Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Alumni; Theatre and Dance (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
English; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Geology (1)
Higher Education (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (6)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Office of the Provost (1)
Political Science (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Theatre and Dance (1)
Revere grad enjoying life on small screen 01/19/2012 Leader Publications - Online Text Attachment Email

...Copley. After high school, she headed to Kent State University, where she received a degree in theater. Since finishing college, she's appeared on the Porthouse Theatre stage with her mother — an actress, dancer and choreographer — in “Anything Goes” and “Chicago.” The past year, though, has seen...


College of Business (COB) (1)
LEARN ABOUT KENT STATE'S BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM THROUGH LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE'S UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP 01/19/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

ELYRIA, Ohio, Jan.19 -- Lorain County Community College issued the following news release: Representatives from Kent State University will be available for an information session on the Bachelor of Business Administration degree through Lorain County Community...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Report Looks at Valley Health Problems, Solutions (Slenkovich) 01/20/2012 WYTV - Online Text Attachment Email

...morning at the Mill Creek MetroParks Farm in Canfield. The Tri-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative was put together with help from Kent State University and officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties. The report identified problem areas in public health and developed...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Kentite is Recipient of Kent State's Diversity Trailblazer Award (Fowler, Mohan) 01/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


English; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Catherine Wing to Read at the Wick Poetry Center 01/20/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Catherine Wing to Read at the Wick Poetry Center Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center will host poet Catherine Wing on Thursday, Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 306 ABC of the Kent Student...


Fashion Design (1)
Massillon Museum prepares its own Project Runway 01/19/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...classic looks, fusing the "New Look" with new ideas. The exhibit features garments from the museum's permanent collection as well as original designs from Kent State University fashion students and a few "Project Runway" designers. The end result, Rosengard says, is breathtaking. "I wasn't prepared...


Geology (1)
Kent State researcher helps discover new species named after the "King of Pop" 01/19/2012 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University researcher was part of an international team of paleontologists that recently made a significant discovery in northern Spain....


Higher Education (1)
Improving graduation rates at Ohio's public universities a priority for Gov. John Kasich, Chancellor Jim Petro 01/20/2012 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (6)
TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) 01/20/2012 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

...testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence. Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that...

TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) 01/20/2012 Boston Globe - Online Text Attachment Email

...testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence. Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that...

TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) 01/20/2012 CBSNews.com Text Attachment Email

...testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence. Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that...

TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) 01/20/2012 Today Show - NBC News Network - Online Text Attachment Email

...testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence. Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that...

TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) 01/20/2012 Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online Text Attachment Email

...testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence. Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that...

Cleveland television station covering high-profile Ohio bribery trial with on-air puppet help (Idsvoog) 01/20/2012 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence. Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that...


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Street vacation sent to council 01/19/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...decided to recommend the vacation to council. Cowan said after the meeting the upper portion of Union Street was vacated last year at the request of Kent State University and that the lower portion is not currently being used.


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
County sales-tax purse grows 01/20/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...machinery, Mamarella said, with the money coming from landowners receiving leasing bonuses from oil and gas companies. The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia is also helping to bring more people into the area, he added. This news doesn't mean that...


Office of the Provost (1)
UA administrator is a candidate for Kent State post 01/20/2012 Tuscaloosa News - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...graduate school dean David Francko is one of four candidates in the running to become the next provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Kent State University. The announcement was made on Kent State's website. On-campus interviews for the position begin with Francko on Monday....


Political Science (1)
Ohio State experts to appear in Ohio Organic Farming Conference 01/19/2012 Newark Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...Entomology, from 2:50 to 3:45 p.m. Feb. 18. » "The Role of Cooperatives in Marketing" by Bob Cohen, an Ohio State instructor and program coordinator at Kent State University's Cooperative Development Center, from 2:50 to 3:45 p.m. Feb. 18. » "Pumpkins, Squash and Bugs -- Oh My!" by Welty and Melinda...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Author seeks memories for book on Ray's Place 01/20/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Revere grad enjoying life on small screen | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Leader Publications - Online
Contact Name: Kathleen Folkerth
News OCR Text: 1/19/2012 - West Side Leader

Kaitlyn Black, shown below and at far left in the photo above, is appearing as Annabeth on the CW show “Hart of Dixie.” Also shown above in a scene from “Hart of Dixie” are Jamie King (Lemon Breeland) and Cress Williams (Levon Hayes).

Photos courtesy of Kaitlyn Black

COPLEY — Playing a recurring role on a network TV series isn't the only thing that helped Kaitlyn Black realize she's making it in Hollywood.

“It's been great because I've been able to get rid of my part-time jobs, which is a success in itself,” she said.

Black, a 2001 Revere High School graduate, is currently appearing on the CW's “Hart of Dixie” as Annabeth. What started out as a two-episode commitment on the show has turned into 10 episodes, and Black couldn't be happier about it.

“It's such a pleasure to work with such a group of people committed to their jobs and not the Hollywood scene,” said Black, who has called the Los Angeles area home for five years.

Black is the daughter of Dr. John and MaryAnn Black, of Copley. After high school, she headed to Kent State University, where she received a degree in theater.

Since finishing college, she's appeared on the Porthouse Theatre stage with her mother — an actress, dancer and choreographer — in “Anything Goes” and “Chicago.”

The past year, though, has seen Black increasingly working on TV and in film. She completed two movies in 2011: “The First Ride of Wyatt Earp,” with Val Kilmer, which she said could be picked up by a cable network such as Lifetime or Hallmark; and “Officer Down,” which she said is a police drama starring Stephen Dorff that could be released in theaters.

“I played an assault victim, and basically I'm crying in it,” she said. “Every job has been so different than the last.”

Black also appeared on a couple of episodes of the Fox sitcom “Raising Hope” this season, she said.

“Hart of Dixie” premiered in the fall on the CW and stars Rachel Bilson as a young doctor from New York City who inherits a medical practice in the town of Bluebell, Ala. While settling in to her new life, she comes across the town's residents, such as Lemon Breeland, daughter of another town doctor. Black's character is Lemon's best friend, she said.

The show returns with new episodes starting Jan. 23 at 9 p.m., Black said. That episode and the one airing Jan. 30 are big episodes for her character, she added.

She's hoping that means the character will continue to be a big part of the show, as she's grown to really enjoy playing her.

“I wouldn't say Annabeth is dumb, but she lives in her own reality a little bit,” Black said. “She tries to make Lemon happy and can have a bit of a sassy quality, but deep down she has a good heart.”

Black said pilot season is looming in Hollywood and she hopes her recent endeavors will help her find a project that could turn into something more permanent.

“There will be a lot of auditions and a lot of opportunities that will come from having such a great recurring role,” she said. “A lot of casting directors now know my work and my face. You have to keep building upon it. No one is ever an overnight success.”

She credits her parents and sister for helping her to remain levelheaded as she continues her career.

“It's such a blessing to have a family that is supportive in such a rollercoaster business,” she said.

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News Headline: LEARN ABOUT KENT STATE'S BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM THROUGH LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE'S UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP | Email

News Date: 01/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ELYRIA, Ohio, Jan.19 -- Lorain County Community College issued the following news release:

Representatives from Kent State University will be available for an information session on the Bachelor of Business Administration degree through Lorain County Community College's University Partnership.

The session will be held at 6 p.m.Thursday, February 2 in Room 213 of the University Center.

Those interested in earning the business administration degree are encouraged to attend to learn more about admission requirements, course options and an optional minor in International Business.

Register for this free information session by calling the UP Office at 440-366-4949 or by visiting www.lorainccc.edu/upevents.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Report Looks at Valley Health Problems, Solutions (Slenkovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: WYTV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Weather Alert: Winter Storm Warning

Report Looks at Valley Health Problems, Solutions

How can the Mahoning Valley become a more healthy place?

Answering that question is the goal of a report released Thursday morning at the Mill Creek MetroParks Farm in Canfield. The Tri-County Community Health Assessment and Planning Initiative was put together with help from Kent State University and officials in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties.

The report identified problem areas in public health and developed a plan to to attack those issues over the next several years.

"Things like reducing suicide rates, increasing access to behavioral healthcare services, dental services, increasing people's access to healthy foods. And trying to encourage folks to adopt healthier lifestyles," said Ken Slenkovich of the Kent State College of Public Health.

The report shows the Valley is higher than the national and state averages in smoking rates, lung cancer and obesity.

"It provides a road map for the organizations interested in improving health status for residents of the Mahoning Valley. And so it will give them targets to shoot for, some goals to strive for, and also it identifies some specific programs that have been shown to work," Slenkovich said.

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News Headline: Kentite is Recipient of Kent State's Diversity Trailblazer Award (Fowler, Mohan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent resident Dr. David Mohan, dean of Kent State University at Geauga, is the 2012 recipient of the university's Diversity Trailblazer Award.

Mohan will receive the award and be recognized during Kent State's 10th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration, set for Jan. 26 at 2 p.m. in the Kent Student Center Ballroom. The event is free and open to the public.

The university wide Diversity Trailblazer Award is designed to recognize faculty, staff or a departmental group for significant contributions to enhance diversity and inclusive excellence at Kent State.

Mohan oversees the university's Regional Campus in Burton and the Kent State University Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg. The two locations serve more than 2,500 students.

“This award is important because it is designed to recognize a person who internalizes one of the core values of the university, which is excellence in diversity and inclusion,” said Rev. Ronald Fowler, a member of the selection committee and recipient of last year's Diversity Trailblazer Award.

“The award is an affirmation of what kind of community we want to be, and Dean Mohan really cares about creating a diverse community for students to learn in and learn from. The committee made a very wise choice, and we're very fortunate here in our Kent State family to have a person of this stature working at the university,” Fowler said.

Upon notification that he was going to receive the 2012 Diversity Trailblazer Award, Mohan said his reaction was one of “extreme appreciation and thankfulness” on behalf of the faculty, staff and students at Kent State at Geauga and Kent State University Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg.

“Diversity provides a greater synergy across all segments of both our campuses to ultimately benefit our students and enrich their university experience,” Mohan said regarding the importance of diversity.

“It is an additive dynamic which increases the level of ‘community well-being' in both curricular and extracurricular experiences for all concerned. It also broadens a variety of perspectives within the organization at a time when tolerance for others' contributions must be respected for the special attributes all people bring to the university,” he explained.

Mohan's achievements in diversity include the decision to engage as many faculty, staff and students to embrace a campus culture that values the uniqueness and affirms the right for all opinions to be heard and respected.

He also was instrumental in creating a program titled “A College Degree is in Your Future.” This program was presented during several visits to support middle and high school students in and around the cities of Twinsburg and Cleveland.

“Our program, by design, is meant to reach students where they are in thought and behavior so they will make positive choices about their future,” Mohan said. “We also encourage the importance of education at the post-secondary level. Our efforts focused primarily on the diverse and disenfranchised communities."

Mohan began his career at Kent State as an assistant professor in industrial teacher education. After earning a promotion to associate professor, Mohan was named director of Kent State's School of Technology, where he administered both undergraduate and graduate programs, assisted in the development of technical associate degrees on seven regional campuses and supervised the university's flight training program.

Following his academic career, Mohan accepted the position of vice president of operations at a printing corporation in Akron, where he was eventually promoted to chief operating officer.

In addition to his credentials in education and industry, he also has a background in community affairs, serving as president of the Board for Portage Area Senior Services and chairman of the Board for United Christian Ministries. Mohan also has volunteered his time and support to Hospice and the Alzheimer's Association.

Mohan holds a doctoral degree in industrial technology from The Ohio State University, a Master of Arts in gerontology from Kent State, a Master of Science in industrial education from the University of Maryland and a bachelor's degree in industrial arts education from California University of Pennsylvania.

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News Headline: Catherine Wing to Read at the Wick Poetry Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Catherine Wing to Read at the Wick Poetry Center

Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center will host poet Catherine Wing on Thursday,

Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 306 ABC of the Kent Student Center. Wing teaches English at Kent State University and also serves as the editor of the Wick Chapbook Series. Her first book of poems, Enter Invisible was nominated for a Los Angeles Times' book prize in 2005. Her second book, Gin & Bleach is forthcoming. Contact: Nicole Robinson, nlrobin1@kent.edu, 330-672-2067

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News Headline: Massillon Museum prepares its own Project Runway | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Pinching the long, sheer fabric between his fingers, Steven Rosengard spins in place. The lightweight fabric first envelops him in a transparent cloud and then billows gracefully into place as he uses his hands to pin it against the ironing board.

Using a metal ruler, he carefully notes the measurements for the top of what will be long curtains that portion off the Massillon Museum's newest gallery exhibition.

He pins the fabric and irons it out as he prepares it for the sewing machine. He works quickly and gracefully, laughing and joking with the Massillon Museum staff as he does.

And the whole time, he smiles. He smiles so broadly that has to squint to make room for a genuine grin that lights his face and warms the entire room.

Given all of that, you would never suspect the kind of deadline crunch he faces.

"Well, we have to sew 50 curtains," Rosengard said with his signature smile. He paused for a moment and rolled the figure around in his mind.

Fifty. Curtains.

"Oh my gosh, we have to sew 50 of them!" He said laughing, placing his palms to both his cheeks in mock distress. "When does this exhibit open again? Saturday? This is crunch time. We're into crunch time."

If Rosengard knows anything, though, it's how to work with a tight deadline, a tight budget and unlimited creativity. He knows how to take all of that and, well ... "make it work."

Rosengard, assistant curator of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, got a crash course on time and budget management during his season 4 appearance on Bravo's "Project Runway." The reality television competition pits talented, young designers against one another for the chance to show off their work at New York's Fashion Week and, ultimately, win funding to design their own clothing line.

These days, Rosengard still designs, focusing mainly on wedding gowns. Though his newest fashion quest involves a makeover for the Massillon Museum main gallery through an exhibit he's titled "Another Look at the New Look."

NEW INTERPRETATIONS

Rosengard teamed with the Massillon Museum after meeting registrar Christina Sevu Teeters little more than two years ago during a professional development course he taught on garment preservation. A friendship between the two led to Rosengard designing a wedding dress for Sevu Teeters and an introduction to Massillon Museum Executive Director Alex Nicholis Coon, who called on Rosengard's creative talents for a museum exhibit.

Inspired by the Massillon Museum's collection of gowns from the post-World War II era, Rosengard fashioned an exhibit that pays homage to Christian Dior, a fashion industry icon who, with his collection that debuted in 1947 gave the world new perspectives.

Dior's collection, dubbed "New Look," emphasized femininity and the female figure, with the garments featuring rounded shoulders and cinched waists. The fullness of the skirts on Dior's dresses not only ushered in a "new look" but a new way of thinking as the world redefined life after a war that led to limited resources and sacrifice.

Through the exhibit, Rosengard put his own spin on Dior's classic looks, fusing the "New Look" with new ideas. The exhibit features garments from the museum's permanent collection as well as original designs from Kent State University fashion students and a few "Project Runway" designers.

The end result, Rosengard says, is breathtaking.

"I wasn't prepared for this," Rosengard said, gesturing to the three garments designed by the Kent State students. "These three (designers) executed a three-dimensional work from a sketch, and it's absolutely what I had in mind when I first looked at the sketches. That is incredibly hard to do."

�NECESSARY ART'

If there were ever a perfect "runway" for a fashion exhibition, it's a museum. Fashion, after all, is one of the most visible and familiar forms of art.

"Fashion is an art, but it's a necessary art," Rosengard said grinning broadly. "Hey, I like that. �Necessary art.' I should trademark that. ... It could be the title for my next (exhibition)."

Rosengard believes that fashion as an art form has become more appreciated as the creative process has been unmasked through the media and made more accessible to the general public.

"I think because of shows like �Project Runway' people have developed a respect for the process of creating fashion," Rosengard said. "They see the thought process and the idea of the sketch. They see the physical labor of taking something that was just an idea and making into something three-dimensional, forming what had been a concept around the body."

Fashion also involves everyone. Whether designing it or wearing it, fashion makes everyone a critic.

"Everyone qualifies to be a critic because everyone wears clothes," Rosengard said, noting that when it comes to fashion, every opinion matters.

"Lord knows I have had my share of criticism," Rosengard said chuckling, "and I have shared almost all of it with the world."

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IF YOU GO: Another Look at the New Look

WHAT: An exhibit focusing on designer Christian Dior's classic looks, guest-curated by Project Runway alumnus and Museum of Science and Industry Assistant Curator Steven Rosengard.

WHEN: Jan. 21 through April 1

WHERE: Massillon Museum Main Gallery.

FEATURES: Fashions from the Massillon Museum's collection and original designs from Kent State University Fashion students and Project Runway designers.

COST: Free

FOR MORE: Information about the Massillon Museum and its hours of operation or Rosengard's show and other museum exhibits is available at www.massillonmuseum.org or 330-833-4061.

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News Headline: Kent State researcher helps discover new species named after the "King of Pop" | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University researcher was part of an international team of paleontologists that recently made a significant discovery in northern Spain. The group discovered a new family, genus and species of fossil hermit crab – one that lived 100 million years ago.

The group's findings were published online this month in the Germany-based journal Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie.

The team made the surprising discovery on June 25, 2009. Later that day, while meeting at a restaurant in the city of Alsasua, the group saw on TV that international superstar Michael Jackson had passed away that day. The paleontologists decided to honor the “King of Pop” by the naming the new species after the late music icon: Mesoparapylocheles michaeljacksoni.

“Michael Jackson's music will no doubt live a very long time and influence many people so I think the name is appropriate,” explained co-author Adiël Klompmaker, a Ph.D. candidate in Department of Geology at Kent State.

The shield of the new hermit crab was discovered in an abandoned limestone quarry in the foothills of the Pyrenees in the Spanish province of Navarra. “The rocks in the Koskobilo quarry are part of a fossil coral reef with an age of 100 million years,” Klompmaker said. “This is right in the middle of the Cretaceous period, when dinosaurs were dominating the continents. In this area in northern Spain, we find many invertebrate fossils, such as corals, algae, sea urchins, but also a wide variety of crabs. ”

Mesoparapylocheles michaeljacksoni has one living relative from the same family. Parapylocheles scorpio lives in deep waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. “However, the new hermit crab lived in the shallow waters of a coral reef hidden in between the branching corals,” said Dr. René Fraaije, the lead author and director of the Dutch Oertijdmuseum. “Still undiscovered species of the same family must have migrated to deeper waters at some point in time.”

Nowadays, hermit crabs predominantly use a snail shell as a shelter when the shell comes available after the death of the snail. When the extinct ammonites were still around in the Cretaceous period, they also would use their shell sometimes.

“We are not sure what the fossil hermit crabs from Spain used as a protection because snail and ammonite shells are extremely rare in the quarry,” Klompmaker said. “They may have relied on the additional protection provided by the branching corals, as hermit crabs are rare in rocks from the same quarry that contain few corals.”

According to Klompmaker, fossils shields of hermit crabs are much rarer than those of true crabs, which are a separate group within the decapod crustaceans. Today, less than a dozen of these shields are known and a great deal of information concerning the evolution of this group remains undiscovered.

Kent State researchers recently discovered the oldest fossil shrimp know to date in the world. “Kent State is the one of the leading universities in the world studying fossil decapod crustaceans, such as crabs, lobsters, shrimp, and hermit crabs,” Klompmaker said.

For more information on Kent State's Department of Geology, visit www.kent.edu/geology.

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News Headline: Improving graduation rates at Ohio's public universities a priority for Gov. John Kasich, Chancellor Jim Petro | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Ohio's public four-year colleges don't have a problem attracting students, but keeping them enrolled long enough to get a degree continues to pose a challenge.

About 56 percent of students who enrolled full time as freshmen in 2004 had earned degrees six years later, according to the Ohio Board of Regents. That's just about the national average.

Retaining and graduating more students is a top priority for Gov. John Kasich and Chancellor Jim Petro, the head of the state's higher-education system. Petro told the Ohio Board of Regents last week that he plans to implement several innovative programs this year -- even if university officials oppose them.

"Clearly there has to be a motivational weakness that causes a student to start college and not finish," Petro said. "The notion is to give recognition at every stage of the program."

He proposes a pilot project giving students a Certificate of Career Readiness if they attend college for one year and pass a standardized test. That would help them if they leave school and look for a job, Petro said.

After two years of study, a qualified student would receive an associate degree, even at four-year universities.

And community-college students, who often work or have family obligations, would be offered year-round block scheduling in their academic area. For example, they could attend school from 8 a.m. to noon five days a week for 18 months and receive an associate degree.

"Every day I wake up and wonder, 'What can we do to get more degrees and complete degrees?' " Petro told the regents. "Only 36 percent or 37 percent of Ohioans have two- or four-year degrees. Ohio's economic fortune is tied to our initiative."

Kasich agrees.

In a recent meeting with Plain Dealer editors and reporters, he said he has told college leaders to make a pledge to students.

"Don't enroll students without being committed to graduating them," the governor said.

Petro told the regents that while many factors affect whether a student graduates, colleges have to address what he considers the main barriers.

"The first is time," he said. "The longer it takes, the less likely someone will get a degree. Next is choice. We are giving students too many choices."

He also said schools have to make it clearer to students how to achieve a degree.

"The degree is the deal -- not the major," the chancellor said.

Petro said he plans to implement his "Roadmap to Success" first as pilot programs at Central State University and Shawnee State University, the public schools with the lowest graduation rates. He was ordered last year by the state legislature, which provides financial supplements to those two institutions, to develop plans for the schools to improve.

Petro hopes to expand the program to other universities with low graduation rates, including Cleveland State University and the University of Akron.

CSU President Ronald Berkman and University of Akron President Luis Proenza have said they believe the benchmark to measure graduation rates is flawed because it is based on first-time full-time freshmen students. Most of their students attend part-time, drop out and return, or transfer in.

But they acknowledge that they want more students to graduate. Their universities, and others across the state, are implementing numerous programs to address the issue, including a method that allows students to track their academic progress and intensive advising through which students are contacted weekly to make sure they are on track for a degree.

Both Berkman and Proenza said Petro's ideas have merit.

"A lot of four-year universities think associate degrees mean they have lower standards, but in the sense it will give [students] a milestone, it is fantastic," Proenza said of awarding a degree after two years of study.

Berkman said CSU plans to initiate several programs this fall to improve retention, aimed at eliminating what he calls the "crapshoot of registering for classes."

All freshmen will have block programming, classes scheduled in blocks of time on specific days, such as Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, he said.

In addition, all students will be able to register for a full academic year of classes in the fall, making CSU the first school in the state to offer such an option, Berkman said.

"It will guarantee them the courses and allow them to choose more intelligently," he said. "We are doing everything we can to help the kids understand what they have to do to graduate."

Cuyahoga Community College President Jerry Sue Thornton said Petro plans to meet with community-college leaders today. She expects a focus on retention and graduation.

Tri-C offers scheduling so students can arrange classes for mornings, afternoons or evenings but has not offered the courses in blocks tied to specific degree programs, which Petro is proposing, she said.

"What he wants to do is take clusters or schedules and advertise it as a block," she said. "You can sit down with the student and map it out. It is a great idea, and we have the structure to do it."

Thornton said graduation rates at community colleges are traditionally low because most students attend part time and need more than two years to complete a degree.

"This coming year we are working with every student on a life plan," she said. "We are asking them, 'Where do you want to end up?' and determining what is the pathway to get there."

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News Headline: TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name: THOMAS J. SHEERAN
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND — The high-profile corruption trial of a longtime Democratic power broker in Cleveland has drawn some unusual TV coverage – puppets playing the roles of courtroom figures and re-enacting alleged bribe deals.

"It's a satirical look at the trial and, again, I think we have it appropriately placed at the end of the newscast," WOIO news director Dan Salamone said Thursday.

He said the puppets are in addition to the station's regular coverage of the Akron federal trial of ex-Cuyahoga County Commissioner Jimmy Dimora.

"It's not intended in any way to replace any of the serious coverage of the trial," Salamone said.

Dimora, a former county Democratic chairman in Cleveland, has pleaded not guilty to bribery and racketeering. He also faces another trial on a second indictment.

With cameras barred from court, the news media has relied on artist sketches of the proceedings inside and daily video of Dimora walking into court with his wife and his defense team.

The station uses the puppets repeating testimony and performing as witnesses, reporters and jurors to detail the case, which began last week and is expected to last three months. The trial has been a daily staple of front-page coverage in The Plain Dealer newspaper and often leads TV newscasts in town.

According to Salamone, the puppets are meant to lampoon the sometimes-steamy testimony, including details of a topless hot tub excursion in Las Vegas and taped phone calls with off-color and often unprintable comments.

The station is awaiting the arrival of an updated puppet that looks like the newly clean-shaven Dimora. For now, the station has been showing the back of a puppet's head that doesn't resemble Dimora, Salamone said.

And if Dimora grows his familiar salt-and-pepper beard back? "We've asked for some accessories in the event that he might decide to regrow his beard," Salamone said.

The puppets perform near the end of the late newscasts on WOIO and its sister station, WUAB. The stations started using them on Tuesday.

At that point in the newscast, Salamone said, "People are accustomed to seeing a lighter story, what is often called a `kicker' story."

Salamone said viewers are in for another lookalike puppet debut when Dimora's longtime friend and political ally, former Cuyahoga County Auditor Frank Russo, testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence.

Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that to go on the air because it was dull and boring," he said.

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News Headline: TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Boston Globe - Online
Contact Name: Thomas J. Sheeran
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND—The high-profile corruption trial of a longtime Democratic power broker in Cleveland has drawn some unusual TV coverage -- puppets playing the roles of courtroom figures and re-enacting alleged bribe deals.

"It's a satirical look at the trial and, again, I think we have it appropriately placed at the end of the newscast," WOIO news director Dan Salamone said Thursday.

He said the puppets are in addition to the station's regular coverage of the Akron federal trial of ex-Cuyahoga County Commissioner Jimmy Dimora.

"It's not intended in any way to replace any of the serious coverage of the trial," Salamone said.

Dimora, a former county Democratic chairman in Cleveland, has pleaded not guilty to bribery and racketeering. He also faces another trial on a second indictment.

With cameras barred from court, the news media has relied on artist sketches of the proceedings inside and daily video of Dimora walking into court with his wife and his defense team.

The station uses the puppets repeating testimony and performing as witnesses, reporters and jurors to detail the case, which began last week and is expected to last three months. The trial has been a daily staple of front-page coverage in The Plain Dealer newspaper and often leads TV newscasts in town.

According to Salamone, the puppets are meant to lampoon the sometimes-steamy testimony, including details of a topless hot tub excursion in Las Vegas and taped phone calls with off-color and often unprintable comments.

The station is awaiting the arrival of an updated puppet that looks like the newly clean-shaven Dimora. For now, the station has been showing the back of a puppet's head that doesn't resemble Dimora, Salamone said.

And if Dimora grows his familiar salt-and-pepper beard back? "We've asked for some accessories in the event that he might decide to regrow his beard," Salamone said.

The puppets perform near the end of the late newscasts on WOIO and its sister station, WUAB. The stations started using them on Tuesday.

At that point in the newscast, Salamone said, "People are accustomed to seeing a lighter story, what is often called a `kicker' story."

Salamone said viewers are in for another lookalike puppet debut when Dimora's longtime friend and political ally, former Cuyahoga County Auditor Frank Russo, testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence.

Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that to go on the air because it was dull and boring," he said.

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News Headline: TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: CBSNews.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (AP) CLEVELAND — The high-profile corruption trial of a longtime Democratic power broker in Cleveland has drawn some unusual TV coverage — puppets playing the roles of courtroom figures and re-enacting alleged bribe deals.

"It's a satirical look at the trial and, again, I think we have it appropriately placed at the end of the newscast," WOIO news director Dan Salamone said Thursday.

He said the puppets are in addition to the station's regular coverage of the Akron federal trial of ex-Cuyahoga County Commissioner Jimmy Dimora.

"It's not intended in any way to replace any of the serious coverage of the trial," Salamone said.

Dimora, a former county Democratic chairman in Cleveland, has pleaded not guilty to bribery and racketeering. He also faces another trial on a second indictment.

With cameras barred from court, the news media has relied on artist sketches of the proceedings inside and daily video of Dimora walking into court with his wife and his defense team.

The station uses the puppets repeating testimony and performing as witnesses, reporters and jurors to detail the case, which began last week and is expected to last three months. The trial has been a daily staple of front-page coverage in The Plain Dealer newspaper and often leads TV newscasts in town.

According to Salamone, the puppets are meant to lampoon the sometimes-steamy testimony, including details of a topless hot tub excursion in Las Vegas and taped phone calls with off-color and often unprintable comments.

The station is awaiting the arrival of an updated puppet that looks like the newly clean-shaven Dimora. For now, the station has been showing the back of a puppet's head that doesn't resemble Dimora, Salamone said.

And if Dimora grows his familiar salt-and-pepper beard back? "We've asked for some accessories in the event that he might decide to regrow his beard," Salamone said.

The puppets perform near the end of the late newscasts on WOIO and its sister station, WUAB. The stations started using them on Tuesday.

At that point in the newscast, Salamone said, "People are accustomed to seeing a lighter story, what is often called a 'kicker' story."

Salamone said viewers are in for another lookalike puppet debut when Dimora's longtime friend and political ally, former Cuyahoga County Auditor Frank Russo, testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence.

Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that to go on the air because it was dull and boring," he said.

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News Headline: TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Today Show - NBC News Network - Online
Contact Name: THOMAS J. SHEERAN
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND (AP) - The high-profile corruption trial of a longtime Democratic power broker in Cleveland has drawn some unusual TV coverage - puppets playing the roles of courtroom figures and re-enacting alleged bribe deals.

"It's a satirical look at the trial and, again, I think we have it appropriately placed at the end of the newscast," WOIO news director Dan Salamone said Thursday.

He said the puppets are in addition to the station's regular coverage of the Akron federal trial of ex-Cuyahoga County Commissioner Jimmy Dimora.

"It's not intended in any way to replace any of the serious coverage of the trial," Salamone said.

Dimora, a former county Democratic chairman in Cleveland, has pleaded not guilty to bribery and racketeering. He also faces another trial on a second indictment.

With cameras barred from court, the news media has relied on artist sketches of the proceedings inside and daily video of Dimora walking into court with his wife and his defense team.

The station uses the puppets repeating testimony and performing as witnesses, reporters and jurors to detail the case, which began last week and is expected to last three months. The trial has been a daily staple of front-page coverage in The Plain Dealer newspaper and often leads TV newscasts in town.

According to Salamone, the puppets are meant to lampoon the sometimes-steamy testimony, including details of a topless hot tub excursion in Las Vegas and taped phone calls with off-color and often unprintable comments.

The station is awaiting the arrival of an updated puppet that looks like the newly clean-shaven Dimora. For now, the station has been showing the back of a puppet's head that doesn't resemble Dimora, Salamone said.

And if Dimora grows his familiar salt-and-pepper beard back? "We've asked for some accessories in the event that he might decide to regrow his beard," Salamone said.

The puppets perform near the end of the late newscasts on WOIO and its sister station, WUAB. The stations started using them on Tuesday.

At that point in the newscast, Salamone said, "People are accustomed to seeing a lighter story, what is often called a 'kicker' story."

Salamone said viewers are in for another lookalike puppet debut when Dimora's longtime friend and political ally, former Cuyahoga County Auditor Frank Russo, testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence.

Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that to go on the air because it was dull and boring," he said.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets (Idsvoog) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: National / World News 3:11 a.m. Friday, January 20, 2012

TV covering high-profile Ohio trial with puppets

By THOMAS J. SHEERAN

The Associated Press

CLEVELAND - The high-profile corruption trial of a longtime Democratic power broker in Cleveland has drawn some unusual TV coverage - puppets playing the roles of courtroom figures and re-enacting alleged bribe deals.

"It's a satirical look at the trial and, again, I think we have it appropriately placed at the end of the newscast," WOIO news director Dan Salamone said Thursday.

He said the puppets are in addition to the station's regular coverage of the Akron federal trial of ex-Cuyahoga County Commissioner Jimmy Dimora.

"It's not intended in any way to replace any of the serious coverage of the trial," Salamone said.

Dimora, a former county Democratic chairman in Cleveland, has pleaded not guilty to bribery and racketeering. He also faces another trial on a second indictment.

With cameras barred from court, the news media has relied on artist sketches of the proceedings inside and daily video of Dimora walking into court with his wife and his defense team.

The station uses the puppets repeating testimony and performing as witnesses, reporters and jurors to detail the case, which began last week and is expected to last three months. The trial has been a daily staple of front-page coverage in The Plain Dealer newspaper and often leads TV newscasts in town.

According to Salamone, the puppets are meant to lampoon the sometimes-steamy testimony, including details of a topless hot tub excursion in Las Vegas and taped phone calls with off-color and often unprintable comments.

The station is awaiting the arrival of an updated puppet that looks like the newly clean-shaven Dimora. For now, the station has been showing the back of a puppet's head that doesn't resemble Dimora, Salamone said.

And if Dimora grows his familiar salt-and-pepper beard back? "We've asked for some accessories in the event that he might decide to regrow his beard," Salamone said.

The puppets perform near the end of the late newscasts on WOIO and its sister station, WUAB. The stations started using them on Tuesday.

At that point in the newscast, Salamone said, "People are accustomed to seeing a lighter story, what is often called a 'kicker' story."

Salamone said viewers are in for another lookalike puppet debut when Dimora's longtime friend and political ally, former Cuyahoga County Auditor Frank Russo, testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence.

Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that to go on the air because it was dull and boring," he said.

___

January 20, 2012 03:11 AM EST

Copyright 2012, The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Inside AJC.COM

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News Headline: Cleveland television station covering high-profile Ohio bribery trial with on-air puppet help (Idsvoog) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND (AP) — The high-profile corruption trial of a longtime Democratic power broker in Cleveland has drawn some unusual TV coverage — puppets playing the roles of courtroom figures and re-enacting alleged bribe deals.

"It's a satirical look at the trial and, again, I think we have it appropriately placed at the end of the newscast," WOIO news director Dan Salamone said Thursday.

He said the puppets are in addition to the station's regular coverage of the Akron federal trial of ex-Cuyahoga County Commissioner Jimmy Dimora.

"It's not intended in any way to replace any of the serious coverage of the trial," Salamone said.

Dimora, a former county Democratic chairman in Cleveland, has pleaded not guilty to bribery and racketeering. He also faces another trial on a second indictment.

With cameras barred from court, the news media has relied on artist sketches of the proceedings inside and daily video of Dimora walking into court with his wife and his defense team.

The station uses the puppets repeating testimony and performing as witnesses, reporters and jurors to detail the case, which began last week and is expected to last three months. The trial has been a daily staple of front-page coverage in The Plain Dealer newspaper and often leads TV newscasts in town.

According to Salamone, the puppets are meant to lampoon the sometimes-steamy testimony, including details of a topless hot tub excursion in Las Vegas and taped phone calls with off-color and often unprintable comments.

The station is awaiting the arrival of an updated puppet that looks like the newly clean-shaven Dimora. For now, the station has been showing the back of a puppet's head that doesn't resemble Dimora, Salamone said.

And if Dimora grows his familiar salt-and-pepper beard back? "We've asked for some accessories in the event that he might decide to regrow his beard," Salamone said.

The puppets perform near the end of the late newscasts on WOIO and its sister station, WUAB. The stations started using them on Tuesday.

At that point in the newscast, Salamone said, "People are accustomed to seeing a lighter story, what is often called a 'kicker' story."

Salamone said viewers are in for another lookalike puppet debut when Dimora's longtime friend and political ally, former Cuyahoga County Auditor Frank Russo, testifies for the prosecution. Russo has pleaded guilty to taking bribes and hopes his cooperation will trim his nearly 22-year sentence.

Karl Idsvoog, of Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Thursday that the puppet show didn't work. "Why would anyone approve that to go on the air because it was dull and boring," he said.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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News Headline: Street vacation sent to council | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - City Council will be asked to consider vacating a portion of a street on which a local company has built a tank "farm" at the recommendation of the city Planning Commission.

Officials of the North Star Coal Co., which is part of Parsons Coal Co., asked to have vacated a portion of Union Street that is located between Norfolk Southern Combined rail line and the approximate low water line of the Ohio River.

According to planning Director Bill Cowan, the company is consolidating numerous parcels of its property into one lot and during a survey, it was discovered its storage tanks had been built on a portion of Union Street.

The Planning Commission met Tuesday to consider the request and decided to recommend the vacation to council.

Cowan said after the meeting the upper portion of Union Street was vacated last year at the request of Kent State University and that the lower portion is not currently being used.

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News Headline: County sales-tax purse grows | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Jon Baker
News OCR Text: Tuscarawas County's sales tax receipts continue to rise, with the county receiving $75,000 more this month than it did in January 2011.

Officials attribute much of that increase to the oil and gas boom.

The sales tax is collected by the state and then returned to the county after a three-month lag, so collections reflect an increase in retail sales in October. The increase means that residents spent $7.5 million more on taxable goods than they did in October 2010 – or that each resident spent an additional $83.94 on items other than groceries, which are tax-exempt.

This rise in purchasing also meant that the state of Ohio collected an additional $400,000 in sales taxes.

“It would be nice if some of that could stay in Tuscarawas County,” Treasurer Jeff Mamarella said.

These figures mean that things are looking up for the local economy, he said.

Most of the increase is coming from the sale of big items, such as vehicles and farm machinery, Mamarella said, with the money coming from landowners receiving leasing bonuses from oil and gas companies.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia is also helping to bring more people into the area, he added.

This news doesn't mean that Tuscarawas County's government is flush with cash, though.

The county has lost significant funding because of cuts in the Local Government Fund from the state, and historically low interest rates have slashed the county's income from its investments.

“We're trying to make up for the cuts from the state,” Mamarella said.

County Auditor Larry Lindberg added that increased sales tax receipts merely offset other losses in revenue.Tuscarawas County's sales tax receipts continue to rise, with the county receiving $75,000 more this month than it did in January 2011.

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News Headline: UA administrator is a candidate for Kent State post | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tuscaloosa News - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University of Alabama associate provost and graduate school dean David Francko is one of four candidates in the running to become the next provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Kent State University.

The announcement was made on Kent State's website. On-campus interviews for the position begin with Francko on Monday.

"It's something that I feel I need to look into at this point. All the folks on campus that need to know, know and they're actually my references," Francko said Thursday afternoon. "I'm just going to see what they have to say and we'll go from there."

Provost Judy Bonner, UA executive vice president and provost, said she is aware of the opportunity and praised Francko for his work at UA.

"He is doing an outstanding job here as dean of the graduate school and associate provost. We would certainly hate to see him leave, but understand fully that he needs to look at opportunities that may be available," Bonner said.

According to the website, Francko will be at Kent State Monday and Tuesday and will be available at open forums for undergraduate students, faculty and staff and graduate students Monday afternoon.

The forums will be streamed live on the Kent State website.

In addition, Francko will meet with Kent State vice presidents, deans, chairs and directors and other faculty and administrative groups during his visit.

"We encourage members of the faculty, staff, students and members of the public to participate in the visits," said Daniel Mahony, search committee chair and education, health and human services dean. "We look forward to introducing these accomplished candidates to our university community and listening to your feedback."

The three other candidates for the position are:

- Timothy S. Moerland, Kent State arts and sciences dean

- Bernard Mair, University of Florida associate provost for undergraduate affairs

- Todd Diacon, University of Massachusetts Amherst deputy chancellor.

The four candidates were selected in a national search by a 28-member search committee including representatives of the university's faculty, students, administration and staff.

According to the site, Kent State President Lester A. Lefton plans to make his final selection by the end of February.

In addition to serving as the graduate school dean, Francko has also brought attention to UA through FreezePruf.

While teaching botany at Ohio's Miami University in 2005, Francko began work on FreezePruf, a spray that increases a plant's tolerance to low temperatures by as much as 10 degrees.

Soon after Francko became the dean of the University of Alabama graduate school in August 2006, the spray was completed and UA now owns it as intellectual property.

The spray became available in stores in 2009.

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News Headline: Ohio State experts to appear in Ohio Organic Farming Conference | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Newark Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GRANVILLE -- Experts from Ohio State University will give presentations at a dozen of the workshops at this year's Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association annual conference, whose theme is "Sowing the Seeds of Our Food Sovereignty."

The program will take place Feb. 18-19 in Granville.

The conference's keynote speakers are Woody Tasch, chairman of the Slow Money Alliance, on "Slow Money: Investing as if Food, Farms and Fertility Matter," and Andrew Kimbrell, a leading environmental attorney and the founder and executive director of the Center for Food Safety and the International Center for Technology Assessment, on "The Future of Food."

The workshops cover topics such as mulches, cover crops, composting, food safety, growing berries, growing field crops, grower co-ops, aquaculture, livestock production, season extension, social investing, small-space gardening, companion planting, edible landscaping, renewable energy and organic certification.

Lectures include:

» "Brix Levels as an Indicator of Vegetable Quality" by Natalie Bumgarner, Matt Kleinhenz and Joe Scheerens, all of the OSU Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 18.

» "Identifying and Managing Beneficial Insects in Vegetable Crops" by Jim Jasinski, an OSU Extension educator, and Celeste Welty, Mary Gardiner and Parwinder Grewal, all of the Department of Entomology, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 18.

» "Producing Grass-fed Beef and Lamb" by Jeff McCutcheon, of OSU Extension's Forage Team, and Bob Hendershot, grassland conservationist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 18.

» "Sow It, Grow It, Sell It ... Safely!" by Troy Cooper, an OSU Extension educator and certified food safety instructor; part 1, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 18; part 2, from 1:45 to 2:40 p.m. Feb. 18.

» "Nutritional Nuances of Pastured Poultry" by Mike Lilburn, of the Department of Animal Sciences, from 10:35 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 18.

» "OFFERings: Charting Future Directions for Organic Research in Ohio" by Brian McSpadden Gardener, new director of Ohio State's Organic Food and Farming Education and Research Program, from 1:45 to 2:40 p.m. Feb. 18.

» "Plant Residues in Organic Vegetable Production: A Look Back and Ahead on the Pros and Cons" by Kleinhenz, McSpadden Gardener, Mark Bennett, of the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, and Sally Miller, of the Department of Plant Pathology, from 2:50 to 3:45 p.m. Feb. 18.

» "Managing Organic Soil Fertility to Improve Spelt Bread Quality" by Larry Phelan, of the Department of Entomology, from 2:50 to 3:45 p.m. Feb. 18.

» "The Role of Cooperatives in Marketing" by Bob Cohen, an Ohio State instructor and program coordinator at Kent State University's Cooperative Development Center, from 2:50 to 3:45 p.m. Feb. 18.

» "Pumpkins, Squash and Bugs -- Oh My!" by Welty and Melinda O'Briant, of Turner Organic Farm, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 19.

» "Are You Market-Ready?" (selling directly to restaurants, supermarkets, and other wholesale and retail outlets) by OSU Extension educators Mike Hogan and Julie Fox, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 19.

In addition to the workshops, there will be an exhibit hall; book signings; a kids' conference; Feb. 17 pre-conference programs on slow money and no-till; and talks by Jeff Moyer of the Rodale Institute, Gary Zimmer, of Midwestern Bio-Ag, and Dan Ravicher, a patent law professor and executive director of the Public Patent Foundation.

Information about the schedule, all the speakers and how to register are at www.oeffa.org, or contact OEFFA Program Director Renee Hunt, (614) 421-2022, ext. 205, or renee@oeffa.org.

Compiled from submitted reports.

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News Headline: Author seeks memories for book on Ray's Place | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A book celebrating 75 years of locally-owned, downtown Kent restaurant and pub Ray's Place will share the stories of its employees and customers over the years.

Kent State University Associate Professor Patrick O'Connor of the School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies, and author of the book, is seeking contributions to the publication that will celebrate the restaurant as it marks its 75th anniversary.

The bulk of the book will feature fond, funny, sentimental or weird memories of Ray's Place shared by employees and customers. Submissions for the book can be made via the Ray's Place website.

Contributors also have the opportunity to suggest a title for the book, which will be published in spring 2013 by the Kent State University Press. Proceeds from the book will support the Ray's Place Entrepreneurship Scholarship program for Kent State University's College of Business Administration.

For more information, email O'Connor at poconnor@kent.edu.

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