Report Overview:
Total Clips (37)
Alumni; Athletics; KSU Foundation; University Communications and Marketing; University Relations (1)
Anthropology (1)
Athletics (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geography (1)
Health Sciences (1)
Health Sciences; Sociology (1)
Higher Education (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Salem (2)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (3)
Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE) (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Office of the Provost (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC); University Communications and Marketing (1)
Psychology (3)
Sociology (1)
Students (3)
Town-Gown (2)
University Press (1)
WKSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Athletics; KSU Foundation; University Communications and Marketing; University Relations (1)
Kent State alumni magazine wins gold 12/27/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

HONORED Kent State University's alumni publication, Kent State Magazine, won the school a gold at the ninth annual Public Relations Society of America...


Anthropology (1)
'Ardi' Fossil Altering Ideas on Human Evolution 01/03/2012 YouTube Text Email


Athletics (1)
KSU coach Senderoff to give Kent chamber talk 01/03/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees (1)
Kent State expanding (Lefton) 12/24/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State expanding Raises, land buys among items approved by board by WKSU's KABIR BHATIA Reporter Kabir Bhatia Areas with red stripes...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
'Green' projects get thumbs up to vie for sewer district funding (Schwarz) 12/29/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...district's green infrastructure program has the potential to transform Cleveland neighborhoods, improving property values and quality of life. Schwarz heads Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, which is providing assistance in the development of the Urban Agriculture Innovation...

Cleveland works on fitting a casino into its cityscape (Jurca) 12/24/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...be back on as the first four floors of Higbees becomes phase one of the Horseshoe Casino. So what's not to like? David Jurca, an urban designer at Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, says a better question is: How can the casino be as good as possible? He's excited by how the...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Going Places: Jan. 2, 2012 01/03/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Geography (1)
MAP AUDIO Earthquake Hits Near Youngstown Featured (Schmidlin) 12/31/2011 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...happened at just before 3:05 PM, and U.S.G.S. measurements put it about 1.4 miles deep. Earthquake expert Thomas Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University, tells AkronNewsNow.com that quakes are common in Northeast Ohio. But he says as far as he's concerned, the "jury's out"...


Health Sciences (1)
You asked about childhood obesity - Sleepy Eye, MN - The Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch (Caine-Bish) 12/29/2011 Sleepy Eye Herald-Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

... Sleepy Eye Herald-Dispatch Posted Dec 29, 2011 @ 06:00 AM Sleepy Eye, Minn. - According to Dr. Natalie Caine-Bish, associate professor at Kent State University and licensed dietitian, childhood obesity rates are rising at an alarming rate; meanwhile everyone is pointing fingers at the...


Health Sciences; Sociology (1)
Teens safer behind the wheel, but nowhere else (Kerr, Olds) 12/24/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...safety. Fewer high-school students are eating fruits and vegetables and exercising than in 2007. Dianne Kerr is a professor of health education at Kent State University. She says the state should give more priority to physical education. KERR: "It's unfortunate that a lot of schools are getting...


Higher Education (1)
Akron companies ranked by trade publication 12/31/2011 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...CVCA's enrollment was listed at 855 and Western Reserve was listed at 402. Colleges Based on what was called 2011 full-time equivalent enrollment, Kent State was No. 1 (30,520 students), followed at No. 2 by the University of Akron (23,219). Career and vo-ed schools The Medina County Career...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Editor Simmons wins diversity award 12/28/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

Plain Dealer editor Debra Adams Simmons has been named winner of the 2012 Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity by the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication. The award, which recognizes media professionals who encourage diversity in journalism,...

Adams Simmons to receive McGruder Award 01/03/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


KSU at Salem (2)
KSU Salem Nursing Students Recall Trip to Tanzania (Ferranto) 01/03/2012 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Five months have passed since 15 nursing students at Kent State University's Salem campus returned from Tanzania, a country in East Africa, which is home to lions, Mount Kilimanjaro and a life expectancy...

KSU Salem Nursing Students Recall Trip to Tanzania (Ferranto) 01/02/2012 WYTV - Online Text Attachment Email

Five months have passed since 15 nursing students at Kent State University's Salem campus returned from Tanzania, a country in East Africa, which is home to lions, Mount Kilimanjaro and a life expectancy...


KSU at Stark (1)
Hoover Foundation grants awarded 01/03/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...50-school elementary series and the expansion of the middle and senior high series to 60 schools that reach more than 55,000 students in live performances. Kent State University at Stark for Making the Invisible Visible: Water Quality in Stark County, a collaborative effort between five Universities and...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Local history: 1962: Stories that shaped the year 01/03/2012 Reporter, The Text Attachment Email


KSU Museum (3)
2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Dec. 23-29, 2011 12/23/2011 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

By John Gruner, The Plain Dealer MUSEUMS Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until...

Fashion with social consciousness (WITH VIDEOS) (Palomo-Lovinski) 12/24/2011 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...Designers include Earth Pledge, Dosa, Isabel Toledo, Linda Loudermilk, Rogan Gregory, Sa Va, Calvin Klein and Yves Saint Laurent. Museum information The Kent State University Museum is at 515 Hilltop Drive. It is open 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 8:45 on Thursdays,...

Beyond Fashion – Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo 12/24/2011 Leader Publications - Online Text Attachment Email

Akron Ohio Events Beyond Fashion – Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo Work of local fashion designer and Kent State University professor. Through Feb. 12, 2012, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.;...


Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE) (1)
KSU profs want native Ohioan to be the state children's author (Brodie) 12/29/2011 TwinsburgBulletin Text Attachment Email

by MARC KOVAC | CAPITAL BUREAU CHIEF Columbus -- Two Kent State University professors are urging lawmakers to name native Ohioan Virginia Hamilton as the state's official children's and youth literature...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Census: More young adults living with parents (Cichy) 12/24/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...percent. For women, the increase was slightly lower _ 8 percent to 10 percent. Kelly Cichy is a professor of Human Development and Family Studies for Kent State University. She said the economic recession contributed to the increase, but it's not the only factor. "The other thing that's going...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Exploradio - The liquid crystal kingdom (Yokoyama) 12/24/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Exploradio - The liquid crystal kingdom The future is now at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's foremost lab dedicated to research in this mysterious state of matter. by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR...


Office of the Provost (1)
Cash-strapped universities look at cutting remedial classes (Frank) 01/03/2012 Sacramento Bee, The Text Attachment Email


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) (1)
Kent State receives $225,000 federal economic development grant to assist rural communities (Messing) 12/27/2011 akronlegalnews.com Text Attachment Email

Login | December 27, 2011 Kent State receives $225,000 federal economic development grant to assist rural communities Published: December 27, 2011 Kent State University...


Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC); University Communications and Marketing (1)
CSU offers $1,000 incentive to spring semester transfers (Danes) 12/27/2011 Plain Dealer Text Email

...develop applicable solutions. The research institutions were awarded nearly $4 million from the National Council of Science and Technology-Mexico. Kent State gets social: Kent State University has launched a social media portal, called a "smash up," at social.kent.edu. It links users to...


Psychology (3)
Exploradio - Obesity and memory (Gunstad) 12/24/2011 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...memory loss. by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR Morning Edition Host Jeff St. Clair Holiday feasting makes watching your weight especially difficult. Kent State researcher John Gunstad and his colleagues have found that excess weight gain can lead to memory loss in addition to other adverse health...

Remember Your Weight Loss Plan (Gunstad) 01/03/2012 PsychCentral.com Text Attachment Email

Study: Remembering to Lose Weight (Gunstad) 01/03/2012 Coastal Breeze News Text Attachment Email


Sociology (1)
Software gets tough on crime (Jefferis) 12/27/2011 Chronicle-Telegram - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Mansfield, Toledo and Youngstown. Elyria and Lorain, which previously did little computerized crime analysis, have made “huge strides,” said Eric Jefferis, a Kent State University associate professor and consortium member who works with officers in the group. Intelligence-led policing is loosely based on...


Students (3)
KSU student death likely natural causes: Medical examiner to issue report next week 01/03/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

JUST IN: Kent State Dorm Student Died of Natural Causes 01/03/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Coroner Releases Details in Kent State University Student's Death 01/03/2012 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (2)
OUR VIEW Esplanade signals new chapter for KSU, Kent 01/03/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

READY FOR DEMOLITION 01/03/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
About books: Rock 'n roll photographs - Canton, OH - CantonRep.com 12/29/2011 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...site About books: Rock 'n roll photographs By Gary Brown CantonRep.com staff writer Posted Dec 28, 2011 @ 02:45 PM The book's publisher, Kent State University Press, calls "1950s Radio in Color" a "remarkable collection of photographs by one of rock's early champions." Indeed, "1950s...


WKSU (1)
Chamber Chatter: Welcome new Chamber member n Camp Bow Wow 01/01/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Women2Women Breakfast in January Join Women2Women on Jan. 26 at Kent State University Student Center in Room 204, for breakfast and great networking. Our speaker will be M. L. Schultze, news director at WKSU. The...


News Headline: Kent State alumni magazine wins gold | Email

News Date: 12/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HONORED

Kent State University's alumni publication, Kent State Magazine, won the school a gold at the ninth annual Public Relations Society of America Cleveland Rocks Awards. KSU was one of 58 entries out of 121 that won awards. The magazine is printed three times a year and reaches about 180,000 readers, including staff, faculty and alumni. This is the second consecutive year that Kent State has won awards from the society. In 2010, it won in Best of Show and two gold medals.

To submit candidates for Honored, email information to metrodesk@plaind.com, fax it to 216-999-6374, or mail it to Honored, c/o Plain Dealer Plaza, 1801 Superior Ave., Cleveland 44114. Please include the names and contact information of the honor's recipient, its source and yourself.

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: 'Ardi' Fossil Altering Ideas on Human Evolution | Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: YouTube
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus, an ancient fossil dubbed "Ardi," is radically changing our ideas about mankind's origins. Kent State University's C. Owen Lovejoy says Ardi shows our ancestors were more like us and less like chimps. WSJ's Robert Lee Hotz reports.

Please click link for video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7ve4LIPG9U

Category:
Science & Technology

Tags:
fossils Fossil Human Evolution Adventures Darwin ardipthecus mankind intelligent design Charles Darwin Creationism Dawkins WSJ
License:
Standard YouTube License

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News Headline: KSU coach Senderoff to give Kent chamber talk | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rob Senderoff, Kent State University men's head basketball coach, will open the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce's 2012 luncheon program series on Jan. 12 at Ray's Place.

Networking starts at 11:30 a.m., with lunch and program following at noon.

Cost for chamber members is $15; potential members and/or guests: $20. Walk-ins will be charged an additional $5.

Reservations are due no later than Jan. 10 by contacting gina@kentbiz.com. No-shows will be invoiced.

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News Headline: Kent State expanding (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State expanding

Raises, land buys among items approved by board

by WKSU's KABIR BHATIA

Reporter

Kabir Bhatia

Areas with red stripes are either prior or pending sales to Kent State. The purchase approved today was for the areas with blue diamonds.

Courtesy of Kent State University

In The Region:

Kent State University is growing -- physically, financially and programmatically. The Board of Trustees approved across the board raises for some 14-hundred employees, and the purchase of three plots of neighboring land at Tuesday's meeting. WKSU's Kabir Bhatia has more.

Kent's main campus is ostensibly bordered by South Lincoln Street to the west. But the school has been buying up land across that street, for a planned esplanade to link the university to downtown. The latest acquisition is three houses for 1.4 million dollars. President Lester Lefton the expansion has a lot to do with atmosphere.

"I really can't speculate on what else we might or might not be purchasing. This is not to build a barrier around the university, but (to) really to create a neighborhood around the university, where people can come to play with their kids, to walk their dogs, to ride their bikes. And not have traffic and local establishments that would not necessarily enhance the neighborhood."

Lefton says campus expansions have proven successful at Temple University and the University of Hartford. Cleveland State is undergoing a similar project.

The trustees also signed a letter of intent to merge the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine into Kent State. Lefton says it's the equivalent of the schools going from dating to getting engaged.

The board also approved a one-and-a-half percent raise, retroactive to September 1, for non-union employees. The school's unions continue to negotiate with the college.

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News Headline: 'Green' projects get thumbs up to vie for sewer district funding (Schwarz) | Email

News Date: 12/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Davis, Dave
News OCR Text: The finalists are in.

After months of work, officials with the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District on Wednesday unveiled 20 so-called "green" projects that are in the running to receive a combined $42 million earmarked for reducing flooding and the discharge of untreated sewage into local waterways.

The green infrastructure program, which is being funded by ratepayers as part of the sewer district's $3 billion in court-ordered system improvements, is one of 10 being used as a model for other large cities by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal agency now must approve the overall plan with the Ohio EPA and the U.S. Department of Justice.

But by early next year, residents in some Cleveland neighborhoods will begin seeing changes: the peeling back of concrete and asphalt to create ponds and parklike green spaces, the demolition of abandoned homes in favor of community gardens, and the installation of green streetscapes, among other improvements.

The projects, contained in a 148-page report being sent to regulators, must be completed in the next eight years, and they range in cost from $735,000 to $15 million each.

They comprise many pieces and are as varied as the problems they are meant to help fix – combined sewer overflows or the discharge of untreated wastewater into Lake Erie and waterways that feed it.

The sewer district, which serves Cleveland and 61 suburbs, currently dumps an average of more than 5 billion gallons a year of sewage mixed with rainwater, typically during storms when the sewer district's treatment system exceeds capacity. It is under court order to reduce that figure to a few hundred thousand gallons in the next 25 years.

But what the projects unveiled Wednesday have in common is that they all tie community redevelopment and partnering with local organizations to the district's goal of dramatically reducing sewer overflows.

"This is great news," said Damien Forshe, who with two childhood friends started an urban farm in Cleveland's Kinsman neighborhood. The Rid-All Green Partnership sits on about an acre in the 23-acre Urban Agricultural Innovation Zone, one of the projects picked Wednesday.

Sewer district officials proposed spending about $9 million to manage stormwater in the area and possibly create a system to capture and clean it for agricultural use. They expect the project will keep 7.2 million gallons of stormwater out of the sewer system.

"We can really use that water," Forshe added. "It's a win-win-win situation for everybody."

Sewer district officials actually proposed projects totaling $102 million that would eliminate an estimated 95 million gallons of stormwater from the sewer system. That's double what regulators required.

But they expect that as they drive deeper into the projects, some will drop off the list for legal or engineering reasons. They plan to meet Jan. 13 with federal officials, who must approve the overall plan but not individual projects.

"We have to do a deeper dive and see which of these projects we are going to construct," said Kellie Rotunno, the sewer district's director of engineering and construction.

"The big hope is that our first and earliest green projects will be wildly successful," Rotunno added. That would open the door for the sewer district over the next 25 years to swap green projects for so-called "gray" ones, heavy construction projects such as the seven massive tunnels the district is building to store wastewater during storms.

Urban planner Terry Schwarz said the sewer district's green infrastructure program has the potential to transform Cleveland neighborhoods, improving property values and quality of life. Schwarz heads Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, which is providing assistance in the development of the Urban Agriculture Innovation Zone.

When asked if the sewer district was doing enough green projects, Schwarz said, "It's too soon to tell."

Green infrastructure is an accepted practice in terms of stormwater management, capturing that first inch of rainfall on a site, but it hasn't been fully tested in terms of controlling the large volumes of wastewater that cause combined sewer overflows, Schwarz said.

"That's one of the things that makes this project in Cleveland pretty interesting," Schwarz added. "I think it's the prudent course of action to do these $42 million in projects and see what works and what works really well."

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Cleveland works on fitting a casino into its cityscape (Jurca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This story is part of a special series:

The Billion-dollar Bet

Senior Reporter

Mark Urycki

In The Region:

Everyone knew the new casino being built in Northeast Ohio would be in Cleveland. After all, that's what the constitutional amendment that voters passed in 2009 stipulates. Using the old Higbee building for Phase One of the project was a pleasant surprise for Clevelanders.

Still, WKSU's Mark Urycki reports that some concerns remain about how good a fit the casino will be in the city's downtown.

Images with audio

(Urycki)">



Cleveland's Chief of Regional Development Chris Warren says the city will have to spend $7-8m a year on new expenses, such as police, due to the casino, but will gain new tax revenue as well.

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GM Marcus Glover says the Horseshoe will market the city as much as the casino, to attract visitors

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CUDC's David Jurca says Cleveland's downtown doesn't have to settle for 2nd best...

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Chris Warren is not worried about the confluence of bicycles and cars at the new welcome center

(Click image for larger view.)

Even if you didn't grow up in Cleveland, you probably know Higbee's through its role in the holiday movie "A Christmas Story." It's been nine years since the department store _ then called Dillard's _ closed.

The lights will soon be back on as the first four floors of Higbees becomes phase one of the Horseshoe Casino. So what's not to like?

David Jurca, an urban designer at Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, says a better question is: How can the casino be as good as possible? He's excited by how the two phases _ phase one in Higbees and phase two along Huron Road over the Cuyahoga River _ could transform downtown and help link developments from the river to Lake Erie.

"It doesn't mean game over . . . we've done the best we can," he says. "It's the connection of that to the rest of the city that matters. So the public space, the quality of the street, the scale of the street, the traffic calming, all those are the fabric and the network around it where people really experience the day-to-day life. That's where they get their impression of Cleveland not from, ‘Boy, that casino is nice.'"

How the casino fits into the city can be examined from a physical perspective and from a business perspective. First the physical.

City Development Director Chris Warren likes the synergy of how the casino ties the Gateway stadiums into the Avenue of Shops at Tower City, which has been struggling for much of the last decade. He also says the second phase of the casino will allow enough space for access to the river and will open just as the towpath trail is completed along the other side of the river.

The Pedestrian Bridge

Still, Rock Ohio Caesars angered many preservationists when it tore down the historic Columbia building to build a parking deck. The casino operators also want to connect their planned welcome center at the edge of the deck directly to the Higbee building with a secon-story skywalk. David Jurca calls that 170-foot-long bridge a "stick in the eye" of the 1931 building.

"It's an awkward connection that compromises a historic building," he says. "Functionally, too, it drives foot traffic away from the street and onto an enclosed internal connection directly from the parking garage into the building."

The National Park Service has ruled that if such a walkway is built, it would deactivate $7 million or more in federal historic preservation tax credits. Building owner Forest City Enterprises got the credits to renovate the structure. Brian Goeken of the park service says it rarely allows skywalks, and a pedestrian bridge over the intersection of Prospect and Ontario raises a couple issues.

"One is the impact of the historic fabric itself, and when a pedestrian bridge gets connected, you have to make a hole into the side of the building. The second issue is relative to historic character: having that structure connecting to a primary or significant faÇade of the building and crossing the street, which is also affecting the immediate surroundings. In the case of this building, it's actually within two historic districts."

Rock Ohio Caesars is appealing the tax decision. Even if it loses, the cost could be tolerable because federal tax credits are issued with a five-year recovery period. If unacceptable changes are made after the first year, an owner would have to pay back 80 percent of the credits. But after four years, the payback would drop to just 20 percent. Forest City has sold its Higbee credits to other entities, so a reimbursement deal with Rock Ohio Caesar's is unlikely. The casino could simply wait until the five years are up, in 2016, and then build its skywalk with no repercussion.

The business fit

Construction crews are now working two shifts a day rebuilding the first four floors of Higbee's. One bow to historic preservation they're making is to keep the original windows. That lends to the character of the Horseshoe Casino, says its general manager, Marcus Glover.

"This very different than most casino developments that are windowless."

The old-school tradition is to prevent bettors from even thinking that something exists outside the casino. But Rock Ohio promises the Horseshoe will be an "urban casino" _ one that is integrated rather than separated from its surroundings. David Jurca of the Urban Design Collaborative says that's part of a trend among casinos: to move away from a big closed box.

"It has that more urban vitality that I think the next generation finds more interesting. At the same time, they want a sense of authenticity in a place. ... If they can make this feel like a unique venue -- this isn't any old gambling center _ then I think that's to their advantage and their bottom line."

Open all day, all night

Whether the Horseshoe casino taps into the vitality of the city or saps it is a big concern for Jurca and many others. It will be open 24/7.

Glover says they should be reassured by the one Caesar's runs in New Orleans

GLOVER: "It connects similar to what we'll do here with a lot of surrounding businesses."

URYCKI: "You used to work there."

GLOVER: "I started my career in New Orleans."

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News Headline: Going Places: Jan. 2, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AWARDS

INTERNATIONAL TEXTILE AND APPAREL ASSOCIATION: Vincent Quevedo (Kent State University) received the Pearson Prentice Hall Lecturer Award for Exceptional Service.

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News Headline: MAP AUDIO Earthquake Hits Near Youngstown Featured (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Mike Ward
News OCR Text: Written by Mike Ward

Rate this item

The U.S. Geological Survey reports an earthquake took place at just after 3 PM Saturday afternoon.

The U.S.G.S. earthquake monitoring website says the quake, preliminarily measured at 4.0 on the Richter scale, was centered about 5 miles northwest of Youngstown near the town of McDonald.

It happened at just before 3:05 PM, and U.S.G.S. measurements put it about 1.4 miles deep.

Earthquake expert Thomas Schmidlin, a geography professor at Kent State University, tells AkronNewsNow.com that quakes are common in Northeast Ohio.

But he says as far as he's concerned, the "jury's out" on questions about the controversial gas well drilling procedure known as "fracking" causing larger quakes.

Schmidlin says any quakes caused by disturbance of the ground surface would probably be very small, and not likely to be detected.

Earthquake expert Thomas Schmidlin with ANN's Mike Ward by MPWard

There aren't yet any reports of damage or injuries in the quake, which was felt by many in the Akron area and elsewhere in Northeast Ohio.

On the Web: U.S. Geological Survey, earthquake.usgs.gov

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News Headline: You asked about childhood obesity - Sleepy Eye, MN - The Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch (Caine-Bish) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Sleepy Eye Herald-Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You asked about childhood obesity

By Anonymous

Sleepy Eye Herald-Dispatch

Posted Dec 29, 2011 @ 06:00 AM

Sleepy Eye, Minn. -

According to Dr. Natalie Caine-Bish, associate professor at Kent State University and licensed dietitian, childhood obesity rates are rising at an alarming rate; meanwhile everyone is pointing fingers at the government, schools, parents, physicians, soda and snack manufacturers and fast food chains.

Is it Congress's fault for failing to pass a spending bill to implement stricter USDA school lunch standards?

Are financially strapped schools to blame for eliminating physical education classes?

Should parents monitor their children's eating and exercising more closely?

Dr. Caine-Bish says the blame game is actually part of the problem.

"When it comes to childhood obesity, focusing on blame diverts attention from the real issues and prevents progress. There is not one particular organization, food or habit to blame," she said.

"Everyone wants to blame someone or something else, as a result, nothing gets accomplished. Pointing fingers at one another is not going to solve the issue. We need to get involved and be proactive." 

Dr. Caine-Bish offers five keys to start moving in a better and healthier direction:

1. Get educated: Learn about current issues related to and new findings on preventing childhood obesity.

2. Engage: Write your Congressman and Representatives about current issues on nutrition and physical activity initiatives. Get involved in your children's schools.

3. Start small: Work with your child's school PTA or local city officials to make healthy changes in your local environments.

4. Work together: Invite school officials, local government officials, health care professionals, educators and businessmen to participate or volunteer in local events that focus on preventing childhood obesity such as Farmer's Markets, health fairs, PTA meetings, school board meetings and local races. This allows you to get to know each other and find ways of collaborating.

5. Be a role model: Start with yourself or your own family and engage in healthy behaviors. If everyone takes small steps toward being healthier, then progress has been made.

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News Headline: Teens safer behind the wheel, but nowhere else (Kerr, Olds) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A study from the Ohio Department of Health shows teens are safer behind the wheel, but still engage in unsafe behavior in other activities

by WKSU's VALERIE BROWN

Reporter

Valerie Brown

Courtesy of Flickr

A new survey from the Ohio Department of Health says teens are more likely to be careful in their cars then in other behaviors.

The Youth Risky Behavior Survey measures teen alcohol and drug usage, physical and mental health and personal safety.

Fewer high-school students are eating fruits and vegetables and exercising than in 2007. Dianne Kerr is a professor of health education at Kent State University. She says the state should give more priority to physical education.

KERR: "It's unfortunate that a lot of schools are getting rid of physical education programs. All the emphasis seems to be on these core topics of science and math. And we know healthy kids learn better, but we aren't attending to their health."

The survey results show about three out of four of students do not attend a phys. ed. class every day. They also do not exercise for at least an hour each day.

Also, more than a third of those surveyed say they drink alcohol, and nearly a quarter say they smoke. Scott Olds is a professor of public health at Kent State University. He says teens think it is normal to smoke and drink alcohol which leads more students to do it.

Olds says the key to changing these behaviors is educating teens about the risks of smoking and excessive drinking. But that requires funding.

OLDS: "Because we removed our tobacco dollars from the tobacco foundation, there has been an indication of a slight uptick in use. So when you're not willing to commit resources and the industry is spending ten billion (dollars) a year on promoting the product, it becomes an uphill battle to wage."

The study also says about half of high school students are sexually active, a third drink alcohol, and nearly a quarter smoke.

On the plus side of the survey, four-out-of-five teens say they wear seat belts and will not ride with someone who had been drinking.

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News Headline: Akron companies ranked by trade publication | Email

News Date: 12/31/2011
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dec. 31--Akron companies were sprinkled atop lists in many industrial and business sectors in newly compiled rankings of employers, companies, governments and other entities by the trade publication Crain's Cleveland Business.

The Crain's Book of Lists 2012, just published for the biweekly period of Dec. 19 to Jan. 2, sells for $44.95. The website is www.CrainsCleveland.com/lists.

The weekly publication's surveys and research include rankings for private businesses, nonprofits, colleges and medical institutions.

Summa Health System of Akron was listed as the city's top employer, according to Crain's, with 8,000 workers. In Northeast Ohio, Summa ranked sixth, behind the Cleveland Clinic, the federal government, University Hospitals, grocer Giant Eagle, based in Pittsburgh, and Mayfield Village-based insurance company Progressive Corp. FirstEnergy Corp. was Akron's second-highest listed employer, at No. 15, with 7,717 workers.

Crain's said it based the research on employers in the following Northeast Ohio counties: Ashland, Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Erie, Geauga, Huron, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Trumbull and Wayne.

The Akron-Canton area had three of the top five largest companies in Northeast Ohio that are foreign owned.

They were:

No. 1 -- Sterling Jewelers Inc. of Akron, a unit of Signet Jewelers Ltd., based in Bermuda.

No. 4 -- Bridgestone Americas Inc. of Akron, a unit of Bridgestone Corp. of Tokyo.

No. 5 -- Republic Engineered Products Inc. of Canton, a division of Mexican steel maker Industrias CH SAB de CV.

Four companies with area headquarters made the top 11 among largest publicly traded firms based in the region: No. 5 FirstEnergy (Akron utility); No. 7 J.M. Smucker Co. (Orrville food company); No. 10 Timken Co. (Canton steel maker); and No. 11 Goodyear (Akron tiremaker).

Three companies were listed among the region's top 10 largest privately owned firms: No. 4 Westfield Insurance (of Westfield Center in Medina County); No. 8 Carter Lumber Co. (a Kent building materials firm); and No. 9 Davey Tree Expert Co. (Kent tree services).

Ranked by number of area employees, Timken, Goodyear and Babcock & Wilcox Co. were among the top 10 manufacturers in the region. Timken was No. 2 (behind General Motors), Goodyear was No. 6 and B&W (Barberton maker of industrial power systems) was No. 8.

FirstMerit Bank, based in Akron, was the fourth largest among Northeast Ohio banks ranked by deposits, trailing KeyBank, PNC and Huntington.

Here are highlights of other economic sectors in the Crain's report:

Credit unions

Three Akron credit unions were among the top six listed, based on 2010 assets: No. 3 Firestone Federal Credit Union; GenFed Federal Credit Union at No. 5; and BFG Federal Credit Union at No. 6.

Business insurance agencies The largest Akron-based agency was Seibert Keck Insurance, with 55 licensed employees, at No. 10.

Law firms

The largest Akron-based firm was Brouse McDowell LPA, with 71 local attorneys, at No. 13.

Accounting firms

The largest Akron-based firm was Bruner-Cox LLP, with 50 local certified public accountants, at No. 13.

Public relations firms

Hudson-based Akhia Public Relations & Marketing Communications was ranked No. 3 with 27 employees and Highland Public Relations in Akron was No. 10 with six employees.

Marketing firms

Akron-based WhiteSpace Creative was ranked No. 8 with 23 employees and OuterBox Solutions Inc. of Akron came in at No. 9 with 22 employees.

Ad agencies

Hitchcock Fleming & Associates Inc. of Akron was the second-largest advertising agency based on full-time employees with 86. Innis Maggiore of Canton was No. 6 with 34 employees, 9Threads of Akron was No. 7 with 28 employees and WRL Advertising was No. 8 with 25 employees.

Architectural

Tied for seventh largest were three Akron firms: Braun & Steidl Architects Inc., Domokur Architects and Hasenstab Architects Inc., all with 16 architects. GPD Group of Akron ranked No. 10 with 15 architects.

Engineering

GPD Group was ranked fourth largest, with 62 registered engineers.

Nonprofits

Ranked No. 13 was Oriana House Inc. of Akron, based on 2011 expenses of $38.8 million.

Foundations

The Timken Foundation of Canton was rated sixth with grants totaling $7.4 million in 2010. The highest-ranking Akron grant maker was the Akron Community Foundation at No. 10 with $6 million.

Private schools

Two Summit County private schools made Crain's top five listing: No. 2 Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy of Cuyahoga Falls and No. 5 Western Reserve Academy of Hudson. The rankings were based on fall 2011 enrollment. CVCA's enrollment was listed at 855 and Western Reserve was listed at 402.

Colleges

Based on what was called 2011 full-time equivalent enrollment, Kent State was No. 1 (30,520 students), followed at No. 2 by the University of Akron (23,219).

Career and vo-ed schools

The Medina County Career Center ranked No. 1 with 2,222 enrolled in fall 2011. The Medical Technology Education Center Inc. of Fairlawn, with 1,200 enrolled, was No. 4. Wayne County Schools Career Center in Smithville ranked No. 7 with 825 students and Akron Institute of Herzing University ranked No. 9 with 615 students.

Hospitals

Summa Akron City Hospital and Summa St. Thomas Hospital were put together in this category, ranking fourth largest in the region, based on revenue of $646 million. Akron General Medical Center was sixth ($428 million) and Akron Children's Hospital, seventh ($424 million). Summa Barberton Hospital was 21st ($156 million).

Commercial real estate brokerages

NAI Cummins Real Estate of Akron ranked No. 10 with 14 agents/brokers.

Commercial contractors

The Ruhlin Co. of Sharon Center (Medina County) was ranked No. 4 with 2010 local revenue of $166 million.

Industrial parks

The Crain's listing showed six area parks, ranked by acres, among the top seven in the region.

They were Liverpool Industrial Park, in Valley City (Medina County); Twinsburg Industrial Park; Akcan Industrial Park in Green; Interstate Commerce Center in Streetsboro; NEOCOM I in Massillon; CAK International Business Park in Green; and Midway Industrial Park in Twinsburg.

Shopping centers

Chapel Hill Mall was No. 9 in the region, ranked by square feet. The Strip in North Canton was No. 11 and Summit Mall was No. 13.

___

(c)2011 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright © 2011 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Editor Simmons wins diversity award | Email

News Date: 12/28/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Plain Dealer editor Debra Adams Simmons has been named winner of the 2012 Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity by the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

The award, which recognizes media professionals who encourage diversity in journalism, will be presented during a luncheon and lecture on March 26 at the university campus in Kent.

Simmons has been editor of The Plain Dealer since October 2010, after having served as managing editor for three years, and previously was vice president and editor of The Akron Beacon Journal.

The award is named for the late Robert G. McGruder, a 1983 Kent State graduate, first black reporter at The Plain Dealer and first black editor of the Detroit Free Press.

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Adams Simmons to receive McGruder Award | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Debra Adams Simmons, editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland, has been named the 2012 winner of the Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University. The award recognizes the accomplishments of media professionals who encourage diversity in the field of journalism.

KSU's School of Journalism and Mass Communication will honor Adams Simmons at an awards luncheon and lecture March 26 on the Kent campus.

Adams Simmons was named editor of The Plain Dealer in October 2010 after serving as managing editor from 2007-2010. Previously, she was vice president and editor of the Akron Beacon Journal.

The late Robert G. McGruder was a 1963 graduate of KSU and a foundational local figure for diversity in journalism.

He went on from KSU to become the first black editor of the Daily Kent Stater and first black reporter at The Plain Dealer. McGruder marked several other firsts in his career, becoming the first black president of the Associated Press Managing Editors group and the first black editor of the Detroit Free Press in 1995 and 1996.

Caesar Andrews, an ethics and diversity faculty member at the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University, was the recipient of the 2011 Robert G. McGruder Award.

Previous award winners include: 2010 - Richard Prince, columnist, Richard Prince's Journal-isms, Maynard Institute of Journalism Education; 2008 - Dr. Jannette Dates, dean, John H. Johnson School of Communications at Howard University; 2007 - Michelle Singletary, columnist, The Washington Post; 2006 - Leonard Pitts, Jr., Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, Miami Herald; 2005 - Albert E. Fitzpatrick, assistant vice president, Akron Beacon Journal; 2004 - David Lawrence, Jr., former publisher, Miami Herald; and 2003 - Gregory Moore, editor, Denver Post.

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News Headline: KSU Salem Nursing Students Recall Trip to Tanzania (Ferranto) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Five months have passed since 15 nursing students at Kent State University's Salem campus returned from Tanzania, a country in East Africa, which is home to lions, Mount Kilimanjaro and a life expectancy of 59.

We recently talked with the nursing professor that accompanied the students. We caught up with her early last month on campus, where the nursing students were charging $5 for a picture with Santa, with the money going to orphanages and HIV Clinics in Tanzania.

"So it was a pretty exciting adventure for the students," said Mary Lou Ferranto, nursing coordinator for Kent State's Salem campus, who spoke vividly and passionately about the trip.

"One of our students at Kent State Salem, Lillyan, is also from Tanzania, so we really had in-depth access to people and patients in Tanzania," Ferranto said.

The group spent 13 days in Africa. They visited Kilimanjaro Medical Center, where they found babies in the neonatal care unit in boxes, being kept warm by a light bulb. They also spent time at an HIV clinic.

"I actually never cry. And when we arrived, the HIV patients were out singing and applauding us just for showing up. And the students naturally went and started to hug and embrace the patients and the patients then were overwhelmed by the students touching them because they're shunned," Ferranto said.

At the orphanages, the students handed out suckers and got a chance to practice what they've been learning by conducting examinations on the kids.

"And the one day we were there, we actually diagnosed I think about three cases of bronchitis, a couple cases of pneumonia. We were able to verify hearing loss in a newborn, umbilical hernia in a child," Ferranto said.

The students also had some fun. They visited villages, saw wild animals and even attended a wedding.

"The goal was for them to be the best nurses they can be and the best nurses are ones that take care of patients in a holistic way, especially focusing on cultural needs. And I think we were able to drive that home with the students," Ferranto said.

The entire trip was actually 16 days. Before Tanzania, the students also spent a few days in Geneva, Switzerland, where they attended seminars at the World Health Organization, the International Refugee Center and the United Nations.

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News Headline: KSU Salem Nursing Students Recall Trip to Tanzania (Ferranto) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: WYTV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Five months have passed since 15 nursing students at Kent State University's Salem campus returned from Tanzania, a country in East Africa, which is home to lions, Mount Kilimanjaro and a life expectancy of 59.

We recently talked with the nursing professor that accompanied the students. We caught up with her early last month on campus, where the nursing students were charging $5 for a picture with Santa, with the money going to orphanages and HIV Clinics in Tanzania.

"So it was a pretty exciting adventure for the students," said Mary Lou Ferranto, nursing coordinator for Kent State's Salem campus, who spoke vividly and passionately about the trip.

"One of our students at Kent State Salem, Lillyan, is also from Tanzania, so we really had in-depth access to people and patients in Tanzania," Ferranto said.

The group spent 13 days in Africa. They visited Kilimanjaro Medical Center, where they found babies in the neonatal care unit in boxes, being kept warm by a light bulb. They also spent time at an HIV clinic.

"I actually never cry. And when we arrived, the HIV patients were out singing and applauding us just for showing up. And the students naturally went and started to hug and embrace the patients and the patients then were overwhelmed by the students touching them because they're shunned," Ferranto said.

At the orphanages, the students handed out suckers and got a chance to practice what they've been learning by conducting examinations on the kids.

"And the one day we were there, we actually diagnosed I think about three cases of bronchitis, a couple cases of pneumonia. We were able to verify hearing loss in a newborn, umbilical hernia in a child," Ferranto said.

The students also had some fun. They visited villages, saw wild animals and even attended a wedding.

"The goal was for them to be the best nurses they can be and the best nurses are ones that take care of patients in a holistic way, especially focusing on cultural needs. And I think we were able to drive that home with the students," Ferranto said.

The entire trip was actually 16 days. Before Tanzania, the students also spent a few days in Geneva, Switzerland, where they attended seminars at the World Health Organization, the International Refugee Center and the United Nations.

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News Headline: Hoover Foundation grants awarded | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hoover Foundation grants awarded

By Anonymous

CantonRep.com staff report

Posted Jan 02, 2012 @ 09:43 PM

CANTON -

The Herbert W. Hoover Foundation has announced its grant recipients for 2011. They are:

American University for its Center for Environmental Filmmaking, which aims to train students to produce films and new media that focus attention on the need to conserve the environment in a way that is effective, as well as ethically sound, educationally powerful and entertaining.

Arts In Stark for its Liquid Math program, which teaches math, science, water conservation and art simultaneously.

Canines Helping Independent People (CHIP) for a service dog trainer to assist with daily operations of running a service dog and educational program.

Canton Palace Theatre Association for the 2011 Canton Film Fest, a four-day event showcasing local filmmakers and short films in seven different categories.

Canton Symphony Orchestra for its Zimmermann Symphony Center project.

Community Harvest of Stark County for its Hunger Relief and Waste Prevention program.

Easter Seals Northern Ohio for the Creating Summer Fun for Kids with Disabilities program.

Encounters in Excellence for Florida's Fountains of Life program to launch Odyssey Earth, a website featuring short video lessons about the Florida environment. The grant also includes reviving the 50-school elementary series and the expansion of the middle and senior high series to 60 schools that reach more than 55,000 students in live performances.

Kent State University at Stark for Making the Invisible Visible: Water Quality in Stark County, a collaborative effort between five Universities and several top science and environmental partners in and out of Stark County.

Neighbors 4 Neighbors for the outreach programs for Emergency Social Services and Disaster Preparedness and Recovery.

Ocean Research and Conservation Association (ORCA) for Making Water Pollution Visible in Biscayne Bay.

Pathway Caring for Children for its post-adoptive services program.

Prescription Assistance Network of Stark County (PAN) for the Medication Access, Education and Assistance Program.

Stark County Educational Service Center for Character Counts of Stark County.

Stark County Historical Society for the McKinley Presidential Library & Museum's teaching kiosk "How Can I Help Protect Our Watershed?"

Stark State College for its Community Sustainability Partnership, which is dedicated to the advancement of sustainability on campus and within Stark County communities.

University of Miami to host the Society for Environmental Journalists annual conference.

Walsh University, to complete its Environmental Field Center.

Since 1990, the foundation has been awarding grants to not-for-profit organizations, primarily in Stark County. The foundation's mission is to "take a leadership role in funding unique opportunities that provide solutions to issues related to community, education and the environment."

Organizations interested in applying for grants from the foundation can visit www.hwhfoundation.org for more information.

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News Headline: Local history: 1962: Stories that shaped the year | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tuscarawas County was a hive of construction 50 years ago, as landmarks familiar to residents of today took shape.

During 1962, ground was broken for Warther's Museum in Dover, the state moved forward on construction of Interstate 77 through Tuscarawas County and work progressed on the new Little Theatre in New Philadelphia. In addition, the first county residents began attending college classes in New Philadelphia offered by Kent State University.

On Aug. 9, the state highway department reported that about 20 percent of the 4.9-mile I-77 Dover bypass was completed.

On Aug. 29, the state authorized construction of an additional 28.3 miles of the interstate through Tuscarawas, Guernsey, Noble and Washington counties, at a cost of $33.1 million ($235.9 million in 2010 dollars).

On Nov. 14, ground was broken for a 46-foot by 50-foot structure to house the priceless works of master carver Ernest “Mooney” Warther of Dover. Don Newland, a Dover architect, designed the building, and J.A. Raeder Inc. of Dover was general contractor of the project. The Dover Daily Reporter ran a front-page photo of Warther sitting at the controls of a bulldozer at the groundbreaking.

The Timken Foundation of Canton donated $5,000 toward construction of the Little Theatre on Dec. 28, the largest single contribution to the fundraising drive. The estimated cost of the project was $70,000, with a considerable portion of the cost being met by donated labor and materials.

Kent State University announced Aug. 30 that 94 students had enrolled for classes at the Tuscarawas County Center of KSU, which were to be held at New Philadelphia High. Classes began Sept. 19. By that time, enrollment had jumped to 202.

The Dover Board of Education opened bids Aug. 7 for its $2 million project to expand and remodel Dover's high school and junior high school. The 50,750-square-foot project included construction of a new library, cafeteria and physical education building at the high school. Brown Construction of Massillon was awarded the bulk of the project.

During the summer of 1962, county officials launched a three-month campaign to immunize residents against polio.

The drive concluded Aug. 26, when nearly 30,000 people (out of a total population of 76,700) flocked to 13 Sabin oral polio vaccine clinics around the county, pushing the number immunized to 52,690.

Immunizations were free, though a 25-cent donation was requested. During the campaign, 8,000 received the vaccine at Dover High, 8,800 at the New Philadelphia High gymnasium, 6,100 at Uhrichsville, 4,200 at Dennison, 3,600 at Sugarcreek and 3,000 at Gnadenhutten. Newcomerstown was part of the Coshocton County campaign.

The accomplishments of the Dennison St. Mary's football team and the Dover St. Joseph's basketball team dominated sports news in 1962.

St. Mary's went 9-0 for the season, with halfback Herb Murray setting a county scoring record of 210 points and quarterback Joe Pangrazio passing for 29 touchdowns. Both received All-Ohio mention.

St. Joseph's posted a 16-2 record during its season, finally losing to St. Mary's, 70-58, in noncounty tournament action. The parochial school's top scorers were Tom Young, with 396 points, and Jack Evans, with 286.

One of the largest fires in the county that year occurred when a Nickel Plate Railroad train derailed at Somerdale on March 4. Fifteen cars left the tracks, including one hauling chemicals. A spark ignited the chemicals, causing a blaze that required 15 fire departments — including Dover, New Philadelphia and Uhrichsville — to contain it. No one was injured.

On Feb. 26, county residents tuned in to watch Harry Clever of New Philadelphia — for whom Harry Clever Field is named — stump panelists on the popular national TV quiz show “I've Got a Secret.” His secret? He was flying instructor for astronaut John Glenn, who had become the first American to orbit the Earth just six days earlier.

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News Headline: 2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Dec. 23-29, 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/23/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: John Gruner
News OCR Text: By John Gruner, The Plain Dealer

MUSEUMS

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5. Exhibit: On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life. An exhibit about the material circumstances and domestic life during the Civil War and in the years that followed. Display of women's and children’s costumes, which is supplemented with related photographs, decorative arts and women’s magazines. In observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Through Sunday, Aug. 26. Exhibit: A Day at the Beach. A selection of garments worn near and at the beach between the 1860s and 1910s. Through Sunday, Oct. 7.

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News Headline: Fashion with social consciousness (WITH VIDEOS) (Palomo-Lovinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jobs

Classified

Legals

MarketplaceOhio

by APRIL HELMS | SPECIAL PRODUCTS EDITOR

The concept of sustainable fashion may seem an oxymoron in an industry whose mass market clientele want their clothing to be inexpensive, and to conform with the current fashion trends, which change with the seasons.

But it is possible, and several fashion designers, including some well-known names, for the manufacture of clothing to also have a conscious, said NoËl Palomo-Lovinski, guest curator for "Sustainable Fashion: Exploring the Paradox." The exhibit, which opened in April, can be seen through March 12, 2012.

"What I was looking for was a real answer rather than something that is strictly theoretical, something that becomes so crafty it becomes nonsalable," Palomo-Lovinski said of the exhibit. "What I was really looking for was fashion designers that were the needs of sustainability within the realms of established fashion."

The exhibit highlights pieces in several categories: organic fabrics, sustainable printing and dying techniques, recycled materials and localized labor/fair trade. Designers include Earth Pledge, Dosa, Isabel Toledo, Linda Loudermilk, Rogan Gregory, Sa Va, Calvin Klein and Yves Saint Laurent.

Museum information

The Kent State University Museum is at 515 Hilltop Drive. It is open 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 8:45 on Thursdays, and from noon to 4:45 on Sundays. It is closed Mondays and Tuesdays.

General admission is $5, seniors 55 and older are $4 and students and children 7 to 18 are $3. Children younger than 7, and students, staff and faculty with a KSU ID are free. Sundays are free.

Parking is free for museum visitors.

Call 330-672-3450 or visit www.kent.edu/museum for details.

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News Headline: Beyond Fashion – Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: Leader Publications - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron Ohio Events

Beyond Fashion – Fiber and Fashion Art by Vincent Quevedo

Work of local fashion designer and Kent State University professor.

Through Feb. 12, 2012, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 4:45 p.m.; $5, $4 for seniors, $3 for children ages 7-18, free for children 7 and younger, Kent State University students, faculty and staff, and on Sundays

Kent State University Museum, Higbee Gallery

330-672-3450

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News Headline: KSU profs want native Ohioan to be the state children's author (Brodie) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: TwinsburgBulletin
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: by MARC KOVAC | CAPITAL BUREAU CHIEF

Columbus -- Two Kent State University professors are urging lawmakers to name native Ohioan Virginia Hamilton as the state's official children's and youth literature author.

Carolyn Brodie and Alexa Sandmann provided testimony to the Ohio House's State Government and Elections Committee this past week as proponents of the selection, which would be codified if House Bill 190 is approved and signed into law.

The legislation would also designate Hamilton's book, "M.C. Higgins, the Great" as Ohio's official youth literature novel.

"Virginia Hamilton is a most distinguished literary voice who wrote for young readers [and] is known as America's most honored writer of children's literature," Brodie said. "... Virginia's accomplishments over her 35-year career in youth book publishing resulted in 41 books and countless awards."

Hamilton was born and spent much of her life in Yellow Springs, near Dayton. She published her first children's book in 1967 and received numerous accolades for her work, said Rudine Sims Bishop, professor emerita at Ohio State University.

"M.C. Higgins, the Great" received the John Newbery Medal, "the most coveted award given to American children's book writers," Bishop said.

She added, "... It is a classic Ohio story, richly deserving of the honor of being named the official Ohio youth novel. Furthermore, its author, Virginia Hamilton, because of the exceptional quality of her work, because her work is so deeply rooted in the soil of Ohio and because she has brought honor and attention to the state through the numerous national and international honors and recognitions she has earned, deserves, more than any other writer, to be the official Ohio author of youth literature."

Brodie and Sandmann are co-directors of the annual Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth at KSU. Hamilton attended the event until her death in 2002, and her family continues to be involved.

Next year's conference is set for April 12 and 13.

Marc Kovac is the Dix Capital Bureau Chief. Email him at mkovac@dixcom.com or on Twitter at OhioCapitalBlog.

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News Headline: Census: More young adults living with parents (Cichy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Census: More young adults living with parents

An increased number of people ages 25-34 are moving back home

by WKSU's ALISON RITCHIE

Reporter

Alison Ritchie

The number of young adults living at home with their parents is rising. That's according to a Census report released Thursday. The study shows that over the last six years, the number of men ages 25-34 who live at home increased from 14 percent to 19 percent. For women, the increase was slightly lower _ 8 percent to 10 percent.

Kelly Cichy is a professor of Human Development and Family Studies for Kent State University. She said the economic recession contributed to the increase, but it's not the only factor.

"The other thing that's going on is increasingly more and more people are delaying marriage," said Cichy. "They're delaying having children. They're pursuing advanced education, you know, going on to graduate school or medical school. And that sometimes means in order to handle the financial obligations, a lot of people are choosing to stay at home."

Cichy said it's likely the Census numbers reflect longer term changes to our society. She said it's become more socially acceptable for young adults to live with their parents longer.

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News Headline: Exploradio - The liquid crystal kingdom (Yokoyama) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Exploradio - The liquid crystal kingdom

The future is now at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, the world's foremost lab dedicated to research in this mysterious state of matter.

by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR

Morning Edition Host

Jeff St. Clair

Occupying a state between liquid and solid phases, liquid crystals respond to minute electric fields in a myriad of display and other applications. You're likely viewing this on an LCD panel.

Courtesy of Karen Neill

In The Region:

Look around and you're likely to encounter liquid crystal technology - your computer screen, alarm clock, cell phone, calculator -- even the parking meter.

What was once an obscure branch of chemistry is now indispensible technology, and the world center for liquid crystal research is at Kent State University.

In this week's Exploradio, we meet the new head of the program, and learn what's next at the Liquid Crystal Institute.

(Click image for larger view.)

From cell membranes to magic cloaks

Harry Potter had one. And it's not just Hogwarts' magic if you ask what Hiroshi Yokoyama is working on ...

"Have you ever heard of the ‘invisibility cloak'?"

"You're working on that?"

"Some of our researchers are working on that here."

Yokoyama explains that his researchers are imbedding ‘metamaterials' that can bend light inside a liquid crystal fabric.

"Metamaterial is artificial optical material that can manipulate optical waves..." - an invisibility cloak.

It's just one of a long list of futuristic sounding advances being developed at the world's foremost lab dedicated to liquid crystal research.

Yokoyama is the fifth director of the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State University. The institute was the brainchild in 1965 of Kent State chemistry professor Glenn Brown, who likely never dreamed of invisibility cloaks. His interest was liquid crystals in living things, which Yokoyama explains, are quite common.

"Actually most of the cell's membranes and small organelles in it, proteins, DNA for example, all are in liquid crystal states."

Despite his personal interests, Brown founded the institute to study all aspects of liquid crystals, which were just being rediscovered after nearly 80 years of obscurity. German scientists in the 1880's had accidentally discovered molecules that, when heated, went through a mysterious phase between the solid and liquid phases. They named this flowing liquid with the organized structure of a solid a ‘liquid crystal'.

The birth of the LCD

The discovery sat dormant until a few chemists in the 1960's, including Kent State's Brown, took an interest. Soon Kent State chemist James Fergason discovered a new type of liquid crystal that responded to very low voltages and he patented the first liquid crystal display. Fergason formed a company and quickly sold the technology to Swiss watch-maker Gruen. In a glass case at the institute, Yokoyama points to the first LCD watch....

"the wrist-watch right here, made in the 1970's...still working..."

The technology invented at the Liquid Crystal Institute was quickly adapted to everything from calculators to clocks, Yokoyama even points to a liquid-crystal parking meter.

"Yeah, a parking meter is a pretty trivial application of the liquid crystal."

"Still Kent State is very proud..."

There's even a mood ring in the display case.

But Yokoyama says liquid crystals have come a long way since the 70's.

The dream factory

These days, in addition to the invisibility cloak idea, liquid crystals are being used in self-correcting eye-glasses with liquid crystal lenses - no need for bifocals. Even the tiny lens inside your cell-phone camera uses liquid crystals to focus when you take a picture.

Some of Yokoyama's team are working on the next generation of display technologies, including 3-D liquid crystal displays.

Yokoyama says the institute is returning to its roots in biological liquid crystals. It's developing advanced drug delivery devices that can fine-tune drug therapy

"Liquid crystals can be tuned to respond to certain molecules extremely sensitively."

We step into his lab where he's following another line of research.

"To make a foam of liquid crystals."

"Why would you want liquid crystal foam."

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News Headline: Cash-strapped universities look at cutting remedial classes (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Sacramento Bee, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- As finals approached, nearly 240 students in a computer lab worked through basic algebra problems at Kent State University, where they and more than 3,200 of their classmates had been deemed unprepared for college-level math. They struggled to solve for x in equations such as 3x plus 1 equals 7, a skill students are meant to master in middle school. (The correct answer: x equals 2.)
Just down the hallway, university officials were trying to crunch a few numbers of their own, analyzing how much it'd cost to keep providing such remedial education to students who don't arrive ready for college-level work.
The annual price tag for remedial education in American colleges and universities is at least $3.6 billion, according to the Alliance for Excellent Education, a national advocacy organization in Washington. It's also a reason that many college students quit in frustration, contributing to high dropout rates.
In a largely overlooked but precedent-setting move, cash-strapped Ohio has said it'll soon stop footing the bill for remedial courses. The state's 2007 budget quietly mandated that the government phase out money for remediation at four-year universities beginning in the 2014-15 academic year, and eliminate such funding altogether by 2020.
The gap between the skills with which students graduate from high school and what colleges expect them to be able to do has come under increased scrutiny, as federal policymakers push states to increase college graduation rates. At least 13 other states, including Florida, Missouri and South Carolina, have tried to slow the spiral of spending on remedial education, typically by restricting funding to colleges and universities that provide a lot of it.
Changing the systems, however, won't be easy.
"Simply waving a wand and saying, 'There shall be no remediation' probably won't take care of the problem," said Bob Wise, the president of the Alliance for Excellent Education and a former governor of West Virginia. "There is, unfortunately, a need for remediation."
Higher-education reformers nationwide say that need can be reduced.
"The degree it's happening right now is far too great and far too expensive," said Kim Norris, Ohio Board of Regents spokeswoman. Ohio, with the country's fifth-largest university system, spends about $130 million annually on remediation, Norris said.
Nationwide, some 44 percent of students at community colleges and 27 percent at four-year institutions had to take at least one remedial course in 2008, the last year for which data are available from the U.S. Department of Education. Even if students pass such remedial classes, research shows they're less likely to graduate than their peers who start directly in college-level classes.
At Kent State - where just more than half of first-year students in 2006 had to take remedial courses in math, English or both - remediation costs more than $750,000 a year, an amount that Provost Robert Frank calls "non-trivial."
"We are receiving students who successfully graduated from high school who aren't ready for (college) math, writing and chemistry," Frank said.
Following up on the 2007 mandate, Ohio legislators directed the Board of Regents and the state Department of Education this year to develop a report suggesting ways to reduce the need for remedial courses.
Jim Petro, the chancellor of the University System of Ohio, wants to solve the problem by going back to its root. He's called for better assessments to be given in 10th grade, which would leave time for unprepared students to get extra help before they finish high school. That's likely to become a popular idea nationwide, said Matthew Smith of the Education Commission of the States, a Denver-based group that helps states develop education policies.
The University of Toledo has a different plan: changing its recruitment tactics. This year, about 21 percent of incoming freshmen at the open-admission school enrolled in at least one remedial course, said Lawrence Burns, the vice president for external affairs.
Mindful of the 2020 deadline, university officials at Toledo are working to improve outreach to private schools, whose graduates are thought to be better prepared. It's promising prospective students guaranteed scholarship money as early as the eighth grade, in hopes of encouraging them to acquire the skills they'll need to avoid remedial classes.
"The bottom line is we need to make sure we're recruiting more prepared students," Burns said.
But some experts worry that this shift will discriminate against students from low-performing high schools in poor areas, pushing more students away from universities into already-overburdened community colleges.
"It would just add to the already difficult challenges that exist because of space needs and capacity," said Ronald Abrams, the president of the Ohio Association of Community Colleges.
A handful of states already restrict spending on remedial courses by four-year universities. In some instances, universities in these states have tried to strike what Smith called "kind of a happy medium" by teaming up with community colleges to offer remedial courses on university campuses. This strategy works as a loophole of sorts, allowing universities to cope with the elimination of remedial funding, while not shutting students out of the remedial classes they need.
Wright State University in Dayton - where about half of students land in one or more remedial courses - is experimenting with such a partnership now, working with nearby community colleges to standardize a remedial-education curriculum, according to Thomas Sudkamp, associate provost for undergraduate studies and the University College at Wright State.
"If we're required to phase out (remedial) education altogether, having those relationships ongoing with community colleges would provide a way for serving our students," he said.
(This article was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, nonpartisan education-news outlet affiliated with Teachers College, Columbia University.)
2011, The Hechinger Report.

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News Headline: Kent State receives $225,000 federal economic development grant to assist rural communities (Messing) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: akronlegalnews.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Login | December 27, 2011

Kent State receives $225,000 federal economic development grant to assist rural communities

Published: December 27, 2011

Kent State University will receive a $225,000 economic development grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to assist businesses in rural Ohio communities. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack recently announced the selection of Kent State and 35 other organizations in 26 states and the District of Columbia for grants to help rural cooperatives and small businesses expand, create jobs and strengthen their capacity to serve rural citizens and communities.

Kent State's grant will be used to provide assistance to small communities by transitioning small businesses to worker-owned cooperatives. Kent State's Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC), recognized as a Cooperative Development Center by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will administer the grant.

The OEOC, a non-profit outreach center of Kent State, supports the development of business across Ohio and around the world by its proven efforts to save jobs, create wealth and grow the economy.

"We are pleased to receive this grant to help promote and build cooperatives and cooperative activity in rural America," said Roy Messing, OEOC program coordinator.

"We're conducting outreach, providing technical assistance and one-on-one training where appropriate for private businesses that are looking to transition their existing company to employee or worker-owned co-ops," Messing said. "We're also working with individual groups who are interested in forming a business under the worker cooperative model."

The other Ohio organizations among the grant recipients are the National Network of Forest Practitioners in Athens and the Ohio State University Research Foundation. Messing says he works with both institutions on a regular basis to provide services for the all areas of the state.

"These grants help cooperatives support local projects and initiatives that create jobs and improve rural economic conditions," Vilsack said. "The USDA is proud to continue its support of local and regional efforts to bolster these cooperatives and help them bring increased value and economic opportunity to rural residents."

The grants are being provided through USDA Rural Development's Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. Under this program, grants of up to $225,000 may be awarded to colleges, universities and non-profit groups to create and operate centers that help individuals or groups establish, expand or operate rural businesses, especially cooperatives and mutually-owned businesses. Grants may be used to conduct feasibility studies, create and implement business plans, and help businesses develop new markets for their products and services.

Overall, Vilsack announced more than $7.9 million in economic development loans and grants. A complete list of nationwide projects is available at www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?contentidonly=true&contentid=2011/10/0460.xml

"2012 has been designated the International Year of Cooperatives by the United Nations," Messing said. The OEOC will be expanding its outreach and educational activities to spread the word about cooperatives' contribution to the economy, according to Messing.

Funded by federal and private foundation grants as well as by contracts for fees for services rendered, Kent State's OEOC provides information and preliminary technical assistance concerning broad-based business owner succession planning and worker-owned cooperatives.

For more information on Kent State's OEOC, visit www.oeockent.org.

[Back]

The Akron Legal News • 60 South Summit St. • Akron, Ohio 44308 • Phone: 330-376-0917 • Fax: 330-376-7001

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News Headline: CSU offers $1,000 incentive to spring semester transfers (Danes) | Email

News Date: 12/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Farkas, Karen
News OCR Text: HIGHER EDUCATION

Cleveland State University is offering a $1,000 incentive to entice qualified students to transfer to the university for spring semester.

Students must have between 30 and 89 credit hours from another college or university and a GPA of at least 3.0. They must register for 12 or more credit hours by Jan. 13. Classes begin Jan. 14.

The $1,000 scholarship offer is independent of any other scholarships and grants the student may receive.

CSU said the one-time offer is available because of an increase in financial contributions.

"The economy has affected the ability of many students to continue their education, and we hope this added support can help them get back on track," said Cleveland State Director of Admissions Heike Heinrich in a press release.

Students can apply online at engagecsu.com or request an application by calling 216-687-5411. CSU offices are closed this week.

University of Akron to study pipeline corrosion: Homero Castaneda-Lopez, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Akron, has been awarded a multimillion-dollar grant along with researchers at other institutions to study pipeline corrosion issues in Mexico.

Mexico has nearly 40,000 miles of underground pipelines and thousands of miles more slated for construction over the next few years.

"What we see in the lab can be applicable in the field where steel pipelines that carry millions of gallons of gas, crude oil and petroleum products face consistent, time-dependent, aggressive environmental threats," said Castaneda-Lopez in a university press release. He cited moisture, chemical elements and inherent operating conditions as major corrosion triggers.

Castaneda- Lopez and researchers from institutions including Battelle and the National University of Mexico, will simulate in the lab conditions to which Mexico's pipelines are exposed and develop applicable solutions. The research institutions were awarded nearly $4 million from the National Council of Science and Technology-Mexico.

Kent State gets social: Kent State University has launched a social media portal, called a "smash up," at social.kent.edu. It links users to all its social media outlets, including Facebook, Twitter and Flickr.

"What we'd like to advance now is an awareness of the depth of social media opportunities at the college and departmental levels," said Lin Danes, Kent State's director of web services and interactive media.

The site includes links to more than 100 specific social media offerings for schools, departments and offices at the university.

Assistance to rural businesses: Kent State University received a $225,000 economic development grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to assist businesses in rural Ohio communities.

Kent State and 35 other organizations in 26 states and the District of Columbia received grants of up to $225,000. The other Ohio organizations are the National Network of Forest Practitioners in Athens and the Ohio State University Research Foundation.

Kent State will use its grant to provide assistance to small communities by transitioning small businesses to worker-owned cooperatives. Its Ohio Employee Ownership Center, a nonprofit outreach center, will administer the grant.

To reach this Plain Dealer reporter: kfarkas@plaind.com, 216-999-5079

Copyright © 2011 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Exploradio - Obesity and memory (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/24/2011
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Exploradio - Obesity and memory

New research shows that weight loss can improve brain function - but the opposite is also true, weight gain leads to memory loss.

by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR

Morning Edition Host

Jeff St. Clair

Holiday feasting makes watching your weight especially difficult. Kent State researcher John Gunstad and his colleagues have found that excess weight gain can lead to memory loss in addition to other adverse health effects.

In The Region:

The holidays are hard on just about everyone's waistline. But that's what New Year's resolutions are for.

A new body of research, though, is showing that for seriously obese people, keeping those New Year's resolutions can actually improve brain function.

In this week's Exploradio, we look at the link between weight loss and memory gain.

(Click image for larger view.)

Weight gain and memory loss

The holidays mean music, family get togethers, and of course, food. And then more food.

And while a few extra pounds earned over the holidays are no big deal, a Kent State researcher says the problems created by obesity are far reaching.

Neuropsychologist John Gunstad says one of the side effects of weight gain is memory loss, and obesity causes problems with heart disease, and blood pressure, and diabetes. "This is another type of side-effect, another consequence of weight gain."

Gunstad and an international team of researchers are working with a group of overweight people who have taken a drastic step to shed pounds: bariatric surgery. That's where part of the stomach is removed or restricted to force people to eat less. Gunstad tested the brain functions of hundreds of obese people before the surgery, and after.

"And we know that many individuals have reported that their memory has improved, or their memory feels better in the process of losing weight. And we don't know that's simply because their feeling better or they're actually noticing these memory changes. But on testing, when we have a chance to put them on a computer and see what their memory can actually do, we see that they get better. And they get better as fast as three months later."

Testing the theory

I'm not a candidate for bariatric surgery. Still, Gunstad offers to show me the computer test he uses to measure brain function in his subjects.

It's an hour-long test that looks at a series of brain functions like memory, attention, impulsiveness and to some degree dexterity as numbers flash on the screen and my poor brain is asked to match them...

Gunstad has run hundreds of these tests over the years. And the data shows a clear link between losing weight and improved brain function. He says a lot of things could be tied to that link.

"At this point, we have 35 different possibilities that we're in the process of sorting out. And that's probably an incomplete list."

One theory is that obesity hurts overall health. Your heart has to work harder, heavy people may have trouble sleeping, high blood pressure, and often, diabetes -- and the brain like any other organ, suffers.

But Gunstad says new research is pointing to a more troubling effect of excess weight on the brain.

Obesity ages the brain

"We found that obese individuals, in a recent paper that came out, obese individuals actually started to show pathological changes in the brain similar to Alzheimer's disease at a much higher rate than their lean counterparts. So it's arguing that whatever obesity is causing in the body is actually damaging the brain in a way that speeds the aging process, that speeds the Alzheimer's disease process far before it really ever should."

Again, Gunstad 's work shows a link between obesity and bad effects on the brain, but not the cause.

"It might be things that are genetic. It's possible that there're some particular genes that causes a person to have both of those: You're at a higher risk for obesity and memory loss."

The good news is that not everyone with a weight problem is at risk for memory loss. Much depends on the "make-up" of the person's brain, what Gunstad calls its "cognitive reserve."

"Some people's brains are just wired better than others. They're somehow more resilient to disease or more resilient to damage than other people. And we're not sure how that happens, if it's at the chemical level or at the tissue level, or where it may actually be."

Gunstad says the main thing to remember is that losing weight improves health in the body and in the brain, and that's food for thought.

The Centers for Disease Control reports two-thirds of Americans are overweight, nearly one-third are actually obese.

Gunstad and his colleagues warn that America's obesity epidemic is no longer just a risk for individuals. It could impact American productivity and competitiveness.

I'm Jeff St. Clair with this week's exploradio.

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News Headline: Remember Your Weight Loss Plan (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: PsychCentral.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New research finds that the better your memory and other thinking skills, the better your chances of losing weight and keeping it off.

A new study led by Dr. John Gunstad, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio, found that memory and other mental abilities clearly influence the amount of weight people lose.

“The results of our latest study indicate that better performance on tests of memory and executive function is linked to greater weight loss in persons who have weight loss surgery,” he said.

“We believe this effect comes from a better ability to stick to the diet and exercise habits that promote weight loss.”

He is quick to add that these findings “should not be misinterpreted to indicate that cognitive impairment automatically leads to negative outcomes.”

“Instead, it might encourage cognitive screening to help identify those people who might benefit from additional support to help them reach their weight loss goals.”

If you want to lose weight and keep it off, you need a plan and reminders to stay on track, he said. He recommends that after talking with your doctor to identify the best weight loss plan for you, strategies such as planning your meals in advance or using alerts on your smartphone might make a big difference.

“Some people appear to have a better ability than others to keep themselves on task,” said Gunstad. “Fortunately, a little planning can help those of us that have a harder time doing so still achieve our weight loss goals.”

Gunstad's findings will appear in an upcoming issue of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

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News Headline: Study: Remembering to Lose Weight (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Coastal Breeze News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Could a string around your finger help with weight loss?

Whether you are worried about keeping off the pounds during the holidays or getting a head start on your 2012 weight loss resolution, the answer may be simple… tie a string around your finger.

The better your memory and other thinking skills, the better your chances of losing weight and keeping it off.

According to a new study led by Dr. John Gunstad, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University, memory and other mental abilities clearly influence the amount of weight people lose.

“The results of our latest study* indicate that better performance on tests of memory and executive function is linked to greater weight loss in persons who have weight loss surgery,” said Dr. Gunstad. “We believe this effect comes from a better ability to stick to the diet and exercise habits that promote weight loss. But, these findings should not be misinterpreted to indicate that cognitive impairment automatically leads to negative outcomes. Instead, it might encourage cognitive screening to help identify those people who might benefit from additional support to help them reach their weight loss goals.”

In short, if you plan to lose weight and keep the pounds at bay, you need a plan and helpful reminders to stay on track. After talking with your doctor to identify the best weight loss plan for you, using strategies such as planning your meals well in advance or using alerts on your smartphone might make a big difference.

“Some people appear to have a better ability than others to keep themselves on task,” said Dr. Gunstad, “fortunately, a little planning can help those of use that have a harder time doing so still achieve our weight loss goals.”

Dr. John Gunstad is available for interviews to discuss the potential impact of cognitive function on short and long-term weight loss. Please contact Kalyeigh Fitch at 440.333.0001 ext. 105or kayleigh@sweeneypr.com to schedule an interview.

*These findings will appear in an upcoming issue of “Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases”.

About Dr. Gunstad

John Gunstad, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Kent State University Department of Psychology. With specialties in neuropsychology and health, Dr. Gunstad conducts research that examines two broad areas: 1) the effects of aging and disease on neurocognitive function, with a particular interest in cardiovascular disease and obesity; and 2) acute factors that affect neuropsychological functioning, including environmental stressors.

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News Headline: Software gets tough on crime (Jefferis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/27/2011
Outlet Full Name: Chronicle-Telegram - Online, The
Contact Name: Evan Goodenow
News OCR Text: LORAIN — A new police patrol hitting the streets this week bases where and when officers work on computer-crunched crime statistics. The statistics are based on police reports as well as anecdotal information from patrol and narcotics officers and residents. They are compiled on software by police Sgt. Michael Failing, the department's crime analyst. “The police department's going to intelligence-led policing,” Failing said “We do hot-spot mapping to determine what areas in the city we're going to direct our patrol units to.” Most patrol officers work 12-hour shifts that run 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. The new unit will handle routine calls, but its focus will vary, Failing said. Everything from burglaries and quality of life issues to traffic control. It consists of officers Eric Alten, Dennis Camarillo, Howard Heathcoat, Randall Leiby II, A.J. Matheson and Craig Payne and will be supervised by Sgt. Michael Hendershot. The patrol and the increased emphasis on crime analysis is part of the police department's membership in the Northern Ohio Violent Crime Consortium, a group paid for with federal taxpayer money that trains police in computerized crime analysis. The other departments in the consortium are Elyria, Akron, Canton, Cleveland, Mansfield, Toledo and Youngstown. Elyria and Lorain, which previously did little computerized crime analysis, have made “huge strides,” said Eric Jefferis, a Kent State University associate professor and consortium member who works with officers in the group. Intelligence-led policing is loosely based on Compstat, the New York Police Department's computer-based crime analysis developed in 1994 under then-Police Commissioner William Bratton and credited with helping dramatically decrease crime. The program has since been replicated around the nation. However, Failing and Jefferis said Compstat was more about increasing accountability among police commanders while intelligence-led policing is a department-wide philosophy emphasizing evidence-based use of resources. Jefferis said traditional practices, like random patrols, have proven to be ineffective. “Effective strategies are driven by good use of data or analysis,” he said. “Identifying where and who and what to target.” Failing used software to predict a Dec. 8 burglary based on crime trends in the neighborhood where it occurred and the number of criminals who lived in the area. Police said the prediction helped in catching the suspected burglar shortly after the burglary. Detective Jacob Morris mistakenly said in a Dec. 9 Chronicle-Telegram article that Failing used the “Analyst's Notebook,” a computer program that identifies patterns and trends. Failing said he plans to use the program but hasn't been trained on it yet. Failing said he used regular software to make the prediction but said predicting crime isn't the main point of the new focus on analysis. The idea is to be more proactive and maximize resources at a time when police are being asked to make due with less. “That's what you have to do with everybody losing officers like crazy,” Failing said. “You've got to manage your resources a little better.” Contact Evan Goodenow at 329-7129 or egoodenow@chroniclet.com.

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News Headline: KSU student death likely natural causes: Medical examiner to issue report next week | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer
The death of a Kent State University student discovered in his dormitory room in October will likely be ruled a death by natural causes.
James Barnes, a 26-year-old graduate student at KSU, was found dead in his Leebrick Hall room on Oct. 16. Investigators estimated that he had died several days before.
A spokesman for the Portage County Coroner's Office said Friday that the Summit County Medical Examiner's office, which is performing Barnes' autopsy, has informed them Barnes' drug screen was negative.
The Summit County Medical Examiner is expected to release a cause of death for Barnes next week.
“Everything indicates it will be ruled natural causes,” the spokesman said.
Barnes earned his bachelor's degree in finance at Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania before enrolling at KSU as a graduate student pursuing a master's degree in business administration.
More than 200 friends, family and fellow students gathered to remember Barnes at the rock on KSU's front campus on Oct. 20.
At the memorial, Barnes' family members stressed that his friends should remember the joyful way Barnes lived his life, not the way he died.
“Whenever you feel discouraged, just think of him — think of the smile that he had, think of the laugh that he had, think of the love that he showed to each and every one of you as well as us,” Nolan Harmon, Barnes' cousin, said at the memorial.

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News Headline: JUST IN: Kent State Dorm Student Died of Natural Causes | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: James Barnes, 26, of Midland, PA, did not have drugs or alcohol in his system when he died, according to the Portage County Coroner's Office. Coroner Dr. Roger Marcial said he died of natural causes, citing pneumonia of the left lung.

He was found dead in his fourth-floor Leebrick Hall dorm room on Oct. 16 after a family member called the university and asked them to check in on him because he hadn't contacted family for some time, Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said previously.

Barnes was a first-semester graduate student pursuing his master's degree, according to the university.

Students at the university gathered at a candlelight vigil on Oct. 20 to remember Barnes. His family members gave emotional testimonies and reminded other Kent State students to "check your neighbors."

University officials could not be reached for comment.

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News Headline: Coroner Releases Details in Kent State University Student's Death | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio— A Kent State University student who died earlier this year most likely passed away from natural causes, Fox 8 News reports.

Portage County Coroner Chief Investigator Tom Decker said an autopsy performed by the Summit County Medical Examiner's Office revealed that James Barnes, 26, of Midland, Pennsylvania, had underlying "medical issues," which contributed to his death. In addition, toxicology tests came back negative--meaning no drugs were found in Barnes' system.

Decker was not specific about the medical conditions, but he did note that foul play had been ruled out in the investigation.

Barnes' body was found in his Leebrick Hall dorm room by police officers making a welfare check on October 16.

A KSU spokesperson said previously that family members had grown concerned after not hearing from Barnes for a long time.

Decker said it appeared Barnes had been dead for several days.

The Summit County Medical Examiner's Office is expected to release an official cause of death this week.

Stick with Fox 8 News and FOX8.com for updates on this story as they become available.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Esplanade signals new chapter for KSU, Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 TO SEE WORK UNDER WAY ON
LINK FROM CAMPUS TO DOWNTOWN

WITH FOUR MAJOR CONstruction
projects under way, the
revitalization of downtown Kent
— actually, the birth of 21st Century Kent
— will continue to take shape during the
year to come.
The new year also
will see work begin in
earnest on another exciting
improvement
— The Esplanade, the
pedestrian walkway
linking the Kent State University campus
with the downtown area.
Kent State has spent millions acquiring
property in the South Willow, East
Erie and College Avenue area for The Esplanade,
which will provide direct access
from the new Kent State University Hotel
and Conference Center to the campus.
The walkway will cross Haymaker Parkway,
whose construction 35 years ago did
a great deal to separate Kent State from
the downtown area.
Demolition work is set to begin this
week on four properties on Willow and
Erie streets that the university acquired.
Homes along East Erie Street will be
razed and the street will be vacated for
The Esplanade. Many of the properties
set for demolition are rundown; removing
them will be an improvement.
Plans for The Esplanade call for a pair
of 15-foot-wide sidewalks with 20 feet of
open space running in between them. The
walkway will run from Hilltop Drive to
Haymaker Parkway via East Erie Street,
ending with a park area at Haymaker and
a crosswalk to the KSU hotel, which will
be located on South DePeyster Street at
East Erie.
Kent State has made a substantial investment
in The Esplanade project as well
as the hotel, and Kent residents ought to
be grateful for it. The university is the city's
leading employer and its willingness not
only to become involved in the revitalization
of Kent but to take on a key role as
one of the leading players is a welcome sign
of a partnership that can only mean good
things for the city and the campus.

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News Headline: READY FOR DEMOLITION | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Contractors for Kent State University plan to demolish these four houses next week to make way for
the university's extension of the Esplanade walkway.

KSU TO TEAR DOWN FOUR HOUSES FOR WALKWAY

By THOMAS GALLICK | STAFF WRITER
Kent State University
plans to celebrate the new
year with new work on a
project that will transform
an area between campus
and downtown Kent.
According to city records,
KSU's contractor
plans to start demolition
work on four houses
near the school's Esplanade
walkway extension
on Tuesday.
KSU has spent millions
of dollars on 35 properties
near the northwest edge of
its campus over the last few
years. School officials plan
to demolish many of the
houses and build a large
path to the downtown redevelopment
zone over a
section of East Erie Street
the city is vacating.
Rhonda Boyd, senior engineer
for the city of Kent,
said the first houses to go
will be located at 325 and
329 E. Erie St. and 214 and
220 S. Willow St.
Boyd said the buildings
on Erie Street are being removed
so the land can be
used by the university for
storing dirt moved from the
construction site of the Portage
Area Regional Transportation
Authority's parking
deck and transit center
on DePeyster Street for use
in the construction of the
Esplanade extension.
“It's sort of a triangleshaped
parcel bound by
Erie, Haymaker Parkway
and Willow,” Boyd said.
“They're going to stockpile
dirt there.”
Boyd said the Willow
Street properties were
vacant and are being removed
because of security
concerns.
Bill Lillich, safety director
for the city of Kent, said
the KSU Police Department,
which includes the
properties in its jurisdiction,
had some reports of
illegal activity on the site
in recent months.
A KSU Police Department
dispatcher said no
one at the department was
able to comment on the
matter because most university
employees are on
winter break.
Boyd said that KSU offered
salvageable materials
from the houses to local
non-profit groups.
“They invited (Habitat
for Humanity) ReStore to
come in,” she said. “I think
the fire department also
did some training in some
of (the houses).”
University plans for the
Esplanade extension call
for two 15-foot-wide sidewalks,
with 20 feet of open
space in between, running
from Hilltop Drive on campus
to Haymaker Parkway
over what is now a section
of East Erie Street. The
walkway will end with a triangular
“great park” that
abuts Haymaker Parkway
and a crosswalk to KSU's
planned hotel and conference
center across the
parkway.

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News Headline: About books: Rock 'n roll photographs - Canton, OH - CantonRep.com | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/29/2011
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: More in: AP Top 25 site

About books: Rock 'n roll photographs

By Gary Brown

CantonRep.com staff writer

Posted Dec 28, 2011 @ 02:45 PM

The book's publisher, Kent State University Press, calls "1950s Radio in Color" a "remarkable collection of photographs by one of rock's early champions."

Indeed, "1950s Radio in Color: The Lost Photographs of Deejay Tommy Edwards" by Christopher Kennedy, gives noted rock photographer Edwards his due recognition "as the deejay responsible for perhaps the most important photographic and written documentation of 20th century music ever produced," the publisher said.

"Between 1955 and 1960, popular Cleveland deejay Tommy Edwards photographed the parade of performers who passed through the WERE-AM radio station for on-air interviews, shooting more than 1,700 Ektachrome slides," explains publicity material for the book. "Following his death in 1981, most of the collection vanished and was presumed lost. The few images that remained were often reprinted and rarely credited to Edwards, labeled �photographer unknown.' Until now."

PHOTOS FOUND

Kennedy, a songwriter and musician with the band Ruth Ruth," discovered the collection in 2006 during research into the rock-and-roll film "The Pied Piper of Cleveland."

Also a "passionate music fan," said the publisher, the author knew that Edwards' photographs "capture the birth of rock 'n' roll at its flashpoint: Elvis Presley while he was still dangerous; a raw and incomplete Chuck Berry before his star ascended; and some beady-eyed, high voiced kid named Roy Orbison."

"It wasn't just the architects of rock music whom Edwards had in his viewfinder," says publicity material for "1950s Radio in Color."

"There were also pop and country's music's biggest stars; mysterious, unknown hopefuls; and vulnerable deglamourized Hollywood celebrities."

BEHIND-THE-SCENES

Edwards' photos offer a behind the scenes look at the evolution of music in the 1950s.

But, how would the author explain the images?

He needed another discovery.

In 2009, Kennedy found the only known copy of the �T.E. Newsletter' collection. This was Edwards' self-published weekly two-page recap of Cleveland radio and record news. Aiming it at music business insiders, the collection of newsletters are dated from 1953 to 1960.

PUT INTO CONTEXT

"The wealth of information and dates contained in the newsletters are the photo collection's indispensable companion piece," said the publisher, noting that "Edward's anecdotal quips are interspersed throughout the text of the book."

A foreword is written by Terry Stewart, president of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.  The book features 200 color photographs.

"This book will transport readers back in time," said the publisher, "allowing them to step into (Edwards') shoes for a moment and to feel the wonder and excitement he must have felt every day while witnessing a cultural revolution."

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News Headline: Chamber Chatter: Welcome new Chamber member n Camp Bow Wow | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name: Doris Stewart
News OCR Text: Women2Women Breakfast in January

Join Women2Women on Jan. 26 at Kent State University Student Center in Room 204, for breakfast and great networking. Our speaker will be M. L. Schultze, news director at WKSU. The topic is "Old Media and New - and the Consumer's Place in Both." The expansion of new media has meant the end of much of the old media's role as gatekeeper. Come and hear more about these changes.

Parking is free in the visitors' lot, located at the Student Center on Risman Drive, right off Summit Street. Student Ambassadors will be on hand to direct you to the room. RSVP today to the Chamber by phone or by email. Cost is $10 per person, and includes a breakfast buffet. Payment is cash only, payable at the door. We regret cancellations will not be accepted after noon on Jan. 20, and all no-shows must be billed to meet our reservation guarantee. Please send a representative in your place if you are unable to attend.

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