Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; May 4 (1)
Athletics (3)
Board of Trustees (1)
Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Fashion Design (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (3)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Office of the Provost (3)
Students (1)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Saban intense and demanding ... personable and funny? 01/09/2012 CBSSports.com Text Attachment Email


Alumni; May 4 (1)
Arizona shootings: Randy Gardner only had time to react 01/09/2012 AZCentral.com Text Attachment Email


Athletics (3)
Fate and a lot of flights brought David Fisher to Kent State (Hazell) 01/09/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU recruiting: Process starts with slips of paper, ends with new class of Golden Flashes (Hazell) 01/09/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

$1 million donation to Kent State withdrawn (Nielsen) 01/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees (1)
Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine and Kent State University discuss merger (Lefton) 01/07/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio -- The Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, independent for 96 years, plans to merge with Kent State University. Officials at both institutions have signed non-binding letters of intent to make the podiatry school part of Kent State...


Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Business News Briefs - Jan. 6 01/09/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design (1)
Going Places: Jan. 2, 2012 01/07/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

4:30 am, January 2, 2012 Find out who's climbing Northeast Ohio's business ladder. INTERNATIONAL TEXTILE AND APPAREL ASSOCIATION: Vincent Quevedo (Kent State University) received the Pearson Prentice Hall Lecturer Award for Exceptional Service.


KSU at E. Liverpool (3)
ELO committee seeks to increase participation (Rose, Burns) 01/09/2012 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...Horner of ADAPT Coalition said, "We have the opportunities; we just need to get the people there." Others agreed, including Lydia Rose, a professor at Kent State University who said her class sponsored two community events and after distributing 1,000 fliers, about 80 people attended, about 15 of...

Committee discusses citizen involvement (Rose, Burns) 01/09/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...Horner of ADAPT Coalition said, "We have the opportunities; we just need to get the people there." Others agreed, including Lydia Rose, a professor at Kent State University who said her class sponsored two community events and after distributing 1,000 fliers, about 80 people attended, about 15 of...

Community encouraged to attend MLK celebration 01/09/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...public is invited to participate. At the POL Center, a documentary, "Being Black in Middle America," will be shown, featuring interviews conducted by Kent State University Professor Patti Swartz and videotaped by Sherrill Shaw. The interviews include those with current NAACP President Makeesha...


KSU at Salem (1)
Students help to clean up greenhouse 01/08/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

WARREN - Students and graduates of the Kent State University Salem's horticultural program have been helping clean up the Packard Park greenhouse. Patricia Fuller, executive director...


KSU Museum (1)
WKSU News: Dressing for the Civil War (Hume) 01/06/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...simplify military uniforms. But dresses and kids clothes were more free-form, and often more intricate. WKSU's Kabir Bhatia has on a new exhibit at the Kent State fashion museum that looks at the domestic wear of the 1860s. (Click image for larger view.) To mark the sesquicentennial of the start...


Office of the Provost (3)
Kent State provost heads to New Mexico 01/06/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

Kent - Kent State University Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Robert Frank will become the new president at the University of New Mexico....

New UNM Boss Looks Forward to Challenge (Frank) 01/06/2012 Albuquerque Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...reassessing the way remedial courses are taught at the state flagship university, incoming President Bob Frank said Thursday. Frank, currently provost at Kent State University in Ohio, starts a five-year term as UNM president on June 1 after David Schmidly's contract expires. Frank, in an interview...

New UNM Boss Looks Forward to Challenge (Frank) 01/06/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...reassessing the way remedial courses are taught at the state flagship university, incoming President Bob Frank said Thursday. Frank, currently provost at Kent State University in Ohio, starts a five-year term as UNM president on June 1 after David Schmidly's contract expires. Frank, in an interview...


Students (1)
Bob Dyer: Grad student sues Kent State after getting the boot (Neumann) 01/08/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...names correctly. This person's last name is actually Moore. So what's he all worked up about? I hope you're sitting down. This person is suing Kent State University because he flunked out of graduate school. Seriously. Moore, 56, claims in his civil suit the university did not “honer”...


Town-Gown (2)
ALONG THE WAY: Portage 'numbers' impressive 01/09/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

PORTAGE PATHWAYS: Fire station was a matter of debate in new city of Kent 01/08/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Kent fell short of city status in 1910 by about 500 residents -- some blamed the aftermath of the Seneca Chain Co. fire for that -- but the opening of Kent State Normal School more than made up for that in the following decade. The 1920 Census showed Kent with 7,070 residents, assuring city status...


News Headline: Saban intense and demanding ... personable and funny? | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: CBSSports.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW ORLEANS -- During Nick Saban's 29-year coaching career, he has been described a lot of ways: demanding, intense and driven. Also he's been called a liar for how he left the Miami Dolphins for Alabama and a dictator. And those were some of the nicer things.

The perception of Saban is that he's as approachable as a porcupine.

The reality, his Alabama players, say is much, much different.

"When the cameras are on, he's really intense," Alabama left tackle Barrett Jones said. "He's a very intense coach at times. What people don't see is how personable he is behind closed doors. He's real easy to talk to -- he really encourages his players. Any time you have an issue you want to talk about you come to his office, he kind of has an open door policy.

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"He does joke around in practice, especially at the start of practice before things get heated up. He really has a different side to him that you don't really see."

A win Monday against No. 1-ranked LSU would give Alabama and Saban his second BCS national title in three seasons. Despite Saban's public persona, Alabama running back Trent Richardson said Saban is very down to earth.

"He jokes with us all the time," Richardson said. "He keeps us happy, man. We love for playing for Coach Saban. He says crazy stuff. He tells us we're being soft. Tells us funny jokes."

Saban also has a generous side. When he was an assistant with the Cleveland Browns in the early 1990s, he used his first playoff check to purchase his father-in-law a Cleveland Browns jacket. Inside one of the pockets, Saban placed the deed to his in-law's house, which he had paid off.

At Michigan State, Saban and his wife, Terry, started the Nick's Kids Fund, which they have continued at Alabama. It has raised millions of dollars for disadvantaged children. Saban made it a priority to help in the recovery efforts after the deadly tornados hit Tuscaloosa.

Saban also can let his hair down -- well, kind of. There's the YouTube clip of him dancing even if he isn't as limber as Oklahoma State's Mike Gundy.

And when Saban was at Kent State, where he was a quarterback, he would write his future wife these wonderful letters quoting poetry and music.

Nick Saban: a jokester, dancer and poet? What's the biggest misconception about Saban's personality and coaching style?

"Well, I think that, first of all, there's certain things that we think are important to being a champion," Saban said. "And hard work is one of those things, a tremendous commitment to the goals and things that are important to you.

"But I also think it's important that people learn how to be responsible for their own self-determination, which is accountability. And to have that in an organization, any organization, you have to define what the expectation is of the people in the organization.

"And I find that players and people in our organization really feel good about the fact that they know what the expectation is."

Saban said he learned it's about "doing your job and the responsibility and the accountability that goes with that" when he was Bill Belichick's defensive coordinator with the Cleveland Browns from 1991-94.

"But as a leader, make sure you define what that is. And we believe that it's important to be very positive in your approach to doing that, which I think is where the misconception probably starts. You know, you don't have to be negative to do that. "And I think that's probably what our players think. And that we are positive in our approach to what we do. But it's also defined, and the expectation is defined for them, and we expect them to be responsible to it. And it's really the only way you can have a team, because for people to trust and respect each other, which is important to togetherness on a team, they have to all buy into the same things and you can't have one guy saying, well, he did this but I'm not allowed to do that, because that creates divisiveness, which is never going to allow you to have the togetherness that you need to be successful in difficult circumstances.

"So those things we believe in, and I think that it's the way we do it that there's a misconception on because it's done in a very positive way."

Alabama defensive coordinator Kirby Smart says he appreciates the demands Saban puts on his coaches and players.

"When you say 'demanding,' to me: the definition of demanding is they require you to do what you're supposed to do, when you're supposed to do it and how you're supposed to do it," Smart said. "That's what he does. So is he demanding, yeah, he requires you to do your job.

"And I appreciate that. That gives me job security knowing that everyone in the organization is held accountable. And he holds everybody accountable. When he's demanding, he's usually right."

When Saban became LSU's coach before the 2000 season after five seasons at Michigan State, Saban admitted it was his fault for the way he was portrayed.

"I don't blame anybody for it," Saban said in a 2000 interview. "I'm amused by it. But I also take responsibility for it. Maybe I missed the boat. I think my role as a head coach trying to have a class program is to represent the program with professionalism and class. In doing that, maybe I haven't been as amusing as I should be. Maybe I haven't tried to make everyone think I'm a happy-go-lucky, easy-going, don't-care-about-anything guy.

"I don't think there's very many guys who coach like that who have much success. Maybe I represented, not as a person, but more how I feel a coach should be. Maybe that hasn't been a true reflection of my personality. Therefore, I do shake my head and laugh about it. My wife does too."

So do his players.

"Coach is a wonderful guy on and off the field," Alabama wide receiver Marquis Maze said. "A lot of people just see him hollering. The media catches him hollering and intense. At practice, he's more laid back, he talks to us. We can talk to him anytime.

"He approaches everything as a business approach. That's how you know. That's what the NFL is a business. That's how we practice and we go about doing things."

Saban said he gets satisfaction and enjoyment out of getting his team ready to play each week.

"It's very challenging," Saban said. "So that's my enjoyment. Now, maybe your perception of enjoyment is you go out and have a party. Well, that's not my enjoyment of this experience. We have been to the Sugar Bowl four times, and I really do enjoy the relationships that we have with the people here at the Sugar Bowl. "So in my own way, as the coach, I enjoy this. Putting the team together, putting the plan together, to have an opportunity to play against a great team and see if you can be successful, that's my enjoyment.

"So that's my fun. It may not be other people's fun. So I enjoy it. In my own way I enjoy it. This is what you work for, to have these kinds of opportunities."

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News Headline: Arizona shootings: Randy Gardner only had time to react | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: AZCentral.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Had there been time to think -- to remember -- Randy Gardner would have flashed back to Kent State, the last time gunfire rang in the air and he was running for his life.

But there was only time to react. As before, he focused on moving away from the sound of gunshots, looking past the gray silhouettes that were moving, and falling, around him.

"All I knew was I had to get out of there," Gardner said.

He did just that in the Safeway parking lot on Jan. 8, 2011, putting one foot in front of another, even though a bullet had pierced the right one.

A year later, 61-year-old Gardner, who dodged bullets in May 1970 when the National Guard opened fire on antiwar protesters at Kent State University in Ohio, is fully recovered physically, his foot experiencing only occasional stiffness from the wound.

But his emotional scars still tear apart unexpectedly, and those seconds that took the lives of six people unfold once again.

"I've healed over the months, but I'll never get over it," Gardner said. "Some days are tougher than others."

He has remained in close touch with the family of Phyllis Schneck, who was among those killed. He had just gotten in the line that had casually formed among people waiting to speak with U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Gardner and Schneck shared their common political beliefs, connecting on a level deeper than two people sharing small talk to pass the time.

Gardner clearly remembers the warm touch of the sun, the clear blue sky, the folding chairs that had been set up for visitors.

Memories go gray when the first gunshots ring out. Schneck disappears. Those in front and behind Gardner fall down. He finds himself on the ground as well. He lifts himself from the asphalt and walks.

"I know there are people who say, 'If I had a gun there, that never would have happened,'" he said. "But that's not how it happens. Everything goes on automatic pilot."

Even today Gardner asks himself why he was able to walk away when so many others -- mothers, husbands, a child -- were silenced forever.

His answer is the same as it was in the days that followed.

"I don't know," Gardner said. "I can ask that question forever, and I will never know."

He has come to grips with that, as he has the lingering survivor's guilt that inevitably leads him to wonder if he could have helped, perhaps carried someone out.

Gardner, a former mental-health therapist, now hopes to change minds, and help the country come to grips with its focus on violence. He and other Jan. 8 survivors traveled to Washington, D.C., in November in support of a gun bill to strengthen background checks.

"I've tried to work to do what I can to make this world a little bit safer," he said. "And I will continue to do that when I can."

In May, he returned to Kent, Ohio, joining others in an annual commemoration of events. He had not been back in years but decided to go when he was contacted by another survivor who saw Gardner had been shot. The visit surprised him. He found peace among others still trying to cope with a tragic circumstance now more than 40 years old.

"It helped me emotionally," Gardner said. "Here were all these people caught up in a very strange experience, people with unresolved feelings going back all those years. What happened here (in Tucson) will last many years, too. I hope to go forward, help make society a little safer when I can."

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2012/01/07/20120107giffords-victims-gardner.html#ixzz1iyG01YyM

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News Headline: Fate and a lot of flights brought David Fisher to Kent State (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University football recruit, David Fisher is transferring from a junior college in California. (Ed Suba Jr./Akron Beacon Journal)

Editor's note: This is the second in a series of stories going behind the scenes in the football recruiting process at Kent State.

KENT: David Fisher's fate came in the form of a Facebook message from a former teammate.

A little over halfway through Fisher's sophomore season last fall at Palomar Community College, he received a message from C.J. Malauulu, a friend he grew up with in Oceanside, Calif., whom he'd played with the previous year at Palomar.

The message implored Fisher, a 6-foot-1, 215-pound quarterback, to send his midseason football highlight tape to Kent State. It was an odd request considering when Malauulu left Palomar to play at Kent State, it was the first Fisher had ever heard about the school he only knew then as “somewhere far away in the Midwest.”

“I pictured lots of open space,” Fisher said. “You know, nothing but farmland. With lots and lots of cows.”

Still, Fisher sent the tape. Then he searched for Kent State on Google to see what he could learn about the school and its football program.

“I saw [KSU] had like six or seven quarterbacks and I thought, ‘Why is C.J. even asking me?' I figured, ‘That's not happening' and just went back to doing my thing,” he said.

A couple of weeks later, Malauulu called Fisher and told him the staff had shown considerable interest in his tape. A couple of days later, Fisher's cell phone rang. On the other end was KSU's offensive coordinator, Brian Rock. Rock introduced himself and told Fisher he planned to come and watch his next game. When Rock arrived, he and Fisher hit it off right away.

“He was so cool, this vibrant, loud, energetic guy who makes you feel like he's known you his whole life,” Fisher said. “I've talked to scouts before and usually they're really blunt. But coach Rock was so different. I just fed off him as we talked for like, two hours.”

A week later, Rock boarded a plane again to visit Fisher. Rock made the trip four times in all, keeping Fisher in the loop with what was going on at KSU while keeping tabs on how Fisher's season was wrapping up.

Fisher's parents, Mario and Phenella Adame, began getting excited about what appeared to be their son's big break. After years of trying to land a football scholarship — first at the University of Nevada as a preferred walk on and then spending two years at Palomar — a Division I school was interested in their son.

Fisher said his coaches at Palomar warned him not to commit too soon, to keep his options open. Fisher couldn't help but think about what happened the last time he got stuck on a Division I school [Nevada] too soon. So he kept KSU in the back of his mind, trying not to get too excited by the prospect of a scholarship while focusing on the task at hand.

A dual-threat quarterback, Fisher went on to throw for 2,539 yards with 27 touchdowns and seven interceptions and added 403 yards on the ground with seven rushing touchdowns.

He led Palomar to a 7-4 record and into the Southern California Community College semifinals. Fisher was named the National Southern Conference Co-Offensive Player of the Year.

Rock had set the foundation with Fisher, but it was KSU coach Darrell Hazell who put the finishing touches on the deal with a visit of his own.

Hazell's No. 1 priority coming off the Flashes' 5-7 season in his first year as a coach was to create a greater competition at the most important position on the field. Even before the end of the season, Hazell had written a list of three names in the upper left-hand corner of a large white dry-erase board in his office.

It was his personal wish list of quarterbacks whittled down after he and his staff had combed through hours of film on hundreds of players across the country. The first name on the list was David Fisher.

Despite all the attention they'd given Fisher, including bringing him in for an official visit in early December, the polite kid who is half Native American was still reluctant to commit to Kent State.

“The No. 1 priority coming off the season was to sign a JC quarterback,” Hazell said. “David was tops on the list because he gives you a lot of different dimensions; the ability to run with [the football] and the ability to throw it.

“In addition, he keeps his eyes down the field when things break down and creates big plays by finding open guys. He's also got a very good arm. Probably not an A arm, but I'd rate him a B-plus arm with good accuracy.”

So a few days after the Flashes wrapped up their 7-5 season with four wins in the last five games, Hazell set out to meet Fisher's family.

In mid-December, Hazell headed across the country in a plane (he prefers driving) to a state that makes him a bit nervous (something about earthquakes).

Hazell and Fisher first met at Palomar, then went their separate ways for a couple of hours before meeting up for dinner at Fisher's home. There, Hazell, Fisher and Fisher's parents, sister, bother-in-law and baby nephew enjoyed a dinner of steak, baked potato, corn on the cob and banana crème pie.

Afterward, the group was gathered in the family room as Hazell made his last pitch.

“Things were going so well, deep down inside I had a gut feeling he was going to commit,” Hazell said. “But I wasn't sure why he was still holding back. I didn't want to push it, so I backed off and we all just kept talking some more.”

Eventually, Fisher's father had had enough of the suspense and put his stepson on the spot.

“My dad turns to me and says, ‘Well, son, what are you going to do?' ” Fisher said. “Then coach Hazell goes, ‘David hasn't told me yet, I'm still trying to get it out of him.' ”

Embarrassed, Fisher said: “I really don't know how to do this. Mom, you might want to get out the camera.”

When Phenella Adame returned with the camera ready, Fisher stood up, shook Hazell's hand and said, “I'm not sure if this is how you do it Coach, but I'm committing to Kent State.”

“Coach Hazell got a big smile on his face and gave me a big hug. Out of the corner of my eye I could see tears in my mom's eyes. I was so glad my whole family got to see the moment.”

As high as expectations already seem to be for Fisher, there are no guarantees. On Feb. 1, the Flashes will unveil a 25-player 2012 recruiting class that could include a freshman quarterback.

Such a scenario would set up at least a three-way battle at the position heading into preseason camp, with a starter to be determined in the fall.

“From where I went, from there to there to there to get here,” Fisher said Friday, sitting in Hazell's office, “we believe it was a plan. It was all God's plan for me to come here all along.”

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News Headline: KSU recruiting: Process starts with slips of paper, ends with new class of Golden Flashes (Hazell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MAC adjusts football division lineups

Editor's note: This is the first in a series of a behind-the-scenes looks at the football recruiting process at Kent State leading up to national signing day on Feb. 1. Next: A profile of KSU quarterback recruit David Fisher.

KENT: It started nearly seven months ago with about 220 strips of yellow paper with the names, stats and photos of potential recruits from across the United States.

It will end when Kent State announces its 2012 football recruiting class on Feb. 1.

“This board was filled with guys we watched and/or evaluated at every position,” said KSU coach Darrell Hazell as he swept an arm across the expanse of a meeting room wall in the football office in which several large sliding dry erase boards are mounted. “Each position had a numerical value attached to it for how many guys we want to take in that class based on what's currently on the team.”

With the aid of magnets, these soon-to-be color-coded and information-filled strips of paper were first organized by position. As the months went on, the strips were moved around and manipulated by further interest in particular players. Strips were removed from the board as interest in the player waned.

Hazell, an assistant at Ohio State for seven years, just completed his first season as coach of the Golden Flashes. He and his staff meet several times a week in the staff meeting room at a large oval table surrounded by 13 black leather chairs.

“Each [staff member] takes his area and goes through all the players in his area,” Hazell said. “If the area coach likes him, then they're passed on to their position coach. If the position coach likes him, then he comes to me.”

Once a potential player has been passed on for Hazell's final approval, he decides whether or not to make a scholarship offer or put the player on hold. If the player's strip gets a red dot, it means there are academic issues to take into consideration.

“So, we go from all-yellow board, which means a player is being evaluated, to a blue board, meaning he's been offered,” said Hazell, sliding one dry erase board over to reveal another with a different color-coded scheme behind it. “Then, the blue guys become green once they commit.”

The process might sound easy, but a lot more goes into the evaluation process. A majority of the players on the board have been scouted by at least one staff member, many by three. Some others were recommended, sent with statistics and YouTube videos.

Of the initial 220 candidates, only 24 or 25 will make the final cut and be announced as future Flashes on signing day. With less than a month to go, Hazell and his staff have 19 commitments.

“I feel really good where we're at now,” he said. “This time last year, we were just getting together as a staff and had zero [commits]. So we are way ahead this season.”

Hazell's ability to recruit proved to be a key factor in his hiring on Dec. 20, 2010, after former coach Doug Martin resigned after seven seasons.

“During the process of looking for a head coach, we felt we needed someone who was known for his recruiting,” KSU Athletic Director Joel Nielsen said. “Darrell was known at Ohio State, and even before that, as one of the top assistant coaches for recruiting.”

Hazell wasn't on the Kent State campus very long when he began reaching out to local high school coaches through clinics, many of whom had felt snubbed under the former coaching staff.

“The other thing we looked really strong at was his ties to Ohio and his ability to recruit the state. With him playing in Ohio [Hazell was a receiver at Muskingum College before getting right into coaching after graduating in 1986] and working in Columbus for seven years, we were very confident he could bring those contacts immediately with him and also hire people to his staff with similar contacts. And that's exactly what we've seen these last 13 months, his ability to not only rework some of the contacts that maybe we didn't have in the past, but also strengthen those we did have.”

But Hazell's genuine charisma reaches far beyond his fellow coaches.

“He's got a personality that's filled with integrity,” Nielsen said. “He comes across that way because it's the only way he knows. He's sincere, and that really resonates with not only the young men he's recruiting, but also their parents. I've seen him with recruits and their families, and he's really good. The best part is it's not an act. It's just the way Darrell is naturally.”

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News Headline: $1 million donation to Kent State withdrawn (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A $1 million gift from Kent State University alumnus Jason M. Cope and his wife, Stacie, was unexpectedly withdrawn Friday. Kent State planned to name its basketball court “Cope Court” in a ceremony Jan. 14 before the men's game.

The announcement of the withdrawal came after the Daily Kent Stater made inquiries into the past of Jason M. Cope, a 1995 Kent State finance graduate. Cope was the branch manager of a financial firm that defrauded 190 investors of $8.7 million in late 1999 and early 2000.

Cope was one of four defendants required to pay a total of more than $19 million in penalties, according to litigation from the Securities and Exchange Commission and court documents.

Asked about the $1 million donation and Cope's SEC violations on Jan. 4, KSU Athletic Director Joel Nielsen said that “it was an action that was 12 years ago, it was fully litigated and he abided by the letter of the litigation.

“Obviously we were aware of the litigation of 10 to 12 years ago,” he said about Jason Cope, who was to become the namesake of the basketball court. “We've had the discussion with the donor, and we are comfortable in not only where he stands but where we stand in that relationship.”

Prior to the withdrawal of the donation, numerous attempts to reach Cope by listed phone numbers, by email and by phone at the golf course he owns, in person at his Gates Mills address listed by the Cuyahoga County auditor and through the Kent State athletic department were unsuccessful.

An email from Todd Vatter, interim director of athletic communications at Kent State, was received at 4:19 Friday afternoon and stated, “Due to unforeseen changes, Jason Cope has found it necessary at this time to withdraw his gift to the athletic department. The university understands this decision and appreciates the Copes' thinking enough of Kent State to consider their generous donation. We look forward to an opportunity in the future to engage them in the life of Kent State.”

Cope and his wife are the co-owners of several golf courses under their company Copeland Group, LLC. The pregame ceremony was to reveal a 10-foot by 5-foot Cope Court logo on each sideline, according to the athletic department.

Cope has recently become a member of the National Athletic Development Council at Kent State, a group that Nielsen says meets throughout the year and advises the athletic department in fundraising efforts. He was a featured speaker during November's “Founders Gala” at Kent State, recognizing donors to the university.

“We share in the thoughts of our current coaches and administration that believe strongly in the mission of Kent State athletics and the development of well-rounded student-athletes,” said Cope in the December press release announcing the $1 million donation. “We know that our commitment will make a significant impact and be a difference-maker.”

“This is an alum that has been a very strong supporter of our program for years, and we are very comfortable with what we know to this point,” said Nielsen when asked if the SE C charges had any impact on the decision to take the donation and name the court after Cope. “The gift is something in the best interest of the university and the department.”

Announcing the donation and the Cope Court name in mid-December, Nielsen said in a press release, “This leadership gift assists in providing the necessary resources to uphold the national prominence of our men's basketball and men's golf programs.”

The SEC complaint

According to SEC records, Cope opened a branch of A.C. Financial in Pittsburgh in 1999 and soon began to sell phony stocks to investors sent to him by Ira Monas, the president of Milan Capital Group in New York, who reportedly hatched the plan right before serving an unrelated prison sentence for grand larceny.

Milan Capital Group, led by Monas, and A.C. Financial, led by Cope, “offered and purportedly sold to investors shares of four ‘hot' IPOs,” — highly publicized initial public offerings of securities — and received $8.7 million from 190 investors, according to SEC litigation. Investors thought they were purchasing shares of Worldwide Wrestling Federation Entertainment, United Parcel Service, Inc., FogDog, Inc. and Freemarkets.com, Inc., court records show. Cope and Monas did not have access to those shares.

The complaint said, “Money from investors was used to pay Cope and other salespeople in A.C Financial's Pittsburgh office, and to pay for Milan Capital's operating expenses and personal expenses of Monas and his family,” according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in March of 2000. They were running a Ponzi scheme, according to SEC litigation. “The defendants stole the investors' money and, to create the illusion of legitimate stock purchases, gave the investors phony trade confirmations and account statements,” paid small amounts back to some original investors “and falsely represented these monies as repayment of principal and profits on the sham IPO investments.”

In January of 2000, just months after the scheme began, the SEC brought a case against Cope, Monas and their firms. The bank accounts were frozen, and charges were expanded in the following months.

Courts found the defendants violated anti-fraud provisions of federal securities laws and charged Cope, Monas and another Monas associate with aiding and abetting Milan Capital's violation of brokerage registration provision.

In August 2001, a United States District Court in New York ordered Cope and Monas to pay a civil penalty of $10 million because their “violations of the anti-fraud provisions involved fraud and deceit and resulted in substantial losses to investors.” The court also found Monas, Cope, Milan Capital Group and A.C. Financial “jointly and severally liable for disgorgement and prejudgment interest” for more than $9.39 million.

The SEC said on Thursday that the amount Cope individually paid — and if or when it was paid off — would not be made public. Documents from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority reveal that soon after Cope was notified of the SEC investigation in 2000, he left A.C. Financial to work for I.A.R. Securities on Wall Street in New York City. He was soon disqualified for employment by the National Association of Securities Dealers because of the SEC investigation.

“The public interest would not be served by Cope's continued association with I.A.R. and that Cope represents an unreasonable risk of harm to the market and investors,” stated the document.

The document also revealed several other complaints — including misrepresentation and theft — made against Cope when he was employed by Fairchild Financial Group. He was an investor there from the time he graduated from Kent State until leaving for A.C. Financial in 1999.

According to a 2003 SEC filing by Biophan Technologies, Inc., Cope had become an owner of Westbay Consulting, Inc. and was paid $107,503 and given Biophan stock for brokering private-placement stocks for the company. The SEC alleged that Biophan was in violation of SEC regulations by using Cope, who was barred from being a stockbroker.

“If Biophan had been aware of Mr. Cope's prior violations of the securities laws it would not have hired Westbay to assist in private placement,” according to Biophan's filing.

In 2005, Cope and his wife Stacie established their current business venture, The Copeland Group, LLC, and purchased several Ohio golf courses, including Copeland Hills in Columbiana.

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News Headline: Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine and Kent State University discuss merger (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: INDEPENDENCE, Ohio -- The Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, independent for 96 years, plans to merge with Kent State University.

Officials at both institutions have signed non-binding letters of intent to make the podiatry school part of Kent State and expect an agreement to be completed by summer.

A merger would give Kent State -- which has a college of nursing, a college of public health and a school of health sciences -- an affiliation with another medical college and a more visible presence in Cuyahoga County. The podiatric school's students would have opportunities for dual degrees and research and training, especially in sports medicine.

The podiatric college would likely establish a pre-podiatry track with Kent State similar to those it has with other institutions, including Cleveland State University, allowing qualified students to be automatically admitted into the college after three years of study.

The podiatric college, with 430 students, is among the largest of the nine podiatric graduate-level medical colleges in the country, which focus on the foot, ankle and lower leg. Only the Ohio school and the New York College of Podiatric Medicine are not affiliated with a university.

The planned merger grew out of discussions with Kent State about potential research and clinical opportunities that began about eight months ago, said David Nicolanti, executive vice president of the podiatric college.

As a good working relationship and mutual respect developed, it became apparent that an affiliation could be beneficial to both parties, he said.

"It opens opportunities," Nicolanti said. "There are different professional programs at the university level that we can draw on."

Kent State views an affiliation with the podiatric college as a way to expand its research and teaching in its health and science departments.

President Lester Lefton said in a meeting in December with Plain Dealer editors and reporters that his university had been "dating" the podiatric college.

"This is very likely to happen," he said of an affiliation. While administrative and other functions would merge, Lefton said, he did not expect any layoffs at the podiatric college, which would likely bear Kent State's name.

University officials declined last week to say any more about the merger talks.

The Kent State board of trustees on Dec. 13 authorized the letter of intent and asked Lefton to present a final plan for acquisition or merger for review to the board within six months.

Three days later the podiatric college posted a statement saying it was discussing an affiliation.

The Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine was founded in 1916 and was based in the University Circle area until 2006, when it purchased the former home office of Realty One for $11.75 million. Its large brick Georgian building is visible from Interstates 77 and 480 in Independence.

The college spent about $7 million on renovations and expansion, including adding a 300-seat lecture hall, high tech labs and computer and media centers at its 27-acre campus.

It sold its seven-acre complex at East 105th Street and Carnegie Avenue to the Cleveland Clinic in 2006 for $15 million, according to property records. That land is currently a parking lot.

The non-profit college is financially stable, Nicolanti said, and recent tax filings with the Internal Revenue Service through 2009 confirm that. Its 2009 form showed $12 million in revenue from tuition and fees. Annual tuition is $31,000.

Although it may be affiliating with a university in Portage County, the podiatric college remains committed to Cleveland, where it maintains strong ties to hospitals, Nicolanti said.

"We plan to expand our clinics in Cleveland because that is part of our mission," he said.

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News Headline: Business News Briefs - Jan. 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU touts corporate center

Kent State University will tout its Center for Corporate and Professional Development at a free breakfast at 8 a.m. Feb. 2. The event — designed for human resource workers, managers of employee training and organizational leaders —will be at the Hilton Garden Inn, 8971 Wilcox Drive, Twinsburg.

The center provides onsite, customized training and public, open enrollment professional development programs in areas such as supervisory skills, management and leadership development, the operation called “Lean Six Sigma” and continuous improvement, project management and human relations skills.

For more information or to register, call 330-672-8698 or send an e-mail to: ckocarek@kent.edu or go online to the site www.kent.edu/YourTrainingPartner.

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News Headline: Going Places: Jan. 2, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4:30 am, January 2, 2012

Find out who's climbing Northeast Ohio's business ladder.

INTERNATIONAL TEXTILE AND APPAREL ASSOCIATION: Vincent Quevedo (Kent State University) received the Pearson Prentice Hall Lecturer Award for Exceptional Service.

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News Headline: ELO committee seeks to increase participation (Rose, Burns) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - There are many opportunities in the area for young people and their parents. The problem is convincing them to take advantage of those opportunities.

This is the dilemma facing members of a Community Collaboration Committee recently formed as an outreach of the East Liverpool-Wellsville NAACP which held its second meeting Saturday morning at Carnegie Public Library.

Composed of members from a variety of organizations and agencies, the committee had previously identified the most important issues facing the community as employment, drug abuse and opportunities/activities for young people.

At Saturday's session, members discussed primarily ways to convince people to participate in the activities that are available, with several saying events are held and only handfuls of people show up.

Elizabeth Horner of ADAPT Coalition said, "We have the opportunities; we just need to get the people there."

Others agreed, including Lydia Rose, a professor at Kent State University who said her class sponsored two community events and after distributing 1,000 fliers, about 80 people attended, about 15 of which were her students.

One problem discussed was the need for transportation to such events, with Rose saying, "Children need picked up to come. It's a real barrier for people showing up for things."

Makeesha West, NAACP unit president, said often if her organization holds an event, there is a perception it is only for minorities or that it is geared to specific issues, and said, "I feel all organizations face that (stereotyping). I hope with us coming together we can take our individual (events) and bring them altogether."

Horner agreed, saying people who hear that ADAPT (Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention Team) is sponsoring an event, it is for those with related problems.

"It's not a problem group, it's a prevention group. It's for everyone," she stressed.

Discussion also centered on ways to spread the word about events, with the Rev. Ernest Peachey of Second Baptist Church saying often groups depend on students to take home fliers and they don't always make it home.

Roxanne Burns, also a KSU professor, suggested starting a blog "so we can all know what we're doing."

Teacher Whitney Taylor-Washington said today's young people are much different than her generation, when "we weren't allowed to stay inside."

She said youngsters now stay inside, watching television, playing video games and accessing Facebook, whereas, "We'd get on the bus, come downtown and run around all day. We're creating a society that is complacent and we're shoving people back in the box. Our focus needs to be getting them out of that mindset."

West said a related problem is when someone does decide to go out, they travel 45 minutes away instead of getting involved in a local activity.

"How can we motivate people to be vested in our community? We're holding events and still not getting people out," West said.

Peachey said much rests on getting to the parents and involving them.

Horner said it is also imperative to make people realize most of these events are free to the public, due to many fearing a cost is involved and not being able to afford it in the current economy.

"They have to know it won't cost anything but an hour or two of their time," Horner emphasized.

Alonzo Spencer of Save Our County said the collaboration committee is still missing a vital link: political representation from City Hall or City Council, which he said "carries a lot of weight."

He said the group needs to encourage that aspect of the community to participate, and Danielle Dillon, county ESC, agreed, but said public officials would need to be made to see where they specifically fit in.

"Once we establish what we need to make a positive change, then we'd go to the policy makers," Dillon said.

Taking their message to other groups also was seen as a positive step, and Spencer already made arrangements to speak to the Community Resource Center board of directors.

It was agreed compiling a community calendar of such groups to arrange to be on their agendas was one step to be taken.

The possibility of sponsoring block parties throughout the area in the future met with favor from all members, and more immediately, Rose agreed to prepare a presentation for the upcoming Martin Luther King Day celebration which will include a signup sheet for those interested in various community activities.

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News Headline: Committee discusses citizen involvement (Rose, Burns) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - There are many opportunities in the area for young people and their parents. The problem is convincing them to take advantage of those opportunities.

This is the dilemma facing members of a Community Collaboration Committee recently formed as an outreach of the East Liverpool-Wellsville NAACP which held its second meeting Saturday morning at Carnegie Public Library.

Composed of members from a variety of organizations and agencies, the committee had previously identified the most important issues facing the community as employment, drug abuse and opportunities/activities for young people.

At Saturday's session, members discussed primarily ways to convince people to participate in the activities that are available, with several saying events are held and only handfuls of people show up.

Elizabeth Horner of ADAPT Coalition said, "We have the opportunities; we just need to get the people there."

Others agreed, including Lydia Rose, a professor at Kent State University who said her class sponsored two community events and after distributing 1,000 fliers, about 80 people attended, about 15 of which were her students.

One problem discussed was the need for transportation to such events, with Rose saying, "Children need picked up to come. It's a real barrier for people showing up for things."

Makeesha West, NAACP unit president, said often if her organization holds an event, there is a perception it is only for minorities or that it is geared to specific issues, and said, "I feel all organizations face that (stereotyping). I hope with us coming together we can take our individual (events) and bring them altogether."

Horner agreed, saying people who hear that ADAPT (Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention Team) is sponsoring an event, it is for those with related problems.

"It's not a problem group, it's a prevention group. It's for everyone," she stressed.

Discussion also centered on ways to spread the word about events, with the Rev. Ernest Peachey of Second Baptist Church saying often groups depend on students to take home fliers and they don't always make it home.

Roxanne Burns, also a KSU professor, suggested starting a blog "so we can all know what we're doing."

Teacher Whitney Taylor-Washington said today's young people are much different than her generation, when "we weren't allowed to stay inside."

She said youngsters now stay inside, watching television, playing video games and accessing Facebook, whereas, "We'd get on the bus, come downtown and run around all day. We're creating a society that is complacent and we're shoving people back in the box. Our focus needs to be getting them out of that mind set."

West said a related problem is when someone does decide to go out, they travel 45 minutes away instead of getting involved in a local activity.

"How can we motivate people to be vested in our community? We're holding events and still not getting people out," West said.

Peachey said much rests on getting to the parents and involving them.

Horner said it is also imperative to make people realize most of these events are free to the public, due to many fearing a cost is involved and not being able to afford it in the current economy.

"They have to know it won't cost anything but an hour or two of their time," Horner emphasized.

Alonzo Spencer of Save Our County said the collaboration committee is still missing a vital link: political representation from City Hall or City Council, which he said "carries a lot of weight."

He said the group needs to encourage that aspect of the community to participate, and Danielle Dillon, county ESC, agreed, but said public officials would need to be made to see where they specifically fit in.

"Once we establish what we need to make a positive change, then we'd go to the policy makers," Dillon said.

Taking their message to other groups also was seen as a positive step, and Spencer already made arrangements to speak to the Community Resource Center board of directors.

It was agreed compiling a community calendar of such groups to arrange to be on their agendas was one step to be taken.

The possibility of sponsoring block parties throughout the area in the future met with favor from all members, and more immediately, Rose agreed to prepare a presentation for the upcoming Martin Luther King Day celebration which will include a sign up sheet for those interested in various community activities.

The Review

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News Headline: Community encouraged to attend MLK celebration | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Members of the Community Collaboration Committee are encouraging the public to attend this year's celebration commemorating the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. set for 11 a.m. Jan. 16 at the Point of Light Center, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue in the East End.

The day's celebration will actually begin at 10:30 when participants will meet in the parking lot of Second Baptist Church for the annual march to the POL Center. The march is held regardless of weather conditions, and the public is invited to participate.

At the POL Center, a documentary, "Being Black in Middle America," will be shown, featuring interviews conducted by Kent State University Professor Patti Swartz and videotaped by Sherrill Shaw.

The interviews include those with current NAACP President Makeesha West; the late Richard Pack, a local businessman; and the late Jeannette Hicks, whose son Kevin Burks was killed in a racially-motivated murder during the 1980s. They will tell about their experience living in the East Liverpool and Wellsville area.

In the near future, these series of interviews will be included in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

West encouraged committee members to "invite the youth you're involved with, the people you work with, the churches you go to," saying the annual celebration of the civil rights activist's life and death is "the perfect event to show unity."

The committee is hoping this event will kick off a series of activities that will bring the community together.

In addition to the documentaries, the day's events will include a competition by area students in grades K-8 featuring illustrations based on the Coretta Scott King Award books, an award sponsored by the American Library Association for books by African-American writers and artists that demonstrate social responsibility.

Entries for the competition are due by Jan. 11 to Dr. Patti Swartz, Kent State University-East Liverpool, 400 E. Fourth St., East Liverpool, Ohio, 43920 and can be by individuals or classes.

Winners will be announced at the MLK celebration Jan. 16 with book store prizes awarded by the local campus of KSU.

More information on the illustration contest can be had by calling Swartz at 330-382-9574.

Additional information on the MLK celebration is available by calling 330-386-5803.

The Review

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News Headline: Students help to clean up greenhouse | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WARREN - Students and graduates of the Kent State University Salem's horticultural program have been helping clean up the Packard Park greenhouse.

Patricia Fuller, executive director of Friends of the Greenhouse Consortium, said the Kent State University Salem Campus offers a horticulture technology program with students who have completed the program or need internship credit hours.

Volunteers also offered their assistance while learning about the operation and maintenance of a greenhouse.

Fuller said the assistance was offered by Paul Pfeifer, who has also offered technical support and assistance for a garden that is being planned for this year to be placed next to the entrance of the greenhouse by Friends of the Greenhouse Consortium.

Fuller said the garden will feature herbs, grasses, perennials, and other plants and flowers. She said plans are to complete the garden by November.

Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com

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News Headline: WKSU News: Dressing for the Civil War (Hume) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: During the Civil War, women and children came second... in the fashion world. The government tried to standardize sizes for men's clothing to simplify military uniforms. But dresses and kids clothes were more free-form, and often more intricate. WKSU's Kabir Bhatia has on a new exhibit at the Kent State fashion museum that looks at the domestic wear of the 1860s.

(Click image for larger view.)

To mark the sesquicentennial of the start of the Civil War, Kent State and the Western Reserve Historical Society culled their collections to show what Ohioans might have worn around town 150 years ago. Most of the exhibit features clothing. But curator Sara Hume really enjoys showing accessories.

"It is a bracelet in which the band is made out of braided human hair. The clasp of it is a locket. It's both capturing the memory with the photograph as well as having someone's hair. It was a way of keeping a memento of someone. You would send someone a lock of hair; you'd take a lock of hair. It's my favorite part of the tour to take people here and show them the jewelry and then to tell them that it's hair. There's always a visceral reaction to that information."

Less creepy are the garments making up most of the exhibit. The military influence is hard to miss. Children's coats with high collars and top-to-bottom buttons look like mini versions of the coats worn by Union soldiers.But ladies' fashion is the centerpiece. Rows of dresses display eye-popping patterns and eye-catching waistlines.

"You have really bright colors because they just invented synthetic dyes. They just invented the blue dyes and the purple dyes. They go from these big, giant patterns to smaller, subtler ones by the end of the decade."

The end of the decade saw widespread access to sewing machines. Tailors began to manipulate fabric into pleats and bustles for ornamentation, along with stripes, diamonds and other patterns in the cloth itself.

The ornate hoop skirts and shawls highlight how tiny the dresses themselves are. Looking at the collection of wedding attire, Hume suggests some of the brides could not have been more than five feet tall.

"The waist on the smallest dress is about 19 inches, the corset we have is a 19 inch waist, so they're extremely small. These are wedding boots, so they were worn by a bride who probably wasn't more than 19 or 20."

Most 19- or 20-year-olds around the museum are studying business or fashion. Hume says the students are usually impressed by the same thing.

"One of the things that's so amazing about the dresses from this period is the craftsmanship of them. The detail of the dresses is just so amazing. The piping at the seams and the stitching and the way the strips line up. They're just so immaculately made. There's so much care in how they're put together. They were really just made better than clothing today. Clearly it wasn't thrown away because it's been 150 years and it's still here."

The exhibit runs through next August, and Hume says she plans to add a multimedia portal soon.

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News Headline: Kent State provost heads to New Mexico | Email

News Date: 01/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent - Kent State University Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Robert Frank will become the new president at the University of New Mexico.

Frank announced last July that he wanted to pursue opportunities to become a college president and would leave the university by May 2012. He has been provost since 2007.

KSU announced Wednesday that Frank had accepted the job and will assume his new position in June. He beat out four other candidates seeking to replace outgoing UNM President David Schmidly, who took over in 2007, according to the Albuquerque Journal.

Schmidly earns a $587,000 total package from UNM. Regents said the new president is likely to receive a smaller compensation package, the newspaper said.

Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: New UNM Boss Looks Forward to Challenge (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Albuquerque Journal - Online
Contact Name: James Monteleone
News OCR Text: The University of New Mexico can improve its graduation and retention rates by continuing to increase admission standards and reassessing the way remedial courses are taught at the state flagship university, incoming President Bob Frank said Thursday.

Frank, currently provost at Kent State University in Ohio, starts a five-year term as UNM president on June 1 after David Schmidly's contract expires. Frank, in an interview with the Journal, said the university is already doing many things right, but he hopes to find areas that can be improved to better serve students and begin to improve UNM's disappointing 45.1 percent six-year graduation rate and 74.1 percent freshmen retention rate.

“I think UNM should set a standard for itself over time for being a university that really tries to serve the highest, best prepared students in New Mexico, in time,” he said. “Right now, I think you have to go very slowly to address that. You really have to start at the lower end of where the skills deficiency is, which is basically math or reading skills.”

Frank pointed to a revised teaching model for basic math courses at Kent State that has helped students who struggle in math and often choose majors just to avoid the subject.

“It opens up some of the kind of (science, technology, engineering and math) areas that we want to see more kids major in, lets kids succeed in degrees like nursing, where we lost a lot of students because they can't do basic math very well,” he said.

UNM already is moving toward higher admission standards, increasing the number of high school courses required and minimum grade point averages. But the university has drawn criticism that as standards increase, access could be limited for some New Mexico students.

“Overall, at the end of the day, at the end of the time I'm president (hopefully) in 10 years, I would imagine that the admission to the university might be a little more competitive than they are today, and we would have all sorts of resources that would help kids compete to be ready for that,” Frank said.

“So we're not turning kids away, but were preparing them to be a student at UNM…”

Frank's contract will include the possibility of a bonus up to $25,000 per year for showing “measurable improvements” in student retention and graduation rates. UNM should strive toward improving its graduation rate to 60 percent, he said, but that will take time.

UNM also needs to continue to develop its relationships with Central New Mexico Community College and Albuquerque Public Schools to improve the pipeline students travel between high school and a bachelor's degree, he said. Frank praised the work Schmidly has done in improving UNM's relationship with the city's other schools.

But before anything can get done when Frank takes the helm at UNM, the first job is building trust with university faculty, some of whom insisted that Frank's perceived leadership style was not a good fit at UNM.

“Obviously the faculty are looking at this transition with a high level of scrutiny, and they want a president that they believe listens to them and understands their needs and is sensitive to what it takes to build a great university and to do their daily work. I think I understand that, I just need to convey to them that I understand that,” Frank said.

Frank on Wednesday was selected unanimously by regents to be UNM's 21st president. He is expected to receive a total compensation package up to $492,000 per year, at least $102,000 less than UNM pays Schmidly.

In a wide ranging interview with Journal reporters and editors Frank also addressed other areas of the university including:

♦ Athletics: “The president has to accept that accountability and live and die with it, so to speak. So I intend to do that. That means I'm going to look carefully at the athletic programs, the values, the integrity of the program. My first meeting with the athletic staff, I will talk to them about my belief that these are student athletes, not athlete students.”

♦ Research: “By building effective partnerships to these already best-of-practice enterprises that exist in New Mexico (like the national labs), we can advance the research enterprise here, I think quite successfully.”

♦ Fundraising: “I think UNM has a significant amount of potential in fundraising, and I think it's going to take some focus from the president, from the foundation, from the development officers and the deans, … So I think it's an area of opportunity. Some of that opportunity is not in New Mexico. New Mexico graduates are all over the place.”

♦ Vice Presidents: “You know, to be honest, I'm not sure the numbers are greater than some other universities, but it'll be part of my hundred-day agenda to really drill down and understand more about how many we have and what their responsibilities are.”

— This article appeared on page A1 of the Albuquerque Journal

-- Email the reporter at jmonteleone@abqjournal.com. Call the reporter at 505-823-3953

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News Headline: New UNM Boss Looks Forward to Challenge (Frank) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The University of New Mexico can improve its graduation and retention rates by continuing to increase admission standards and reassessing the way remedial courses are taught at the state flagship university, incoming President Bob Frank said Thursday.

Frank, currently provost at Kent State University in Ohio, starts a five-year term as UNM president on June 1 after David Schmidly's contract expires. Frank, in an interview with the Journal, said the university is already doing many things right, but he hopes to find areas that can be improved to better serve students and begin to improve UNM's disappointing 45.1 percent six-year graduation rate and 74.1 percent freshmen retention rate.

"I think UNM should set a standard for itself over time for being a university that really tries to serve the highest, best prepared students in New Mexico, in time," he said. "Right now, I think you have to go very slowly to address that. You really have to start at the lower end of where the skills deficiency is, which is basically math or reading skills."

Frank pointed to a revised teaching model for basic math courses at Kent State that has helped students who struggle in math and often choose majors just to avoid the subject.

"It opens up some of the kind of (science, technology, engineering and math) areas that we want to see more kids major in, lets kids succeed in degrees like nursing, where we lost a lot of students because they can't do basic math very well," he said.

UNM already is moving toward higher admission standards, increasing the number of high school courses required and minimum grade point averages. But the university has drawn criticism that as standards increase, access could be limited for some New Mexico students.

"Overall, at the end of the day, at the end of the time I'm president (hopefully) in 10 years, I would imagine that the admission to the university might be a little more competitive than they are today, and we would have all sorts of resources that would help kids compete to be ready for that," Frank said.

"So we're not turning kids away, but were preparing them to be a student at UNM..."

Frank's contract will include the possibility of a bonus up to $25,000 per year for showing "measurable improvements" in student retention and graduation rates. UNM should strive toward improving its graduation rate to 60 percent, he said, but that will take time.

UNM also needs to continue to develop its relationships with Central New Mexico Community College and Albuquerque Public Schools to improve the pipeline students travel between high school and a bachelor's degree, he said. Frank praised the work Schmidly has done in improving UNM's relationship with the city's other schools.

But before anything can get done when Frank takes the helm at UNM, the first job is building trust with university faculty, some of whom insisted that Frank's perceived leadership style was not a good fit at UNM.

"Obviously the faculty are looking at this transition with a high level of scrutiny, and they want a president that they believe listens to them and understands their needs and is sensitive to what it takes to build a great university and to do their daily work. I think I understand that, I just need to convey to them that I understand that," Frank said.

Frank on Wednesday was selected unanimously by regents to be UNM's 21st president. He is expected to receive a total compensation package up to $492,000 per year, at least $102,000 less than UNM pays Schmidly.

In a wide ranging interview with Journal reporters and editors Frank also addressed other areas of the university including:

Athletics: "The president has to accept that accountability and live and die with it, so to speak. So I intend to do that. That means I'm going to look carefully at the athletic programs, the values, the integrity of the program. My first meeting with the athletic staff, I will talk to them about my belief that these are student athletes, not athlete students."

Research: "By building effective partnerships to these already best-of-practice enterprises that exist in New Mexico (like the national labs), we can advance the research enterprise here, I think quite successfully."

Fundraising: "I think UNM has a significant amount of potential in fundraising, and I think it's going to take some focus from the president, from the foundation, from the development officers and the deans, ... So I think it's an area of opportunity. Some of that opportunity is not in New Mexico. New Mexico graduates are all over the place."

Vice Presidents: "You know, to be honest, I'm not sure the numbers are greater than some other universities, but it'll be part of my hundred day agenda to really drill down and understand more about how many we have and what their responsibilities are."

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News Headline: Bob Dyer: Grad student sues Kent State after getting the boot (Neumann) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The writing appears to have come straight from the pen of a third-grader.

“I David E. Moor has filed a complain,” it begins.

I has read it, so I know that's what it says.

Most of us would refer to his submission as a “complaint,” and a rather formal one at that: It is part of a legal action filed in the Summit County Court of Common Pleas.

Most of us also would manage to spell our names correctly. This person's last name is actually Moore.

So what's he all worked up about?

I hope you're sitting down.

This person is suing Kent State University because he flunked out of graduate school.

Seriously.

Moore, 56, claims in his civil suit the university did not “honer” a written agreement to straighten out his situation, which came about, he writes, because “my grades were not posted on time” and also because “my civil rights ... have been violated.”

So he wants the court to step in “and allow me to finish my degree. I'm asking for financial compensation pay for my education and montery [sic] award of money.”

When it comes to monetary awards, money is among the better ones.

The case has been assigned to Judge Thomas Teodosio, who is probably ruing the day he signed up for law school.

Moore is a former teacher and coach for Akron Public Schools. He received an undergraduate degree from Fairmont State University in West Virginia and spent 25 years in the teaching profession, including seven as boys basketball coach at Buchtel.

Known on the hardwood as Dave Moore, he was All-Ohio at Central-Hower and All-America at Fairmont State, where this fall he was inducted into the university's hall of fame. Moore was good enough to get a tryout with the Philadelphia 76ers and ended up playing five years of pro ball in Europe.

Sounds like the kind of guy who knows that some people win and some people lose, and that winning and losing is based on how well they perform.

“I feel that there were some teachers that — maybe I rubbed them wrong way, because I'm an educator myself — but for whatever reason, they were giving me incompletes and to a point where I wouldn't even get a grade,” he says when asked about the suit.

But if you are given an “incomplete,” you're not going to get a grade, right?

“Well, yes, but I've done the work and they won't post the grade. ...

“I'll give you an example. There was a class called ‘event planning.' It's a graduate, two-hour class. Come on! How can you give me an incomplete in event planning? We didn't hardly do anything. And I did everything that was asked of me.”

Moore says he talked to six lawyers, all of whom declined to take his case. Some of them cited a conflict of interest, he says, but he suspects the real reason is they're afraid to take on the university.

When told his court papers don't read as if they were written by a retired educator — he didn't even spell his own name correctly — he laughs.

“Well, my son said that. He said, ‘Let me type this up.' I said, ‘No, no. I just want to get this over with.”

Moore is in a hurry because he is worried about the fact that courses don't count toward a degree if too much time elapses between the first and last of them. He says he was enrolled in the KSU grad program for four years, last attending two years ago.

So what does this have to do with civil rights?

“I just don't feel like I've been treated like everybody else,” he responds.

You honestly think they flunked you out because you're black?

“I don't know if I want to go that far,” he says. “But maybe because I am an older student. I'm not going to say because I'm black. I personally don't believe that. But maybe my age, I think.

“I don't know. I'm a pretty go-getcha guy. Maybe I was intimidating. Anybody who knows me knows I'm pretty intense.”

But not intense enough in the classroom, apparently.

KSU spokesman Thomas Neumann says he is unable to comment beyond confirming Moore was indeed a student there but isn't now and did not graduate.

According to his suit, Moore was enrolled in “the Department of Education and the Sports Studys [sic] department.”

Say this about the American justice system: Everyone has access. They might not get very far, but anyone can get a foot in the door — even those who seem to be wearing their shoes on the wrong feet.

What this says about the American educational system should go without saying.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Portage 'numbers' impressive | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When I read through the Crain's Cleveland
Business annual book of lists last week, I was
not surprised that Kent State University and
Robinson Memorial Hospital appeared as two
of the largest employers in the Greater Cleveland
area. Kent State, with 5,040 employees, is
ranked the 16th largest employer and Robinson
Memorial, with 999 full-time equivalent employees,
is ranked 83rd.
Most on the lists had Cleveland and Akron addresses,
but I was pleased at how many Portage
County businesses and organizations appeared.
The government of Portage County, for instance,
with its 989 employees, is ranked the 84th largest
employer in the greater Cleveland area. Like
Robinson Memorial Hospital, the government of
Portage County is a major economic driver for its
host city, Ravenna.
Portage County has two home-based companies
on the list of largest privately held companies
in the Greater Cleveland area in terms of
sales. The Carter Lumber Co., headquartered on
Tallmadge Road in Brimfield, is ranked 8th with
sales of $652 million reported for 2010. The Davey
Tree Expert Co. of Kent, reporting $592 million in
sales, is ranked the 9th largest privately held company
in the Greater Cleveland area.
The ranking of banks in terms of deposits was
interesting, too. Portage Community Bank makes
the list, coming in at 18th in size with reported
deposits of $223 million. A dozen or so years ago,
this bank didn't even exist except as a gleam in
the eye of one of its founders, Rick Coe, its president
and CEO. Rick cherry-picked the staffs of
some much larger regional banks to create this
growing business with offices in Ravenna and
Kent. Hometown Bank, formerly known as Home
Savings Bank, makes the list of the largest savings
institutions in greater Cleveland with deposits
reported at $125 million. Led by its president,
Howard Boyle, it comes in 13th on its list. Its attractive
offices in Kent, Ravenna and Brimfield
have a comfortable historical flavor.
The big regional banks, Huntington, PNC, First
Merit, Chase and others with offices in Portage
County not surprisingly are the largest banks in
Greater Cleveland. Huntington also ranks at the
top in terms of small business loans in Greater
Cleveland. A big regional, Huntington nevertheless
does a good job of making you feel it's a
friendly community bank. Headquartered in Akron,
First Merit is noteworthy for its support of local
Portage County activities such as the Ravenna
Balloon A-Fair.
Schlabig & Associates, Akron-based, but with a
substantial Portage County operation, is ranked
32nd among Cleveland accounting firms in terms
of CPAs.
Hattie Larlham, which apparently has moved
its headquarters to Twinsburg, but whose main
operation remains in Shalersville, comes in at 18th
on the list of largest nonprofits in Greater Cleveland.
Its budgetary expenses are reported at nearly
$32 million annually. Coleman Professional Services,
based in Kent, is ranked 34th on the list of
top 100 nonprofits in Greater Cleveland with reported
expenses of $18.2 million.
In terms of enrollment at the largest colleges
and universities in Greater Cleveland, Kent State
is tops with an enrollment of 30,520 full-time equivalent
students. Hiram College is 21st on the list
with 1,334 full-time equivalent students, the college
having shown substantial growth under its
president, Tom Chema. Northeast Ohio Medical
University is 25th on the list, reporting an enrollment
of full-time equivalent students of 778.
NEOMED continues to grow as new fields of study
such as pharmacy are added to the curriculum.
A big surprise for me was the list of largest shopping
centers when ranked in terms of square footage
devoted to retailing. The Cascades of Brimfield,
with 650,000 square feet of retailing space,
comes in as the 19th largest shopping center in
Greater Cleveland topping its neighbor to the
west, Chapel Hill, if Howe Road is not counted.
Although not in Portage County, the Stow Community
Center, which hosts Kohl's and Target, is
ranked 35th on the list with 472,500 square feet
devoted to retailing.
Interstate Commerce Park and Frost Road
Commerce Park, both in Streetsboro, rank 4th
and 13th on the list of Greater Cleveland's largest
industrial parks.

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News Headline: PORTAGE PATHWAYS: Fire station was a matter of debate in new city of Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When the new city of Kent came into existence 90 years ago, one of its first orders of business was fire protection for a growing community.

Mayor Wesley O. Hollister had been swept into office in a Democratic landslide -- voters "literally wiped up the earth with the Republicans," the Kent Tribune commented after the 1921 election -- and he and his party had pledged to tackle the challenges of the new city with a new spirit.

Kent had achieved city status a full decade after it had expected it, and not until after its rival, Ravenna, had become Portage County's first city after passing the 5,000-resident mark in 1910.

Kent fell short of city status in 1910 by about 500 residents -- some blamed the aftermath of the Seneca Chain Co. fire for that -- but the opening of Kent State Normal School more than made up for that in the following decade. The 1920 Census showed Kent with 7,070 residents, assuring city status following the 1921 election.

Mayor Hollister took office on Jan. 1, 1922, along with the first Kent City Council, whose seven members included only one Republican, R.P. Nichols. Four of the new Democratic members, Edward O'Bierne, F.L. Boosinger, John McMullen and Charles Horning, were first-time officeholders.

The new city government also included George Snethkamp as the first police chief, replacing the village marshal. Alf Ravenscroft, a blacksmith at the Erie Railroad car shops and a former eight-year council member, was the first city safety director.

The first mayor of the city of Kent earned $400 per year, but the highest-paid elected member of city government was W.W. Reed, who served as city auditor and City Council clerk. He earned $500. Council President Fred Bechtle earned $50 per year, and council members were paid $2 per meeting, with a $60 annual cap.

The new mayor and City Council had a special election to contend with a little more than a week after taking office. The outgoing council had placed a $60,000 bond issue before voters at a special election on Jan. 10, 1922.

The bond issue would finance the construction of a city fire station, but more importantly in the eyes of many, also covered the cost of acquiring new fire equipment. Kent had seen a boom in residential construction during the decade since the opening of Kent State and the new city's downtown area, with a few exceptions, consisted of a number of ramshackle frame buildings.

"A big fire in Kent would mean a tremendous loss of property and possibly of life because we are unprepared to fight it," the Kent Courier observed.

Both the Courier and its competitor, the Tribune, shied away from a strong endorsement of the bond issue, however, because of unanswered questions about it.

The wording of the ballot issue didn't require the entire $60,000 to be spent, which led some to question the request (as well as its size, because $60,000 in today's dollars amounted to roughly $773,000).

Others believed that improving Kent's water supply was a more important priority.

"Many would like to know just what is to be done in the matter of securing more water before voting for more equipment," the Tribune observed. "Kent needs better fire protection, and it is unfortunate that something definite has not been presented to show the voters just what is to be done if the issue carries."

The bond issue passed. Just barely.

The final tally was 533 to 229, a sound plurality, but because the bond required a two-thirds affirmative vote, the total was only 25 more than what was required for passage.

The question of a water supply was resolved in April 1922, when the voters of the new city approved a $200,000 bond issue to purchase the waterworks at Plum Creek.

The new fire station was erected on South Water Street at Day Street on a site known as Belgian Hill that was acquired from the Kent City Board of Education, which had planned to build a new high school there but found the location unsuitable for it.

The fire station, the first structure erected by the city of Kent, also doubled as a City Hall. Council met in Firemen's Hall, which was located on the second floor; fire trucks were housed on the lower level.

Ninety years after Kent became a city, the building at 319 S. Water St. that was erected as a result of the 1922 bond issue still stands. Remodeled and renovated over the years, it is now the home of the Kent Police Department.

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