Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
Health Sciences (1)
History; Journalism and Mass Communications; Music; Office of the President; Theatre and Dance (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; Sociology; Students (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Psychology; Research (1)
University Facilities Management (1)


Headline Date Outlet

College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
WHO TO WATCH: TECHNOLOGY, HIROSHI YOKOYAMA: Director, Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University (Yokoyama; Moerland): 01/18/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

WHO TO WATCH: TECHNOLOGY, A look at Northeast Ohio's innovators 01/16/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
Teacher of the Year to speak at Kent State 01/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Shearer, who was recognized by President Barack Obama as the 2011 National Teacher of the Year, will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at Kent State University at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Kent Student Center Kiva. Shearer teaches advanced placement chemistry at Urbana High School...

National Teacher of Year to Speak at Kent State 01/18/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Health Sciences (1)
Scare tactics don't help children get fit and healthy (Caine-Bish) 01/18/2012 Daily Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

"Childhood obesity --and related health issues -- is most definitely a scary problem," says Kent State University's Dr. Natalie Caine-Bish, "but the use of scare tactics and name-calling will not help children to get healthy and fit." ...


History; Journalism and Mass Communications; Music; Office of the President; Theatre and Dance (1)
REVIEW: Ensemble's A SONG FOR CORETTA points spotlight on the other civil rights King 01/18/2012 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

...Frost's poem "Road Not Taken," each time he comes to a fork in the road, he has taken the path less traveled. He holds degrees, thought the doctorate from Kent State, University of Michigan and The Pennsylvania State University. His present roles, besides husband and grandfather, are professor, crisis...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Going Places: Jan. 16, 2012 01/18/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Wikipedia goes dark to protest anti-piracy laws (Goodman) 01/17/2012 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...limit, if not try to put an outright stop to, some of the Internet copyright piracy that's going on especially via international websites," explained Kent State University Professor of Journalism Mark Goodman. Copyright holders would be able to report piracy to law enforcement and get websites...


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Surry partners for national viticulture and enology initiative 01/17/2012 Tribune - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...partners who will share in the $4.3 million National Science Foundation grant with Surry Community College are Missouri State; Michigan State University; Kent State University, Ohio; Niagara County Community College, N.Y.; Yakima Valley Community College, Wash.; Arkansas Tech University; Rend Lake College;...


KSU at E. Liverpool; Sociology; Students (1)
March and presentations honor king 01/18/2012 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...communities, including Steubenville and Wellsville. The late Richard Pack, a businessman and former NAACP president was also interviewed as part of a Kent State University project several years ago, and he spoke of the 1950s through 1970s when he and other black teen-agers were discriminated against,...


KSU Museum (1)
Maltz Museum sets up Project Mah Jongg 01/17/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Mannequins sit and wait in the Maltz Museum Artifact Room. They will be part of the local component of Project Mah Jongg, displaying couture on loan from the Kent State University Museum by Dior, Paulene Trigere and Charles James. (Photo: … By: Tina Kaufmann, newsnet5.com BEACHWOOD, Ohio - The game...


Psychology; Research (1)
Study: How to stick to weight loss resolutions (Gunstad) 01/18/2012 Rock River Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...better your chances of losing weight and keeping it off. According to a new study led by Dr. John Gunstad, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University, memory and other mental abilities clearly influence the amount of weight people lose. “The results of our latest study...


University Facilities Management (1)
Separate elevator mishaps trap two (Vincent) 01/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...must come down. Although it may take a while if you're riding in an elevator in Portage County. Two people, a male student in a residence hall at Kent State University and a woman in a Ravenna apartment building were trapped in elevators at the same time Tuesday morning. Shortly before 10:30...


News Headline: WHO TO WATCH: TECHNOLOGY, HIROSHI YOKOYAMA: Director, Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University (Yokoyama; Moerland): | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HIROSHI YOKOYAMA

By CHUCK SODER
4:30 am, January 16, 2012

Hiroshi Yokoyama wants to create a new liquid crystal industry — one that has nothing to do with flat-screen TVs or computer monitors.

And he wants to do it in Northeast Ohio.

Dr. Yokoyama, who became director of the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State University last summer, is in the process is equipping the institute with about $2 million in new machines it will use to develop liquid crystal sensors, which he described as the next wave in liquid crystal technology.

Today, most people are familiar with liquid crystal displays. Kent State invented the technology in the 1960s, though almost all LCDs now are made in Asia. But Dr. Yokoyama, who became a professor at the institute in mid-2009, said there is more that can be done with liquid crystals.

In liquid crystal displays, electricity is used to alter the formation of liquid crystal molecules, creating an image on the screen. However, the formation of the liquid crystals also is altered when they come in contact with other molecules. The resulting liquid crystal formation can be analyzed, making it possible to determine what type of molecule touched it.

The institute could use the technique to develop a device that would detect explosives in the same way a dog would or analyze biological samples to check for cancer or other diseases.

The goal is to license the new technologies to firms in Northeast Ohio or create companies to commercialize them, Dr. Yokoyama said, noting that the state of Ohio is funding much of the new research.

Dr. Yokoyama has spent 30 years researching liquid crystals and tools used to alter materials on a molecular scale.

Dr. Yokoyama is a “superb” scientist, but he knows how to lead an organization, said Timothy Moerland, dean of the college of arts and sciences at Kent State.

“He is one of those people who can both manage and be at the bench himself,” Dr. Moerland said.

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News Headline: WHO TO WATCH: TECHNOLOGY, A look at Northeast Ohio's innovators | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The innovators contributing to Northeast Ohio's tech scene of the future can be found working in any number of areas and filling a variety of roles.

Some you may already have heard of, still others might be new to the region or are conducting their efforts under the radar.

In this special section, find out more about people such as Paul Allen, business launch leader, Bizdom U; Lance Hill, CEO, Within3 Inc.; or Hiroshi Yokoyama, director of the Liquid Crystal Institutue at Kent State -- all of whom are among those "to watch" on Northeast Ohio's tech scene.

The innovators contributing to Northeast Ohio's tech scene of the future can be found working in any number of areas and filling a variety of roles.

Some you may already have heard of, still others might be new to the region or are conducting their efforts under the radar.

In this special section, find out more about people such as Paul Allen, business launch leader, Bizdom U; Lance Hill, CEO, Within3 Inc.; or Hiroshi Yokoyama, director of the Liquid Crystal Institutue at Kent State -- all of whom are among those "to watch" on Northeast Ohio's tech scene.

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News Headline: Teacher of the Year to speak at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Homes

Jobs

Autos

MarketplaceOhio

DiscountGuru

Michelle Shearer, who was recognized by President Barack Obama as the 2011 National Teacher of the Year, will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at Kent State University at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Kent Student Center Kiva.

Shearer teaches advanced placement chemistry at Urbana High School in Frederick, Md. Previously, she taught high school chemistry and mathematics at the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick.

As the daughter of two teachers, Shearer said that education was so central to her life that she recognized from a young age that she wanted to become a teacher. While studying at Princeton University, she learned sign language and volunteered to teach a deaf fourth-grade class. She holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Princeton University and a master's degree in deaf education from McDaniel College in Westminster, Md. She is also certified in special education.

Shearer is an advocate for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education for all K-12 students and successfully reaches those who have been traditionally underrepresented in scientific fields, including students with special needs and those from diverse racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Her teaching methods rely heavily on real-life applications of scientific concepts.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Linda Robertson, director of the Center for International & Intercultural Education in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State, at lfrobert@kent.edu or call 330-672-0563.

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News Headline: National Teacher of Year to Speak at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Michelle Shearer to present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture on Jan. 24.
Michelle Shearer, who was recognized by President Barack Obama as the 2011 National Teacher of the Year, will present a Gerald H. Read Distinguished Lecture at Kent State University at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 24 in the Kent Student Center Kiva.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Shearer teaches advanced placement chemistry at Urbana High School in Frederick, MD. Previously, she taught high school chemistry and mathematics at the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick.

As the daughter of two teachers, Shearer said that education was so central to her life that she recognized from a young age that she wanted to become a teacher. While studying at Princeton University, she had the opportunity to learn sign language and volunteer to teach a deaf fourth-grade class.

From that point on, she knew that she had to become a teacher. She holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Princeton University and a master's degree in deaf education from McDaniel College in Westminster, MD. She is also certified in special education.

Shearer is an advocate for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education for all K-12 students and successfully reaches those who have been traditionally underrepresented in scientific fields, including students with special needs and those from diverse racial and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Her teaching methods rely heavily on real-life applications of scientific concepts. “When students feel connected not only to the teacher but to the subject itself, they quickly become eager to explore,” she said.

For more information, contact Dr. Linda Robertson, director of the Center for International & Intercultural Education in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State, at lfrobert@kent.edu or call 330-672-0563.

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News Headline: Scare tactics don't help children get fit and healthy (Caine-Bish) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Times - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Childhood obesity --and related health issues -- is most definitely a scary problem," says Kent State University's Dr. Natalie Caine-Bish, "but the use of scare tactics and name-calling will not help children to get healthy and fit."

Instead, Caine-Bish offers a more supportive and motivational approach.

» Parents need to be open with their children, but focus on health instead of weight. It is important for children to feel good about themselves.

» Recognize that every child is different, which means the causes for being overweight and the solutions for losing weight will depend on the particular child involved and his or her environmental circumstances.

» Use a multi-faceted healthcare response that includes a physician, a psychiatrist and a dietitian; it is essential to understand the child and the reason for the weight gain.

» Parents need to be good role models, demonstrate healthy behaviors and not make comments about their own weight, size or personal body image. The best way to deal with weight issues with children is to make lifestyle changes as a family and not focus on that particular child.

» Be age appropriate. You can talk more openly about body weight and size with an adolescent than you can with a school-age child.

"Being negative -- calling a child fat -- does not help with weight loss. A big concern we see is people who are overweight as children actually suffer from eating disorders in early adulthood at a higher rate than the rest of the population. This could be partially attributed to self-esteem. Food is related to people's emotions, so many times people eat because they are sad or don't feel good about themselves; attacking self-esteem does not help the process," said Caine-Bish.

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News Headline: REVIEW: Ensemble's A SONG FOR CORETTA points spotlight on the other civil rights King | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: � Cleveland-based Paycloud launches the Groupon killer

REVIEW: Ensemble's A SONG FOR CORETTA points spotlight on the other civil rights King

Ensemble's A SONG FOR CORETTA points spotlight on the other civil rights King

Reviewed by Roy Berko

The recent dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial in Washington, DC draws further attention to the person credited with being the father of the African American civil rights movement. Often, the effect of his wife, Coretta, seems to be ignored.

Coretta Scott King was a leader, author and the founder and former president of the King Center. She was a recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal and the Gandhi Peace Prize. Many also know that Mrs. King was a trained singer who was preparing for a career as a vocalist when she met a young preacher, Martin Luther King, in the 1950s. Together they helped change history.

Pearl Cleage, in her play A SONG FOR CORETTA, now in production at Ensemble Theatre, explores the impact Mrs. King had on the lives of black women, and the connections they can build with one another through honoring her memory and legacy.

It's Atlanta, Georgia, on a rainy afternoon in 2006 in front of the Ebenezer Baptist Church, where the body of Coretta Scott King is lying in state. She has died at age 78 after battling ovarian cancer and the effects of a stroke.

A bench center stage is emblazoned with a sign stating, “A seat for those who walked in Montgomery in 1955.” The march that, along with the bus strike that brought Rosa Parks to fame, and the restaurant sit-ins, resulted in breaking the back of segregation in the U.S.

The play centers on five women who are in line to pay their respects to the woman who many think of as a saint of the black community.

Fifty-seven year old Helen, a pious, up-tight and proud Negro woman, met Mrs. King several times when, as a child, her parents took her to civil rights activities. She rode on the Montgomery bus the day the transit company gave in and let Blacks sit wherever they wanted in the vehicles.

Helen knows her civil rights history and is concerned with the decline of young peoples' values and their lack of interest in the history of the struggle for equal rights.  Her fears are confirmed when she meets Gwendolyn, a 17-year-old who has just left an abortion clinic where she had gone to void herself of her second pregnancy. Lil Bit, Gwendolyn's nickname, knows the words to rap music but is unaware of any civil rights songs or the purpose or impact of the movement.

Zora is a 22-year-old journalism student who hopes her interviews with people waiting in line will be aired on National Public Radio.

Mona Lisa, a 40-year-old artist who survived the destruction and human horror of Hurricane Katrina, lost almost everything, and lives in her car.

Gwen is a traumatized Iraq war veteran, who is questioning the purpose of the war and the folly of service to her country.

Their serendipitous meeting brings them together and helps each to gain some understanding of how their lives are intertwined and have been influenced by Coretta Scott King.

Taylor's script is purposeful and filled with the educational material that makes it a good choice for Black History month. It consists mainly of dialogue, with little action. There is some humor mixed in with history lessons and drama.

Ensemble's production, under the direction of Margaret Ford Taylor, is quite acceptable but sometimes lacks the proper pacing and character development to bring out the impact of the script. In general, the actors stay mainly on the surface, feigning emotion and meaning, though there were moments of depth of motivation. Generally, however, they present characterizations rather than becoming the people they portray. It's sometimes hard to feel the pain each of these women feels because our emotions aren't stimulated.

We needed more of the emotional involvement displayed by Sonia Bishop (Gwen), when she exposes us to the horrors she experienced in the Middle East.

CAPSULE JUDGEMENT: A SONG FOR CORETTA sets its focus on CORETTA SCOTT KING. It's worth seeing Ensemble's production to gain the seldom exposed tale of this important American history icon.

From Cool Cleveland contributor Roy Berko. Berko's blog, which contains theatre and dance reviews from 2001 through 2011, as well as his consulting and publications information, can be found at http://RoyBerko.info . His reviews can also be found on NeOHIOpal and CoolCleveland.com .

Roy Berko, who is a life-long Clevelander, is a Renaissance man. Believing the line in Robert Frost's poem "Road Not Taken," each time he comes to a fork in the road, he has taken the path less traveled. He holds degrees, thought the doctorate from Kent State, University of Michigan and The Pennsylvania State University. His present roles, besides husband and grandfather, are professor, crisis counselor, author and entertainment reviewer... Read Roy Berko's complete bio here

WIN $500 by using the free Cool Cleveland app now available for your iPhone, iPad & iPod Touch by clicking here , and for your Android smartphone or tablet by clicking here .

[Click here to return to the current issue of Cool Cleveland]

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News Headline: Going Places: Jan. 16, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ARCHITECTURE

TDA ARCHITECTURE: John Waddell to senior project manager.
CONSTRUCTION

RUHLIN CO.: Jeff Lawson to project manager, estimator; Morgan Covey to administrative assistant; Mike Bauman to mechanical estimator; Mary Meyer to administrative assistant, estimating.
FINANCIAL SERVICE

CIUNI & PANICHI INC.: Jamie Zielinski and Michael Tilenni to auditors.

HOWARD, WERSHBALE & CO.: Edward C. Lowe to principal; Gary T. Dayton, Lindsay Glavan, Kate Protsenko-Blake and Melanie McPeak to managers; Christina V. Luangrath, William Cope, Laura Bove, Ben A. Stumpf, Benjamin Whalley, Debbie Palmer and Shayna Raj to staff accountants; Kathy Loy to senior consultant; Linda C. Lewis to consultant; Audrey Cahn to para-professional; Linda S. Zevnik to senior manager.

MCMANAMON & CO. LLC: Jeffrey D. Firestone to partner.

SS&G: Kimberly A. Zagar and Paul Woznicki to directors; Brian Palisin, Marc S. Newman, Leif E. Erickson and Marie A. Brilmyer to associate directors.

SS&G HEALTHCARE SERVICES LLC: Jeffrey L. Bushong to director.
HEALTH CARE

CANDLEWOOD PARK HEALTHCARE: Cynthia Brewer-Knight to executive director.
LEGAL

DAVIS & YOUNG: Thomas W. Wright to managing partner and president; David J. Fagnilli to chief financial officer; Shannon M. Fogarty to partner; Nicole R. Ford to associate.

DWORKEN & BERNSTEIN CO.: Richard Selby, Erik Walter and Kenneth Cahill to partners.

JACKSON LEWIS LLP: Steven D. Bell to of counsel.

JONES DAY: Stephen P. Coolbaugh to partner.

THACKER MARTINSEK LPA: Marquettes Robinson to shareholder.
MANUFACTURING

GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER CO.: John F. Winterton to president, North American Tire consumer business unit; Phillip Kane to vice president, North American Tire commercial tire business.
MARKETING

MARCUS THOMAS LLC: Nikki Andrick and Pam Gant to account supervisors; Nicole Eberle to senior account executive; Chris Sledzik to account executive, PR; Dave Muller to art director; Brandi Hensler to copywriter; Allison Loparo to human resources generalist; Roger McMullan to junior art director; Sunny Chelmella to junior developer; Stefanie Riediger to junior planner; Edwige Winans to associate research director; Jessica Folger to audience insights strategist; Jim Gough to creative director; Brian Roach to associate creative director.

PECCHIA COMMUNICATIONS: Jim Houck to senior consultant.
NONPROFIT

POSITIVELY CLEVELAND: Colette M. Jones to vice president, marketing.

SAINT LUKE'S FOUNDATION: LaTida Smith to vice president, programs, outcomes and learning.

SUSAN G. KOMEN NORTHEAST OHIO: Lena L. Grafton to programs manager.
REAL ESTATE

STOUFFER REALTY INC.: Betty Wulff to sales associate.
SERVICE

THINK MEDIA STUDIOS: Olivia Otten to associate producer.
TECHNOLOGY

THUNDER::TECH: Andrea Aber to account services team manager.
BOARDS

APPLIED INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES: John F. Meier to chairperson.

CLEVELAND COACH FEDERATION: Susan J. Cucuzza to president.

LUPUS FOUNDATION OF AMERICA, GREATER OHIO CHAPTER: John Sheldon to chairman.
AWARDS

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Debra Adams Simmons (The Plain Dealer) received the 2012 Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity, School of Journalism and Mass Communication.
RETIREMENTS

RUHLIN CO.: Kathy Mitman, after 16 years; Sandy Kreuscher, after 13 years.

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News Headline: Wikipedia goes dark to protest anti-piracy laws (Goodman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wikipedia goes dark to protest anti-piracy laws

By Sally Phillips, Reporter - email

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio - Between midnight January 17th and midnight January 18th you won't be able to access Wikipedia's English site.

It's one of several online communities planning to go dark to protest proposed anti-piracy laws. Stop Online Piracy Act, or "SOPA," as well as the Protect Intellectual Property Act are being considered by Congress and mainly supported by the film and music industry.

"The goal is to try to limit, if not try to put an outright stop to, some of the Internet copyright piracy that's going on especially via international websites," explained Kent State University Professor of Journalism Mark Goodman.

Copyright holders would be able to report piracy to law enforcement and get websites shut down, which opponents say violates due process.

"It's pretty draconian," Goodman said. "It's pretty extreme in that it will actually allow someone to stop them from linking to that site with very little evidence presented."

The most controversial part of the law would cut off these websites from U.S. users, which critics call an attack on free speech.

"You don't like someone's message, you disagree with them politically, accuse them of being a rogue pirate site and get them taken down," said Duke University Law Professor James Boyle.

In a White House blog, federal technology and cyber security officials say that while they believe online piracy is a serious problem, they oppose the proposals. "We will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cyber security risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet. Any effort to combat online piracy must guard against the risk of online censorship of lawful activity and must not inhibit innovation by our dynamic businesses large and small."

Some journalists also disagree with the proposed law. The American Society of News Editors issued a letter calling the laws "onerous," saying SOPA "would violate the constitutional rights of free speech and due process, and stifle innovation in the news business."

For some opponents, censoring websites sounds too familiar. "Some of the people who were supporting these bills were arguing that the technology would work and they say, 'The technology would work because we've seen China and other repressive countries use technology like this to shut down their dissidence, so we know it would work,'" recalled Boyle. "Is this really the example we want to be implementing?"

Some worry about blacking out any part of the Internet.

"One of the good and bad things about the Internet has been thus far is that it doesn't selectively choose what we as users of it have access to- we have access to everything," explained Goodman. "That would change if this law were to be enacted."

Many expect the law to fail or to be amended to exclude the more controversial components.

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News Headline: Surry partners for national viticulture and enology initiative | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: national viticulture and enology initiative

Elkin Tribune

3 months ago | 516 views | 0

| 1

Mount Airy News

Surry Community College has received a $213,000 grant from the National Science Foundation and joins a 17-state partnership to deliver distance education opportunities for the emerging grape and wine industry.

The project, a part of the Viticulture Enology Science and Technology Alliance (VESTA), focuses on the establishment of programs of study in viticulture and enology through collaborations with educational institutions, government and industry across the country. VESTA creates a pathway for persons interested in certified training in viticulture and enology including hands-on field experiences using partnerships with area vineyards and wineries. Development of courses incorporating advances in science and technology in the industry and workshops/seminars on best practices for small to large scale grape and wine related operations will help ensure a skilled workforce.

Surry will serve as a VESTA National Center of Excellence serving the eastern United States, sponsoring online boot camps and workshops/seminars inviting participation from across this section of the nation. These sessions will introduce the science of viticulture and enology, as well as Surry's specific educational opportunities and state-of-the-art facilities. Surry's online degree program would then allow interested persons to pursue a certificate, diploma or degree in viticulture and enology including new vineyard and winery development and professional development for the current industry.

National partners who will share in the $4.3 million National Science Foundation grant with Surry Community College are Missouri State; Michigan State University; Kent State University, Ohio; Niagara County Community College, N.Y.; Yakima Valley Community College, Wash.; Arkansas Tech University; Rend Lake College; Ill.; Ivy Tech Community College, Ind.; Northwest Iowa Community College; Highland Community College, Kan.; Central Lakes College, Minn.; Redlands Community College, Okla.; Umpqua Community College, Ohio; South Plains College, Texas; Northwest Wisconsin Technical College; and Sonoma State University, Calif.

Emphasis will be placed on the viticulture and enology technology program offered at Surry Community College which includes courses in vineyard establishment and development, grape and wine science, vineyard and winery operations, grape pests, diseases, and disorders, and wine finishing and packaging. In addition, students enrolled in the Surry viticulture and enology program will be engaged with the national VESTA offerings, enhancing their knowledge of the industry-at-large and the 21st century challenges.

The main goals of the project are to produce highly qualified technicians that have industry validated credentials for the grape and wine production industry in the U.S. and to broaden the scope of activities that support professional development for students, faculty, entrepreneurs and the industry workforce.

In 2009, Surry Community College received a Department of Education FIPSE grant, which enabled the college to develop online viticulture and enology courses. This development led to Surry's opportunity to become a national leader in grape and wine industry training.

For more information, go to www.ncviticulturecenter.com for viticulture and enology curriculum, links to the North Carolina grape and wine industry and the Shelton-Badgett N.C. Center for Viticulture and Enology.

Copyright 2012 Elkin Tribune. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: March and presentations honor king | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: / News / Elsewhere in Columbiana County /

← and → arrow keys on your keyboard to activate these links ?');return false" onmouseout="hideBubbleTip()" class="txtRight"> Hospital CEO named to Salem...>>

March and presentations honor king

January 17, 2012

Morning Journal News

EAST LIVERPOOL - It is not what a person has on the outside but what he has on the inside that matters, according to the legacy of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose birthday was observed in the city Monday with several events.

Makesha West, president of the East Liverpool-Wellsville chapter of the NAACP, was not born when King and others like him spread their message of freedom around the country, but she reflected on the lessons left behind, saying, "He wanted to say we're all the same. We can work as one. No matter what you have on the outside, it's what's on the inside that matters."

She said King "didn't step forward with a fist raised (but) with kindness."

As part of Monday's observance, a video presentation, "Being Black in Middle America," featured interviews of local people discussing their own experiences, and West was one of those interviewed.

She spoke of being "the only one" while living in various communities, including Steubenville and Wellsville.

The late Richard Pack, a businessman and former NAACP president was also interviewed as part of a Kent State University project several years ago, and he spoke of the 1950s through 1970s when he and other black teen-agers were discriminated against, forbidden to enter certain establishments.

Jeannette Hicks' interview about her son Kevin's brutal racially-motivated murder concluded the day's events.

A tribute to King was recited by Adam Brooks, and a dance ministry in mime was presented by Arletta Reed and Jamar Harvey to an appreciative audience that included Mayor Jim Swoger and his wife, Amy.

The Kent State University sociology class offered a presentation on the "Moving Youth 2 Youth" project, incorporating the same kinds of messages for which King was known, saying, "We're here to make this city better" and encouraging those present to "even do something little by helping a neighbor or cleaning up litter."

One member challenged, "Look out East Liverpool, heck, look out world, because here we come."

Professor Patti Swartz announced the winners of an essay contest, with first and second places going, respectively, to sisters Isabella and Jocelyn McCloskey who attend the Buckeye Online School for Success and third place to Shane Andrews, a Rogers Elementary student.

Honorable mention went to Rogers Elementary students Becky Morgan and Alaina Jones.

The celebration at the Point of Life followed a march down Pennsylvania Avenue from the Second Baptist Church, and its pastor, the Rev. Ernest Peachey offered the opening prayer.

Trish Wolf performed a solo, while Nicki Brooks served as mistress of ceremonies.

Morning Journal News

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News Headline: Maltz Museum sets up Project Mah Jongg | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Project Mah Jongg opens Jan. 24

Mannequins sit and wait in the Maltz Museum Artifact Room. They will be part of the local component of Project Mah Jongg, displaying couture on loan from the Kent State University Museum by Dior, Paulene Trigere and Charles James. (Photo: …

By: Tina Kaufmann, newsnet5.com

BEACHWOOD, Ohio - The game mah jongg has been part of American culture since 1922. Now in 2012, the game will be featured at the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Beachwood as it presents Project Mah Jongg.

Project Mah Jongg, an exhibition exploring the traditions, history, and meaning of the game, was created by the the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York City.

The exhibition was wildly popular and a traveling version was developed. Its only scheduled Midwest appearance will be January 24 through April 22 at the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. After that, it will go to a cultural center in L.A.

The colorful exhibition includes original artwork by Christoph Niemann, Isaac Mizrahi, Maira Kalman and Bruce McCall; beautiful early game sets made of bone, Bakelite, and bamboo; vintage advertisements and household items; Chinoiserie; and instruction materials.

The Maltz Museum has added vintage mah jongg sets and rule cards from area Clevelanders, period costumes on loan from the Kent State University Museum, and a short film by area filmmakers Amy Wasserstrom Cummings and John Cummings. Titled May the Tiles Be with You: Cleveland's Love Affair with Mah Jongg, the documentary records the mah jongg memories of Clevelanders.

You can submit your own stories about the game by clicking this link: www.maltzmuseum.org/share-story/

Full details on the exhibition, programs, and events can be found on the "Happenings" calendar of the museum website.

Tickets for all events and programs can be purchased by calling the Museum at (216) 593-0575.

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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News Headline: Study: How to stick to weight loss resolutions (Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Rock River Times - Online
Contact Name: Brandon Reid
News OCR Text: Staff Report



For those searching for a better way to stick to 2012 weight loss resolutions, the answer may be simple … tie a string around your finger.



The better your memory and other thinking skills, the better your chances of losing weight and keeping it off.



According to a new study led by Dr. John Gunstad, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University, memory and other mental abilities clearly influence the amount of weight people lose.



“The results of our latest study indicate that better performance on tests of memory and executive function is linked to greater weight loss in persons who have weight loss surgery,” said Dr. Gunstad. “We believe this effect comes from a better ability to stick to the diet and exercise habits that promote weight loss. But, these findings should not be misinterpreted to indicate that cognitive impairment automatically leads to negative outcomes. Instead, it might encourage cognitive screening to help identify those people who might benefit from additional support to help them reach their weight loss goals.”



In short, if you plan to lose weight and keep the pounds at bay, you need a plan and helpful reminders to stay on track. After talking with your doctor to identify the best weight loss plan for you, using strategies such as planning your meals well in advance or using alerts on your smartphone might make a big difference.



“Some people appear to have a better ability than others to keep themselves on task,” said Dr. Gunstad. “Fortunately, a little planning can help those of us that have a harder time doing so still achieve our weight loss goals.”



The results of the study led by Dr. Gunstad will appear in an upcoming issue of Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.



Dr. Gunstad is an associate professor in the Kent State University Department of Psychology. With specialties in neuropsychology and health, Dr. Gunstad conducts research that examines two broad areas: 1. the effects of aging and disease on neurocognitive function, with a particular interest in cardiovascular disease and obesity; and 2. acute factors that affect neuropsychological functioning, including environmental stressors.



From the Jan. 18-24, 2012, issue

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News Headline: Separate elevator mishaps trap two (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Autos

MarketplaceOhio

DiscountGuru

By Thomas Gallick | Staff Writer

What goes up must come down.

Although it may take a while if you're riding in an elevator in Portage County.

Two people, a male student in a residence hall at Kent State University and a woman in a Ravenna apartment building were trapped in elevators at the same time Tuesday morning.

Shortly before 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, the Ravenna Fire Department responded to a call from a woman trapped inside an elevator near the sixth floor of Prospect House, an apartment building located at 245 S. Prospect St in Ravenna.

A spokesman for the Ravenna Fire Department said the woman was not injured, but was stuck for around an hour due to a mechanical issue. He said firefighters communicated with the woman while they waited for a mechanic who could fix the problem and free her.

"It was roughly an hour before they got someone from the elevator company out there," he said.

Minutes after the Ravenna Fire Department received its call, the KSU Police Department received a call that a student was trapped in an elevator in Leebrick Hall, which is located in the Tri-Towers complex on the campus' east side.

By the time KSU police arrived on the scene, the student was stepping out of the elevator.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said earlier the student had used an emergency phone in the elevator to notify authorities that he was trapped

"All those calls go to a call center where a mechanic answers," Vincent said.

Vincent said the student spent around 20 minutes stuck in the elevator before the mechanic arrived.

She said the student was not hurt in the incident and was able to step out of the elevator as soon as the door was opened.

The Leebrick Hall elevator was still being worked on as of Tuesday at around noon.

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