Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
Accounting; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Aeronautics (1)
Athletics (2)
Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Human Resources (1)
Finance and Administration (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Office of the Provost (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Accounting; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Students invited to accountants' session 01/09/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...any college student, with an interest in accounting are invited to attend at no cost as guests of the chapter. It will begin at 6 p.m. on Jan. 17 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia in Room 113 of the Science and Technology Building. The event opens with a social half-hour...


Aeronautics (1)
Hartzell Propeller Introduces New Scimitar Top Prop For Piper Seminole 01/10/2012 Aero-News Network Text Attachment Email

2-blade Conversion Developed In Cooperation With Kent State University Aeronautics Program The FAA has granted an STC to Hartzell Propeller for a 2-bladed propeller conversion kit for all normally...


Athletics (2)
Kent State University alumnus withdraws $1 million gift (Vatter) 01/10/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Alumnus withdraws $1 million gift to KSU (Vincent, Nielsen, Geis" 01/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Digital Sciences (School of) (1)
Kent aims for versatile tech specialists (Walker, Wearden) 01/10/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Human Resources (1)
Hispanic-Jobs.com Recognizes Top Employers and Advertisers in 2011 01/09/2012 Columbus Dispatch - Online (press release) Text Attachment Email

...Eastern Michigan University Advanced Behavioral Health Eastern Illinois University General Electric Hartford Foundation for Public Giving Kent State University NARAL Pro-Choice America Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) Chicago San Mateo County Transit District UT System...


Finance and Administration (1)
At the University of Akron, development continues despite debt 01/10/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Committee discusses citizen involvement (Rose, Burns) 01/10/2012 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Horner of ADAPT Coalition said, "We have the opportunities; we just need to get the people there." Others agreed, including Lydia Rose, a professor at Kent State University who said her class sponsored two community events and after distributing 1,000 fliers, about 80 people attended, about 15 of...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Beatles tribute in New Phila 01/09/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Rain, a Beatles tribute act that recently enjoyed a successful run on Broadway, will appear in concert Jan. 19 at 7 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus in New Philadelphia. With costume changes and multimedia elements, the band recreates all eras of the Beatles...


Office of the Provost (1)
A Frank choice to lead UNM 01/10/2012 Santa Fe New Mexican Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Students invited to accountants' session | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The January 2012 technical meeting of the Ohio Mid-Eastern Chapter of the Institute of Management Accountants will be the group's annual student night. Juniors and seniors in area high schools, as well as any college student, with an interest in accounting are invited to attend at no cost as guests of the chapter.

It will begin at 6 p.m. on Jan. 17 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia in Room 113 of the Science and Technology Building. The event opens with a social half-hour with refreshments provided. That will be followed by a presentation by Dr. Linda Zucca, accounting department chairwoman in the College of Business at Kent State University in Kent. Zucca will provide information on degree requirements and career opportunities in accounting.

For reservations, members and guests should contact Bill Welch at 330-364-1454 or e-mail at wlwelch@kent.edu or by e-mailing Polli Truman at ptruman@ohiocpa.net by Thursday.

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News Headline: Hartzell Propeller Introduces New Scimitar Top Prop For Piper Seminole | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aero-News Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2-blade Conversion Developed In Cooperation With Kent State University Aeronautics Program

The FAA has granted an STC to Hartzell Propeller for a 2-bladed propeller conversion kit for all normally aspirated PA-44-180 Piper Seminoles. The conversion kit provides Piper Seminoles with improved performance, appearance, and decreased noise signatures.

The new Hartzell Top Prop kit features 74” diameter 2-blade aluminum compact hubs with “blended” airfoil Scimitar-shaped aluminum alloy blades that offer an improved take-off and climb performance (+80 fpm at 2500msl). The swept-tip Scimitar blades result in reduced noise of .9 dB(a); 84.2 dB(a) measured per Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 36 Appendix G as well as the ICAO Annex 16, Chapter 10 noise standards. Performance margins are improved, with a 50 fpm increase in single engine climb as well as a 60 fpm increase in balked landing climb with the gear and flaps down.

Hartzell developed the new Top Prop STC in cooperation with the Kent State University Aeronautics Program. Kent State, of Kent, Ohio, currently operates 24 aircraft in its training fleet. For multi-engine training, they use Piper Seminoles recently re-equipped with new Hartzell Scimitars. “Top Prop conversions are one of the easiest and most economical methods for improving the value and utility of their aircraft,” says Top Prop program manager Mike Trudeau. “We are particularly honored to have cooperated with Kent State in this development program, since they provided real-world input and feedback from their flight training operations, throughout the process.

“With more than 18,000 conversion kits sold for more than 70 different Beechcraft, Cessna, Commander, Diamond, Mooney, Piper, and SOCATA kits currently available, the Top Prop family the largest and most complete propeller conversion offerings in the world.”

Available directly from Hartzell or through Hartzell's Top Prop dealers, the 2012 list price for these kits, which include new highly polished aluminum spinners, is $22,600. The new propeller carries the exclusive Hartzell Plus3 warranty, which delivers a full three years or 1000 hours of coverage, and have a six-year/2400 hour TBO.

FMI: www.hartzellprop.com

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News Headline: Kent State University alumnus withdraws $1 million gift (Vatter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- A $1 million gift to Kent State University's basketball and golf programs, which was to result in naming the basketball court for donor Jason Cope, was withdrawn after the student newspaper began questioning Cope's activities as a broker 12 years ago.

At the time, Cope denied fraud allegations by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. But he and other defendants were ordered by a court to pay millions in penalties.

Kent State's M.A.C. Center basketball court was to have been named in recognition of the gift by Cope and his wife, Stacie, of Gates Mills. The unveiling of a "Cope Court" logo on each sideline was planned for Saturday night at a men's game.

But last Friday the university, which had been aware of the investigation of Cope by the SEC, released a two-paragraph statement saying it had canceled the court naming.

"Due to unforeseen changes, Jason Cope has found it necessary at this time to withdraw his gift to the athletic department," the statement said. "The university understands this decision and appreciates the Copes thinking enough of Kent State to consider their generous donation. We look forward to an opportunity in the future to engage them in the life of Kent State."

The statement was released as a Daily Kent Stater reporter, who had worked on a story on Cope's past for two weeks, was writing it, said editor Taylor Rogers. The story, scheduled for publication on Monday, was posted online Friday. Rogers said she couldn't say whether Cope's decision was tied to the story or not. The reporter was unable to reach him for a comment.

The Plain Dealer also could not reach Cope for comment on Monday and university officials declined to talk about why the donation was withdrawn.

Cope graduated from Kent State with a finance degree in 1995. In a short profile in the Kent State University Foundation 2011 Annual Report, Cope said he reconnected with the university after a chance encounter with the girlfriend of an assistant basketball coach. His gift was to be used to fund emerging program needs.

He hoped his gift would inspire other alumni to return.

"I always ask them, 'Why not come back?' " Cope said. "It's great to be a part of it all again."

Athletic Director Joel Nielsen knew about Cope's issues with the SEC when the school accepted the gift, Todd Vatter, a spokesman for the athletic department, said Monday. He said Nielsen would not comment beyond the university statement.

Cope is a member of the National Athletic Development Council at Kent State, which supports the athletic department. In November, he spoke at the university's Founders Gala which honored donors.

Cope, a principal in the Copeland Group LLC, owns several golf courses. He is also a venture capital and private equity consultant, according to his LinkedIn profile.

According to a broker report by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Cope worked for two firms in New York City from 1995 to 1999, then became a branch manager in Pittsburgh for AC Financial Inc.

Over a period of several months he and his sales team convinced 190 people to invest a total of $8.7 million for shares in initial public stock offerings for companies that AC Financial actually had no access to, according to documents.

An investigation by the SEC led to a U.S. District Court order requiring Cope and three other defendants to pay more than $19 million in penalties, according to documents. It is not known how much of that amount Cope was to pay.

Cope denied the allegations, saying he was unaware of the scheme, according to the broker report. But the court ruled Cope either knew of it or the fraud was so obvious that he was reckless in failing to uncover it.

Cope was suspended by the National Association of Securities Dealers Inc. in November, 2002. The Copeland Group LLC was established in 2005.

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News Headline: Alumnus withdraws $1 million gift to KSU (Vincent, Nielsen, Geis" | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State alumnus fined by the Securities and Exchange Commission for defrauding investors has withdrawn a $1 million gift to the university.

The university said in a statement that "unforeseen changes" had prompted Jason M. Cope and his wife, Stacie, of Gates Mills, to rescind their gift to the basketball and golf programs.

"The university understands this decision and appreciates the Copes thinking enough of Kent State to consider their generous donation," the statement read. "We look forward to an opportunity in the future to engage them in the life of Kent State."

Cope could not be reached for comment at his golf course, Copeland Hills in Columbiana. He does not have a published home phone number.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the university would not comment beyond the four-sentence statement. Cope was the branch manager in Pittsburgh of a financial firm that, according to the SEC, defrauded 190 investors of $8.7 million in 1999 and 2000.

The KSU business graduate was one of four defendants required to pay more than $19 million in penalties for collecting money from investors who believed they were purchasing highly publicized initial public stock offerings.

"Instead, the defendants stole the investors' money and, to create the illusion of legitimate stock purchases, gave the investors phony trade confirmations and account statements," according the the SEC.

In 2005, Cope started his own company, the Copeland Group LLC, which, according to the university is made up of several golf courses in Ohio.

In December, KSU trustees accepted the $1 million gift from the 1995 finance graduate and his wife.

The athletic department originally praised the Copes for the gift. On Dec. 14, it announced that the basketball court in the M.A.C. Center would be renamed Cope Court in the couple's honor Saturday, when the men's team hosts Bowling Green. The renaming has been canceled.

In a news release, Joel Nielsen, the KSU athletic director, said the Copes "heeded our call for providing a significant gift and becoming 'difference makers' within our donor group."

According to the press release, Jason cope had been a roommate of the university's associate head golf coach, Rob Wakeling.

Cope also is a member of the KSU National Athletic Development Council and was one of the featured speakers at the Kent State Founders Gala in November, which honors individuals who give at least $100,000 and corporations that give at least $250,000 in one year.

The Copes are "dear friends" and their gift "is a real game-changer for our department," Matthew R. Geis, KSU executive director of athletic advancement, said is a previous release.

On Wednesday, KSU journalism graduate student Doug Brown, of Ann Arbor, Mich., began asking Nielsen questions about the Copes and their gift. Brown writes for the student newspaper, The Daily Kent Stater.

Brown said Nielsen initially defended KSU's acceptance of the gift because Cope's problem with the SEC "was 12 years ago, and it was fully litigated and he [Cope] abided by the letter of the litigation."

Two days later, the university announced that the gift had been pulled.

Vincent, the KSU spokeswoman, said she was unable to find out how this gift compares in size to others that sports at the university have received.

By Carol Biliczky

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News Headline: Kent aims for versatile tech specialists (Walker, Wearden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Digital sciences school combines disciplines

Kent State University is looking to mold an army of digital super employees with the creation of a new academic unit that's a mashup of offerings from various disciplines.

Dubbed the School of Digital Sciences, the academic unit that launched last fall combines courses from computer science, visual communication design, journalism and communications to give students a broad understanding of the digital sciences.

Exactly what “digital sciences” means still is a bit amorphous, but Robert Walker, the school's director, said the idea is to teach students how a variety of cultures, ethnic groups and business organizations use technology differently and how they can solve problems in those settings.

“(Students) need to be exposed to different types of people and be exposed to how they think,” said Dr. Walker, also a professor of computer science. “Putting them in a bubble and not letting them talk to people who don't look or think like them isn't going to be very useful.”

Dr. Walker said a central piece of the program is its bachelor's and master's degrees in enterprise architecture — a business concept that focuses on how to use information technology to enhance collaboration and efficiency throughout an organization.

Dr. Walker maintains Kent State is the first school in the country to offer such degrees, noting the master's degree would be of particular value to computer science graduates looking to apply more appropriately their technical and critical thinking skills in the business world.

Also, because the new digital sciences school is made up of the university's existing resources, Kent State hasn't had to invest in hiring faculty to get the program off the ground.

“The thing that's amazing about this from an academic perspective is that we've torn down a lot of silos to make this happen,” said Dr. Stanley Wearden, dean of Kent State's College of Communication and Information. “It's great to see how faculty can work together and students can draw on all these disciplines.”

By TIMOTHY MAGAW

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News Headline: Hispanic-Jobs.com Recognizes Top Employers and Advertisers in 2011 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online (press release)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bilingual job search site, Hispanic-Jobs.com named the top employers and advertisers in 2011 who contributed to posting their job openings and ads on the site.

"We want to recognize those companies and agencies who have demonstrated their commitment to reaching out to bilingual and diversity candidates and posting volume job opportunities in front of our audience," says Simone Emmons, founder of the company. Emmons is a former Human Resources professional and founded the site in 2004 in order to cater to what she saw as the growing demand for bilingual Spanish speaking workers.

As the U.S. Hispanic population continues to grow, employers are increasingly looking for skilled bilingual workers to fill job vacancies. Spanish has become the nation's second most widely spoken language and companies have responded through initiatives to recruit more Hispanic employees. Hispanic-Jobs.com allows employers to reach jobseekers online who are fluent in both Spanish and English.

The following companies are being recognized for their volume job postings in 2011:

Wellpoint

Blue Cross Blue Shield of California

Citi

Rio Hondo Community College

Eastern Michigan University

Advanced Behavioral Health

Eastern Illinois University

General Electric

Hartford Foundation for Public Giving

Kent State University

NARAL Pro-Choice America

Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) Chicago

San Mateo County Transit District

UT System - Texas

Walt Disney Parks and Resorts

Polk County Board of County Commissioners

Suny Orange/Orange County Community College

TMP Worldwide

Bayard Advertising

JobElephant.com

Stride Advertising

About Hispanic-Jobs.com

Since 2004, Hispanic-Jobs.com has been providing online recruiting for companies looking to hire bilingual, Spanish speaking workers. Founded by a former Human Resource executive with over 18 years of experience, Hispanic-Jobs.com is the premiere career site to find thousands of bilingual professionals located in the U.S. ranging from entry level to executive level. The website helps job seekers and employers conveniently apply to jobs and post opportunities online. In addition to helping employers and jobseekers, the website also allows advertisers to create targeted ads for the growing Hispanic market. Hispanic-Jobs.com is owned by Diversity Advertising, Inc., a 100% woman owned business.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/1/prweb9091260.htm

PRWeb.com

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News Headline: At the University of Akron, development continues despite debt | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In lieu of borrowing, University of Akron hopes to expand recent spate of public-private deals to continue on-campus momentum

The University of Akron isn't going to let a steep pile of debt stop the school from continuing to develop its campus and the blighted areas surrounding it, as it plans to use other people's money to make capital investments happen.

The university has dabbled in the public-private partnership arena in the past to finance capital projects, but administrators expect the number of such deals to ramp up in coming years given the school's lofty debt load — about $425 million — and its desire to continue to build to accommodate further enrollment growth.

“We don't want to lose that momentum, and we have others trying to catch us because they see our formula is working,” said Ted Curtis, the university's vice president for capital planning and facilities. “There's a point in borrowing where we still have the demand, but you run out of funds, so now we're leaning heavily toward public-private partnerships.”

Until now, public-private partnerships involving the university had been reserved for student housing. The university, for example, in 2004 developed a $22 million residential complex with Signet Enterprises, an Akron-based developer. Likewise, Signet is building a $35 million, 520-bed residence hall on 1.2 acres of University of Akron property on Grant Street.

This time, however, the university is courting developers to create new academic buildings because several of the school's current teaching facilities are nearing the end of their useful lives — a problem facing many of the region's colleges and universities. Mr. Curtis said such buildings would be financed and constructed by outside developers on University of Akron property and leased back to the school over 20 or 30 years.

Though he couldn't provide details about the prospective partnerships, Mr. Curtis said such arrangements are the best way to continue muscling up the urban campus to attract students without risking the university's fiscal health.

When Mr. Curtis arrived in 1998, enrollment at the University of Akron hovered around 21,000. Last fall, enrollment was 29,699 — an increase he attributes to the campus's dramatic facelift over the last decade.

“What I like to say is that we've developed a new architectural welcome mat,” Mr. Curtis said about the school's capital investments.

A decade of debt

Under the watch of president Luis Proenza, the University of Akron has added 21 new buildings, undertaken 18 major additions or renovations and created 34 acres of green space — all at a staggering cost of $626 million.

While those lofty investments have transformed the campus, they've also placed the university among the most debt-laden in the state, according to the most recent figures available from the Ohio Board of Regents.

The university's debt load is the main driver in the school's pursuit of creative arrangements with developers to continue the campus overhaul because, as Dr. Proenza put it, there's still plenty to be done.

“I don't see a point where we'll stand still,” he said, “but how fast we'll develop (new buildings) depends on the rate of growth for the university.”

The school's plan to revamp some of its academic buildings via lease arrangements with private developers is a far cry from that of its main rival, Kent State University, which looked to finance the overhaul of a number of its academic buildings through a $210 million bond sale that would be repaid by a slew of student fees. That bond sale, which has been stonewalled by state lawmakers who are concerned about rising college costs for students, would have added significantly to Kent State's debt load, which sits at about $326 million.

Though the University of Akron is shying away from the bond market for now, it's still keeping a watchful eye on its debt obligations. So is Moody's Investors Service, which has cautioned the University of Akron in recent years about its mounting debt. Last spring, the credit rating agency noted that the chances of a rating upgrade were unlikely in the near term and that more borrowing could push the university's rating downward.

The old double-edged sword

While Fitch Ratings assigned the University of Akron a stable outlook, the school is the only public university rated by Moody's that carries a negative outlook. The University of Cincinnati and Ohio State University, the two universities carrying more debt than the University of Akron, both are assigned stable outlooks.

Also, the Ohio Board of Regents, which assigns a score determining the fiscal health of each public higher education institution, assigned the university one of the lowest scores among four-year colleges and universities — a 3.3 out of 5 for fiscal 2010. That score ties the school with the University of Cincinnati and makes Central State University in Wilberforce as the only institution worse off than Akron.

State officials still are hammering out the final numbers for fiscal 2011, which ended June 30, but University of Akron officials expect their fiscal health score to rise modestly to 3.6.

“We are on the high end relative to other universities in Ohio” in terms of how much debt the school carries, said David Cummins, the University of Akron vice president for finance and administration and chief financial officer. “You have to be careful. It's a double-edged sword. You can use debt in a way to significantly transform the campus, but you have to manage it well.”

By TIMOTHY MAGAW

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News Headline: Committee discusses citizen involvement (Rose, Burns) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Committee discusses citizen involvement

Salem News

EAST LIVERPOOL - There are many opportunities in the area for young people and their parents. The problem is convincing them to take advantage of those opportunities.

This is the dilemma facing members of a Community Collaboration Committee recently formed as an outreach of the East Liverpool-Wellsville NAACP which held its second meeting Saturday morning at Carnegie Public Library.

Composed of members from a variety of organizations and agencies, the committee had previously identified the most important issues facing the community as employment, drug abuse and opportunities/activities for young people.

At Saturday's session, members discussed primarily ways to convince people to participate in the activities that are available, with several saying events are held and only handfuls of people show up.

Elizabeth Horner of ADAPT Coalition said, "We have the opportunities; we just need to get the people there."

Others agreed, including Lydia Rose, a professor at Kent State University who said her class sponsored two community events and after distributing 1,000 fliers, about 80 people attended, about 15 of which were her students.

One problem discussed was the need for transportation to such events, with Rose saying, "Children need picked up to come. It's a real barrier for people showing up for things."

Makeesha West, NAACP unit president, said often if her organization holds an event, there is a perception it is only for minorities or that it is geared to specific issues, and said, "I feel all organizations face that (stereotyping). I hope with us coming together we can take our individual (events) and bring them altogether."

Horner agreed, saying people who hear that ADAPT (Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention Team) is sponsoring an event, it is for those with related problems.

"It's not a problem group, it's a prevention group. It's for everyone," she stressed.

Discussion also centered on ways to spread the word about events, with the Rev. Ernest Peachey of Second Baptist Church saying often groups depend on students to take home fliers and they don't always make it home.

Roxanne Burns, also a KSU professor, suggested starting a blog "so we can all know what we're doing."

Teacher Whitney Taylor-Washington said today's young people are much different than her generation, when "we weren't allowed to stay inside."

She said youngsters now stay inside, watching television, playing video games and accessing Facebook, whereas, "We'd get on the bus, come downtown and run around all day. We're creating a society that is complacent and we're shoving people back in the box. Our focus needs to be getting them out of that mind set."

West said a related problem is when someone does decide to go out, they travel 45 minutes away instead of getting involved in a local activity.

"How can we motivate people to be vested in our community? We're holding events and still not getting people out," West said.

Peachey said much rests on getting to the parents and involving them.

Horner said it is also imperative to make people realize most of these events are free to the public, due to many fearing a cost is involved and not being able to afford it in the current economy.

"They have to know it won't cost anything but an hour or two of their time," Horner emphasized.

Alonzo Spencer of Save Our County said the collaboration committee is still missing a vital link: political representation from City Hall or City Council, which he said "carries a lot of weight."

He said the group needs to encourage that aspect of the community to participate, and Danielle Dillon, county ESC, agreed, but said public officials would need to be made to see where they specifically fit in.

"Once we establish what we need to make a positive change, then we'd go to the policy makers," Dillon said.

Taking their message to other groups also was seen as a positive step, and Spencer already made arrangements to speak to the Community Resource Center board of directors.

It was agreed compiling a community calendar of such groups to arrange to be on their agendas was one step to be taken.

The possibility of sponsoring block parties throughout the area in the future met with favor from all members, and more immediately, Rose agreed to prepare a presentation for the upcoming Martin Luther King Day celebration which will include a sign up sheet for those interested in various community activities.

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News Headline: Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Beatles tribute in New Phila | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: More in: AP Top 25 site

Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Beatles tribute in New Phila

By Dan Kane

CantonRep.com staff writer

Posted Jan 09, 2012 @ 06:30 AM

Rain, a Beatles tribute act that recently enjoyed a successful run on Broadway, will appear in concert Jan. 19 at 7 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus in New Philadelphia. With costume changes and multimedia elements, the band recreates all eras of the Beatles career, with songs ranging from "A Hard Day's Night" to "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" to "Come Together" and "Let It Be." Tickets, $40 to $66, may be ordered at 330-308-6400 and www.tusc.kent.edu/pac .

Look here daily for CantonRep.com Entertainment Writer Dan Kane's best picks for things to do this week.

Discover more things to do at CalendarofOhio.com .

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News Headline: A Frank choice to lead UNM | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Santa Fe New Mexican
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 21st president of The University of New Mexico won't have to be taught how to navigate the school's signature "woof, woof, woof" cheer. After all, Robert G. Frank holds three degrees from UNM and hails from Las Cruces, although he's the only member of his family to be a Lobo rather than an Aggie.

His knowledge of the university and the state helped give Frank a leg up on the other presidential finalists, but just as essential is Frank's understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing the university.

Key among those are improving a dismal freshmen retention rate (74 percent, the lowest in 10 years), moving to make faculty salaries nationally competitive and retaining the best and the brightest high school students, all while managing for excellence in lean times. He starts with another advantage — no one has to sell Frank on the value of a UNM education. It is as a Lobo that he made his way in academia, rising to top spots at the University of Florida and Kent State University, most recently as provost there. At Kent State, Frank helped improve freshmen retention by some 5 percent; he also helped increase the number of international students, from 450 to 1,800 — a savvy way to bring in more tuition dollars in this dismal economic climate.

In Frank, UNM has found someone who can hit the ground running with his New Mexico roots and outside-the-state experience. Wisely, Frank came in asking for a lower salary than his predecessor, David Schmidly, and will be satisfied to live in university housing rather than receiving extra dollars for a home away from campus. The tens of thousands of dollars saved in the president's pay will be directed to academics, a necessary re-ordering of priorities.

Perhaps that gesture, and Frank's determination to spend the first months as president listening — to students, staff, community members and faculty — will assuage those members of the faculty who had opposed Frank's appointment. Regents took those concerns into consideration, but in the end, believed Frank to be the right man for this important job. It is hard to argue with Frank's combination of experience, intelligence and belief in his alma mater. While we were skeptical that a president disliked by the faculty should be the choice, it is clear that opposition to Frank was hardly widespread and that he will work hard to improve the administrative-academic relationship. He is fortunate, too, that many of the larger problems UNM had faced — an embarrassing football coach among them — have been dealt with, leaving the new president a fresh slate.

Consider the challenges that still remain. UNM is the go-to university for many students unprepared for college work, while too many of the state's top scholars leave to go out-of-state. Frank has to figure out how to admit better-prepared students without ruffling feathers because some might be turned away, while wooing more top minds to stay home. The state's higher-education budget is flat, with the new funding formula being proposed by Gov. Susana Martinez one that could leave UNM financially strapped. Then there's the perception that administration is top-heavy and spends too much; Frank plans to study UNM's structure even before taking office on June 1 and make changes if necessary once on the job. On top of that, there is the complexity that comes with running the UNM Health Sciences Center — one reason Frank got the job had to do with his experience in health. He's a clinical psychologist and has served as dean of the College of Public Health and Health Professions at the University of Florida.

Now, those disparate experiences — from his early days in Las Cruces to college at UNM to work at Missouri, Florida and Kent State universities — will come together as Frank takes over the reins at The University of New Mexico. It's a big job, but for Frank, becoming the president of his alma mater is a dream come true. We wish him well as he returns home to lead the university he loves to greater excellence and achievement.

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