Report Overview:
Total Clips (24)
Alumni (1)
Art, School of (2)
Board of Trustees (4)
Commencement (1)
Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
Geology (3)
Health Sciences (1)
Human Resources; University Facilities Management (2)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU Museum (2)
Town-Gown (4)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Devo still whippin' things up 12/14/2011 Falls Church News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...not advancing, but was instead falling back and falling apart. Abbreviated to Devo, it became the name of that project that brought three students from Kent State University together in 1973, in the wake of the May 1970 Kent State shootings - when national guardsmen fired on unarmed student...


Art, School of (2)
Art best bets 12/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

SOCIAL JUSTICE EXPRESSED THROUGH ART IN DEC. 16 ART SHOW 12/14/2011 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Dec.14 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Often, feelings of oppression and inequality are expressed through an art form, and the...


Board of Trustees (4)
Kent State University sees a good fit in Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine 12/14/2011 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is moving forward with its planned acquisition of the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, a private medical school in Independence...

KSU to take steps to acquire podiatric college (Lefton) 12/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Dec. 14--KENT -- Kent State trustees agreed Tuesday to take steps to acquire the independent Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine. KSU President Lester Lefton said...

KSU to take steps to acquire podiatric college (Lefton) 12/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Kent State trustees agreed Tuesday to take steps to acquire the independent Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine. KSU President Lester Lefton said...

KSU taking steps toward podiatry college (Lefton) 12/15/2011 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is a step closer to acquiring its own medical college. Tuesday, the KSU Board of Trustees gave President Lester Lefton authority...


Commencement (1)
Petro to speak at KSU commencement 12/15/2011 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
South Africa: Social Media Campaign Mounts to Free Jailed American in South Africa (Walton) 12/15/2011 Thai News Service Text Email

...greed. His appeals were rejected and he started serving his term this year. Watch the trailer for Maree v. State Theresa Walton, a professor from Kent State University, went to interview Maree in South Africa in 2007 as part of research for a book she hopes to release next year. His life parallels...


Geology (3)
Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry 12/14/2011 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Alliance of Ohio (UCEAO) and investments through Ohio Third Frontier. In addition, a number of colleges and universities throughout the state, such as Kent State University, Hocking College, Marietta College, The Ohio State University, and Zane State University, offer world-class natural gas industry...

Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry 12/14/2011 WLNE-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Alliance of Ohio (UCEAO) and investments through Ohio Third Frontier. In addition, a number of colleges and universities throughout the state, such as Kent State University, Hocking College, Marietta College, The Ohio State University, and Zane State University, offer world-class natural gas industry...

Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry 12/14/2011 WVNS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Alliance of Ohio (UCEAO) and investments through Ohio Third Frontier. In addition, a number of colleges and universities throughout the state, such as Kent State University, Hocking College, Marietta College, The Ohio State University, and Zane State University, offer world-class natural gas industry...


Health Sciences (1)
Their view: Focus on solution instead of blame game (Caine-Bish) 12/14/2011 Portales News Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

Natalie Caine-Bish, an associate professor at Kent State University and licensed dietitian, offers this view on childhood obesity: Who is to blame for childhood obesity... the schools? the...


Human Resources; University Facilities Management (2)
Kent State among sites providing new lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) 12/14/2011 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text Attachment Email

AKRON, Ohio -- Got milk? At a growing number of companies, the answer is yes. Kent State University announced this week it has joined the ranks of employers providing "lactation rooms" for breast-feeding employees. For Kent...

Kent State among sites providing new lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) 12/15/2011 Kansas City Star Text Attachment Email


KSU at Geauga (1)
Geauga's Renaissance Singers performed for Kent State students to ease the stress of final exam week 12/14/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

BURTON - The Geauga Renaissance Singers went back to school last week and sang to Kent State University students at the Geauga campus. The group, made up of about 26 retirees who love to sing, entertained during the school's...


KSU at Stark (2)
70 KSU Stark students unexpectedly get degrees 12/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...James Bunnell in a conference room at the company where he works, presteligence, on Tuesday in North Canton. Bunnell is one of 70 students who attended Kent State Stark or the main campus who will be receiving an associate's degree through a new program called Project Win-Win. Click here to view...

70 KSU Stark students unexpectedly get degrees (Southards, Wagor) 12/15/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...unexpectedly get degrees December 15,2011 04:32 AM GMT Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Jim Bunnell racked up credits in English at Kent State Stark, but dropped out to marry and have two children. This fall, though, the school in Jackson Township called him with pleasant news:...


KSU Museum (2)
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 12/14/2011 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Front," "Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox," "Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido" and "Collectors and Collecting," KSU Museum, front campus, Kent State University.

On With The Show 12/14/2011 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

..."Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox," "Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido" and "Collectors and Collecting," the KSU Museum on front campus, Kent State University.


Town-Gown (4)
Akron, Kent receive Clean Ohio funds 12/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...grants totaling more than $27.5 million. Those projects are expected to help retain nearly 1,280 jobs. In addition, the controlling board also approved Kent State University's purchase of $1.57 million of land totaling two acres to expand the university's Esplanade into downtown Kent. The Esplanade,...

Akron, Kent receive Clean Ohio funds 12/14/2011 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...grants totaling more than $27.5 million. Those projects are expected to help retain nearly 1,280 jobs. In addition, the controlling board also approved Kent State University's purchase of $1.57 million of land totaling two acres to expand the university's Esplanade into downtown Kent. The Esplanade,...

State approves more than $1.3 million for cleanup at Kent industrial site 12/14/2011 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...documents, "The project property is also located near the historic downtown that is currently undergoing revitalization efforts and helps to reconnect Kent State University with the city's downtown. The vision for the project property is to create a new location for start-up and technology-oriented...

Akron, Kent receive Clean Ohio funds 12/14/2011 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...grants totaling more than $27.5 million. Those projects are expected to help retain nearly 1,280 jobs. In addition, the controlling board also approved Kent State University's purchase of $1.57 million of land totaling two acres to expand the university's Esplanade into downtown Kent. The Esplanade,...


News Headline: Devo still whippin' things up | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Falls Church News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Devo has never been short on ideas. When Gerald Casale, a founding member of the band that earned international fame with the 1980 New Wave hit "Whip It," talks about the future of the band, he has several aspirations, from staging a musical to developing complex applications to let users put themselves into video games based on the band's songs.While cost and feasibility are sometimes barriers, the band still pushes the outer boundary of "could" into "can," now nearly 40 years after its inception.

Take "What We Do" from their most recent album and its video - video using the term loosely, as the end result is a fully interactive melding of various vignettes (like competitive hot dog eaters chowing down and tattooed arm wrestlers battling) set to the song that allows the viewer to zoom, pan, and generally move around a 360-degree created virtual space.

The project comes from the band's latest album, 2010's Something for Everybody, part of a tongue-in-cheek promotional effort in which the band focus-grouped and polled its potential audience (and determined that the classic red Energy Dome hats that became cultural icons after the "Whip It" video would be more marketable if they were blue instead).

"An artist who usually works solo, without any input from society, just bursts upon the scene and says ‘here's what I did, take it or leave it,'" Casale said. "We've done that, so we thought it would be fun to experiment with the art of marketing."

With Something for Everybody, the band ended a 20-year absence from the recording studio.

"It was really a question of now or never," Casale said of releasing an album after the break. "We're senior citizens." He added that the positive response from a Dell laptop ad that group members worked on helped to push them in that direction.

Devo will take the stage at the State Theatre Thursday, playing tracks from the new album in what Casale says will be a catalog-spanning show sure to feature some Devo classics.

The band members, known for memorable stage-wear that had included disposable janitorial supply suits and garbage bags, will be donning action-wear like uniforms which Casale, 63, calls "age appropriate." Wearing suits - made with titanium-woven fabric that reflects so much light when photographed that it obscures the wearer - and masks that shield half the face "was an attempt to push the art collective idea and make us look all similar," Casale said.

"We needed to find a visual expression for our unique point of view," Casale said of the role costumes have played in Devo shows. "You have to find ways to communicate what you are thinking that are immediate. You can't walk around with a philosophy."

When the band was founded that philosophy to communicate was devolution, the idea that society was not advancing, but was instead falling back and falling apart. Abbreviated to Devo, it became the name of that project that brought three students from Kent State University together in 1973, in the wake of the May 1970 Kent State shootings - when national guardsmen fired on unarmed student protestors, killing four.

"[Devolution] was a kind of cheeky, offhanded observation at the time that we found somewhat humorous and in retrospect, it's not funny at all," Casale said, looking back at the concept that generated the band, now several decades away. "Certainly in that amount of time, very serious, scholarly people have basically broached the same subject, in a very thorough, analytical way."

Though members of Devo are credited as early music video trailblazers, and the band enjoys a devoted cult following of "spuds," "Whip It" would be the band's only hit single, climbing to #14 on the Billboard charts.

"Our accomplishments and contributions are marginalized and trivialized," Casale said, adding that respect has come by way of scholarship in the New Wave genre that mainstream media would not give.

But will Devo find its place in the history books?

"It depends on which history prevails," Casale said.

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News Headline: Art best bets | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life — Through Aug. 26 at Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive. Also, Beyond Fashion-Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo, through Feb. 12 and Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox through March 18. 330-672-3450.

Annual Small Works Competition and Holiday Sale — Through Dec. 24, Kent State School of Art's Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St. 330-672-1369.

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News Headline: SOCIAL JUSTICE EXPRESSED THROUGH ART IN DEC. 16 ART SHOW | Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Dec.14 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Often, feelings of oppression and inequality are expressed through an art form, and the message is sometimes stronger in these impactful pieces.Dr.Christa Boske, an assistant professor of PreK-12 Educational Administration at Kent State University, acknowledges and embraces this with her Leading for Social Justice class where she offers graduate students a unique opportunity to express their discovered emotions through art.

Students work with local artist-mentors, children, families and community members to understand and communicate social justice and equality-oriented issues through meaningful pieces of art.The students' work, along with those by local artist-mentors, will be on display at the Kent State School of Art Gallery on Friday, Dec.16, from 5:30 p.m.to 8:30 p.m.

The show, aptly titled "Standing Still is Not an Option," encourages attendees not to choose inaction when dealing with inequality and "the lived experiences of marginalized populations due to race, class, gender, language, immigration status, ability, religion and sexual identity."

"Students learn to utilize artmaking for making sense of lived experiences through sensory exploration, which creates spaces for school leaders to consider their actions and reflect upon their impact," Boske said."Artmaking plays a significant role in sense-making because the act of knowing is interconnected with affect, intuition and imaginative thinking."

Students partnered with community artist-mentors and worked together throughout the semester to translate their understanding of social justice issues into artistic endeavors.

"Throughout this course, I have been challenged by my professor, my classmates and the various readings to self-reflect and discover who it is that I really am as an individual and explore ways in which I can lead for social justice by championing for people who are marginalized," said Beth Mariola, a graduate student studying education administration K-12 leadership."The art show creates a space to communicate my transformation and journey."

Guests who attend the show will be challenged to consider how powerful their own beliefs could be when supported by facts, said Susan Hanna, a master's graduate who enrolled in the course for professional development."We have all critically studied and researched a social justice topic close to our heart," she said."With this knowledge, we've been able to create art that inspires children and educators and up-standers to speak out about an injustice occurring within the walls of their own school."

Students in the Leading for Social Justice course are committed to transform their sense of self to acknowledge and interrupt oppressive practices and empower underserved children and families throughout U.S.public schools.Their commitment is founded in research and equity audits conducted within Ohio.

The Dec.16 art show is free and open to the public.Light refreshments will be served, and the artwork is available to purchase with all proceeds going to charity.

Kent State's School of Art Gallery is located in the Art Building at 400 Janik Drive.For more information, contact Boske at cboske@kent.edu.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2011 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State University sees a good fit in Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is moving forward with its planned acquisition of the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, a private medical school in Independence that is expected to become part of the Kent State family by July 1.

University officials have been in talks with the podiatric college for some time, but Kent State trustees on Tuesday, Dec. 13, signed an “exclusive letter of intent” to hash out final details of the merger over the next few months.

“We're sort of engaged now is the way I would put it,” said Kent State president Lester Lefton. “We're no longer dating.”

Dr. Lefton said that while the podiatric college will bear Kent State's name and act as another regional campus, little is expected to change in the acquisition's immediate aftermath.

For one, tuition at the medical college, which currently is about $31,000 a year, isn't expected to change in the interim. Likewise, staffing is expected to remain the same, though it likely will shift over the next few years as people retire or move on in their careers.

“This isn't going to be like corporate America when you take over somebody and you fire everybody,” Dr. Lefton said. “We're very happy with the way they run their organization.”

While he couldn't share specific details, Dr. Lefton noted that the acquisition would provide a new revenue stream for KSU, as the podiatric college runs a yearly profit of a “couple million dollars.”

“This will not lose money for Kent State University,” Dr. Lefton said.

In other actions, Kent State trustees approved the following:

a 1.5% percent salary increase for non-bargaining employees;

renovations to the university Tri-Towers residence hall complex, which will require the university to issue $30 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds;

the appointment of alumnus Michael Solomon as the university's first national trustee — a new role for Kent State graduates who aren't Ohio residents. Mr. Solomon, who lives in California, has worked with several early stage companies, including a role in setting up Apple's Midwest dealer network in the early 1980s; and

the naming of the court in Kent State's Memorial Athletic Convocation Center for Jason and Stacie Cope, two Kent State benefactors who donated $1 million to the university's golf and basketball programs. The Copes co-own Copeland Group LLC, which runs several golf courses in Ohio.

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News Headline: KSU to take steps to acquire podiatric college (Lefton) | Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Dec. 14--KENT -- Kent State trustees agreed Tuesday to take steps to acquire the independent Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine.

KSU President Lester Lefton said he hopes to bring details of a merger or acquisition to trustees within six months.

"We see it as a strategic alignment," Lefton said. "They like us. We like them."

The 430-student, four-year medical school in Independence is among nine accredited podiatry colleges nationwide, seven of which are affiliated with a university or hospital.

The podiatric college wanted to find a partner and happened on KSU as a possible suitor when legislative liaisons for the two institutions compared notes, Lefton said.

Dr. David Nicolanti, the podiatric college's executive vice president, could not be reached for comment.

KSU officials and trustees visited the medical college's 27-acre campus in southern Cuyahoga County over the past few weeks before deciding to pursue what Lefton called an "exclusive" relationship.

He said some spots in each class of 120 students probably would be reserved for KSU graduates. KSU students in public health, nursing, anthropology and biomedical sciences would benefit by having podiatry classes under the university's menu of offerings.

Lefton also said the medical college appears to be financially healthy.

"This will not lose money for Kent State," he said.

He said tuition probably would stay at the current level of $31,000, at least initially, and KSU would not make any wholesale changes in staffing at first. The medical college campus would remain in Independence.

Lefton said the OCPM board of trustees would be disbanded if KSU acquires the college, but individuals probably would find roles as advisers and as members of the podiatry college's foundation.

Trustees of both institutions would have to approve the merger, which could be in place by July, the start of the next academic year.

Podiatrists specialize in prevention and treatment of foot disorders and face promising job prospects because of an active, overweight and increasingly older population, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

OCPM was founded in 1916 and is the only accredited school of podiatry in Ohio.

In other business, KSU trustees approved:

-- A 1.5 percent raise to base pay for 1,400 employees not covered by bargaining units. The increase will be retroactive to Sept. 1 and will be included in the Dec. 23 paychecks. The raise will cost the university an additional $1.8 million a year.

-- Agreed to buy three more parcels of property west of campus for the extension of an esplanade, or walking path.

The university will pay $570,000 for property at 209 S. Willow St. owned by MCP Willow 09 LLC; $400,000 for 210 S. Willow St., owned by George and Patricia Waliga; and $450,000 for land at 208 S. Lincoln St., owned by Jay and Margie Waliga.

All parcels have boarding houses with multiple bedrooms. The buildings will be knocked down next spring to make way for the brick and concrete walkway linking the campus to downtown.

-- Agreed to spend $30 million to replace the heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems in the Tri-Tower residence halls, Kent State's largest housing complex.

The project, which will include new windows and new roofs, will be completed over four consecutive summers. The improvement will be funded by bonds paid back by student fees currently in place. The complex is more than 40 years old.

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News Headline: KSU to take steps to acquire podiatric college (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State trustees agreed Tuesday to take steps to acquire the independent Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine.

KSU President Lester Lefton said he hopes to bring details of a merger or acquisition to trustees within six months.

"We see it as a strategic alignment," Lefton said. "They like us. We like them."

The 430-student, four-year medical school in Independence is among nine accredited podiatry colleges nationwide, seven of which are affiliated with a university or hospital.

The podiatric college wanted to find a partner and happened on KSU as a possible suitor when legislative liaisons for the two institutions compared notes, Lefton said.

Dr. David Nicolanti, the podiatric college's executive vice president, could not be reached for comment.

KSU officials and trustees visited the medical college's 27-acre campus in southern Cuyahoga County over the past few weeks before deciding to pursue what Lefton called an "exclusive" relationship.

He said some spots in each class of 120 students probably would be reserved for KSU graduates. KSU students in public health, nursing, anthropology and biomedical sciences would benefit by having podiatry classes under the university's menu of offerings.

Lefton also said the medical college appears to be financially healthy.

"This will not lose money for Kent State," he said.

He said tuition probably would stay at the current level of $31,000, at least initially, and KSU would not make any wholesale changes in staffing at first. The medical college campus would remain in Independence.

Lefton said the OCPM board of trustees would be disbanded if KSU acquires the college, but individuals probably would find roles as advisers and as members of the podiatry college's foundation.

Trustees of both institutions would have to approve the merger, which could be in place by July, the start of the next academic year.

Podiatrists specialize in prevention and treatment of foot disorders and face promising job prospects because of an active, overweight and increasingly older population, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

OCPM was founded in 1916 and is the only accredited school of podiatry in Ohio.

In other business, KSU trustees approved:

• A 1.5 percent raise to base pay for 1,400 employees not covered by bargaining units. The increase will be retroactive to Sept. 1 and will be included in the Dec. 23 paychecks. The raise will cost the university an additional $1.8 million a year.

• Agreed to buy three more parcels of property west of campus for the extension of an esplanade, or walking path.

The university will pay $570,000 for property at 209 S. Willow St. owned by MCP Willow 09 LLC; $400,000 for 210 S. Willow St., owned by George and Patricia Waliga; and $450,000 for land at 208 S. Lincoln St., owned by Jay and Margie Waliga.

All parcels have boarding houses with multiple bedrooms. The buildings will be knocked down next spring to make way for the brick and concrete walkway linking the campus to downtown.

• Agreed to spend $30 million to replace the heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems in the Tri-Tower residence halls, Kent State's largest housing complex.

The project, which will include new windows and new roofs, will be completed over four consecutive summers. The improvement will be funded by bonds paid back by student fees currently in place. The complex is more than 40 years old.

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News Headline: KSU taking steps toward podiatry college (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is a step closer to acquiring its own medical college.

Tuesday, the KSU Board of Trustees gave President Lester Lefton authority to enter into an exclusive merger negotiation with the Indepedence-based Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine.

"This (is) our commitment to them that we're very serious about this," Lefton said. "They have made a similar commitment to us."

Though the board would still have to give final approval of any deal between the schools, Lefton spoke in concrete terms about the future of the college, which would be called the Kent State University College of Podiatry. He said KSU could acquire the school by July, if that action is approved by the board of trustees.

"We were (at OCPM) two weeks ago and we were very, very impressed with the quality of the students, the faculty and the physical (campus)," said Jaqueline Woods, chairwoman of the KSU Board of Trustees.

In early November, KSU announced its intent to merge with or acquire the college, which currently has 430 students seeking doctor of podiatric medicine degrees. Lefton said the podiatric college was previously in merger discussions with other institutions, but "We're sort of engaged now."

Of the nine accredited colleges of podiatric medicine in the United States, the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine is one of two not closely affiliated with a university or hospital. Lefton said it was that industry trend, not any financial trouble, that led the private medical college to seek out a partner.

"The Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine is cash positive," Lefton said. "It runs a profit each year of a couple of million dollars, and there's no reason to assume it would change."

KSU, which gets 30 spots for students at the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown, wants a similar arrangement with the podiatry college.

"I expect that in the future we will have slots that will be for Kent State students," Lefton said. "They currently have 700 students applying to their program every year for about 120 slots."

Besides the name change, Lefton said most of the details about the podiatric college would not change after the merger - at least in the short term. Staffing and tuition rates are among the areas Lefton said would remain the same.

"This isn't going to be like corporate America where you take over somebody and then fire everybody," Lefton said. "We're very happy with the way they run their organization."

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News Headline: Petro to speak at KSU commencement | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Chancellor Jim Petro of the Ohio Board of Regents will address Kent State University graduates during the Fall 2011 Commencement Ceremony at 2 p.m. Saturday in the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center (MAC Center). He will address graduates receiving baccalaureate degrees.

Dr. Barry Franklin, a 1970 KSU alumnus, will speak during the 10 a.m. commencement ceremony for those receiving doctoral and master's degrees.

More than 2,000 degrees will be granted. The commencement ceremonies may be viewed live at www.kent.edu/commencement/webcast/live-webcast.cfm.

Petro was appointed chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents in March 2011. He leads the University System of Ohio, which is one of the largest comprehensive systems of public higher education in the nation. Petro served as Ohio attorney general from 2003 to 2007 and as Ohio auditor of state from 1995 to 2003.

Franklin serves as director of preventive cardiology and rehabilitation at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., professor of physiology at Wayne State University's School of Medicine in Detroit, and professor of internal medicine and biomedical research at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine in Rochester, Mich. He is a member of the American Heart Association Board of Trustees and the past editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention

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News Headline: South Africa: Social Media Campaign Mounts to Free Jailed American in South Africa (Walton) | Email

News Date: 12/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Thai News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Section: General News - There is a growing social media campaign taking place in the United States to free Sydney Maree, an American citizen and former Olympian who is now in prison in South Africa.

In less than three weeks, Sydney Maree's son, Daniel Maree, was able to raise $10,000 on the social media platform Kickstarter for a documentary he is calling "Maree v. State".

"Kickstarter kick started everything. It put us on the map. It got people aware of the project, because I had spent years developing grants, documents and proposals for the major grant makers and did not win any of them, did not receive any grants," he said.

Aims of the film include revealing what exactly happened to Sydnee Maree, increasing support and even prompting his release.

A former world record holder in the 1,500 meters, the South-African born Maree finished fifth as an American in the 5,000 meters at the 1988 Olympics.

Now the 55-year-old, who returned to work in his native country in the mid-1990s, is in a South African prison, serving out a five-year term for fraud.

Maree was arrested in 2004 and charged with illegally transferring to a personal account the equivalent of $120,000 from South Africa's National Empowerment Fund, of which he was the chief executive.

Maree says he was told by a government superior to do this to hide an illegal transfer. His supporters call him a scapegoat and a victim of others engaging in corruption.

But South African courts ruled he acted independently and was motivated by greed. His appeals were rejected and he started serving his term this year.

Watch the trailer for Maree v. State

Theresa Walton, a professor from Kent State University, went to interview Maree in South Africa in 2007 as part of research for a book she hopes to release next year. His life parallels so much, not just what is going on now with white collar crime and fraud in South Africa, or when he was not accepted as an American as he probably could or should have been when he was a runner, when he was a victim of apartheid in South Africa, his life parallels so much of bigger issues that he had to act within, in his own personal life," she said.

Walton is hoping Maree will get access to the information and lawyers he needs to continue making his case or get an early humanitarian release.

She is part of a group of American lawyers, athletes, artists and academics urging the U.S government to intervene on his behalf. They allege proper legal procedures were not followed.

Elizabeth Trudeau, from the U.S. Embassy in South Africa, responded to an interview request with an email saying that due to privacy concerns, we are unable to discuss in detail this issue.

She added, in her words, the safety, security and support of American citizens abroad is our highest priority.

In the trailer for the upcoming documentary there are snippets of interviews with the now jailed former sprinter, including this one, while the case dragged on. Obviously, I am a little afraid. I am little concerned about my safety, about the safety of my family," he says in the film.

His son Daniel the filmmaker says he will continue working on a movie about his father, whatever the challenges, in what he says is an increasingly difficult environment in South Africa.

He mentioned the state secrets bill which was recently passed by parliament and is pending approval from a second chamber, the National Council of Provinces, before it can be signed into law. Opponents say the law would prevent media from exposing public corruption.

Daniel Maree hopes to release his movie, which he says is also about the state of South Africa today, before the London 2012 Olympics. - VOA

Copyright © 2011 Thai News Service

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News Headline: Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry

SOURCE Ohio Business Development Coalition

Abundant, skilled labor supply improves productivity, quality and profit for the shale gas industry

COLUMBUS, Ohio, /PRNewswire/ -- Shale gas is poised to become big business in Ohio and in this case, location means everything. Proximity to the population centers of the United States and Canada, along with the expected longevity of the resource, establishes the Marcellus and Utica Shale formations as an important long-term and stable source of natural gas supply for the eastern United States. Energy companies that want to maximize their investment in establishing a supply operation to support drilling, processing or delivering the natural gas derived from shale formations must identify a central location that is proximate to all five states that occupy the formation.

The Marcellus Shale formation stretches from the edge of Maryland to Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia and the Appalachian Ohio region along the Ohio River. The boundaries of the deeper Utica Shale formation extend under the Marcellus Shale region and beyond. Shale gas has the potential to meet the total U.S. natural gas demand for generations.

Ohio's state geologist estimates that recovering 5 percent of the reserves in the 100-mile wide Utica Shale formation in eastern and central Ohio could produce 5.5 billion barrels of oil and 15.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, making the Utica a significant contributor to the national fuel supply while creating thousands of jobs in the state. At the lower 1.2 percent recovery rate being seen in the Bakken Shale formation in the West, the Ohio play could produce 1.3 billion barrels of oil and 3.75 trillion cubic feet of gas.

Energy companies looking to achieve the fastest return on their start-up investment benefit from the Ohio Appalachian Region's optimal location in the five-state Marcellus and Utica Shale region and the state's manufacturing know-how and its world-class logistics infrastructure. Everything that made Ohio the ideal location choice for suppliers to the automotive industry is in place for Tier I and II suppliers to leverage to efficiently and affordably supply the Marcellus and Utica Shale gas industry over the life of the shale gas reserves. This standing capability results in lower operating costs and maximum return on investment.

Each natural gas well itself involves about 75 jobs ranging from highly skilled positions such as seismologists, engineers and geophysicists to construction positions and others to check meters and tend the wells. There are also a number of indirect jobs associated with the production of natural gas. The shale gas development could trigger work in many trades, from environmental consultants, to lawyers, to truck drivers, to those who train for jobs at well sites, making it important to have access to a readily available skilled labor pool.

Energy companies have a growing need for engineers, researchers and skilled manufacturing workers, which are readily available in Ohio. Ohio's colleges and universities are ready to meet the need for new technologies and skilled green collar workers through new research, degrees and training specific to the advanced energy industry through programs such as The University Clean Energy Alliance of Ohio (UCEAO) and investments through Ohio Third Frontier.

In addition, a number of colleges and universities throughout the state, such as Kent State University, Hocking College, Marietta College, The Ohio State University, and Zane State University, offer world-class natural gas industry training programs.

Youngstown State University recently announced the development of a new institute designed to educate professionals and provide research for the emerging multi-billion dollar shale natural gas industry. The YSU Natural Gas and Water Resources Institute will provide bachelor's degree level courses in science and engineering that will lead to an academic minor in gas technologies and also will provide research opportunities for industry focusing on analysis of water used in the shale gas extraction process.

"Given YSU's location in the heart of the Utica shale region, this new Institute is well-poised to meet the educational and research demands and needs central to this new and growing industry," said Martin Abraham, dean of the YSU College of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, in which the new institute will be located.

Ohio's competitive tax structure supports the growth of companies involved in the extraction of Marcellus and Utica Shale. The state's broad-based, low-rate commercial activity tax rewards entrepreneurship by charging no tax on the first $1 million in gross receipts. Companies with sales between $150,000 and $1 million pay a flat fee of $150. In Ohio, the playing field is level for manufacturers because all companies are taxed at the same low rate.

And, perhaps the most significant tax benefit supply chain companies will gain is that products or services sold to customers outside of Ohio are not taxed by the state; so, companies located in Ohio can easily do business with the other four states located in the Marcellus and Utica Shale region without having to pay Ohio state tax on revenue.

Many companies have expanded their business in Ohio due to the state's ideal location in the five-state Marcellus and Utica Shale region. In Youngstown, V&M Star announced a $650 million investment in 2010 as a direct result of providing material to the Marcellus and Utica Shale industry. In Steubenville, a city in Appalachian Ohio, more than 300 new jobs have already come to the area from investments in shale gas, with as many as 10,000 more expected in the next three years. In Boardman, Dearing Compressor & Pump Co., a manufacturer of industrial pumps and compressors used in natural gas drilling, invested $3 million in a new assembly plant to expand its production capacity.

Ohio's central location, skilled workforce and friendly business environment are just a few of the key benefits for energy companies involved in the commercial development of Marcellus and Utica Shale gas, according to Ed Burghard, executive director of the Ohio Business Development Coalition, the nonprofit organization that markets the state for capital investment.

Ohio promises a perfect balance that allows business owners, their employees and their families the opportunity to achieve both their professional and personal aspirations without having to sacrifice one for the other. Ohio offers businesses an environment that makes it easy to foster work-life balance. The convenience of travel, with short commutes from work to home, lower stress and give more time to priority family activities.

"In Ohio, work-life balance is more than a buzzword; it's the way we do business," Burghard said. "Companies are trying harder to help their employees achieve better work-life balance because this positively impacts a company's bottom line. Ohio's low-cost, low-stress communities and short commutes create the State of Perfect Balance, where you can achieve both professional and personal success without sacrificing one for the other."

About the Ohio Business Development Coalition

The Ohio Business Development Coalition is a nonprofit organization that provides marketing strategy and implementation to support Ohio's economic development efforts. For more information, visit www.ohiomeansbusiness.com.

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News Headline: Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: WLNE-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry

SOURCE Ohio Business Development Coalition

Abundant, skilled labor supply improves productivity, quality and profit for the shale gas industry

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Dec. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Shale gas is poised to become big business in Ohio and in this case, location means everything. Proximity to the population centers of the United States and Canada, along with the expected longevity of the resource, establishes the Marcellus and Utica Shale formations as an important long-term and stable source of natural gas supply for the eastern United States. Energy companies that want to maximize their investment in establishing a supply operation to support drilling, processing or delivering the natural gas derived from shale formations must identify a central location that is proximate to all five states that occupy the formation.

The Marcellus Shale formation stretches from the edge of Maryland to Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia and the Appalachian Ohio region along the Ohio River. The boundaries of the deeper Utica Shale formation extend under the Marcellus Shale region and beyond. Shale gas has the potential to meet the total U.S. natural gas demand for generations.

Ohio's state geologist estimates that recovering 5 percent of the reserves in the 100-mile wide Utica Shale formation in eastern and central Ohio could produce 5.5 billion barrels of oil and 15.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, making the Utica a significant contributor to the national fuel supply while creating thousands of jobs in the state. At the lower 1.2 percent recovery rate being seen in the Bakken Shale formation in the West, the Ohio play could produce 1.3 billion barrels of oil and 3.75 trillion cubic feet of gas.

Energy companies looking to achieve the fastest return on their start-up investment benefit from the Ohio Appalachian Region's optimal location in the five-state Marcellus and Utica Shale region and the state's manufacturing know-how and its world-class logistics infrastructure. Everything that made Ohio the ideal location choice for suppliers to the automotive industry is in place for Tier I and II suppliers to leverage to efficiently and affordably supply the Marcellus and Utica Shale gas industry over the life of the shale gas reserves. This standing capability results in lower operating costs and maximum return on investment.

Each natural gas well itself involves about 75 jobs ranging from highly skilled positions such as seismologists, engineers and geophysicists to construction positions and others to check meters and tend the wells. There are also a number of indirect jobs associated with the production of natural gas. The shale gas development could trigger work in many trades, from environmental consultants, to lawyers, to truck drivers, to those who train for jobs at well sites, making it important to have access to a readily available skilled labor pool.

Energy companies have a growing need for engineers, researchers and skilled manufacturing workers, which are readily available in Ohio. Ohio's colleges and universities are ready to meet the need for new technologies and skilled green collar workers through new research, degrees and training specific to the advanced energy industry through programs such as The University Clean Energy Alliance of Ohio (UCEAO) and investments through Ohio Third Frontier.

In addition, a number of colleges and universities throughout the state, such as Kent State University, Hocking College, Marietta College, The Ohio State University, and Zane State University, offer world-class natural gas industry training programs.

Youngstown State University recently announced the development of a new institute designed to educate professionals and provide research for the emerging multi-billion dollar shale natural gas industry. The YSU Natural Gas and Water Resources Institute will provide bachelor's degree level courses in science and engineering that will lead to an academic minor in gas technologies and also will provide research opportunities for industry focusing on analysis of water used in the shale gas extraction process.

"Given YSU's location in the heart of the Utica shale region, this new Institute is well-poised to meet the educational and research demands and needs central to this new and growing industry," said Martin Abraham, dean of the YSU College of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, in which the new institute will be located.

Ohio's competitive tax structure supports the growth of companies involved in the extraction of Marcellus and Utica Shale. The state's broad-based, low-rate commercial activity tax rewards entrepreneurship by charging no tax on the first $1 million in gross receipts. Companies with sales between $150,000 and $1 million pay a flat fee of $150. In Ohio, the playing field is level for manufacturers because all companies are taxed at the same low rate.

And, perhaps the most significant tax benefit supply chain companies will gain is that products or services sold to customers outside of Ohio are not taxed by the state; so, companies located in Ohio can easily do business with the other four states located in the Marcellus and Utica Shale region without having to pay Ohio state tax on revenue.

Many companies have expanded their business in Ohio due to the state's ideal location in the five-state Marcellus and Utica Shale region. In Youngstown, V&M Star announced a $650 million investment in 2010 as a direct result of providing material to the Marcellus and Utica Shale industry. In Steubenville, a city in Appalachian Ohio, more than 300 new jobs have already come to the area from investments in shale gas, with as many as 10,000 more expected in the next three years. In Boardman, Dearing Compressor & Pump Co., a manufacturer of industrial pumps and compressors used in natural gas drilling, invested $3 million in a new assembly plant to expand its production capacity.

Ohio's central location, skilled workforce and friendly business environment are just a few of the key benefits for energy companies involved in the commercial development of Marcellus and Utica Shale gas, according to Ed Burghard, executive director of the Ohio Business Development Coalition, the nonprofit organization that markets the state for capital investment.

Ohio promises a perfect balance that allows business owners, their employees and their families the opportunity to achieve both their professional and personal aspirations without having to sacrifice one for the other. Ohio offers businesses an environment that makes it easy to foster work-life balance. The convenience of travel, with short commutes from work to home, lower stress and give more time to priority family activities.

"In Ohio, work-life balance is more than a buzzword; it's the way we do business," Burghard said. "Companies are trying harder to help their employees achieve better work-life balance because this positively impacts a company's bottom line. Ohio's low-cost, low-stress communities and short commutes create the State of Perfect Balance, where you can achieve both professional and personal success without sacrificing one for the other."

About the Ohio Business Development Coalition

The Ohio Business Development Coalition is a nonprofit organization that provides marketing strategy and implementation to support Ohio's economic development efforts. For more information, visit www.ohiomeansbusiness.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ohio's Affordable Skilled Labor Pool Ready to Meet Demands of Shale Gas Industry | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: WVNS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Abundant, skilled labor supply improves productivity, quality and profit for the shale gas industry

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Dec. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Shale gas is poised to become big business in Ohio and in this case, location means everything. Proximity to the population centers of the United States and Canada, along with the expected longevity of the resource, establishes the Marcellus and Utica Shale formations as an important long-term and stable source of natural gas supply for the eastern United States. Energy companies that want to maximize their investment in establishing a supply operation to support drilling, processing or delivering the natural gas derived from shale formations must identify a central location that is proximate to all five states that occupy the formation.

The Marcellus Shale formation stretches from the edge of Maryland to Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia and the Appalachian Ohio region along the Ohio River. The boundaries of the deeper Utica Shale formation extend under the Marcellus Shale region and beyond. Shale gas has the potential to meet the total U.S. natural gas demand for generations.

Ohio's state geologist estimates that recovering 5 percent of the reserves in the 100-mile wide Utica Shale formation in eastern and central Ohio could produce 5.5 billion barrels of oil and 15.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, making the Utica a significant contributor to the national fuel supply while creating thousands of jobs in the state. At the lower 1.2 percent recovery rate being seen in the Bakken Shale formation in the West, the Ohio play could produce 1.3 billion barrels of oil and 3.75 trillion cubic feet of gas.

Energy companies looking to achieve the fastest return on their start-up investment benefit from the Ohio Appalachian Region's optimal location in the five-state Marcellus and Utica Shale region and the state's manufacturing know-how and its world-class logistics infrastructure. Everything that made Ohio the ideal location choice for suppliers to the automotive industry is in place for Tier I and II suppliers to leverage to efficiently and affordably supply the Marcellus and Utica Shale gas industry over the life of the shale gas reserves. This standing capability results in lower operating costs and maximum return on investment.

Each natural gas well itself involves about 75 jobs ranging from highly skilled positions such as seismologists, engineers and geophysicists to construction positions and others to check meters and tend the wells. There are also a number of indirect jobs associated with the production of natural gas. The shale gas development could trigger work in many trades, from environmental consultants, to lawyers, to truck drivers, to those who train for jobs at well sites, making it important to have access to a readily available skilled labor pool.

Energy companies have a growing need for engineers, researchers and skilled manufacturing workers, which are readily available in Ohio. Ohio's colleges and universities are ready to meet the need for new technologies and skilled green collar workers through new research, degrees and training specific to the advanced energy industry through programs such as The University Clean Energy Alliance of Ohio (UCEAO) and investments through Ohio Third Frontier.

In addition, a number of colleges and universities throughout the state, such as Kent State University, Hocking College, Marietta College, The Ohio State University, and Zane State University, offer world-class natural gas industry training programs.

Youngstown State University recently announced the development of a new institute designed to educate professionals and provide research for the emerging multi-billion dollar shale natural gas industry. The YSU Natural Gas and Water Resources Institute will provide bachelor's degree level courses in science and engineering that will lead to an academic minor in gas technologies and also will provide research opportunities for industry focusing on analysis of water used in the shale gas extraction process.

"Given YSU's location in the heart of the Utica shale region, this new Institute is well-poised to meet the educational and research demands and needs central to this new and growing industry," said Martin Abraham, dean of the YSU College of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, in which the new institute will be located.

Ohio's competitive tax structure supports the growth of companies involved in the extraction of Marcellus and Utica Shale. The state's broad-based, low-rate commercial activity tax rewards entrepreneurship by charging no tax on the first $1 million in gross receipts. Companies with sales between $150,000 and $1 million pay a flat fee of $150. In Ohio, the playing field is level for manufacturers because all companies are taxed at the same low rate.

And, perhaps the most significant tax benefit supply chain companies will gain is that products or services sold to customers outside of Ohio are not taxed by the state; so, companies located in Ohio can easily do business with the other four states located in the Marcellus and Utica Shale region without having to pay Ohio state tax on revenue.

Many companies have expanded their business in Ohio due to the state's ideal location in the five-state Marcellus and Utica Shale region. In Youngstown, V&M Star announced a $650 million investment in 2010 as a direct result of providing material to the Marcellus and Utica Shale industry. In Steubenville, a city in Appalachian Ohio, more than 300 new jobs have already come to the area from investments in shale gas, with as many as 10,000 more expected in the next three years. In Boardman, Dearing Compressor & Pump Co., a manufacturer of industrial pumps and compressors used in natural gas drilling, invested $3 million in a new assembly plant to expand its production capacity.

Ohio's central location, skilled workforce and friendly business environment are just a few of the key benefits for energy companies involved in the commercial development of Marcellus and Utica Shale gas, according to Ed Burghard, executive director of the Ohio Business Development Coalition, the nonprofit organization that markets the state for capital investment.

Ohio promises a perfect balance that allows business owners, their employees and their families the opportunity to achieve both their professional and personal aspirations without having to sacrifice one for the other. Ohio offers businesses an environment that makes it easy to foster work-life balance. The convenience of travel, with short commutes from work to home, lower stress and give more time to priority family activities.

"In Ohio, work-life balance is more than a buzzword; it's the way we do business," Burghard said. "Companies are trying harder to help their employees achieve better work-life balance because this positively impacts a company's bottom line. Ohio's low-cost, low-stress communities and short commutes create the State of Perfect Balance, where you can achieve both professional and personal success without sacrificing one for the other."

About the Ohio Business Development Coalition

The Ohio Business Development Coalition is a nonprofit organization that provides marketing strategy and implementation to support Ohio's economic development efforts. For more information, visit www.ohiomeansbusiness.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Their view: Focus on solution instead of blame game (Caine-Bish) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Portales News Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Natalie Caine-Bish, an associate professor at Kent State University and licensed dietitian, offers this view on childhood obesity:

Who is to blame for childhood obesity... the schools? the government? parents? physicians?

Childhood obesity rates are rising at an alarming rate; meanwhile, everyone is pointing fingers - at the government, schools, parents, physicians, soda and snack manufacturers, fast food chains, etc.

Is it Congress's fault for failing to pass a spending bill to implement stricter USDA school lunch standards?

Are financially strapped schools to blame for eliminating physical education classes?

Should parents monitor their children's eating and exercising more closely?

The blame game is actually part of the problem.

"When it comes to childhood obesity, focusing on blame diverts attention from the real issues and prevents progress. There is not one particular organization, food, or habit to blame," Caine-Bish said. "Everyone wants to blame someone or something else, as a result, nothing gets accomplished. Pointing fingers at one another is not going to solve the issue. Instead, we need to take a more positive approach, get involved and be proactive."

Here's five keys to start moving in a better and healthier direction:

• Get educated. Learn about current issues related to and new findings on preventing childhood obesity.

• Engage. Write your Congressman and Representatives about current issues on nutrition and physical activity initiatives.

• Get involved in your children's schools. Start small. Work with your child's school PTA or local city officials to make healthy changes in your local environments.

• Work together. Invite school officials, local government officials, health care professionals, educators, and businessmen to participate or volunteer in local events that focus on preventing childhood obesity such as farmer's markets, health fairs, PTA meetings, school board meetings, and local races. This allows you to get to know each other and find ways of collaborating.

• Be a role model. Start with yourself or your own family and engage in healthy behaviors. If everyone takes small steps toward being healthier, then progress has been made.

See archived 'Opinion' stories >>

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News Headline: Kent State among sites providing new lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Sacramento Bee - Online, The
Contact Name: CAROL BILICZKY
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio -- Got milk?

At a growing number of companies, the answer is yes.

Kent State University announced this week it has joined the ranks of employers providing "lactation rooms" for breast-feeding employees.

For Kent State sustainability manager Melanie Knowles, this means she only has to walk down a hall and into a private room to express milk for her 15-month-old son, Arran.

"It's great. Knowing it's there takes one thing off my mind," she said.

The federal Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 requires companies with more than 50 workers to provide a private place with a lockable door for mothers to express and refrigerate breast milk. Dee Keith, a board-certified lactation consultant in Cincinnati and co-chair of the Ohio Breastfeeding Alliance, said employers seem to be complying with the new regulation.

"People are doing their best to come online as word gets out," she said. "It's a cost benefit to them."

Some employers provided retreats for breast-feeding moms long before it was required.

For example, Akron Children's Hospital included five lactation rooms in the Reinberger Family Center that it opened in 2008, spokeswoman Holly Pupino said.

Employees, patients and visitors use the rooms about 1,300 times a month. The rooms are built for comfort, with TVs, refrigerators, juice and snacks.

Ohio State has 28 lactation rooms on its main campus and Medical Center in Columbus and plans to include more in new construction.

As about 10,500 faculty and staff on OSU's main campus are women in their child-bearing years, the rooms are a valuable lure to recruit and retain employees, the university said.

The University of Michigan has more than 30 lactation sites, from lounges to private meeting rooms that can be commandeered upon request.

The Akro, Ohio-based Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. has provided lactation rooms in its corporate headquarters and Innovation Center since 2006, spokesman Keith Price said.

"The rooms are open and available to associates during working hours," he said. "Associates are encouraged to walk in when needed."

Kent State opened lactation rooms for female employees this week in its Women's Center, Harbourt Hall and the Schwartz Center. Each room is being equipped with a chair and refrigerator, and the Women's Center is getting a breast pump.

"The rooms are cozy - not overly large," said Michael Bruder, who oversees design and construction for KSU.

The university wants to have lactation rooms within a five-minute walk of each of the 100 buildings on campus. Three to five more buildings are being identified, with the library, the busiest building on campus, the next to get a lactation room.

The city of Akron does not have rooms just for lactating mothers in each city facility, spokeswoman Stephanie York said, but it does provide one if a woman needs one.

"I can tell you from personal experience, that such a room at the Law Department was provided to me when I needed it," she said.

The University of Akron offers space for lactating mothers. Employees and supervisors also work together to find private space in individual buildings, and employees with private offices can simply close their door.

But all is not smooth in this brave new world, despite general agreement that breast-fed babies are healthier than their bottle-fed brethren and that lactation rooms can keep young mothers on the job.

Keith of the Ohio Breastfeeding Coalition said she gets at least one call a week from a mom who says she's getting a hard time from an employer about her need to lactate or whose employer won't provide a private space.

One Akron-area woman complained that her employer didn't want her to return to work until her child had moved on to bottles. Keith called the company's law department and "accommodations quickly were made for her."

At Kent State, breast-feeding mothers like Knowles once had to make do with makeshift accommodations - in her case, a large closet that she shared with files.

The current situation is much nicer, she said.

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News Headline: Kent State among sites providing new lactation rooms (Knowles, Bruder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Kansas City Star
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Got milk?

At a growing number of companies, the answer is yes.

Kent State University announced this week it has joined the ranks of employers providing "lactation rooms" for breast-feeding employees.

For Kent State sustainability manager Melanie Knowles, this means she only has to walk down a hall and into a private room to express milk for her 15-month-old son, Arran.

"It's great. Knowing it's there takes one thing off my mind," she said.

The federal Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 requires companies with more than 50 workers to provide a private place with a lockable door for mothers to express and refrigerate breast milk. Dee Keith, a board-certified lactation consultant in Cincinnati and co-chair of the Ohio Breastfeeding Alliance, said employers seem to be complying with the new regulation.

"People are doing their best to come online as word gets out," she said. "It's a cost benefit to them."

Some employers provided retreats for breast-feeding moms long before it was required.

For example, Akron Children's Hospital included five lactation rooms in the Reinberger Family Center that it opened in 2008, spokeswoman Holly Pupino said.

Employees, patients and visitors use the rooms about 1,300 times a month. The rooms are built for comfort, with TVs, refrigerators, juice and snacks.

Ohio State has 28 lactation rooms on its main campus and Medical Center in Columbus and plans to include more in new construction.

As about 10,500 faculty and staff on OSU's main campus are women in their child-bearing years, the rooms are a valuable lure to recruit and retain employees, the university said.

The University of Michigan has more than 30 lactation sites, from lounges to private meeting rooms that can be commandeered upon request.

The Akro, Ohio-based Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. has provided lactation rooms in its corporate headquarters and Innovation Center since 2006, spokesman Keith Price said.

"The rooms are open and available to associates during working hours," he said. "Associates are encouraged to walk in when needed."

Kent State opened lactation rooms for female employees this week in its Women's Center, Harbourt Hall and the Schwartz Center. Each room is being equipped with a chair and refrigerator, and the Women's Center is getting a breast pump.

"The rooms are cozy - not overly large," said Michael Bruder, who oversees design and construction for KSU.

The university wants to have lactation rooms within a five-minute walk of each of the 100 buildings on campus. Three to five more buildings are being identified, with the library, the busiest building on campus, the next to get a lactation room.

The city of Akron does not have rooms just for lactating mothers in each city facility, spokeswoman Stephanie York said, but it does provide one if a woman needs one.

"I can tell you from personal experience, that such a room at the Law Department was provided to me when I needed it," she said.

The University of Akron offers space for lactating mothers. Employees and supervisors also work together to find private space in individual buildings, and employees with private offices can simply close their door.

But all is not smooth in this brave new world, despite general agreement that breast-fed babies are healthier than their bottle-fed brethren and that lactation rooms can keep young mothers on the job.

Keith of the Ohio Breastfeeding Coalition said she gets at least one call a week from a mom who says she's getting a hard time from an employer about her need to lactate or whose employer won't provide a private space.

One Akron-area woman complained that her employer didn't want her to return to work until her child had moved on to bottles. Keith called the company's law department and "accommodations quickly were made for her."

At Kent State, breast-feeding mothers like Knowles once had to make do with makeshift accommodations - in her case, a large closet that she shared with files.

The current situation is much nicer, she said.

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News Headline: Geauga's Renaissance Singers performed for Kent State students to ease the stress of final exam week | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Joan Rusek
News OCR Text: BURTON - The Geauga Renaissance Singers went back to school last week and sang to Kent State University students at the Geauga campus.

The group, made up of about 26 retirees who love to sing, entertained during the school's annual Stress Buster Week, the week before final exams.

In addition to the concert, other stress-busting activities included a lunchtime yoga class and an opportunity to practice Tai Chi with an instructor.

The concert featured holiday songs.

The Renaissance Singers entertain audiences throughout the year at senior centers, nursing homes and at community events.

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News Headline: 70 KSU Stark students unexpectedly get degrees | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Software engineer James Bunnell in a conference room at the company where he works, presteligence, on Tuesday in North Canton. Bunnell is one of 70 students who attended Kent State Stark or the main campus who will be receiving an associate's degree through a new program called Project Win-Win.

Click here to view photo: http://www.ohio.com/news/local/degrees15cut-1.250513?ot=akron.PhotoGalleryLayout.ot&s=1.250501&pt=1

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News Headline: 70 KSU Stark students unexpectedly get degrees (Southards, Wagor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/15/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thursday, December 15, 2011

70 KSU Stark students unexpectedly get degrees December 15,2011 04:32 AM GMT

Carol Biliczky

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

Jim Bunnell racked up credits in English at Kent State Stark, but dropped out to marry and have two children.

This fall, though, the school in Jackson Township called him with pleasant news: He had earned enough credits for an associate degree and could collect it at graduation Friday.

"I said, ‘Wow,' " said Bunnell, 34, a software engineer. "I always thought I was close to the halfway mark. I figured. ‘I can't finish it now, so I'll come back later.' "

He is part of a fledgling program called Project Win-Win that helps community colleges and regional campuses identify students who have completed enough credits for an associate degrees but for some reason never graduated.

When the tax-supported KSU Stark began auditing student records last year, it discovered more than 70 students at its campus and at the main Kent campus who were eligible for associate degrees.

"A lot of time students are so focused on getting their bachelor's degrees that they don't realize that the associate degree is an option," said Mary Southards, assistant dean of enrollment services at Kent State Stark. "That's particularly true for students who are not in a two-year technical program."

Project Win-Win began at nine institutions around the country in fall 2009 and by this fall had grown to 64 institutions in nine states. Ohio participants are KSU campuses in Stark, Tuscarawas and Trumbull, and four Ohio community colleges: Clark State, Sinclair, Northwest State and Lakeland.

The program is sponsored by the Institute for Higher Education Policy and State Higher Education Officers. The Lumina Foundation for Education and the Kresge Foundation provided grants to help institutions do the legwork.

"Project Win-Win positively impacts the educational attainment of our region," Walter F. Wagor, dean of Kent State Stark, said in a news release.

The degree can make students more marketable to employers and gives them a leg up on reaching for a bachelor's degree, he said.

The project looks for students who enrolled after 2001, accumulated at least 61 credit hours and hadn't been enrolled at the institution in at least a year.

Kent State Stark ran the names of potential graduates through the nonprofit National Student Clearinghouse, which verifies student degrees and enrollments, to eliminate those who transferred to other colleges and possibly graduated.

As of August, 24 institutions had completed degree audits on 12,000 students and identified 2,800 as eligible for associate degrees and another 6,200 within nine to 12 hours of earning their associate degrees.

Project Win-Win encourages the latter to go back to school and finish the workload and provides them a road map to do so. Win-Win spokeswoman Tia Gordon said the first full report on results will be published in September.

While the program has nudged many students into getting their sheepskins, not all eligible students took advantage of the opportunity.

Southards, the KSU official, said the campus identified 400 students who were eligible to get associate degrees based on the course work they had completed. But more than 90 percent of those contacted did not take advantage of the offer.

"We were a little perplexed by it," Southards said. "It's not the kind of return rate we thought we would have. It was a decision, ‘No, this is something that I don't want.' "

While the $15,000 grant provided by Project Win-Win will run out this spring, KSU Stark aims to find local funds to keep it going. The Ohio Board of Regents also has expressed interest in a statewide program, Southards said.

As for Bunnell, the North Canton resident who is unexpectedly receiving an associate degree at graduation, he plans to pursue a bachelor's degree when his children are older.

"It's on the radar," he said.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

Click here to read or leave a comment on this story.

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News Headline: SPECIAL ACTIVITIES | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "A Day at the Beach," "On the Home Front," "Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox," "Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido" and "Collectors and Collecting," KSU Museum, front campus, Kent State University.

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Currently -- "A Day at the Beach," "On the Home Front," "Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox," "Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevido" and "Collectors and Collecting," the KSU Museum on front campus, Kent State University.

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News Headline: Akron, Kent receive Clean Ohio funds | Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Downing, Bob
News OCR Text: Dec. 14--The city of Akron is getting $2.9 million to help with an environmental cleanup at the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. complex in East Akron.

The city's request for Clean Ohio funds was approved last month by the Clean Ohio Council and was approved on Monday by the State Controlling Board.

The money will be used to demolish and remediate a brownfield or contaminated site: the old Goodyear powerhouse at 150 and 200 Innovation Way (formerly Martha Avenue).

The funds will be used to remove asbestos and other wastes and to demolish the existing buildings on two parcels that cover 14 acres.

After the cleanup, the site will be used for new commercial and industrial space, including offices and tire manufacturing.

Construction is under way on a new seven-story corporate headquarters for Goodyear. The building with room for 2,000 workers is scheduled to be completed in 2013. It will be connected to the company's Innovation Center with an additional 800 workers.

The new building is part of a $900 million redevelopment in East Akron.

The city of Kent is also getting $1.34 million in Clean Ohio Funds to clean up a 17.7-acre property at 800 Mogadore Road.

The cleanup of the former RB&W property will enable Kent to add the site to its Atlantic and Great Western Technology Park, also known as Discovery Park.

The site along the Mogadore Road technology corridor is envisioned to be a new location for startup and technology-oriented companies.

Kent and T&B Corp. will contribute a combined $1,888,548 in matching dollars.

"This is really an exciting time for our community," said state Rep. Kathleen Clyde, D-Kent.

In all, the state awarded 15 brownfield cleanup grants totaling more than $27.5 million. Those projects are expected to help retain nearly 1,280 jobs.

In addition, the controlling board also approved Kent State University's purchase of $1.57 million of land totaling two acres to expand the university's Esplanade into downtown Kent.

The Esplanade, a $100 million redevelopment project, will make it easier to travel from campus to downtown Kent. It will also serve as a sculpture walk and part of the Portage hike-and-bike trail.

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Akron, Kent receive Clean Ohio funds | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Akron is getting $2.9 million to help with an environmental cleanup at the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. complex in East Akron.

The city's request for Clean Ohio funds was approved last month by the Clean Ohio Council and was approved on Monday by the State Controlling Board.

The money will be used to demolish and remediate a brownfield or contaminated site: the old Goodyear powerhouse at 150 and 200 Innovation Way (formerly Martha Avenue).

The funds will be used to remove asbestos and other wastes and to demolish the existing buildings on two parcels that cover 14 acres.

After the cleanup, the site will be used for new commercial and industrial space, including offices and tire manufacturing.

Construction is under way on a new seven-story corporate headquarters for Goodyear. The building with room for 2,000 workers is scheduled to be completed in 2013. It will be connected to the company's Innovation Center with an additional 800 workers.

The new building is part of a $900 million redevelopment in East Akron.

The city of Kent is also getting $1.34 million in Clean Ohio Funds to clean up a 17.7-acre property at 800 Mogadore Road.

The cleanup of the former RB&W property will enable Kent to add the site to its Atlantic and Great Western Technology Park, also known as Discovery Park.

The site along the Mogadore Road technology corridor is envisioned to be a new location for startup and technology-oriented companies.

Kent and T&B Corp. will contribute a combined $1,888,548 in matching dollars.

"This is really an exciting time for our community," said state Rep. Kathleen Clyde, D-Kent.

In all, the state awarded 15 brownfield cleanup grants totaling more than $27.5 million. Those projects are expected to help retain nearly 1,280 jobs.

In addition, the controlling board also approved Kent State University's purchase of $1.57 million of land totaling two acres to expand the university's Esplanade into downtown Kent.

The Esplanade, a $100 million redevelopment project, will make it easier to travel from campus to downtown Kent. It will also serve as a sculpture walk and part of the Portage hike-and-bike trail.

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News Headline: State approves more than $1.3 million for cleanup at Kent industrial site | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name: Marc Kovac
News OCR Text: Columbus -- The state Controlling Board approved more than $1.3 million in funding Dec. 12 for cleanup activities at a Kent industrial site.

The funds, from the state's Clean Ohio Revitalization program, will be used to ready a 17.7-acre property at 800 Mogadore Road for future use as part of the city's Atlantic and Great Western Technology Park.

According to documents, "The project property is also located near the historic downtown that is currently undergoing revitalization efforts and helps to reconnect Kent State University with the city's downtown. The vision for the project property is to create a new location for start-up and technology-oriented companies that can build upon the city's assets, including Kent State University."

The site was used for a variety of industrial uses for more than a century, starting as the Dithridge and Smith Cut Glass Co. in 1893 and ending as the Russell, Burdsall and Ward Co. in 2009.

According to documents, the current owner demolished all of the buildings at the site and began remediation activities, including a containment wall that is now failing.

The total project will cost more than $3.2 million, with the city and T&B Corp. covering the balance.

The Clean Ohio Council signed off on the funding in November.

E-mail Marc Kovac at mkovac@dixcom.com.

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News Headline: Akron, Kent receive Clean Ohio funds | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/14/2011
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron, Kent receive Clean Ohio funds

Bob Downing

Dec 14, 2011 (The Akron Beacon Journal - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) --

The city of Akron is getting $2.9 million to help with an environmental cleanup at the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. complex in East Akron.

The city's request for Clean Ohio funds was approved last month by the Clean Ohio Council and was approved on Monday by the State Controlling Board.

The money will be used to demolish and remediate a brownfield or contaminated site: the old Goodyear powerhouse at 150 and 200 Innovation Way (formerly Martha Avenue).

The funds will be used to remove asbestos and other wastes and to demolish the existing buildings on two parcels that cover 14 acres.

After the cleanup, the site will be used for new commercial and industrial space, including offices and tire manufacturing.

Construction is under way on a new seven-story corporate headquarters for Goodyear. The building with room for 2,000 workers is scheduled to be completed in 2013. It will be connected to the company's Innovation Center with an additional 800 workers.

The new building is part of a $900 million redevelopment in East Akron.

The city of Kent is also getting $1.34 million in Clean Ohio Funds to clean up a 17.7-acre property at 800 Mogadore Road.

The cleanup of the former RB&W property will enable Kent to add the site to its Atlantic and Great Western Technology Park, also known as Discovery Park.

The site along the Mogadore Road technology corridor is envisioned to be a new location for startup and technology-oriented companies.

Kent and T&B Corp. will contribute a combined $1,888,548 in matching dollars.

"This is really an exciting time for our community," said state Rep. Kathleen Clyde, D-Kent.

In all, the state awarded 15 brownfield cleanup grants totaling more than $27.5 million. Those projects are expected to help retain nearly 1,280 jobs.

In addition, the controlling board also approved Kent State University's purchase of $1.57 million of land totaling two acres to expand the university's Esplanade into downtown Kent.

The Esplanade, a $100 million redevelopment project, will make it easier to travel from campus to downtown Kent. It will also serve as a sculpture walk and part of the Portage hike-and-bike trail.

Copyright (C) 2011, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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