

Some employers provided retreats for breast-feeding moms long before it was required.

For example, Akron Children's Hospital included five lactation rooms in the Reinberger Family Center that it opened in 2008, spokeswoman Holly Pupino said.

Employees, patients and visitors use the rooms about 1,300 times a month. The rooms are built for comfort, with TVs, refrigerators, juice and snacks.

Ohio State has 28 lactation rooms on its main campus and Medical Center in Columbus and plans to include more in new construction.

As about 10,500 faculty and staff on OSU's main campus are women in their child-bearing years, the rooms are a valuable lure to recruit and retain employees, the university said.

The University of Michigan has more than 30 lactation sites, from lounges to private meeting rooms that can be commandeered upon request.

The Akron-based Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. has provided lactation rooms in its corporate headquarters and Innovation Center since 2006, spokesman Keith Price said.

"The rooms are open and available to associates during working hours," he said. "Associates are encouraged to walk in when needed."

Kent State opened lactation rooms for female employees this week in its Women's Center, Harbourt Hall and the Schwartz Center. Each room is being equipped with a chair and refrigerator, and the Women's Center is getting a breast pump.

"The rooms are cozy -- not overly large," said Michael Bruder, who oversees design and construction for KSU.

The university wants to have lactation rooms within a five-minute walk of each of the 100 buildings on campus. Three to five more buildings are being identified, with the library, the busiest building on campus, the next to get a lactation room.

The city of Akron does not have rooms just for lactating mothers in each city facility, spokeswoman Stephanie York said, but it does provide one if a woman needs one.

"I can tell you from personal experience, that such a room at the Law Department was provided to me when I needed it," she said.

The University of Akron offers space for lactating mothers. Employees and supervisors also work together to find private space in individual buildings, and employees with private offices can simply close their door.

But all is not smooth in this brave new world, despite general agreement that breast-fed babies are healthier than their bottle-fed brethren and that lactation rooms can keep young mothers on the job.

Keith of the Ohio Breastfeeding Coalition said she gets at least one call a week from a mom who says she's getting a hard time from an employer about her need to lactate or whose employer won't provide a private space.

One Akron-area woman complained that her employer didn't want her to return to work until her child had moved on to bottles. Keith called the company's law department and "accommodations quickly were made for her."

At Kent State, breast-feeding mothers like Knowles once had to make do with makeshift accommodations -- in her case, a large closet that she shared with files.

The current situation is much nicer, she said.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: KSU, other sites open lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Got milk?
At a growing number of companies, the answer is yes.
Kent State announced this week it has joined the ranks of employers providing "lactation rooms" for breast-feeding employees.
For KSU sustainability manager Melanie Knowles, this means she only has to walk down a hall and into a private room to express milk for her 15-month-old son, Arran.
"It's great. Knowing it's there takes one thing off my mind," she said.
The federal Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 requires companies with more than 50 workers to provide a private place with a lockable door for mothers to express and refrigerate breast milk. Dee Keith, a board-certified lactation consultant in Cincinnati and co-chair of the Ohio Breastfeeding Alliance, said employers seem to be complying with the new regulation.
"People are doing their best to come online as word gets out," she said. "It's a cost benefit to them."
Some employers provided retreats for breast-feeding moms long before it was required.
For example, Akron Children's Hospital included five lactation rooms in the Reinberger Family Center that it opened in 2008, spokeswoman Holly Pupino said.
Employees, patients and visitors use the rooms about 1,300 times a month. The rooms are built for comfort, with TVs, refrigerators, juice and snacks.
Ohio State has 28 lactation rooms on its main campus and Medical Center in Columbus and plans to include more in new construction.
As about 10,500 faculty and staff on OSU's main campus are women in their child-bearing years, the rooms are a valuable lure to recruit and retain employees, the university said.
The University of Michigan has more than 30 lactation sites, from lounges to private meeting rooms that can be commandeered upon request.
The Akron-based Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. has provided lactation rooms in its corporate headquarters and Innovation Center since 2006, spokesman Keith Price said.
"The rooms are open and available to associates during working hours," he said. "Associates are encouraged to walk in when needed."
Kent State opened lactation rooms for female employees this week in its Women's Center, Harbourt Hall and the Schwartz Center. Each room is being equipped with a chair and refrigerator, and the Women's Center is getting a breast pump.
"The rooms are cozy -- not overly large," said Michael Bruder, who oversees design and construction for KSU.
The university wants to have lactation rooms within a five-minute walk of each of the 100 buildings on campus. Three to five more buildings are being identified, with the library, the busiest building on campus, the next to get a lactation room.
The city of Akron does not have rooms just for lactating mothers in each city facility, spokeswoman Stephanie York said, but it does provide one if a woman needs one.
"I can tell you from personal experience, that such a room at the Law Department was provided to me when I needed it," she said.
The University of Akron offers space for lactating mothers. Employees and supervisors also work together to find private space in individual buildings, and employees with private offices can simply close their door.
But all is not smooth in this brave new world, despite general agreement that breast-fed babies are healthier than their bottle-fed brethren and that lactation rooms can keep young mothers on the job.
Keith of the Ohio Breastfeeding Coalition said she gets at least one call a week from a mom who says she's getting a hard time from an employer about her need to lactate or whose employer won't provide a private space.
One Akron-area woman complained that her employer didn't want her to return to work until her child had moved on to bottles. Keith called the company's law department and "accommodations quickly were made for her."
At Kent State, breast-feeding mothers like Knowles once had to make do with makeshift accommodations -- in her case, a large closet that she shared with files.
The current situation is much nicer, she said.

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News Headline: Kent revitalization lauded by OEDA | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Exciting things are happening in downtown Kent that, in some ways, mirror the exciting things happening in downtown Akron. About a month ago, the Ohio Economic Development Association (OEDA) recognized the $100 million Downtown Kent Revitalization Project as one of the three best projects in the state of Ohio. The Best Project Award recognizes outstanding and innovative projects in economic and business development that retain or generate jobs and investment. (A $650 million project in the Youngstown/Warren area took the top spot in the Best Project category. Kent's project was the first finalist; the second finalist was the Clermont County Ford Transmission Plant project.)

Just last August, I was in Kent for the groundbreaking of a hotel and conference center and offices for Davey Tree, a major segment of the overall revitalization. At that time, the area in development was nothing more than a large expanse of dirt that stretched for more than two city blocks in all directions. That's changing fast.

According to a Dec. 5 press release from Dan Smith, Kent economic development director, "Steel is going up at a brisk pace, and the new offices for the Davey Tree Resource Group expansion are well under way." Businesses in the Phoenix Project, phase two, are open or scheduled to open in the next week or two. Businesses already open include Zoupwerks, Wild Earth Outfitters and Dr. Green Bee. Laziza's Mediterranean Restaurant and Tree City Coffee will open in about a week.

Among the dignitaries at that August groundbreaking were Kent State University President Lester Lefton, Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala, executives from Davey Tree, and other city and state officials. The mix of public and private leadership in Kent paralleled the collaboration at the foundation of Akron's ability to get things done. Both Kent and KSU and Akron and the University of Akron are well aware of their mutually beneficial relationships. Cities that work in partnership with the rich academic resources at their cores serve everyone's best interests.

In Kent, one of the tangible forms of the revitalization partnership is the University Esplanade that will connect the KSU campus to downtown Kent.

"Without question, this 1/4-mile connection to Kent State University's 26,700 students and more than 3,500 faculty and staff members made the proposals financially viable," said Smith. "KSU is the economic engine that insures the project is sustainable and will serve Kent and the greater Northeast Ohio region for decades to come."

The portion or the Esplanade already completed on the KSU campus is called the Sculpture Walk, a reference to the artwork along the walkway. Securing private investment for the overall Downtown Kent Revitalization Project was predicated on the implementation of this and other major components of the plan.

Even now, the Kent and surrounding areas are benefiting from the jobs created by the revitalization. According to Smith, ongoing permanent jobs number 714; temporary construction jobs number another 969, not including the city's portion for infrastructure improvements.

The city of Kent has already benefited from the level of construction currently under way in the central business district, said Smith, where income tax receipts have been on the increase for each of the last 12 months. A look at what's ahead is even rosier.

Prior to the current project, the two downtown blocks in development were generating approximately $52,000 a year of which $39,000 went to Kent City Schools and approximately $6,000 to both Portage County and city of Kent. Upon completion of the project, the site has been conservatively estimated to generate approximately $705,000 of which $215,000 will go to the schools and $490,000 will be redirected to pay for bonds for public infrastructure improvement in the district.

That's a great payback for partnership.

Other OEDA accolades

Several other Akron area entities also won OEDA recognition in October. The city of Green was a finalist in the Small Community division in the category of Excellence in Economic Development Marketing. The University Park Alliance took highest honors in the category in the Large Community division for its UPA marketing collateral package and was a finalist for its University Park/University Park Alliance website. A second finalist position went to Hattie Larlham for its website and social media.

The Greater Akron Chamber was recognized as a finalist in the Metro Area division in the category of Excellence in Economic Development Innovation for attracting jobs and investment to Akron via the Rochling Automotive/Project Atlantic initiatives. Rochling Automotive alone represents an investment of more than $28 million and more than 100 jobs.

Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

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News Headline: Hundreds cram for exams at KSU Study-a-Thon | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University junior Rebecca Spott of Solon (face in hand) studies a nursing text while hitting the books during a study-a-thon in the Student Center Ballroom on Sunday, Dec. 11, 2011, in Kent, Ohio.The event, which is being sponsored by several university groups such as Undergraduate Student Government, University Relations, the Center for Student Involvement and the Interfraternity Council, provides a quiet place for students to study with free food, drinks and breaks every hour with prizes awarded each hour. (Ed Suba Jr./Akron Beacon Journal))

Click here to view photos: http://www.ohio.com/news/local/hundreds-cram-for-exams-at-ksu-study-a-thon1.249996?ot=akron.PhotoGalleryLayout.ot&s=1.249964

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News Headline: Hundreds cram for exams at KSU Study-a-Thon - Local - Ohio.com | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You normally don't think of Grand Forks, N.D., as cutting edge, but a tradition at the University of North Dakota has migrated southeast and found a home at Kent State University.

The third Kent State Study-a-Thon drew more than 450 students to the Student Center on Sunday for an all-day cram session ahead of this week's final exams.

The idea originated with Bath Township native Kevin Papp, who has a friend who attends North Dakota. After the friend told him about end-of-semester study marathons there, Papp hooked up with fellow Kent undergrad Alexa Ohlson (North Royalton) and organized the first KSU session in December 2010.

Attendance grew in the spring, when they switched the designated day from Saturday to Sunday, and this fall things really took off.

The ballroom of the Student Center was maxed out for much of the day, and students were taking advantage of several other locations set up around the building.

While the students were cramming their minds, they also were cramming their mouths. At 50 minutes past each hour, they got a 10- minute break with a different free food, ranging from substantial (subs, pizza) to snacks (Jell-O blocks, popcorn, cookies and milk), sponsored by various school and student organizations.

The breaks also included prize drawings for small gift certificates to places such as Starbucks, Chipotle and Subway.

After the doors opened at 10 a.m., the first few hours were slow, with the biggest surge coming between 2 and 10 p.m.

Things were going smoothly late in the afternoon. "Everyone seems to be in cruise mode right now," Papp said. "But as the hours wind down, it starts to get a little more stressful."

Papp, executive director of Undergraduate Student Government, was expecting a mass migration when the session ended at 11:30 p.m., as many die-hards planned to head across the plaza to the library, which stays open all night.

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News Headline: HONOR | Email

News Date: 12/11/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Libraries received an IMMY award at the Tree City Awards hosted by the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce. IMMYs are given to recognize quality businesses and individuals in the Kent area in support of economic retention, reinvestment and new facilities development.

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News Headline: Kent's best in business recognized | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Several individuals and
businesses were honored by
the Kent Area Chamber of
Commerce at the recent 2011
Tree City Awards for their investment
and involvement
in Kent.
Receiving the W.W. Reed
Medal for Public Service,
the highest award given by
the chamber, were Cass and
Bob Mayfield, co-owners
of McKay Bricker Framing
and Black Squirrel Gallery
& Gifts. The Mayfields also
received the key to the city,
given by Kent Mayor Jerry
Fiala.
Kent Economic Development
Director Dan Smith
presented three awards from
the city, which he said represented
the “past, present
and future of Kent.”
The city's awards went to
Dominick's downtown bar
for its recent façade renovation,
Kent start-up Anderson
Aerospace for its innovation
in satellite antenna
communication, and MAC
Trailer LTT, which recently
began manufacturing trailers
in its new Fairchild Avenue
facility.
Immy awards recognize
“quality businesses and/or individuals
in the greater Kent
area in support of economic
retention, reinvestment
and new facilities development.”
They were presented
to ACS Industries Inc.
and Kent State University
Libraries.
Other award recipients at
the Tree City Awards included
Small Business Person of
the Year Mike Crawford of
Advanced Display Systems
Ltd. and Bright Star Award
winner and Arctic Squirrel
owner Michelle Hartman.
Chamber Executive Director
Lori Wemhoff also
received Kent's key to the
city, and Record-Courier Editor
Roger Di Paolo received
the chamber's President's
Award.

Click here to view photos: http://www.recordpub.com/images/media/20111211/pdf/C01.pdf

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News Headline: Noteworthy books for music fans | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gazette (Montreal) - Online, The
Contact Name: IAN McGILLIS
News OCR Text: The distance from Lady GAGA to Bruce Springsteen is far, but maybe not as far as we think: The late Clarence "Big Man" Clemons worked with both, after all. Finding connections like that - ranging across styles and cultures and eras with only enthusiasm as your guide - is part of the reward of being a music lover, and this year's crop of Christmas-ready music books offers as many entry points as anyone could wish for.

Nile Rodgers did as much to define the sound of the 1970s and '80s - and, by extension in these retro-crazy times, the sound of today - as any musician alive, first as co-mastermind of the mega-selling Chic, then as the go-to producer for stars looking for an urban edge, from Diana Ross to David Bowie to Madonna to Duran Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Duran. Le Disco & Destiny (Spiegel & Grau, 318 pages, $31) tells a tale that couldn't have been made up. Rodgers rose from a dizzyingly chaotic broken-home family, fended for himself as a teen in the counterculture '60s and invented a sophisticated popular music, only to see it torn down by racism and homophobia. He tells the whole story with an unaffected sense of wonder, free of the bitterness that would have been forgivable. Le Freak is right up there with Bob Dylan's Chronicles Vol. 1 and Anthony Kiedis's Scar Tissue as one of the best music memoirs of recent years.

My Song: A Memoir, by Harry Belafonte with Michael Shnayerson (Knopf, 469 pages, $34.50) is a music book in the same sense that Moby Dick is a whaling book. Lest we forget, Belafonte was, for a time, the biggest star in American music; his Calypso album was the first to officially sell a million and featured in seemingly every household in the Western world in the late 1950s and early '60s. But the product of a dirt-poor New York upbringing was a star with a conscience; his involvement with social causes eventually overtook his music and acting, and My Song thus becomes something of a Trojan-horse insider's story of the U.S. civil rights movement, among other things. It could serve as a handbook on how to conduct a public life with dignity, and should be placed on 20th-century history course reading lists everywhere, immediately.

Critic Robert Christgau once described Gordon Lightfoot as "a weird new kind of purist: uncompromising proponent of commercial folk music." Ouch. But then, Christgau is American, so perhaps he can't be expected to understand the near-mystical bond Canadians of a certain age have with our first true homegrown star. Dave Bidini is one such Canadian. Gordon Lightfoot: The Man, the Music and the World in 1972 (McClelland & Stewart, 267 pages, $29.99) certainly has its flaws: Bidini never really convinces us that there's anything more than coincidence connecting the Fischer-Spassky chess summit, the Kingston prison break and the 1972 Mariposa Folk Festival. (And can we please declare a moratorium on writers complaining in print that they haven't won any awards?) But the book remains compelling, a very Canadian cri de coeur in which Bidini's failure to connect with his hero somehow speaks for a whole country's loss of some kind of innocence - although the looming presence of Cathy Smith, the Dark Lady of the Lightfoot saga, indicates that maybe the innocence was all in our minds.

You know rockers are feeling their age when they start getting the urge to document the scenes of their youth. The oral history is especially well suited to the impulse, and three new books are models of the form.

The story of how the underclass cultures of heavy metal and punk formed an accidental alliance and achieved worldwide success from their outpost in the Pacific Northwest is told exhaustively, and definitively, in Everybody Loves Our Town: An Oral History of Grunge, by Mark Yarm (Crown Archetype, 567 pages, $28.95). What's perhaps most striking, besides the sheer unlikeliness of it all, is the centrality of heroin to the Seattle scene. Nearly every band had its resident junkie, and the overall mortality rate is astounding. The extremes of grunge are embodied within a single band: Everyone knows how things turned out for Nirvana's Kurt Cobain, but their dynamo drummer, Dave Grohl, pulled himself from the post-Cobain wreckage to carve out an honourable and very lucrative career fronting the arena-rocking Foo Fighters. This Is a Call: The Life and Times of Dave Grohl, by Paul Brannigan (UK General, 400 pages, $21.99), is not an oral history, but a well-told testament to a true believer's perseverance.

Toronto punk never did produce its Nirvana-style crossover - the legendary star-crossed Diodes probably came closest - but it was a fecund scene with as many memorable characters and stories as its New York and London cousins, and Liz Worth gets seemingly all of them into Treat Me Like Dirt: An Oral History of Punk in Toronto and Beyond 1977-1981, (ECW, 383 pages, $22.95), helped by a type size that may strain the eyes of some middle-aged ex-punks.

Still Fresh at Twenty: An Oral History of Mint Records 1991-2011, by Kaitlin Fontana (ECW, 385 pages, $22.95) relates how the spunky and ongoing Vancouver indie label best known as the original home of New Pornographers succeeded against all industry reality and common sense - a heartwarming story that's all the more inspiring as the traditional music-business model grows smaller and smaller in the rear-view mirror.

Walk Like a Man: Coming of Age with the Music of Bruce Springsteen, by Robert J. Wiersema (Greystone, 196 pages, $21.95), treads a fine line between personal testimony and hagiography, but in the end gets the balance just right. Wiersema's account of how one artist's music helped get him through a troubled bluecollar upbringing, and continues to provide solace in adulthood, nails an aspect of the rock 'n' roll experience too often overlooked.

1950s Radio in Color: The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards (Kent State University Press, 254 pages, $51) is pop culture scholarship at its very best.

For years, a Cleveland disc jockey and concert promoter took photos of every act that passed through his studio; the lost cache, now rediscovered and compiled with some gently snarky accompanying text, takes us into a twilight world where old-school showbiz sat uneasily alongside the untamed avatars of rock. Amid the well-scrubbed crooners and forgotten R&B lifers, the young Elvis Presley appears like a visitation from the future, while a pre-fame Roy Orbison, sans trademark shades, looks like the least glamorous rocker who ever lived. The saturated period colour lends the whole thing a faintly lurid tone; if these pictures weren't real, David Lynch would have had to invent them.

With Look, I Made a Hat: Collected Lyrics (1981-2011) with Attendant Comments, Amplifications, Dogmas, Harangues, Digressions, Anecdotes and Miscellany (Knopf, 453 pages, $50), Broadway titan Stephen Sondheim picks up where last year's popular Finishing the Hat left off, bringing a sumptuously designed and exhaustively annotated self-overview up to date with a roundup highlighted by Sunday in the Park with George. If contemporary musical theatre is your thing, this book will be your Santa Claus.

On one level, Four Strong Winds: Ian & Sylvia, by John Einarson with Ian and Sylvia Tyson (McClelland & Stewart, 330 pages, $32.99), can be read as a case study in the capriciousness of popular taste. When folk gave way to folk-rock in the charts of the mid-1960s, the Canadian duo with Hollywood looks had a hard time adjusting, and their thriving career went cold overnight. Much of Four Strong Winds describes the quotidian struggle of working musicians who never quite got their due, but happily the principals survived to see their influence acknowledged. Einarson, a one-man industry of Canadian music history, is no one's idea of an exciting stylist, but he has a knack for crafting a wealth of material into a smooth narrative. Musically, the artist born Stefani Germanotta may traffic in a fairly predictable update of high-gloss 1980s dance fare, but visually, Lady Gaga has brought cutting-edge art-world conceptualism into the pop arena with more panache than anyone this side of Björk and peak-period Pet Shop Boys. It's fitting, then, that to document her lavish Monster Ball tour, she enlisted as court photographer a man known for pushing the taste envelope. Lady Gaga x Terry Richardson ?(Grand Central, 360 pages, $55) is the coffee-table result, and it's as much for lovers of contemporary fashion photography as for Lady G's core audience. Please note: Parents of the subject's younger fans might want to screen it, as there's some raunchy content.

Ken Regan got in on the ground floor of the rock revolution, making his reputation before the easy intimacy his work celebrates became a thing of the past. All Access: The Rock 'n' Roll Photography of Ken Regan (Insight Editions, 300 pages, $86.50) features many images so iconic that it's almost strange to think an actual person took them with an actual camera: the Beatles backstage at the Ed Sullivan Show, the Rolling Stones in their dissipated '70s pomp (you'll wonder how they survived to be their present-day wizened selves), crowd scenes from Woodstock, an ascendant Led Zeppelin. Bob Dylan fans will lap up the many shots of 1975's one-off barnstorming Rolling Thunder Revue. Excitement may flag a bit with the big hair and shoulder pads of the Live Aid '80, but hey, it's all part of pop's rich pageant.

Aso worthy: George Harrison: Living in the Material World, by Olivia Harrison, et al (Harry N. Abrams, 400 pages, $45); Onstage Offstage: The Official Illustrated Memoir, by Michael Bublé (Doubleday Canada, 304 pages, $37); Sweet Judy Blue Eyes: My Life in Music, by Judy Collins (Crown Archetype, 354 pages, $30); A Natural History of the Piano, by Stuart Isacoff (Knopf, 362 pages, $34).

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News Headline: Gallery hopping | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2011
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Voice of Downriver Marketplace

Swords into Plowshares Peace Center & Gallery, 33 E. Adams Ave., Detroit, is featuring "Speak Peace," an exhibit of Vietnamese children's paintings of peace and war, through Dec. 17.

The Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University compiled the works.

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News Headline: WKSU raises $5 million in capital fund campaign | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In September, WKSU
celebrated the successful
conclusion to the station's
Sound of the Future capital
campaign. The station
raised a total of more than
$5 million in the largest fund
raising effort in WKSU's 61-
year history.
The four-year campaign
focused on raising funds to
upgrade WKSU's broadcasting
infrastructure in a
move towards digital technology.
A significant donation
was also made to support
FolkAlley.com.
The Sound of the Future
campaign was led by
WKSU Executive Director
and General Manager Al
Bartholet with assistance
and input from WKSU Director
of Philanthropic Giving
Pamela R. Anderson,
the WKSU Community Advisory
Council and a 21-person
steering committee, cochaired
by Lee Irving and
former Kent State University
President Carol Cartwright.
As a result of the campaign,
all five of the station's
broadcast towers now send
digital signals and two primary
studios were converted
from analog to digital.

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