Report Overview:
Total Clips (41)
Alumni (3)
Alumni; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Alumni; KSU Ice Arena (1)
Alumni; University Press (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Career Services Center; College of Education, Health and Human Services; Geology (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (3)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
College of Undergraduate Studies (2)
Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; KSU at Geauga (1)
Enrollment (1)
Financial Aid (1)
Geology (2)
Health Sciences (1)
Higher Education (1)
KSU at Stark (4)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS); University Administration (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Psychology (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (3)
Kent State's Julian Edelman impresses with versatility in all phases for Patriots 01/29/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Patriots' Triple Threat 01/30/2012 New York Times, The Text Attachment Email

Devo 01/28/2012 WFLC-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving,...


Alumni; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Comedian John Caparulo coming to Kent Tusc 01/30/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Alumni; KSU Ice Arena (1)
ICE FEST IN FEBRUARY 01/27/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

The Kent State University Alumni Association will host its Flash Ice Fest on Feb. 11 at the Ice Arena. This event, open to KSU alumni and the general...


Alumni; University Press (1)
About Books: Kent State planning to publish 'Funky Winkerbean' collection 01/27/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Art, School of (1)
Kent profs past and present give Busta an eyeful 01/27/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

...observant mini-retrospective on the prints, photography and paper constructions of Michael Loderstedt, a native of New Jersey and a longtime professor at Kent State University. With more than 40 works from the past few years, the show dwells on Loderstedt's playful experiments with the notion that...


Athletics (1)
KSU football: Recruiting season not easy on coaches' families 01/30/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Biological Sciences (1)
Data from Kent State University Provide New Insights into Cancer Vaccines (Koski) 01/30/2012 Cancer Vaccine Week Text Email

...peptides. Perhaps most importantly, anti-HER-2/neu peptide responses were observed up to 52-month postimmunization," wrote G.K. Koski and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "These data show that even in the presence of early breast cancer such DC1 are potent...


Career Services Center; College of Education, Health and Human Services; Geology (1)
Hiring predictions on the rise for grads (Motayar) 01/30/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (3)
North Canton to unveil master plan at meeting 01/28/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...City officials have wanted a master plan for several years. Wednesday's program is the culmination of six months of community meetings and work with the Kent State Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. "It's a very thorough, provoking document," said Doug Lane, president of the North Canton Area...

Videos :: Bridge Project & Pop-Up City 01/29/2012 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

...Building, a Leap Night fest on the East Bank of the Flats, a Pop-Up Dog Park on the Steelyard Commons Towpath Trail. She works with her students at the Kent State Design Collective and collaborates with small and large groups to showcase under-appreciated public spaces. Next, Schwarz is working...

Videos :: Popping Up On Euclid Avenue: Urban Design Takes On The Region 01/29/2012 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

...invigorated overlooked spaces throughout the region, and now wants to reinvent retail on Euclid Avenue. Watch the video . As Interim Director of the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative, she is overseeing their recent move to Playhouse Square, centralizing their efforts to work with community...


College of Business (COB) (1)
Spirit of Women In Business 01/29/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM Kent State University will host its second Spirit of Women in Business Conference with the theme “The Empowered Woman,” from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March...


College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Pointing the way in Kent 01/30/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
District says IB program, training to continue status quo at Indian Trail (Mahony) 01/29/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...she feels that money should not be used to fund the IB Program. Daniel Mahony, of Stow, dean of the College of Education Health and Human Services at Kent State University, told the Board and the audience the college decided to embed IB into their education program because of the direction education...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
CCCTC shows off new health sciences wing 01/29/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...continuing on for a registered nursing degree can attend a college nursing program including those offered locally by Eastern Gateway Community College, Kent State University, Youngstown State University or others. Those not certain if they are ready to jump into the nursing field, but who...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Effects of amines on formation of sub-3 nm particles and their subsequent growth 01/27/2012 Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans Text Attachment Email

...enhancement of amines is related to their basicity Our lab study has measured aerosol precursors and sub-3 nm particles College of Public Health, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA Atmospheric Science Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA College of Public...


College of Undergraduate Studies (2)
Kent State Names New Dean of Undergraduate Studies (Lefton) 01/30/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State Announces New Dean of Undergraduate Studies 01/27/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Jan.27 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University has named Dr.Said Sewell as its new dean of Undergraduate...


Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Job help, networking events: Business calendar 01/28/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

THURSDAY Kent State University's Center for Corporate and Professional Development, Breakfast Briefing for Human Resource Professionals: 8 to 10:30 a.m. at...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (1)
NAACP celebrates legacy of Martin Luther King 01/30/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; KSU at Geauga (1)
Kent State Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. 01/30/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Enrollment (1)
Kent State Sets New All-Time Record For Spring Enrollment 01/30/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Financial Aid (1)
SAP is a bandage, not cure 01/27/2012 Jambar, Youngstown State University - Online Text Attachment Email

...losing financial aid, enrollment numbers will continue to plummet. Some of the students will drop out of college altogether. Some will find their way to Kent State University or the University of Akron. The transfer students will be the ones with completion percentage issues, the perpetual...


Geology (2)
Less concern about local wells (Eckstein) 01/27/2012 News-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...injects thousands of gallons of hazardous waste materials into a porous bed of rock at a pressure low enough not to fracture any stone, Lonneman said. Kent State University hydrogeology Professor Yoram Eckstein agreed, saying the geology beneath Sandusky and Ottawa counties is significantly different...

Experts: NW Ohio injection wells not as controversial (Eckstein) 01/27/2012 Fremont News Messenger - Online Text Attachment Email

...injects thousands of gallons of hazardous waste materials into a porous bed of rock at a pressure low enough not to fracture any stone, Lonneman said. Kent State University hydrogeology Professor Yoram Eckstein agreed, saying the geology beneath Sandusky and Ottawa counties is significantly different...


Health Sciences (1)
Parkinson's study explores improved function (Ridgel) 01/28/2012 Bandera County Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...individuals with Parkinson's disease can improve impaired cognitive function through passive leg cycling. An assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State University recently published research showing a correlation between individuals with Parkinson's disease riding a motorized bike and significant...


Higher Education (1)
Studying in the Midwest of the USA, Ohio University Graduate Schools 01/29/2012 Zimbio.com Text Attachment Email

...courses to science subjects at the University of Ohio. Whatever your interests, it is likely that you will find something to suit your future career at ohio university graduate school. Founded in 1804 in the Midwestern United States,Ohio University is a popular public university. There are more...


KSU at Stark (4)
Roosevelt Students' Artwork Headed to National Competition 01/30/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State Stark hosts campus preview 01/27/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Stark hosts campus preview Kent State University at Stark will host a campus preview Feb. 4 for high school juniors, seniors and...

Dover, Garaway students win art awards 01/28/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Tuscarawas, Stark, Summit, Wayne, Medina and Portage counties were submitted. The artworks awarded gold and silver keys will be on display until Feb. 3 in the Kent State University Stark Campus Center and Fine Arts Building. Receiving gold keys from Dover were Olivia Belknap, Trevor Poole, Tony Peterson...

Area students earn Scholastic Art Awards honors - SSNL 01/27/2012 Leader Publications - Online Text Attachment Email

1/26/2012 - South Side Leader JACKSON — Kent State University at Stark is hosting the 58th annual North East Central Ohio (NECO) Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibit through Feb. 2 in the Campus...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Raising the bar (Ritter) 01/29/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...could include things like a unique skill set or an expanded role," she said. James Ritter, director of enrollment management and student services at Kent State University at Trumbull, said it is important not to blindside a supervisor when wanting to discuss such an important issue. "(The employee...


KSU Museum (1)
2Do: museums, parks, family events and more for Jan. 27-Feb. 2, 2012 01/27/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

MUSEUMS Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until...


Library and Information Science (SLIS); University Administration (1)
Storytime at Kent State Library 01/30/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
COPE program seeks grandmothers for project on raising grandchildren 01/27/2012 Baltimore Times Inc. Newspapers - Online Text Attachment Email

...poverty. The national study, which will enroll more than 500 grandmothers is led by project principal investigators, Gregory Smith Ph.D. professor at Kent State University and Bert Hayslip, PhD. regents professor of Psychology at the University of North Texas. In Maryland, 126 grandmothers are...


Psychology (1)
Effects of early albuterol (salbutamol) administration on the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms. 01/29/2012 BioPortfolio Text Attachment Email

...weeks and less severe reexperiencing symptoms at 1 year post-MVA than those who did not receive albuterol. Affiliation Department of Psychology, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA; Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. Journal Details...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Book to toast Ray's Place, a Kent fixture (O'Connor) 01/28/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...celebrating 75 years of locally owned, downtown Kent restaurant and pub Ray's Place will share the stories of its employees and customers over the years. Kent State University Associate Professor Patrick O'Connor of the School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies, and author of the book, is...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Audition list for Jan. 27 and beyond 01/27/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University. Seeking an African American boy age 6-9 and no higher than 45 inches for the role of Coalhouse Walker III in "Ragtime." The...


Town-Gown (1)
Historic district zone eyed for downtown Kent 01/30/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State's Julian Edelman impresses with versatility in all phases for Patriots | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Julian Edelman's role models in football have gradually evolved.

As an undersized quarterback with a big arm growing up in Redwood City, Calif., he wanted to be the next Doug Flutie.
As a dual-threat quarterback at Kent State, he became the next Josh Cribbs, his 3,371 yards of total offense in 2008 breaking Cribbs' single-season record.
Now in his third year as a wide receiver and kick returner with the New England Patriots, Edelman has turned into Troy Brown.
Edelman has played three ways this season for the Patriots, who are headed to Super Bowl XLVI in Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis for a rematch next Sunday with the New York Giants. The Patriots hope to avenge a 17-14 Super Bowl loss to the Giants in 2007.
Edelman, 5-foot-10 and 198 pounds, caught just four passes for 34 yards in 2011. The seventh-round pick in 2009 also returned punts and kickoffs, earning AFC special teams player of the week honors after scoring on a 72-yard punt return Nov. 21 against the Kansas City Chiefs. Edelman brought back 28 punts for a 10.7-yard average, sixth in the AFC and trailing the Browns' Cribbs, who was third (11.4). Edelman's 12 kickoffs weren't enough to qualify for the league list, although he averaged 23.7 yards.
Edelman holds the franchise record for the highest single-season, punt-return average of 15.3 yards, which he set in 2010, when he led the AFC and finished second in the NFL behind the Chicago Bears' Devin Hester. Boosting that average was a team-record 94-yard punt return for a score in the regular-season finale against Miami.
But on Nov. 13 against the New York Jets, Edelman also began playing defensive back. He's following in the footsteps of Brown, a former Patriots wide receiver who made the same contribution during New England's Super Bowl run in 2004.
In last Sunday's AFC Championship victory over the Baltimore Ravens, Edelman found himself trying to cover receiver Anquan Boldin man-to-man on the Ravens' final drive. Edelman made one play, but Boldin caught four passes for 59 yards as the Ravens moved into position for Billy Cundiff's game-tying 32-yard field goal attempt, which Cundiff missed with 11 seconds left.
Playing in the slot, Edelman said he wasn't overwhelmed by the enormity of his challenge defending Boldin.
“I never really thought of it,” Edelman told the Providence Journal on Monday. “You really can't think of it like that. If you do, he'll run right by you or you won't be doing your job.”
Edelman could draw a tougher assignment against the Giants in slot receiver Victor Cruz. In his breakout season, Cruz finished ninth in the league in receiving with 82 catches for 1,536 yards and nine touchdowns. Six of Cruz's eight 100-yard games (including the postseason) came after the Giants defeated the Patriots 24-20 on Nov. 6 in Foxborough, Mass.
Similar to Vrabel
What the Patriots have done with Edelman is not out of character for coach Bill Belichick.
In 2001, he signed free-agent linebacker Mike Vrabel, an Akron native who never reached his potential with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Vrabel showed his versatility playing inside and outside and recorded 48 of his 57 career sacks for the Patriots. But he was also used at tight end in goal-line situations and finished his career with 12 receptions, all for touchdowns, including two in the Super Bowl.
In 2004, Belichick, who was aided by defensive coordinator Romeo Crennel and defensive backs coach Eric Mangini, converted Brown to defensive back. Brown finished with three interceptions, tying for second on the team, as the Patriots won their third Super Bowl in a span of four years.
When Edelman was asked to play defense, he didn't seem fazed by the switch.
“We were a little thin, and coach Belichick asked me to do it,” Edelman told the Boston Herald on Nov. 21. The Patriots were not able to accommodate an interview request for Edelman last week. “You're not going to say no to an opportunity.”
Belichick praises Edelman
Belichick said Edelman's dual role was precipitated largely by injuries, but that Edelman's athleticism has made it work.
“Julian has those skills to be able to compete at that position for the same reasons he can do that on offense,” Belichick said Thursday. “He's strong, he's quick, he's got good toughness, he's got good lateral quickness and change of direction. [Some of what] you want for the defender to cover that receiver are the same things that make him a competitive slot receiver.”
This season, the Patriots also used receiver Matthew Slater on defense when safety Patrick Chung was sidelined with a foot injury. In a conference call Jan. 17, Patriots defensive backs coach Josh Boyer praised the two-way talents of Edelman and Slater.
“With those guys being on the offensive side of the ball, they understand route concepts and what offenses are trying to do,” Boyer said. “From a technique standpoint, a lot of things that we do are a little bit different from the offensive perspective, so that takes a little bit of time. Both of those guys have been excellent. They work hard at it.”
Edelman's contributions on defense could be seen as redemption after he was arrested on a charge of indecent assault and battery for allegedly groping a woman at a Halloween party at a Boston bar.
He pleaded not guilty, and the charges were dropped in December.
Since his arrest, Edelman has ingratiated himself to Belichick with his versatility. Now Edelman can help quarterback Tom Brady and the Patriots avenge a Super Bowl XLII loss to quarterback Eli Manning and the Giants.
“I remember the Patriots lost; I remember that catch,” Edelman said last week of the ball the Giants' David Tyree miraculously trapped against his helmet four years ago. “I was going for the Patriots. I'm not even going to lie. Brady is from a town [San Mateo] next to me. I grew up rooting for him.”
Edelman was well aware of that tough day in Patriots lore, along with the contributions of Brown, who served as an honorary captain for last week's AFC Championship Game.
“I know Troy Brown pretty well; I've talked to him a couple times,” Edelman said in November. “He's a stud. He's done everything; he's like a Swiss Army knife.”
Now in Edelman the Patriots have another multipurpose “knife” who hopes to carve his own slice of history.

Return to Top



News Headline: The Patriots' Triple Threat | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: New York Times, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Super Bowl — Julian Edelman Gives Patriots 3-Way Contributor

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Julian Edelman said he never saw it coming. True, he had been a versatile performer for the New England Patriots, catching passes and returning punts and kicks. He had also set season records for total offense as a quarterback in college. But playing defense?

Julian Edelman has returned kicks and also plays defensive back for the Patriots.
That apparently came out of the ever-creative mind of Coach Bill Belichick. And when the Patriots were trying to snap a two-game losing streak in November, preparing for a crucial road game against the Jets, who were hot, Belichick had a decision to make regarding his depleted and ineffective secondary.

Players were injured. Replacements were not doing the job. So Belichick turned to Edelman, listed as a 5-foot-10 wide receiver, to start playing situational defense in the secondary. It was a first for Edelman; he had never played defense in his three seasons with the Patriots or in three years at Kent State.

“I was cool with it,” Edelman said. “They just said, ‘You're in defensive meetings today.' That's all they say. That's how it is around here. But I enjoy playing football, and anytime you can contribute to the team — that's what you're here for. That's what I like doing.”

And thus was born the N.F.L.'s latest throwback — an honest-to-goodness two-way player. His practice week is like no one else's on the team, as he darts between offensive and defensive meetings on a daily basis.

In the Patriots' 23-20 victory over the Baltimore Ravens in the A.F.C. championship game, Edelman was in for 54 snaps, 27 on offense and 27 on defense, according to research from ESPN.

His college coach, Doug Martin, saw Edelman, his former quarterback, on defense and said: “It surprised me that the Patriots did that. But it didn't surprise me that he did that. He can do anything.”

Belichick said he turned to Edelman because of the rash of injuries in the secondary and because he thought Edelman's skills would work well on either side of the ball.

“He's strong, he's quick, he's got good toughness,” Belichick said. “Some of the things that you want for the defender are the same things that he has a receiver. Julian has those skills to be able to compete at that position for the same reasons he can do that on offense.”

Edelman played both ways over those final eight games, all New England victories, starting with a 37-16 drubbing of the Jets on Nov. 13. He made his first tackle stopping LaDainian Tomlinson. He had four tackles against the Eagles, including one in the open field on Vince Young to prevent a touchdown, and five against the Bills in the season finale. He had 14 tackles in those eight games and has had one in each of the two playoff games.

During that same period, he caught only one pass, but returned 14 punts, including a 72-yarder for a touchdown, and returned two kickoffs (a duty that since has been ceded to Danny Woodhead). Here's what he has yet to do with the Patriots: attempt a pass. He threw for nearly 5,000 yards and 30 touchdowns in three years at Kent State, so it could be only a matter of time before Belichick asks Edelman to do that as well. Maybe even in Super Bowl XLVI?

“No one is surprised at anything around here,” Edelman said.

That Edelman is even in the Patriots' picture is a testament to his versatility and to the creative thinking that has characterized the Belichick era. Edelman was a star high school quarterback in California, but, as he put it: “I was maybe 5-7, 160 pounds, so junior college was the only option. I was a real late bloomer.”

In 2006, Martin thought he needed a new quarterback at Kent State and scoured the junior-college scene in California for a ready-to-play signal caller. One name continually surfaced: Julian Edelman at San Mateo Junior College. Martin had to explain to Edelman the whole Kent State package, from its location (“He had never heard of it and had no clue where it was,” Martin said of the university in Ohio) to its rather underwhelming history (two winning seasons in the previous 25 years.)

But Martin gave Edelman what Edelman wanted: a chance to start. Boise State was also in the picture, but it wanted Edelman to stay in junior college another year. So Edelman went to Kent State, where he started for three years.

“He went up to the guy who had started the year before and told him, ‘I'm getting ready to take your job,' ” Martin said. “And that's exactly what he did. He changed the whole personality of our team. He really could have played anywhere. But we wanted the ball in his hands.”

Kent State won six games in Edelman's first year, the most since 1987. By the time Edelman was a senior, Martin started using him on special teams, concluding that would be the only way he would have a chance to play in the N.F.L.

“I certainly wasn't planning on playing quarterback in the N.F.L.,” Edelman said. “I was too small. But I like the idea of doing whatever you can do, the more versatility the better.”

The Patriots worked out Edelman three times, then chose him in the seventh round of the 2009 draft, 232nd over all. Five months later, he was starting against the Jets in the second game of the season and catching eight passes for 98 yards.

He subbed for Wes Welker in the 2009 playoff game against Baltimore. He set a franchise record with a 94-yard punt return against Miami in the 2010 season. He is the franchise leader in average punt-return yardage for a season and for a career.

This season, he has been recognized by the team for his work leading into both Denver games (when he played the role of Tim Tebow), earning the coveted “black shirt,” given to the player who best prepared the team for its next game. He earned another black jersey earlier this season.

He is probably the only New England player who will be studying film of Eli Manning and of Antrel Rolle this week. For someone who was taken by surprise over the dual roles, he seems to have made the adjustment just fine.

Return to Top



News Headline: Devo | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: WFLC-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Devo

favorite

Artist Snapshot:

Biography

One of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving, mankind has actually regressed, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society. Their music echoed this view of society as rigid, repressive, and mechanical, with appropriate touches -- jerky, robotic rhythms; an obsession with technology and electronics (the group was among the first non-prog rock bands to make the synthesizer a core element); often atonal melodies and chord progressions -- all of which were filtered through the perspectives of geeky misfits. Devo became a cult sensation, helped in part by their concurrent emphasis on highly stylized visuals, and briefly broke through to the mainstream with the smash single "Whip It," whose accompanying video was made a staple by the fledgling MTV network. Sometimes resembling a less forbidding version of the Residents, Devo's simple, basic electronic pop sound proved very influential, but it was also somewhat limited, and as other bands began expanding on the group's ideas, Devo seemed unable to keep pace. After a series of largely uninteresting albums, the band called it quits early in the '90s, and Casale and Mothersbaugh concentrated on other projects.

Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh both attended art school at Kent State University at the outset of the '70s. With friend Bob Lewis, who joined an early version of Devo and later became their manager, the theory of de-evolution was developed with the aid of a book entitled {-The Beginning Was the End: Knowledge Can Be Eaten}, which held that mankind had evolved from mutant, brain-eating apes. The trio adapted the theory to fit their view of American society as a rigid, dichotomized instrument of repression which ensured that its members behaved like clones, marching through life with mechanical, assembly-line precision and no tolerance for ambiguity. The whole concept was treated as an elaborate joke until Casale witnessed the infamous National Guard killings of student protesters at the university; suddenly there seemed to be a legitimate point to be made. The first incarnation of Devo was formed in earnest in 1972, with Casale (bass), Mark Mothersbaugh (vocals), and Mark's brothers Bob (lead guitar) and Jim, who played homemade electronic drums. Jerry's brother Bob joined as an additional guitarist, and Jim left the band to be replaced by Alan Myers. The group honed its sound and approach for several years (a period chronicled on Rykodisc's Hardcore compilations of home recordings), releasing a few singles on its own {%Booji Boy} label and inventing more bizarre concepts: Mothersbaugh dressed in a baby-faced mask as {%Booji Boy} (pronounced "boogie boy"), a symbol of infantile regression; there were recurring images of the potato as a lowly vegetable without individuality; the band's costumes presented them as identical clones with processed hair; and all sorts of sonic experiments were performed on records, using real and homemade synthesizers as well as toys, space heaters, toasters, and other objects. Devo's big break came with its score for the short film The Truth About De-Evolution, which won a prize at the 1976 Ann Arbor Film Festival; when the film was seen by David Bowie and Iggy Pop, they were impressed enough to secure the group a contract with Warner Bros.

Recorded under the auspices of pioneering producer Brian Eno, Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! was seen as a call to arms by some and became an underground hit. Others found Devo's sound, imagery, and material threatening; {-Rolling Stone}, for example, called the group fascists. But such criticism missed the point: Devo dramatized conformity, emotional repression, and dehumanization in order to attack them, not to pay tribute to them.

While 1979's Duty Now for the Future was another strong effort, the band broke through to the mainstream with 1980's Freedom of Choice, which contained the gold-selling single "Whip It" and represented a peak in their sometimes erratic songwriting. The video for "Whip It" became an MTV smash, juxtaposing the band's low-budget futuristic look against a down-home farm setting and hints of S&M. However, Devo's commercial success proved to be short-lived. 1981's New Traditionalists was darker and more serious, not what the public wanted from a band widely perceived as a novelty act, and Devo somehow seemed to be running out of new ideas. Problems plagued the band as well: Bob Lewis successfully sued for theft of intellectual property after a tape of Mothersbaugh was found acknowledging Lewis' role in creating de-evolution philosophy, and the sessions for 1982's Oh, No! It's Devo were marred by an ill-considered attempt to use poetry written by would-be Ronald Reagan assassin John Hinckley, Jr. as lyrical material.

As the '80s wore on, Devo found itself relegated to cult status and critical indifference, not at all helped by the lower quality of albums like 1984's Shout and 1988's Total Devo. With the band's shift toward electronic drums, Alan Myers departed in 1986, to be replaced by ex-Sparks and Gleaming Spires drummer David Kendrick. Devo recorded another album of new material, Smooth Noodle Maps, in 1990, after which its members began to concentrate on other projects. Mark Mothersbaugh moved into composing for commercials and soundtracks, writing theme music for MTV's Liquid Television, Nickelodeon's Rugrats, Pee-Wee's Playhouse, and the Jonathan Winters sitcom Davis Rules. He also played keyboards with the Rolling Stones, programmed synthesizers for Sheena Easton, and sang backup with Debbie Harry. Buoyed by this success, Mothersbaugh opened a profitable production company called Mutato Muzika, which employed his fellow Devo bandmates. Jerry Casale, meanwhile, who directed most of the band's videos, directed video clips for the Foo Fighters' "I'll Stick Around" and Soundgarden's "Blow Up the Outside World." No reunions were expected, but as Devo's legend grew and other bands acknowledged their influence (Nirvana covered "Turnaround," while "Girl U Want" has been recorded by Soundgarden, Superchunk, and even Robert Palmer), their minimalistic electro-pop was finally given new exposure on six dates of the 1996 Lollapalooza tour, to enthusiastic fan response.

The following year, Devo released a CD-ROM game ({*The Adventures of the Smart Patrol}) and accompanying music soundtrack, in addition to playing selected dates on the Lollapalooza tour. 2000 saw the release of a pair of double-disc Devo anthologies: the first was the half-hits/half-rarities Pioneers Who Got Scalped: The Anthology (on Rhino), while the second was the limited-edition mail-order release Recombo DNA (on Rhino's Handmade label), the latter of which was comprised solely of previously unreleased demos. In 2001, the Mothersbaugh and Casale brothers reunited under the name the Wipeouters for a one-off surf release, P'Twaaang!!!Casale would introduce his Jihad Jerry & the Evildoers solo project with the 2006 album Mine Is Not a Holy War. It was that same year that the band teamed with Disney for Dev2.0, a band/project/album that involved a set of pre-teens re-recording classic Devo tracks, although some lyrics were adjusted to be more family friendly. Devo got back to releasing their own material in 2007 with the downloadable single "Watch Us Work It," but a new, promised album failed to materialize. In 2008 they returned to Akron for a rare show and in support of Barack Obamas presidential campaign with all proceeds going towards the Summit County Democratic Party. After deluxe 2009 reissues of Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! and Freedom of Choice sent the band back on the road to play said albums live in their entirety, work resumed on a new album. By the end of the year, it was announced that the band had once again signed with Warner for an album originally titled "Fresh." An internet campaign where fans got to choose the full-length's 12 tracks inspired the 2010 efforts final title, Something for Everybody. ~ Steve Huey & Greg Prato, Rovi

favorite

Return to Top



News Headline: Comedian John Caparulo coming to Kent Tusc | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CANTON — I figured John Caparulo was a Kent State alumnus from the KSU T-shirts he sometimes sports during his frequent appearances on “Chelsea Lately,” the E! network's late-night talk show.

But who knew the guy spent the early part of his childhood in Jackson Township?

“If I'd stayed, I would've gone to the same high school as Ryan,” Caparulo says, referring to Ryan Basford, the 2003 Jackson grad who's been a “Chelsea Lately” staffer for four years.

At age 9, Caparulo and his family moved to East Liverpool, “a town that used to thrive on the pottery and steel industries but now thrives on Walmart,” he notes. “Your goal growing up there is to go somewhere else.”

Somewhere else proved to be KSU, where Caparulo majored in radio-TV production and started appearing at open-mic comedy nights in the area. In 1998, he moved to Los Angeles and began doggedly pursuing a career in stand-up, paying his dues as a doorman at the famed Comedy Store for two years.

That persistence paid off. In addition to being a roundtable regular on “Chelsea Lately,” Caparulo, 36, has appeared on “The Tonight Show,” starred in a Comedy Central special titled “Meet Cap,” was part of Vince Vaughn's Wild West Comedy Tour, hosted “Mobile Home Disaster” on CMT, provides the voice of Headphone Joe on the Disney Channel's “Fish Hooks,” and was a cast member in the short-lived ABC-TV sitcom “Work It.”

Most of all, Caparulo has a busy career touring the country doing stand-up. At 7:30 p.m. Feb. 11, he will appear in concert at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas County in New Philadelphia.

As upbeat, down-to-earth and candidly funny as you'd expect, Caparulo phoned the other day for some conversation. Here's how it went.

Q. I bet you're eager to leave sunny, warm L.A. for the bleak winter of Ohio.

A. I can't wait. As always, it's such a lovely trip. I still hit winter quite a bit with my road schedule. And I always come home and see my family for Christmas, even though I'm slowly trying to convince them that Christmas in L.A. is not so bad.

Q. Sorry to hear about your sitcom (“Work It”) being canceled. That was quick.

A. It aired twice. At the end of the day, it wasn't my show. I was just the brother-in-law on the cross-dressing show. But, hey, the checks cleared, so whatever. I really want to do my own show.

I figured John Caparulo was a Kent State alumnus from the KSU T-shirts he sometimes sports during his frequent appearances on “Chelsea Lately,” the E! network's late-night talk show.

But who knew the guy spent the early part of his childhood in Jackson Township?

“If I'd stayed, I would've gone to the same high school as Ryan,” Caparulo says, referring to Ryan Basford, the 2003 Jackson grad who's been a “Chelsea Lately” staffer for four years.

At age 9, Caparulo and his family moved to East Liverpool, “a town that used to thrive on the pottery and steel industries but now thrives on Walmart,” he notes. “Your goal growing up there is to go somewhere else.”

Somewhere else proved to be KSU, where Caparulo majored in radio-TV production and started appearing at open-mic comedy nights in the area. In 1998, he moved to Los Angeles and began doggedly pursuing a career in stand-up, paying his dues as a doorman at the famed Comedy Store for two years.

That persistence paid off. In addition to being a roundtable regular on “Chelsea Lately,” Caparulo, 36, has appeared on “The Tonight Show,” starred in a Comedy Central special titled “Meet Cap,” was part of Vince Vaughn's Wild West Comedy Tour, hosted “Mobile Home Disaster” on CMT, provides the voice of Headphone Joe on the Disney Channel's “Fish Hooks,” and was a cast member in the short-lived ABC-TV sitcom “Work It.”

Most of all, Caparulo has a busy career touring the country doing stand-up. At 7:30 p.m. Feb. 11, he will appear in concert at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas County in New Philadelphia.

As upbeat, down-to-earth and candidly funny as you'd expect, Caparulo phoned the other day for some conversation. Here's how it went.

Q. I bet you're eager to leave sunny, warm L.A. for the bleak winter of Ohio.

A. I can't wait. As always, it's such a lovely trip. I still hit winter quite a bit with my road schedule. And I always come home and see my family for Christmas, even though I'm slowly trying to convince them that Christmas in L.A. is not so bad.

Q. Sorry to hear about your sitcom (“Work It”) being canceled. That was quick.

A. It aired twice. At the end of the day, it wasn't my show. I was just the brother-in-law on the cross-dressing show. But, hey, the checks cleared, so whatever. I really want to do my own show.

Q. So what are you talking about onstage these days?

A. I've been engaged for about a year and a half, so I get to talk about all that stuff. The idea of getting married and maybe having to grow up somewhat is kind of a whole new frontier for me.

Q. What type of people come to your shows?

A. My fans are as eclectic as can be. I hate when people try to pigeonhole me into this blue-collar thing. I'm not a down-home country guy. I'm not into NASCAR or the Bible. I dress bad and I have a certain twang in the way I talk but that's kind of where the similarities end. I don't fit any of the types. I think people can relate to an average guy with an average perspective who is able to scream and cuss about it and that's funny.

Q. Were you a funny kid?

A. I guess. People ask if I was class clown and I really wasn't. I mean, I was a smart (aleck) but I still got good grades. It's easier to get away with being a jerk if your grades aren't too bad.

Q. Were you a party animal at college?

A. I wasn't a big partier or a big studier. I played a lot of video games sober. Going to Kent State was really my first trip out of small-town life and a chance to meet people from all over the country who weren't repulsed by me. I guess I got to grow up a little bit. That's what gave me the courage to go do stand-up.

Q. Tell me about your first open-mic night.

A. It was June 2, 1997 at a place in Cuyahoga Falls that was called Hilarities at the time. I got to do three minutes and it went well enough to go back.

Q. And then after college you decided to move to L.A. and just go for it?

A. My best friend from high school and I packed up the car and drove to L.A. I thought, ‘Let's see how it goes. If it doesn't work at least I tried it.' I wanted to see if I could be as good a comedian as my friends and family thought I could be.

Q. Doesn't it take a lot of guts to walk out onstage and do comedy?

A. There's something wrong with you if you're not nervous every time. I mean, you've got a couple hundred strangers waiting to hear you talk about yourself. What's more scary for me is the idea of walking away from it.

Q. I love the camaraderie between you and the other comics on the “Chelsea Lately“ roundtable. I feel like I kind of know you all.

A. The environment there is almost a sitcom unto itself, like the bar at “Cheers.” It's a bunch of characters who mix and match depending on the day. People are tuning in to see the gang.

Return to Top



News Headline: ICE FEST IN FEBRUARY | Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Alumni Association will host its Flash Ice Fest on Feb. 11 at the Ice Arena.

This event, open to KSU alumni and the general public, will feature ice skating and food.

Doors open at 6 p.m., with pizza and pop served. The rink will be open to skaters from 6:45 to 8:15 p.m.

Entry fees of $7 for adult members of the Alumni Association, $9 for adult nonmembers, $5 for children (age 12 and under) of Alumni Association members, and $7 for children of nonmembers will cover pizza, pop, skate rental and ice skating.

Register online at www.ksualumni.org by Feb. 3.

For information, visit the website or call 888-320-5368.

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

Return to Top



News Headline: About Books: Kent State planning to publish 'Funky Winkerbean' collection | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Artist Tom Batiuk is this year releasing the “Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1,” containing cartoons from 1972 to 1974.

The collection is being published as the first in a series celebrating the 40th anniversary of the “Funky Winkerbean” cartoons. The books are being released by Kent State University Press through its Black Squirrel Books imprint.

The artist is a 1969 graduate of Kent State.

Batiuk, then a junior high school art teacher in Elyria, first published his popular cartoon characters in a comic panel aimed at teen readers of the Elyria Chronicle-Telegram, information from the publisher notes. That panel grew to become the comic strip “Funky Winkerbean.”

ABOUT THE STRIP

“Since its debut on March 27, 1972, ‘Funky Winkerbean' has chronicled the lives of a group of students from the fictitious Westview High School,” explains the publisher. “This volume, which presents the strip's first three years, introduces the strip's title character, Funky, and his friends Crazy Harry Klinghorn, Bull Bushka, Livinia Swenson, Les Moore, Holly Budd, and Roland Mathews.”

The school's principal, Burch, and its counselor, Fred Fairgood, along with the band director, Harry L. Dinkle also are drawn into those initial strips, said the publicity information.

“Funky fans will relive Les' misadventures in gym class and his unintentional attendance at the homecoming dance as he remains stuck on a climbing rope high above the gymnasium floor,” promises the publisher. “They will remember Crazy Harry's ability to play pizzas like records and his air guitar virtuosity, and majorette Holly who never removed her costume. They will recall the school's winless football team, and Harry Dinkle's attempts to win the Battle of the Bands despite the contest always coinciding with a natural disaster.”

This initial volume in the “Complete Funky Winkerbean” series offers an autobiographical introduction by Batiuk. In it the artist talks about his first attempts at cartooning and discusses his days as a teacher. Thus the birth of “Funky Winkerbean” is disclosed.

“Batiuk has been recognized for his humorous and entertaining portrayals of the students and staff at Westview,” said the publisher, “and acclaimed for his sensitive treatment of social and educational issues.”

A FEW DETAILS

Additional volumes in the series annually will republish “Funky Winkerbean” strips in three-year increments.

The 446-page “Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1 (1972-1974)” (ISBN: 978-1-60635-112-3) is priced at $45. It is available through pre-order through Kent State's partner, Atlas Books. To order, call 419-281-1802 or visit www.kentstateuniversitypress.com.

Batiuk's collection is being released as an art book through Black Squirrel Books, an imprint that Kent State Press notes includes new nonfiction for the general reader, as well as reprinted material.

The book contains a preface by R.C. Harvey, author of “The Art of the Funnies” and “The Art of the Comic Book.” He also has a cartooning website, RCHGarvey.com.

Artist Tom Batiuk is this year releasing the “Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1,” containing cartoons from 1972 to 1974.

The collection is being published as the first in a series celebrating the 40th anniversary of the “Funky Winkerbean” cartoons. The books are being released by Kent State University Press through its Black Squirrel Books imprint.

The artist is a 1969 graduate of Kent State.

Batiuk, then a junior high school art teacher in Elyria, first published his popular cartoon characters in a comic panel aimed at teen readers of the Elyria Chronicle-Telegram, information from the publisher notes. That panel grew to become the comic strip “Funky Winkerbean.”

ABOUT THE STRIP

“Since its debut on March 27, 1972, ‘Funky Winkerbean' has chronicled the lives of a group of students from the fictitious Westview High School,” explains the publisher. “This volume, which presents the strip's first three years, introduces the strip's title character, Funky, and his friends Crazy Harry Klinghorn, Bull Bushka, Livinia Swenson, Les Moore, Holly Budd, and Roland Mathews.”

The school's principal, Burch, and its counselor, Fred Fairgood, along with the band director, Harry L. Dinkle also are drawn into those initial strips, said the publicity information.

“Funky fans will relive Les' misadventures in gym class and his unintentional attendance at the homecoming dance as he remains stuck on a climbing rope high above the gymnasium floor,” promises the publisher. “They will remember Crazy Harry's ability to play pizzas like records and his air guitar virtuosity, and majorette Holly who never removed her costume. They will recall the school's winless football team, and Harry Dinkle's attempts to win the Battle of the Bands despite the contest always coinciding with a natural disaster.”

This initial volume in the “Complete Funky Winkerbean” series offers an autobiographical introduction by Batiuk. In it the artist talks about his first attempts at cartooning and discusses his days as a teacher. Thus the birth of “Funky Winkerbean” is disclosed.

“Batiuk has been recognized for his humorous and entertaining portrayals of the students and staff at Westview,” said the publisher, “and acclaimed for his sensitive treatment of social and educational issues.”

A FEW DETAILS

Additional volumes in the series annually will republish “Funky Winkerbean” strips in three-year increments.

The 446-page “Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1 (1972-1974)” (ISBN: 978-1-60635-112-3) is priced at $45. It is available through pre-order through Kent State's partner, Atlas Books. To order, call 419-281-1802 or visit www.kentstateuniversitypress.com.

Batiuk's collection is being released as an art book through Black Squirrel Books, an imprint that Kent State Press notes includes new nonfiction for the general reader, as well as reprinted material.

The book contains a preface by R.C. Harvey, author of “The Art of the Funnies” and “The Art of the Comic Book.” He also has a cartooning website, RCHGarvey.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent profs past and present give Busta an eyeful | Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Litt, Steven
News OCR Text: REVIEW

William Busta Gallery

What: The exhibitions "Michael Loderstedt: Menagerie" and "Brinsley Tyrrell: Ohio Lands Forever."

When: Loderstedt through Saturday, Feb. 4; Tyrrell through Friday, Feb. 3.

Where: 2731 Prospect Ave., Cleveland.

Admission: Free. Go to williambustagallery.com or call 216-298-9071.

A visit to the William Busta Gallery in Cleveland these days creates the sensation of being in good hands. With half a dozen individual rooms at his disposal and a Rolodex packed with some of the region's best artists, Busta plays a role somewhere between commercial dealer and museum curator. His multiple, overlapping shows are almost always worthy of serious attention.

This is especially true now. The current suite of exhibitions is anchored by an absorbing, tenderly observant mini-retrospective on the prints, photography and paper constructions of Michael Loderstedt, a native of New Jersey and a longtime professor at Kent State University.

With more than 40 works from the past few years, the show dwells on Loderstedt's playful experiments with the notion that two-dimensional images can turn into three-dimensional constructions.

In Loderstedt's hands, blueprint-style images of early 20th-century houses are embellished with colorful patterns and "liberated" by degrees from their flat surfaces with cuts and folds that create the sensation that you're watching a slice of time in which architecture is literally rising off the page.

As part of the gallery installation, Loderstedt has suspended several fully constructed paper houses overhead, enabling viewers to look up at their colorful interiors.

Other works that explore the same visual conceits include paper sculptures of skulls and of magpies – a species known, according to Webster's, for "noisy chattering."

Loderstedt's work has a wistful, ruminative air that invites multiple interpretations and open-ended daydreaming. This is particularly true of his photographs of lakeside neighborhoods in Cleveland, a barrier island off Georgia, scenes in Germany and images of New York, many taken with a small, rudimentary 1950s Taxona camera he picked up at a flea market.

Whether displayed in individual prints on the wall or collected in one-off books created by the artist, Loderstedt's photographs are offbeat, intriguing and quietly strange.

The Loderstedt exhibition is accompanied by a roomful of glass-enamel-on-steel paintings by Kent artist Brinsley Tyrrell, who taught at KSU as a professor of art from 1968 to 1996. Entitled "Ohio Lands Forever," the show is an ecstatic hymn to the gentle, rolling, rural landscapes that characterize the state outside its cities and suburbs.

In a style that fuses expressionist color and a calligraphic sense of touch, Tyrrell creates seamless images that oscillate between areas devoted to pure surface pattern and passages that focus on the effects of light and shadow. The result is pure pleasure.

Also on view are works by Loderstedt's students at KSU, a large installation by recent Cleveland Institute of Art graduate Barbara Polster and a collection of appealing small prints from the series "Common Household Rhymes for the Modern Child" by Michael Gill. Altogether, the shows present a panoramic slice of some of the best current work in Northeast Ohio.

To reach Steven Litt: slitt@plaind.com, 216-999-4136

Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU football: Recruiting season not easy on coaches' families | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University linebackers coach Marcus Freeman leads drills during spring practice at the Kent State University Field House last season.

KENT: In early January when the wife of Kent State linebackers coach Marcus Freeman was due to give birth to the couple's third child, he was hesitant to ask for time off work.
It was the height of the recruiting season, and Freeman was just in his second season as an assistant on coach Darrell Hazell's staff.
As his wife Joanna's due date came and went, Freeman, a former Ohio State linebacker, grew more nervous about being on the road for lengthy periods of time, away from a young family that now includes three kids age 5 and under.
“Here I'm on the road and my wife's about to give birth any minute, already a week overdue,” Freeman said. “In my mind, a part of me was thinking, I need to go see my guys, my recruits. But another part of me was like, if I'm three or four hours away and my wife delivers, she is not going to be a happy woman.”
Luckily, Freeman didn't have to live with indecision very long.
“After I went out the first couple days, then coach Hazell called and said, ‘You need to stay back.' I was so relieved because I didn't want to ask him. I just figured if my wife calls, I better pray that I'm close. But [Hazell] called and then [defensive line] coach Brian George said he'd go [visit the recruits at] my schools for me. Now that's a family unit.”
Because of the large amount of time football coaches spend away from their families, it's crucial that they enjoy their football family at work — the one they see more than the people at home — especially during recruiting season.
“I didn't realize at first how big of an aspect recruiting is to coaching,” said Freeman, who was right where he needed to be when his wife welcomed a baby girl on Jan. 10. “Now I know. It's huge.”
How much is Freeman able to be home relaxing with his family during recruiting season?
“Honestly, not much,” he said, “And now when I am home with [an infant], I'm not sleeping much. Add a 5- and 4-year-old to the mix; trust me, you have to have a very supportive wife for this line of work.”
Freeman said he has been approached by other young coaches who are considering getting into the business full time.
“I tell them, ‘Would I wish my son to grow up and be a college football coach? Probably not. It's long hours and a lot of time away from your family.' I tell them I'll probably try to deter him from the profession. That being said, do I see myself doing anything else? Absolutely not, because I love it.”
So what makes the long hours and so much time away from loved ones worth it for Freeman and the other coaches on Kent State's football staff?
“The people,” Freeman said. “You have to work with the right people.”
That's the reason Jeff Burrow agreed to join Hazell at KSU as the safeties coach last season.
“I've been fortunate here at Kent State because coach Hazell has provided time for us to spend with our families,” Burrow said. “That was huge for me because it was one of the prerequisites I had coming in.”
Before Hazell came calling, Burrow was the secondary coach at Indiana State. While he lived in Terre Haute, Ind., with the team during the season, his wife and young daughter remained a five-hour drive away in Huntington, W.Va., where he had previously coached at Marshall.
“It was the first time I'd been though that, and I couldn't believe how incredibly difficult it was to do,” Burrow said. “Missing the little things like recitals, that can sure tug on your heartstrings.”
One of the first assistants Hazell brought on staff was defensive coordinator Jon Heacock, who spent the previous nine years as the coach at Youngstown State after Jim Tressel left for Ohio State. A big plus for Heacock in accepting a coordinator position was increasing his time at home with family.
“As a head coach, I felt like I was never home,” he said.
Still, the bulk of recruiting season — the end of November to the first few days of February — has a way of making everyone feel like absentee husbands and fathers.
“This time of year, you don't get anything done at home,” said Heacock, who has a daughter and son in middle school. “But it's part of the job. Most of the wives and kids who've been doing this for awhile, they just don't expect you home.”
The football coaches at Kent State all have assigned areas of recruiting. For Heacock, it's the Ohio counties of Summit, Portage, Stark, Tuscarawas, Carroll and Harrison, as well as a secondary assignment in Orlando, Fla.
“But we also do a good job of cross-recruiting,” he said. “I've been to Texas, Florida and Pennsylvania, to name a few. It's just what we do, and you need to do it. Nobody sits in here and goes, ‘Oh, man, I don't want to go see that guy.' It's time away from your family, but recruiting is critical. I love recruiting because it's the lifeblood of your program.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Data from Kent State University Provide New Insights into Cancer Vaccines (Koski) | Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cancer Vaccine Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to the authors of recent research from Kent, Ohio, "Twenty-seven patients with HER-2/neu overexpressing ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast were enrolled in a neoadjuvant immunization trial for safety and immunogenicity of DC1-polarized dendritic cells (DC1) pulsed with 6 HER-2/neu promiscuous major histocompatibility complex class II-binding peptides and 2 additional human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2.1 class I-binding peptides. DC1 were generated with interferon-g and a special clinical-grade bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and administered directly into groin lymph nodes 4 times at weekly intervals before scheduled surgical resection of ductal carcinoma in situ."

"Patients were monitored for the induction of new or enhanced antipeptide reactivity by interferon-g ELISPOT and enzyme-linked immunosorbentassays performed on Th cells obtained from peripheral blood or excised sentinel lymph nodes. Responses by cytotoxic T lymphocyte against HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were measured using peptide-pulsed T2 target cells or HER-2/neu-expressing or nonexpressing tumor cell lines. DC1 showed surface phenotype indistinct from 'gold standard' inflammatory cocktail-activated DC, but displayed a number of distinguishing functional characteristics including the secretion of soluble factors and enhanced 'killer DC' capacity against tumor cells in vitro. Postimmunization, we observed sensitization of Th cells to at least 1 class II peptide in 22 of 25 (88%; 95% exact confidence interval, 68.8%-97.5%) evaluable patients, whereas 11 of 13 (84.6%; 95% exact confidence interval, 64%-99.8%) HLA-A2.1 patients were successfully sensitized to class I peptides. Perhaps most importantly, anti-HER-2/neu peptide responses were observed up to 52-month postimmunization," wrote G.K. Koski and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "These data show that even in the presence of early breast cancer such DC1 are potent inducers of durable type I-polarized immunity, suggesting potential clinical value for development of cancer immunotherapy."

Koski and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Immunotherapy (A Novel Dendritic Cell-based Immunization Approach for the Induction of Durable Th1-polarized Anti-HER-2/neu Responses in Women With Early Breast Cancer. Journal of Immunotherapy, 2012;35(1):54-65).

For additional information, contact G.K. Koski, Kent State University, Dept. of Biol Sci, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Immunotherapy is: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.

Copyright © 2012 Cancer Vaccine Week via NewsRx.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Hiring predictions on the rise for grads (Motayar) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Finding a career after graduating from college can be as
time consuming as the job it leads to. The good news is hiring
predictions are on the rise for college graduates.
According to the Job Outlook 2012 survey conducted by
National Association of Colleges and Employers, 50.8 percent
of responding employers anticipate to add new hires through
2012. Of those responding employers, 37.4 percent said they
would maintain current employment
levels, while 11.8 percent said they
would decrease staff.
In 2009, after the economy took a
downturn, employers responding to
NACE's survey reported only a 16.9
percent increase in hiring expectations,
while 43.4 percent said they
would maintain current levels and
39.7 percent said they would down size.
Knowing where and how to find job opportunities is critical
to having success on the job hunt, and most colleges have a
career center or services department to equip students with
job searching tools and coaching before they graduate.
Ann Motayar, director of Career Services at Kent State
University, said Career Services has much information to
offer for students to help make decisions about themselves
and what they want in a job.
“Your job is really the primary part of how you spend your
time and can really determine your quality of life,” Motayar
said.
Motayar said Career Services provides resources including
career advising, a bi-annual career fair open to students
and alumni and an online aggregation of job listing websites
such as hired.com and Delicous, which groups job searches
into topical areas such as salary, non-profit work, out of
state and military veterans. Career Services also conducts
mock interviews to help build interviewing skills.
Motayar also recommends that students actively build
their marketability while in school through internships, participation
in organizations and volunteer service work.
“At the end of the day, that's what hiring employers are
paying attention to,” she said.
Nick Piazza, an August 2011 graduate of KSU's geology
program, said his social experiences while in school outweighed
his classroom experiences for job preparation.
While working on his geology degree, Piazza was active in
Geology club and went on several field camp trips with professors
and classmates. He said the trips were educational,
but more importantly he learned how to work in a team
with his classmates and professors.
“Be in groups, be in clubs,” Piazza said. “The connections
can help a lot, but most importantly, it gets you in the mindset
to talk to people on a professional level.”
Piazza said one of his professors recommended him to an
employer, which led to a job as an environmental technician.
Four months later, after finding the job to be less fulfilling
than expected, Piazza left. Two weeks later, he was interviewed
and hired for a new job as an environmental monitoring
technician, after posting his resume on Indeed.com.
“I strongly recommend that website to anybody,” he said.
“I found a lot of jobs there and it seems to be less flooded
than sites like Career Builder and Monster.”
Motayar said students shouldn't expect to land their dream
job right after college, rather they should look at their first
job as part of the path to the job they hope for one day.
“It's the nature of the work force these days. It's a more
temporary project-based world of the employer,” she said.
“We're educating our graduates to be more flexible and recognize
that the first job might be a stepping stone to other
opportunities.”
Motayar said part of being flexible includes being open to
relocating for a job, especially for graduates in fields such as
education, where jobs are still scarce and competitive.
Such is the case for Dan Rahe, a KSU education major
who graduated in May 2010.
After months of actively hunting for a job, exhausting all of
his network resources and working two part-time jobs, Rahe
accepted a job as a math teacher in Hampton, Va.
“I was very active. I can't tell you how many different jobs
I applied to, but I did apply in at least five or six different
states before I found the one that I really wanted,” Rahe
said. “There are options open, but you have to be willing to
go get it instead of standing around and waiting.”
Rahe said while searching for a job, he found that most
job applications for school districts were online. His teaching
job came through teacherstoteachers.com, he said.
Motayar said many companies are also branching into social
media websites such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn
to post jobs and find recruits. Employers are also conducting
job interviews over the phone and through telecommunication
programs such as Skype, which allows for face-toface
online conversation.
When a job interview is lined up, Motayar said it's important
not to put yourself before the company.
“Take the stance of what the candidate can do for the employer,
not what the employer can do for you,” she said.
After the interview, she said it's important to ask what the
next step in the process is, as well as follow up with a thank
you to show interest.
Above all, don't underestimate your network of contacts,
Motayar said, adding that “It's not what you know, it's who
you know,” still holds true in most cases.

Return to Top



News Headline: North Canton to unveil master plan at meeting | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NORTH CANTON -

Residents can get a look at the city's master plan for future development and growth during a special presentation  Wednesday.

City officials have wanted a master plan for several years. Wednesday's program is the culmination of six months of community meetings and work with the Kent State Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

"It's a very thorough, provoking document," said Doug Lane, president of the North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce. "There's a lot of food for thought."

Wednesday's meeting is 6:30 p.m. at Walsh University's Barrette Center. It will outline the study's findings, goals and recommended actions.

Lane said North Canton's strengths of community, services, education and culture provide a strong foundation for future growth. "The master plan will be the road map we use," he said.

The city began working with the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative in 2009. The chamber joined the project earlier this year, helping to organize a steering committee and to set up community meetings.

City and chamber officials conducted three public meetings to hear from residents. Lane said the completed document "really took the public input to heart."

North Canton has tried for several years, and has taken a number of steps, to develop a master plan. Mayor David J. Held said a finished master plan will be good for the city and important for economic development.

"I appreciate the work everyone has put into the planning process," Held said. "We're creating a community that is amenable to people wanting to live here."

Lane said he believed the plan will develop more as the city begins working with some of the recommendations. He expects city leaders to reference and review the plan as changes are in the future.

More information is available at the project's website: www.ncantonmasterplan.org. It also can be accessed through the chamber's website: www.northcantonchamber.org.

Community and civic groups interested in scheduling a presentation about the master plan are encouraged to contact the chamber at 330-499-5100.

Residents can get a look at the city's master plan for future development and growth during a special presentation  Wednesday.

City officials have wanted a master plan for several years. Wednesday's program is the culmination of six months of community meetings and work with the Kent State Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

"It's a very thorough, provoking document," said Doug Lane, president of the North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce. "There's a lot of food for thought."

Wednesday's meeting is 6:30 p.m. at Walsh University's Barrette Center. It will outline the study's findings, goals and recommended actions.

Lane said North Canton's strengths of community, services, education and culture provide a strong foundation for future growth. "The master plan will be the road map we use," he said.

The city began working with the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative in 2009. The chamber joined the project earlier this year, helping to organize a steering committee and to set up community meetings.

City and chamber officials conducted three public meetings to hear from residents. Lane said the completed document "really took the public input to heart."

North Canton has tried for several years, and has taken a number of steps, to develop a master plan. Mayor David J. Held said a finished master plan will be good for the city and important for economic development.

"I appreciate the work everyone has put into the planning process," Held said. "We're creating a community that is amenable to people wanting to live here."

Lane said he believed the plan will develop more as the city begins working with some of the recommendations. He expects city leaders to reference and review the plan as changes are in the future.

More information is available at the project's website: www.ncantonmasterplan.org. It also can be accessed through the chamber's website: www.northcantonchamber.org.

Community and civic groups interested in scheduling a presentation about the master plan are encouraged to contact the chamber at 330-499-5100.

Loading commenting interface...

Thank you for the abuse report. We will review the report and take appropriate action.

Return to Top



News Headline: Videos :: Bridge Project & Pop-Up City | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bridge Project & Pop-Up City

Another CoolCleveland.com video exclusive. Terry Schwarz tackles Bridge Project

Terry Schwarz was inspired to build pop-up events lasting only a few hours when she attended a conference in Berlin. Since receiving a Civic Innovation Lab grant, she has created Pop-Up City events all around NEO: a roller skating rink in the Leff Electric Building, a Leap Night fest on the East Bank of the Flats, a Pop-Up Dog Park on the Steelyard Commons Towpath Trail. She works with her students at the Kent State Design Collective and collaborates with small and large groups to showcase under-appreciated public spaces.

Next, Schwarz is working with IngenuityFest to bring life to the lower trolley level of the Detroit-Superior bridge on Fri 9/25 & Sat 9/26, utilizing built prototypes to exhibit potential uses of this monumental bridge, using rapid prototyping as a living charette for artists, activists and citizens. The only question is, where will she pop-up next? http://www.cudc.kent.edu/popup/events.html.

Also view this video here: http://www.coolcleveland.com/files/video/terry.html. Win $50 by clicking links at http://www.CoolCleveland.com.

This video was uploaded on 2010-07-03

Total viewed:324 times.

Return to Top



News Headline: Videos :: Popping Up On Euclid Avenue: Urban Design Takes On The Region | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Terry Schwarz does not sit still. Her Pop-Up City project has invigorated overlooked spaces throughout the region, and now wants to reinvent retail on Euclid Avenue. Watch the video .

As Interim Director of the Kent State Urban Design Collaborative, she is overseeing their recent move to Playhouse Square, centralizing their efforts to work with community partners near and far while they are "Reimagining A More Sustainable Cleveland." It's a full-time job just following Terry around. http://www.cudc.kent.edu

Win an iPhone or $300 by registering at http://www.CoolCleveland.com

This video was uploaded on 2010-08-23

Return to Top



News Headline: Spirit of Women In Business | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM

Kent State University will host its second Spirit of Women in Business Conference with the theme “The Empowered Woman,” from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 7 in the Kent Student Center.

The conference will be divided into three 60-minute breakout sessions with a range of topics, such as financial literacy, performance improvement, communication skills, workplace skills and breaking stereotypes.

The keynote speakers will be DeLores Pressley, motivational speaker, author and founder of DeLores Pressley Worldwide and the BornSuccessful Institute. Regina Brett, author, Plain Dealer columnist and host of “The Regina Brett Show” on WKSU, will deliver the luncheon keynote address.

Early-bird registration for the conference is $25 and ends Tuesday. Late or onsite registration is $40. Students can pre-register for $10 or $15 for late or onsite registration.

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/business/wib.

Return to Top



News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Pointing the way in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Doug Fuller, the architect who works
with Ron Burbick on his Kent downtown renewal
projects, invited me to a presentation of possible
downtown Kent street signs as envisioned by
a group of Graphic Design students at Kent State
University, my curiosity was piqued.
I may not know anything about streets signs, I
thought, but I do know this: Municipal street signs
are like the accessories in an attractive woman's
outfit. Chosen well, they complement what the
lady is wearing.
Chosen poorly? Yuck!
With that in mind, I headed off for the presentation
late Thursday afternoon at the Tannery offices
in Ron Burbick's Phoenix Project. There, I
found myself in the company of Doug Fuller and
Alan Orashan, both members of the Main Street
Kent board, plus Main Street Kent executive director
Mary Gilbert and a staff member, hosting
the occasion.
We were joined by Kent City Engineer Jim Bowling,
who's part of the Kent city team that Editor
Roger Di Paolo likes to say is busy building the
21st century edition of the Tree City. With so many
downtown Kent improvements, Mr. Bowling explained
he is wondering if the city should consider
better street signage and was interested in seeing
what the students had in mind.
We all sat around a table in the presence of a
group of some very nice young people enrolled in
the Environmental Graphic Design class of Associate
Professor David Middleton. Graphic Design
falls within KSU's School of Visual Communication,
which is within the College of Communication
and Information.
Professor Middleton told us other classes he has
taught have undertaken similar projects for other
communities and not too long ago did one for
the city of Elyria. Signs, the professor explained,
are important in branding, in this case giving a
sense of place to the downtown. They also help
people navigate more efficiently. Good signs, he
noted, compliment a community's architectural
heritage.
His students were understandably
eager to
share the results of their
hard work, free of charge
no less. They had divided
themselves into three
undergraduate teams
plus one graduate student
who worked solo.
Every discipline acquires
its own jargon, and in
Graphic Arts they call
signage “Wayfinding Systems”
because signs help
you find your way.
Using PowerPoint,
each team defined its
mission.
Sarah Rutherford, the graduate student who
worked solo, said her goal was to come up with
signs that help unify old and new and establish
the downtown as its own district. The team of
Todd Wendorff, Joseph Ianni and Daniel Ross referred
to a system of signs inspired by the downtown's
architectural heritage that would also appeal
to youth.
Erin Monsman, Ryan
Sprowl and Jason Tiberio
wanted to create a system of
signs that eases navigation
around downtown in a way
that appeals to Kent citizens
and students, but also speaks
to Kent's environmental heritage
and ideals.
The team of Katie Daugherty,
Casey Sandala and Andrew
Sobotka had a goal of
enhancing “the experience
of visiting downtown Kent,
Ohio, by connecting the old
and new areas of the town by
creating a distinctive and uniform
identity throughout.”
The students decided not
to use blue and gold, Kent
State's colors, because, they
said, the downtown needs its
own identity. All chose metals
with various finishes.
Orientation signs had easy-to-read maps. Directional
signs pointed to destinations. Location
signs identified a site where the visitor might be
standing. Gateway signs would be placed at intersections.
As envisioned by Sarah Rutherford,
Gateways consisted of bold latticed metal arches,
distant cousins of the Eiffel Tower. Interpretive
signs would inform you about an interesting site.
An example of this would be the sign that Rutherford
conceived for Brady's Leap along Riveredge
park or the Wendorff, Ianni, Ross sign explaining
the Pennsylvania & Ohio Canal.
Other possibilities
ident
i f i e d f o r
signage?Acorn
Alley, Riveredge
Park, Kent State
University, the
PARTA Multimodal
Transportation
Center,
the KSU Hotel
and Conference
Center, Kent
Free Library,
the municipal
courthouse, the
police and fire stations, the whitewater park, the
Kent Historical Society, Hometown Bank Plaza,
the post office, The Portage Hike and Bike Trail,
John Brown' Tannery Park, and the Erie Depot,
the Pufferbelly's home. I'd throw in Fred Fuller
Park, too.
Included with this column is a small sampler,
food for thought. We'll upload the complete presentations
on our website.

Return to Top



News Headline: District says IB program, training to continue status quo at Indian Trail (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name: Mariana Silva
News OCR Text: Stow -- Despite a vote by the Board of Education Jan. 23, the International Baccalaureate program, and teacher training, will continue at Indian Trail School.

Board of Education members voted down a resolution to pursue IB status at Indian Trail, but the school is still an IB candidate school, said CFO/ Treasurer Catherine Bulgrin.

The resolution asked "that the Board of Education direct[ed] the Superintendent to take the steps necessary to obtain International Baccalaureate World School status for Indian Trail Elementary School and not to pursue such status at any other school in the district at this time."

According to the IB website, the program "aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring" students who can help "create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect."

The program also requires that students are taught a second language, which is Spanish for Indian Trail students.

To reach the IB World School status, schools need to be candidate school for at least one year and pass a verification visit that ensures the program's practices are being applied.

Bulgrin said the language of the resolution asked the Board permission to pursue IB status, and that training and the IB program will continue at Indian Trail.

Training for the four Indian Trail teachers going to Westlake this March will proceed, said Bulgrin. The training, approved during a School Board meeting Jan. 12, will cost $800 per teacher for a total of $3,200.

Bulgrin said it is now up to the superintendent to decide whether and when to come back with a new recommendation to the Board.

"We will come back and revise [the resolution] with wording that is amiable to the Board," Bulgrin said. "The [IB training] process will continue, just not the status."

Board president Karen Powers, Rod Armstrong and Fred Bonacci voted not to approve the resolution. Members Karen Wright and Dick Spangler voted to approve it.

Before the resolution was turned down, Armstrong suggested amending the resolution to eliminate IB training as a whole, a motion that failed to be seconded.

Bonacci then made a motion to amend the resolution to limit the pursuit of IB status to Indian Trail only and eliminate the words "at the time" from the language.

He told the Board and the audience he had spoken with teachers at Indian Trail and IB coordinator Julie Miller about the program on Jan. 22, and that teachers said they would like to run the program for a year and then decide if they want to modify it or kill it.

He added he supported the teachers' opinion and felt neutral to having the program at Indian Trail but would like to see results from the program before considering it in other schools in the district.

Bonacci's motion failed 3-2 with Armstrong, Wright and Spangler voting against it.

Several residents also expressed opinions about the IB program before the vote.

Karen Gonidakis asked the district to present residents with reports that show IB can deliver higher academic achievement than a regular education.

"I've been in Indian Trail with my three children for nine years and those teachers did an incredible job prior to IB," Gonidakis said. "... I think you need to go back to the basics of learning, and help the teachers help the children in learning what they need to learn."

Tami Carlisle told the Board she thinks the program is costly, and a luxury the district cannot afford. She also asked the Board to table the resolution until a further study about IB can be completed.

Heather Galioto said last November she "implored" friends and neighbors to vote to pass the levy and that she feels that money should not be used to fund the IB Program.

Daniel Mahony, of Stow, dean of the College of Education Health and Human Services at Kent State University, told the Board and the audience the college decided to embed IB into their education program because of the direction education is taking.

"Many of the principles of IB are already requirements in our program: a focus in critical thinking, problem solving, problem base learning, global awareness," Mahony said. "... Ultimately I we did it because it was best for our students. It makes them better teachers and it makes them more employable."

Mahony added the college is searching for grant opportunities and that he can see a possible partnership between Kent State and Indian Trail.

Return to Top



News Headline: CCCTC shows off new health sciences wing | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LISBON - From what was once one overcrowded classroom serving the needs of all their students in the health care field, the Columbiana County Career and Technical Center showed off its new health sciences wing on Saturday.

While nursing shortages are projected in the future by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, local students can begin learning about the field and gaining skills as early as their high school days.

"We want students to graduate in areas where they can find available jobs," said Adult Education Director Kelly Weikart of the decision to increase space for the nursing and medical sciences program.

Career Center high school students now have their own classroom devoted to health sciences, where they can begin working on the basic skills they will need to later go into a nursing or a medical assistant field. If they choose to continue studying at the career center after their high school graduation, several instructors said they hope they will now transition into the adult education programs.

Instead of sharing space with the high school students, the adult-education Licensed Practical Nurse program now also has its own classroom.

LPN Director Carolyn McCune sitting at a new, adult style desk during Saturday's open house, pointed out the room now holds the students comfortably, has a wide screen where everyone can see what is going on throughout the classroom and has the latest technology available for use. Smart boards and document cameras, along with wireless microphones, assist teachers in getting their message to even the back corners of the room.

Adults wishing to attend the LPN program take a test to apply. Classes are held Mondays through Fridays from 3:30 to 9:30 p.m. for about a year of intensive study. Once completed, students can take a test to receive their LPN.

Those who complete the LPN program who are interested in continuing on for a registered nursing degree can attend a college nursing program including those offered locally by Eastern Gateway Community College, Kent State University, Youngstown State University or others.

Those not certain if they are ready to jump into the nursing field, but who are interested in learning the skills needed can start down the path and utilize other classrooms added at the career center. One classroom is also now available for those learning to be a State Tested Nursing Assistant, the basic skills necessary to work in home health care or to assist other nurses in a medical facility.

Fonda Moffett, the instructor for the STNA program and primary coordinator for the high school program, said the STNA program has a lot of adult students who come in needing job skills to restart their life and need a lot of encouragement.

"My theory is, it's never too late," Moffett said.

Another room offers the skills needed for the medical billing and transcription fields. Instructors Debbie Arter and Susan Conaway focus on different aspects needed to work in those areas. Students learn how all the insurance companies operate, medical terminology, how to communicate with doctors to ensure the procedures have been properly documented to be covered by insurance and how to code those procedures for proper submission.

"This is not a state license," Arter said of what her students earn. "This is something used world wide. Students take it with them anywhere."

In addition to the new classrooms, Weikart said the wing includes lots of storage rooms instead of small, locked cabinets, office space for the staff, new restrooms and even a laundry facility to clean the linens from the beds after students practice what they learned on medical dummies.

Adults have been graduating from the career center nursing program since 2005. The new wing has taken over an area of the building which once housed agriculture, horticulture and landscaping programs, which had fallen by the wayside.

The next project planned at the career center is an expansion of the welding department to meet the growing needs in those fields. Weikart said students studying in the welding program currently receive an average of three job offers with many companies in the area needing welding and now there is a projected increase in need because of the Marcellus Shale natural gas interest in the area.

The welding space will be increased by taking over the space where health science classes were previously held. Engineering work is already underway for the project.

The Review

Return to Top



News Headline: Effects of amines on formation of sub-3 nm particles and their subsequent growth | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Our laboratory results show that amines affect formtion of sub-3 nm particles

The enhancement of amines is related to their basicity

Our lab study has measured aerosol precursors and sub-3 nm particles

College of Public Health, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA

Atmospheric Science Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA

College of Public Health, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA

Field observations and quantum chemical calculations suggest that amines can be important for formation of nanometer size particles. Amines and ammonia often have common atmospheric emission sources and the similar chemical and physical properties. While the effects of ammonia on aerosol nucleation have been previously investigated, laboratory studies of homogeneous nucleation involving amines are lacking. We have made kinetics studies of multicomponent nucleation (MCN) with sulfuric acid, water, ammonia and amines under conditions relevant to the atmosphere. Low concentrations of aerosol precursors were measured with chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMS) to provide constrained precursor concentrations needed for nucleation. Particle sizes larger than ∼2 nm were measured with a nano-differential mobility analyzer (nano-DMA), and number concentrations of particles larger than ∼1 nm were measured with a particle size magnifier (PSM). Our observations provide the laboratory evidence that amines indeed can participate in aerosol nucleation and growth at the molecular cluster level. The enhancement of particle number concentrations due to several atmospherically relevant amine compounds and ammonia were related to the basicity of these compounds, indicating that acid–base reactions may contribute to the formation of sub-3 nm particles.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Names New Dean of Undergraduate Studies (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Said Sewell to administer programs central to undergraduate student success.

Kent State University has named Dr. Said Sewell as its new dean of undergraduate studies.

Sewell joins Kent State from Fort Valley State University in Fort Valley, Ga., where he has served as executive director of the Academic Success Center and associate professor of political science since December 2009.

Sewell succeeds Dr. Gary Padak, who retired from Kent State in November 2010. He will begin his position at Kent State on April 15.

As dean of undergraduate studies, Sewell will administer and provide leadership for programs that are deemed central to undergraduate student success. This includes pre-college preparation, transition to college, academic advising, student retention issues and undecided/undeclared students.

He will oversee the Exploratory Advising Center, Academic Success Center and Student Success Programs, including academic advising and monitoring academic progress for exploratory majors.

“This year, I've asked the university community to focus on retention, persistence and timely graduation, and Dr. Sewell will be a key driver of this effort,” said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton.

“Dr. Sewell will provide strategic leadership for developing and implementing universitywide programs to enhance student success and persistence,” Lefton added.

Sewell said he is “excited and humbled" to be joining Kent State as its newest dean.

“Because Kent State is a great and highly ranked public university with a distinguished faculty, stellar staff, exceptional students, nationally known programs and dedicated administration, I could not resist joining this awesome team," he said.

"I come to Kent State because I believe in the mission and vision of the university. I share the institution's values toward education and its commitment to moving our students to higher heights. I am committed to leading the college in a very collaborative, energetic and strategic manner,” Sewell added.

Prior to working at Fort Valley State University, Sewell was an associate professor of political science and planning at the University of West Georgia in Carrollton, Ga., from 2000 to 2009. He was promoted to the rank of associate professor in his fourth year and tenured the following year. While there, he served as the interim chair of the department.

In addition, Sewell was the founding executive director of the Center for African American Males: Research, Success, and Leadership in Atlanta from 2004 to 2009. The center, which is the first of its kind is Georgia, has a mission of addressing the challenges faced by African-American men in the academy by focusing on three main areas: research, modeling and training and programming.

He has taught in the public administration and political science department at Albany State University and Georgia Institute of Technology, in the social science department at Georgia Perimeter College and Dekalb College, and in the political science department at Clark Atlanta University and Morehouse College.

Sewell has authored several articles on faith-based initiatives, community and economic development, religion and politics, and juvenile issues. He is currently completing work on two forthcoming books titled “Empowering Black Male Students to Greatness” and “Let Us Make Man: A Conversation with Black Men on Saving Black Boys.”

He is co-author of “Georgia State Politics” and the editor of two American Government readers: “Conflicting Democracy: A Critical Analysis of America's Political Process” and “We the People: Reflections on American Politics.”

Sewell is active in several professional, civic and social organizations. He is a life member and the former national chairman of Leadership Development Institute for his fraternity, the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., and a member of the 100 Black Men of America.

A native of Houston, Texas, Sewell entered Morehouse College at the age of 16 in 1988. He excelled academically, graduating from Morehouse in 1992 with a bachelor's degree in political science. He has been mentioned as one America's rising young leaders for the 21st Century.

He received his master of public administration in public policy from Texas Southern University at the age of 21, becoming the youngest person in the program's history to complete all the requirements for the degree in a year and a half.

Sewell continued his academic pursuits in Georgia by earning a Ph.D. in political science from Clark Atlanta University in 2001. Sewell also has done post-graduate work at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government and School of Divinity.

For more information about Kent State's Undergraduate Studies, visit www.kent.edu/undergradstudies.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Announces New Dean of Undergraduate Studies | Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Jan.27 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University has named Dr.Said Sewell as its new dean of Undergraduate Studies.Sewell joins Kent State from Fort Valley State University in Fort Valley, Ga., where he has served as executive director of the Academic Success Center and associate professor of political science since December 2009.He will begin his position at Kent State on April 15, 2012.Sewell succeeds Dr.Gary Padak who retired in November 2010.

As dean of Undergraduate Studies, Sewell will administer and provide leadership for programs that are deemed central to undergraduate student success.This includes pre-college preparation, transition to college, academic advising, student retention issues and undecided/undeclared students.He will oversee the Exploratory Advising Center, Academic Success Center, Student Success Programs and Dual Enrollment/PSEOP, including academic advising and monitoring academic progress for exploratory majors.

"This year, I've asked the university community to focus on retention, persistence and timely graduation, and Dr.Sewell will be a key driver of this effort," said Kent State President Lester A.Lefton."Dr.Sewell will provide strategic leadership for developing and implementing universitywide programs to enhance student success and persistence."

"I am most excited and humbled to be joining Kent State as its newest dean," Sewell said."Because Kent State is a great and highly ranked public university with a distinguished faculty, stellar staff, exceptional students, nationally known programs and dedicated administration, I could not resist joining this awesome team.I come to Kent State because I believe in the mission and vision of the university.I share the institution's values toward education and its commitment to moving our students to higher heights.I am committed to leading the college in a very collaborative, energetic and strategic manner."

Prior to working at Fort Valley State University, Sewell was an associate professor of political science and planning at the University of West Georgia in Carrollton, Ga., from 2000 to 2009.He was promoted to the rank of associate professor in his fourth year and tenured the following year.While there, he served as the interim chair of the department.Sewell, in addition, was the founding executive director of the Center for African American Males: Research, Success, and Leadership in Atlanta from 2004 to 2009.The center, which is the first of its kind is Georgia, has a mission of addressing the challenges faced by African-American men in the academy by focusing on three main areas: research, modeling and training, and programming.

He has taught in the public administration and political science department at Albany State University and Georgia Institute of Technology, in the social science department at Georgia Perimeter College and Dekalb College, and in the political science department at Clark Atlanta University and Morehouse College.

Sewell has authored several articles on faith-based initiatives, community and economic development, religion and politics, and juvenile issues.He is currently completing work on two forthcoming books titled "Empowering Black Male Students to Greatness" and "Let Us Make Man: A Conversation with Black Men on Saving Black Boys." He is co-author of "Georgia State Politics" and the editor of two American Government readers: "Conflicting Democracy: A Critical Analysis of America's Political Process" and "We the People: Reflections on American Politics."

Sewell is active in several professional, civic and social organizations.He is a life member and the former national chairman of Leadership Development Institute for his fraternity - the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and a member of the 100 Black Men of America.

A native of Houston, Texas, Sewell entered Morehouse College at the age of 16 in 1988.Sewell excelled academically, graduating from Morehouse in 1992 with a bachelor's degree in political science.He has been mentioned as one America's rising young leaders for the 21st Century.He received his Master of Public Administration in public policy from Texas Southern University at the age of 21, becoming the youngest person in the program's history to complete all the requirements for the degree in a year and a half.He continued his academic pursuits in Georgia by earning a Ph.D.in political science from Clark Atlanta University in 2001.Sewell also has done post-graduate work at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government and School of Divinity.

For more information about Kent State's Undergraduate Studies, visit www.kent.edu/undergradstudies.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: Job help, networking events: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THURSDAY

Kent State University's Center for Corporate and Professional Development, Breakfast Briefing for Human Resource Professionals: 8 to 10:30 a.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, 8971 Wilcox Drive, Twinsburg. Free. To register, go to www.kent.edu/YourTrainingPartner or email ckocarek@kent.edu or call 330-672-8698.

Return to Top



News Headline: NAACP celebrates legacy of Martin Luther King | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Portage County NAACP
opened the 2012 annual Martin
Luther King Jr. Prayer Breakfast
with a virtual flyover at the new MLK
National Memorial on the Mall in Washington,
D.C.
Nearly 150 people packed the Fellowship
Hall of the Kent United Church of
Christ to celebrate the Dr. King holiday
with songs, art, remembrances, history
and advocacy.
The Rev. William Blake of the First
Baptist Church of Windham, was the
master of ceremonies for the annual
event.
Speakers included State Rep. Kathleen
Clyde, 68th District; NAACP Vice
President Arthur Johnson; Dr. Geraldine
Hayes-Nelson, executive director
of the Kent State University Office of
Diversity Programming and Community
Outreach; Portage County Municipal
Judge Barbara Oswick; and Dr.
Alfreda Brown, KSU vice president for
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.
The speakers recounted King's historic
acceptance of the Nobel Peace
Prize and contrasted his work on voters' rights
with the threat to voting today.
One of the highlights was the awarding of
the NAACP Community Services Award to
Gene Brown of Ravenna.
The Rev. Deborah Austin organized the
celebration.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Events Thursday included cultural celebrations of music, word and dance.

The Kent Student Center was a hub of activity Thursday afternoon as Kent State University held its 10th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration featuring music, word and dance – and an impassioned speaker.

Dr. Marc Lamont Hill – activist, social critic and one of the nation's most notable African-American leaders – was the keynote speaker at the Kent Student Center Ballroom.

Kent resident Dr. David Mohan, dean of Kent State University at Geauga, was presented with the university wide 2012 Diversity Trailblazer Award. The award is designed to recognize contributions to the promotion of diversity.

The signing of Hill's book, “Beats, Rhymes and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity,” and a reception followed in the ballroom balcony area.

Hill's appearance was preceded by a cultural celebration of music, word and dance at the Kent Student Center Kiva.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Sets New All-Time Record For Spring Enrollment | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has set yet another new record for itself by breaking the 40,000 mark for spring enrollment, according to the university's official 15th day census data for the eight-campus system.

On Friday, Kent State reported 40,398 students were registered for the spring 2012 semester. That's an increase of 1.16 percent over the 39,936 students recorded for spring semester 2011. In spring 2010, that number was 38,196.

“We are staying the course with student success being our number one goal,” said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. “We must keep the momentum going and continue to improve student retention and persistence to timely graduation. As Northeast Ohio's leader in graduation among public universities, we will continue to innovate and collaborate to ensure every student is a success.”

Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro said he congratulates Kent State.

"I commend the university's leadership and employees for their dedication to their students and efforts to increase enrollment, retention and especially graduation rates,” Petro said.

Retention strategies that the university has put into action include:

The opening of the new Kent State Math Emporium, a state-of-the-art computerized learning center designed to equip students with the mathematical knowledge they will need on their path to graduation.
The Graduation Planning System, or GPS, that tracks student progress to graduation with new enhancements allowing students to see all requirements for earning a degree in the declared program and have an individualized plan of study.
The expansion of tutoring and student support services at the Academic Success Center.
The Center for Student Involvement's “What's Up Kent State?” initiative that engages students to participate in on-campus events and earn FLASHperks reward points for activities.
The entire university community is engaged in retention efforts. Kent State held a university wide symposium on student success that focused on retention and persistence and featured keynote speaker Dr. George Kuh, chancellor's professor emeritus at Indiana University and founding director of the Center for Postsecondary Research and the National Survey of Student Engagement.

The Office of Student Success Programs has held a series of sessions to give faculty members access to tools and resources to help support their students and achieve success. Special communications are being sent to stakeholders.

For example, parents of Kent State freshmen received a mailing along with a copy of Kent State Magazine that offered tips on how to talk to their child about their college experience and available resources to help their student succeed in college.

The university's Dining Services hosted a special party for returning freshmen last week to celebrate the students and recognize their completion of their first semester of college.

Highlights from the spring 2012 enrollment numbers include:

Unduplicated (or preponderant) headcount at the Kent campus is 25,773, and the unduplicated headcount for the regional campuses is 14,625. Students are counted only once at the campus at which they hold the majority of their course load.
Enrollment at the Kent Campus has increased by 3.47 percent (preponderant).
The persistence spring 2012 undergraduates (fall 2011 first-time, full-time freshmen who have persisted and registered for spring 2012 classes) at the Kent Campus is 93.8 percent.
Of the regional campuses, the Geauga Campus had the largest percent increase in the number of students with 1.13 percent (preponderant).
The enrollment of international students increased 34.75 percent to 1,927 students compared to 1,430 in spring 2011.
Graduate enrollment has increased by 3.80 percent (preponderant).
“In addition to the release of these strong enrollment figures, I'm very encouraged by the increase of Fall 2012 applications, particularly with 3.0 high school grade point averages,” said T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management.

“To date, we have seen a 40 percent increase in applications compared to this time last year. Under President Lefton's leadership and the great work of our admissions personnel, faculty and staff, we continue to see an increasing number of people who want a Kent State education,” Garcia said.

Kent State University's eight campuses are located in Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Kent, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas.

For the full spring enrollment report, visit www.kent.edu/rpie/enrollment.

Return to Top



News Headline: SAP is a bandage, not cure | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Jambar, Youngstown State University - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Federally mandated changes to the Satisfactory Academic Progress program crack down on students who abuse financial aid. The change aims to alleviate some of the fiscal burden for the federal government but only exacerbates YSU's budget issues.

Compared to the fall, three times as many students are out of SAP compliance this semester. That means 471 students lost federal financial aid.

We admit that the fault lies with the students who failed to meet GPA and completion percentage requirements.

But if they took classes this semester, loans paid their way. Aside from the fact that these loans will be forgiven in 20 years, we're worried about the students who didn't come back.

Fall enrollment for three of Ohio's public universities decreased from 2010 to 2011. YSU was one of those three, losing more students than any other public university in the state.

And with more students losing financial aid, enrollment numbers will continue to plummet.

Some of the students will drop out of college altogether. Some will find their way to Kent State University or the University of Akron.

The transfer students will be the ones with completion percentage issues, the perpetual class droppers, not the ones with GPA issues.

"If you're transferring from YSU with a 0.5 GPA, other schools may look at that transcript and not even accept them," said James Stanger of YSU's office of financial aid and scholarships.

We agree with Stanger that students with poor GPAs are as unappealing to Kent as they were to YSU , but public universities will gladly take in the others, the ones who simply dropped too many classes.

Why?

Students are dollar signs for public universities. Students contribute more than 70 percent of all revenue here at YSU , and any other university's admissions office would be foolish to not accept a student, pending poor grades.

The practice of slipping from one campus to another is common. We all know students enrolled elsewhere, waiting to get that GPA that might bring them home to YSU , or maybe someone using YSU as a stepping stone to another school.

It happens because of a severe lack of oversight.

There must be uniform accountability across the state. The Ohio Board of Regents needs to look into why students are constantly jumping from college to college and let the universities know who they are before they end up here.

Be the first to comment on this article!

Return to Top



News Headline: Less concern about local wells (Eckstein) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald - Online
Contact Name: James Proffitt
News OCR Text: Control room operator Karen Mercorella monitors a bank of computer screens at VEI's Class 1 injection well in Vickery.

Hazardous industrial wastes from across the country are unloaded in Vickery and pumped into a sandstone formation almost a half-mile underground, where, scientists say, it will remain for at least 10,000 years. / Photos by James Proffitt/News Herald

VICKERY -- While some scientists have concluded that deep-well injection of wastewater solutions from hydraulic fracturing activity in northeast Ohio likely caused a series of earthquakes in the Youngstown area, such seismic activity is unlikely to occur as a result of deep injection wells in our area, others say.

"The really short answer is no," said Steve Lonneman, senior district manager at Vickery Environmental, Inc. "Part of our permit process is proving that we can't do this."

Lonneman said the geology deep beneath VEI's site does not contain the faults found beneath the injection well sites in the Youngstown area.

A 1.7 mile-deep well scientists say is linked to recent seismic activity in northeast Ohio is one of a handful that have been temporarily shut down by state officials.

The Vickery operation, a Class 1 well, injects thousands of gallons of hazardous waste materials into a porous bed of rock at a pressure low enough not to fracture any stone, Lonneman said.

Kent State University hydrogeology Professor Yoram Eckstein agreed, saying the geology beneath Sandusky and Ottawa counties is significantly different from that in northeast Ohio.

Eckstein said that while fracking and related activities may have been proven to cause seismic activity in Colorado years ago, it hasn't been proven here.

"Our fault lines are old and our injection pressures are too low," he explained.

Eckstein said earthquakes in northeast Ohio have been happening for centuries and they will continue to happen.

"The media and non-scientists are quick to blame fracking and associated wells, including injection wells," he said.

According to Eckstein, a self-described environmentalist, the injection process used by VEI is both seismically and environmentally safe.

Eckstein, who recently published an academic article on the harmful effects of oil-brine waste being used as a dust control agent, said the fluids pumped into the ground at VEI will come to rest in a layer of sedimentary sandstone called the Mt. Simon Formation.

Dina Pierce, northwest district media coordinator for the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, said the Youngstown-area wells receiving media attention lately are Class 2 wells, and are regulated by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

"Standards for siting and construction of Class 1 wells is the most stringent," she said. "Class 1 wells go far deeper than other well classifications."

According to Pierce, both the U.S. EPA and Ohio EPA work to ensure the safety and reliability of Class 1 wells.

In Portage County, where Eckstein lives, that layer of stone is about 12,000 feet, or more than two miles, deep. In this area, that same layer of stone is much shallower, but still more than a half mile below the surface, between 2,800 and 2,900 feet.

Here, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, liquids are pumped out of a 2 7/8 inch-diameter pipe and directly into the sandstone.

"There's no giant cavern," Lonneman said.

The porous Mt. Simon Formation is about 100 feet thick in our area, and below alternating layers of various types of rock, many impermeable.

Pressures run from 200 to 500 pounds-per-square inch, Lonneman said.

According to Brett Miller, environmental, health and safety manager at VEI, the liquid waste displaces miniscule open spaces in the sandstone. More than five gallons of liquid can be pumped into one cubic square foot of the Mt. Simon stone.

The injected materials are considered hazardous and are the byproducts of numerous manufacturing processes. Some of the materials VEI processes and injects are acids, ammonias, brines, pesticides, pharmaceuticals and other hazardous materials mixed with water. VEI does not dispose of radiocative or medical waste.

Before injection, all incoming products are tested and mixed accrordingly, Lonneman said.

"Our biggest issue is making sure we don't have any chemical reactions," he said.

VEI is one of just three operating Class 1 sites in Ohio, and operates four injection wells.

Ineos, LLC, in Lima and AK Steel in Middletown operate six such injection wells.

Those two sites, according to Pierce, are operated privately and inject waste materials produced on-site.

VEI is the only commercial Class 1 injection well in the state, she said.

Combined, Class 1 well operators pump about 260 million gallons of hazardous wastewater into the ground beneath Ohio each year, according to the Ohio EPA.

And while Lonneman said it won't cause earthquakes, he said it won't cause pollution or health problems, either.

"The permit has a 10,000-year standard," he said, going on to explain the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's permitting process is based on a model that predicts how long it takes for certain chemicals to become neutralized, or how long they can remain in one place.

The waste injected at VEI should stay in essentially the same location where it is injected, and migrate underground less than five miles in the next 100 centuries.

"We're injecting about five times deeper than all potential sources of drinking water sources," he said.

Eckstein described current well casing designs as safe and operating standards, including frequent pressure tests by regulators, as responsible and ecologically sound.

Any leaks detected in an injection system would essentially shut down the pumping system almost instantly.

"It's permanent isolation," Eckstein said.

Pierce said she's not aware of any injected materials returning or migrating to the surface after being injected in a Class 1 well. Pierce said there's also no record of any groundwater or drinking water contamination from Class 1 wells.

A full-time OEPA inspector monitors on-site operations at VEI, Pierce said.

"Deep well injection has become an effective technology for the disposal of liquid hazardous waste," she said.

Email James Proffitt at jproffit@gannett.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Experts: NW Ohio injection wells not as controversial (Eckstein) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fremont News Messenger - Online
Contact Name: James Proffitt
News OCR Text: Control room operator Karen Mercorella monitors a bank of computer screens at VEI's Class 1 injection well in Vickery. / James Proffitt/News-Messenger

Hazardous industrial wastes from across the country are unloaded in Vickery and pumped into a sandstone formation almost a half-mile underground, where, scientists say, it will remain for at least 10,000 years. / Photos by James Proffitt/News-Messenger

VICKERY -- While some scientists have concluded that deep-well injection of wastewater solutions from hydraulic fracturing activity in northeast Ohio likely caused a series of earthquakes in the Youngstown area, such seismic activity is unlikely to occur as a result of deep injection wells in our area, others say.

"The really short answer is no," said Steve Lonneman, senior district manager at Vickery Environmental, Inc. "Part of our permit process is proving that we can't do this."

Lonneman said the geology deep beneath VEI's site does not contain the faults found beneath the injection well sites in the Youngstown area.

A 1.7 mile-deep well scientists say is linked to recent seismic activity in northeast Ohio is one of a handful that have been temporarily shut down by state officials.

The Vickery operation, a Class 1 well, injects thousands of gallons of hazardous waste materials into a porous bed of rock at a pressure low enough not to fracture any stone, Lonneman said.

Kent State University hydrogeology Professor Yoram Eckstein agreed, saying the geology beneath Sandusky and Ottawa counties is significantly different from that in northeast Ohio.

Eckstein said that while fracking and related activities may have been proven to cause seismic activity in Colorado years ago, it hasn't been proven here.

"Our fault lines are old and our injection pressures are too low," he explained.

Eckstein said earthquakes in northeast Ohio have been happening for centuries and they will continue to happen.

"The media and non-scientists are quick to blame fracking and associated wells, including injection wells," he said.

According to Eckstein, a self-described environmentalist, the injection process used by VEI is both seismically and environmentally safe.

Eckstein, who recently published an academic article on the harmful effects of oil-brine waste being used as a dust control agent, said the fluids pumped into the ground at VEI will come to rest in a layer of sedimentary sandstone called the Mt. Simon Formation.

Dina Pierce, northwest district media coordinator for the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, said the Youngstown-area wells receiving media attention lately are Class 2 wells, and are regulated by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

"Standards for siting and construction of Class 1 wells is the most stringent," she said. "Class 1 wells go far deeper than other well classifications."

According to Pierce, both the U.S. EPA and Ohio EPA work to ensure the safety and reliability of Class 1 wells.

In Portage County, where Eckstein lives, that layer of stone is about 12,000 feet, or more than two miles, deep. In this area, that same layer of stone is much shallower, but still more than a half mile below the surface, between 2,800 and 2,900 feet.

Here, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, liquids are pumped out of a 2 7/8 inch-diameter pipe and directly into the sandstone.

"There's no giant cavern," said Lonneman.

The porous Mt. Simon Formation is about 100 feet thick in our area, and below alternating layers of various types of rock, many impermeable.

Pressures run from 200 to 500 pounds-per-square inch, Lonneman said.

According to Brett Miller, environmental, health and safety manager at VEI, the liquid waste displaces miniscule open spaces in the sandstone. More than five gallons of liquid can be pumped into one cubic square foot of the Mt. Simon stone.

The injected materials are considered hazardous and are the byproducts of numerous manufacturing processes. Some of the materials VEI processes and injects are acids, ammonias, brines, pesticides, pharmaceuticals and other hazardous materials mixed with water. VEI does not dispose of radiocative or medical waste.

Before injection, all incoming products are tested and mixed accordingly, Lonneman said.

"Our biggest issue is making sure we don't have any chemical reactions," he said.

VEI is one of just three operating Class 1 sites in Ohio, and operates four injection wells.

Ineos, LLC, in Lima and AK Steel in Middletown operate six such injection wells.

Those two sites, according to Pierce, are operated privately and inject waste materials produced on-site.

VEI is the only commercial Class 1 injection well in the state, she said.

Combined, Class 1 well operators pump about 260 million gallons of hazardous wastewater into the ground beneath Ohio each year, according to the Ohio EPA.

And while Lonneman said it won't cause earthquakes, he said it won't cause pollution or health problems, either.

"The permit has a 10,000-year standard," he said, going on to explain the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's permitting process is based on a model that predicts how long it takes for certain chemicals to become neutralized, or how long they can remain in one place.

The waste injected at VEI should stay in essentially the same location where it is injected, and migrate underground, less than five miles in the next 100 centuries.

"We're injecting about five times deeper than all potential sources of drinking water sources," he said.

Eckstein described current well casing designs as safe and operating standards, including frequent pressure tests by regulators, as responsible and ecologically sound.

Any leaks detected in an injection system would essentially shut down the pumping system almost instantly.

"It's permanent isolation," Eckstein said.

Pierce said she's not aware of any injected materials returning or migrating to the surface after being injected in a Class 1 well. Pierce said there's also no record of any groundwater or drinking water contamination from Class 1 wells.

A full-time OEPA inspector monitors on-site operations at VEI, Pierce said.

"Deep well injection has become an effective technology for the disposal of liquid hazardous waste," she said.

Email James Proffitt at jproffit@gannett.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Parkinson's study explores improved function (Ridgel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bandera County Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Parkinson's disease affects more than 1.5 million people in the United States. In addition to visibly affecting patients' motor functions, producing tremors, rigidity, gait problems and unstable posture, it also results in cognitive impairment.

However, new research suggests individuals with Parkinson's disease can improve impaired cognitive function through passive leg cycling.

An assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State University recently published research showing a correlation between individuals with Parkinson's disease riding a motorized bike and significant improvements in executive function.

Through her research, Dr. Angela Ridgel discovered individuals riding a motorized bike - a bike that moves the legs to facilitate passive exercise - at varying speeds experienced improved scores and reduced completion times on cognitive tests.

Ridgel's research was published in the April 2011 edition of the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity.

"Parkinson's disease results in decreased cognitive function as well as motor function. We previously demonstrated the impact of exercise on motor function, so we applied exercise to understand if it can also improve cognitive function," said Ridgel. "Subjects exhibited improved executive function after passive cycling. These findings suggest passive exercise is a viable therapy for cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease."

The study indicates individuals with Parkinson's disease can improve their ability to complete everyday tasks controlled by executive function, such as driving a car or more accurately anticipating, processing and compensating for changes in landscape while walking, e.g., hills, obstacles and stairs.

An assistant professor in Exercise Science-Physiology, Ridgel received her undergraduate degree in Biology from The College of William and Mary in Virginia, a Master's degree in Biology at Villanova University in Pennsylvania and her Doctoral degree in Biomedical Sciences from Marshall University in West Virginia. Ridgel completed her post-doctoral training at Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic.

Her early work used animal models to examine the neurobiology of movement and the effects of aging on movement.

Most recently, she has been interested in how aging and neurological disorders limits exercise and movement in humans.

Ridgel's current research project examines the effects of exercise mode and rate on improvements in motor function, cognition and balance in Parkinson's disease.

Contents Copyright 2012

Return to Top



News Headline: Studying in the Midwest of the USA, Ohio University Graduate Schools | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Zimbio.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By philbg0nma on

There are a huge variety of universities and colleges, both for undergraduate and graduate studies, in Ohio. There are a diverse range of programs for study, from the arts, to business courses to science subjects at the University of Ohio. Whatever your interests, it is likely that you will find something to suit your future career at ohio university graduate school. Founded in 1804 in the Midwestern United States,Ohio University is a popular public university. There are more than 188 master's and 58 doctoral programs in the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business, Scripps College of Communication, Gladys W, offered at the University. and David H. Patton College of Education and Human Services, Russ College of Engineering and Technology, Fine Arts, College of Health Sciences and Professions, Center for International Studies, and the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs. Ohio University is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and a number of professional accrediting associations. In the state of Ohio, there are many other universities and colleges, including Ohio State University. Ohio State Univeristy is the states highest ranked public school, and one of the largest universities in the country. Other institutions ranked among the top public univerisites in the country include, the University of Cincinnati, Kent State University, Miami University and Youngstown State University. The geographic location of Ohio, being a Midwestern state in the USA, is an asset for economic growth and expansion. Ohio links Northeast to Midwest, and as such a great deal of cargo and business traffic pass through its borders. To the north of Ohio is Lake Erie, giving Ohio 312 miles of coastline. To the east of Ohio is the large state of Pennsylvania, Michigan is northwest of the state, and Canada is North. The state of Indiana is located west of Ohio, whilst Kentucky borders the south and West Virginia, the south-east. Much of Ohio is very flat, a geographical feature known as 'glaciated plains'. However some parts, do feature rugged hills and forests. The climate of Ohio is a humid continental climate. Summer-time in Ohio is typically hot and humid. Rain in the state is moderate year-round, and winters range from cool to cold. Severe weather is not uncommon. Deciding where to study at graduate school is such an important decision, and there are so many different factors to weigh up. It is important to do research when deciding on a graduate school. The variety of courses offered by that university the length of the course, the cost of study are all other factors to consider. ohio university graduate school might be an option for you.

Of all the places in England to stay for a short break or for a week's holiday there can be no place more picturesque or historic than the lovely town of Whitby situated on the North East Coastline...

Eating at restaurants is one of all those number of recreational activities that are great for every last celebration, no wonder that diner has become the most commonly-used places those of you...

In most cases, acid reflux is easily preventable. Lifestyle choices and mild medication can help control the main causes of acid reflux which are environmental. Understanding what is causing your...

I'm sharing along with you right now my Web Traffic Genius Review so that you make the best choice on this plugin. I'll notify you appropriate upfront, it really works, and I use it on all of my...

Become a Miessence representative and sell organic makeup for an incredibly satisfying way to make a living. The Miessence business opportunity is unique because there are several ways for you to...

Return to Top



News Headline: Roosevelt Students' Artwork Headed to National Competition | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Abby Kridelbaugh and Jessica Richards win top honors at Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibit

The artwork of two Theodore Roosevelt High School students is moving to the national level of judging after winning top honors at the 58th Annual Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibit.

Abby Kridelbaugh's Dead Fish and Jessica Richards' Petroglyphs have been declared Gold Key Award winners at the Scholastic exhibit being held at Kent State University Stark through Feb. 2.

The show features artwork from middle and high school students representing school districts in Portage, Stark, Summit, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties.

Kridelbaugh and Richards also earned Silver Key Awards, as did Roosevelt student Chloe Spalsbury for her submission, Amphora.

The Gold Key Award is given to artwork demonstrating the highest levels of achievement in technique, originality and personal voice. Gold Key art is forwarded to New York City for Scholastic National Adjudication. Winners are recognized with Gold Key lapel pins and certificates.

The Silver Key Award is for artwork demonstrating achievement worthy of recognition on the regional level. Students are recognized with Silver Key lapel pins and certificates.

The following Roosevelt students' work merited Honorable Mention status at the show: Maggie Connel, Taylor Danner, Ben Gfell, Scott Haines, Andrea Krebs, Ashley Martin, Kelsey Raabe, Jessica Richards, Patrick Valerius and Meghan White.

Honorable Mentions are awarded to artwork demonstrating creative potential. Works receiving this award are not included in the Scholastic regional exhibition. Students are recognized with certificates.

The regional awards ceremony and reception was held Saturday morning in The University Center at Kent State Stark.

The work of Gold Key winners, American Vision Nominees and Portfolio Finalists will be forwarded to the national level of the Scholastic Art Awards judging process in New York City.

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers presents the National Student Art Exhibition of The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in New York City in June 2012. Approximately 300 artworks designated with National Gold Medals and National American Visions Medals will be included in the exhibition.

Students will be notified if their work has been selected for a national exhibition. Select works will appear in the national catalog, some issues of Scholastic magazines and other publications.

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards are the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition programs for creative young people in the United States. Kent State Stark is one of 90 regional partners that sponsor the local awards program.

The 2012 Scholastic Art Exhibit is on display through Feb. 2 in Kent State Stark's University Center and the Fine Arts Building, located at 6000 Frank Ave. N.W. in Jackson Township. The buildings will be open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Stark hosts campus preview | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Stark hosts campus preview

Kent State University at Stark will host a campus preview Feb. 4 for high school juniors, seniors and their parents. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to noon, with an optional campus tour beginning at 9 a.m.

Campus preview will introduce prospective students to Kent State Stark's academic programs and departments in an informal atmosphere to allow for questions and conversation. Attendees will receive a complimentary breakfast while meeting with representatives from Kent State Stark's Admissions, Financial Aid, Faculty, Advising, Career Services and Student Life.

Kent State Stark students can choose from 16 bachelor degree programs offered in their entirety, plus coursework toward more than 218 choices of undergraduate study at Kent State University.

To RSVP, or for more information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/preview or call 330-244-3260.

Kent State University at Stark will host a campus preview Feb. 4 for high school juniors, seniors and their parents. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to noon, with an optional campus tour beginning at 9 a.m.

Campus preview will introduce prospective students to Kent State Stark's academic programs and departments in an informal atmosphere to allow for questions and conversation. Attendees will receive a complimentary breakfast while meeting with representatives from Kent State Stark's Admissions, Financial Aid, Faculty, Advising, Career Services and Student Life.

Kent State Stark students can choose from 16 bachelor degree programs offered in their entirety, plus coursework toward more than 218 choices of undergraduate study at Kent State University.

To RSVP, or for more information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/preview or call 330-244-3260.

Loading commenting interface...

Thank you for the abuse report. We will review the report and take appropriate action.

Return to Top



News Headline: Dover, Garaway students win art awards | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: High-school and middle-school students from Dover and Garaway will be recognized today when awards are presented in the 58th annual North East Central Ohio Scholastic Art Competition.

More than 2,500 pieces of art from Tuscarawas, Stark, Summit, Wayne, Medina and Portage counties were submitted. The artworks awarded gold and silver keys will be on display until Feb. 3 in the Kent State University Stark Campus Center and Fine Arts Building. Receiving gold keys from Dover were Olivia Belknap, Trevor Poole, Tony Peterson and Keerstin McKain. Hannah Foster of Garaway also received a gold key.

Silver key recipients from Dover were Alex Smith, Selina Board, Cassidy Callentine, Mary Deeds, Jordan Mills, Danni Murtaugh, Andrew Rogers, Corin Hayberg, Cortney Kourie, Greg Neading, Stephanie Walker, Alex Wood and Michael Wright.

Allie Hildebrand and Cody Woodring of Garaway also received silver keys.

Honorable mention awards went to 23 Dover students and five Garaway students.

Gold key recipients will have their work forwarded to New York City for the national competition.

Teachers are Keri Stratton, Jodi Hupp and Susie Hawk of Dover and Mallory Gerstacker of Garaway.

The awards will be given at a 10 a.m. ceremony today. Show hours are 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday.

Return to Top



News Headline: Area students earn Scholastic Art Awards honors - SSNL | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Leader Publications - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 1/26/2012 - South Side Leader

JACKSON — Kent State University at Stark is hosting the 58th annual North East Central Ohio (NECO) Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibit through Feb. 2 in the Campus Center and the Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave.

The exhibition features work from middle and high school students in six area counties, including Summit, Stark and Medina. A regional awards ceremony and reception to recognize winners will take place tomorrow, Jan. 28, at 10 a.m. in the University Center at Kent State Stark. Middle and high school art and photography students will be awarded Silver and Gold Key awards. Several special awards, purchase awards and the American Vision Award also will be presented.

According to awards officials, Gold Key winners, American Vision nominees and Portfolio finalists will move on to the national level of the Scholastic Art Awards in New York City.

This year, there were 3,579 entries for the NECO Scholastic Art Awards, according to awards officials. The top award is the Senior Portfolio category, and this year, 22 Portfolio awards were given. Other awards included 158 Gold Keys, 204 Silver Keys and 440 Honorable Mention awards.

The following students, who attend schools in the South Side News Leader's coverage area, received awards:

Portfolio Gold Key winners:

• St. Vincent-St. Mary (STVM): 12th-graders Joe Coughlin and Rose Klein.

Gold Key Individual Piece winners:

• Archbishop Hoban High School: ninth-grader Tess Powers and 12th-grader Mary Stalter;

• Green High School: 11th-grader Morgan McCarthy; and

• STVM: 12th-grader Hannah Comeriato.

Silver Key Individual Piece winners:

• Hoban: Tess Powers;

• Green: Morgan McCarthy; and

• STVM: Hannah Comeriato.

Honorable Mention winners:

• Hoban: Tess Powers;

• Coventry High School: 12th-grader Brian Hookway; and

• STVM: 11th-graders Christopher Esker and Caroline McCarty; and 12th-graders Maria Alvord, Hannah Comeriato, Annie Davis, Michael Hurley and Joe Wilde.

Return to Top



News Headline: Raising the bar (Ritter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tips on how to ask for a pay increase in a struggling economy

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the unemployment rate at 8.2 percent for the Youngstown, Warren and Boardman area, creating a challenging time for employees. Many are thankful just to have a job, while others continue to search for a way to make ends meet.

The economic climate makes it difficult for those who are thriving in their jobs, looking to advance or get an increase in salary. Local experts offer tips on getting a raise in a struggling economy.

"We're starting to see some glimmers of hope in the economy, and improvement continues to be slow and steady. It is appropriate for those who are excelling in their roles to ask for a raise," said Deborah Miller, branch manager of Manpower's Warren office, a recruiting and staffing business.

"It's really about showing your boss the value you bring to the company. That could include things like a unique skill set or an expanded role," she said.

James Ritter, director of enrollment management and student services at Kent State University at Trumbull, said it is important not to blindside a supervisor when wanting to discuss such an important issue.

"(The employee needs to) know the company's financial situation. For example, if the company has recently laid off employees or finished last year 'in the red,' now may not be the time to ask for a raise," he said.

"(Also) keep in mind that threatening with leaving the company unless you get a raise normally has bad long-term consequences."

Doing some research before approaching a supervisor about a raise is an important first step, Miller said.

"Search online to find out what others in your role and in your geographic are making. If your salary is not consistent, request a meeting with your boss to discuss your salary," she said.

She also recommends being prepared to discuss the key contributions the employee has made to the company.

"Make sure to have concrete examples and numbers, such as how you have cut costs, improved productivity or grown the business. Review your key projects and the goals you have reached," she said.

Sarah Jackson, human resources director for Handel's Homemade Ice Cream based in Canfield, agrees.

"You have to have a plan. You have to be able to show that you excelled over last year," she said.

Ritter said that it is important to bring as much data as possible to show the employee deserves a raise.

"This may include performance reviews, salary for comparative positions in similar markets, and awards and / or congratulations for a job well done," he said.

Also, Ritter said employees need to know the industry standards for their profession in terms of years of experience and degrees.

"A person deserves a raise whenever they go above and beyond their job duties. However, keep in mind that doing more of the same type of work usually does not substantiate a raise," he said. "In this tough economy, almost everyone is asked to do more with less."

But a tough economy doesn't necessarily mean employees should just be satisfied with having a job. Jackson said that's where having a plan comes into play.

"Having the documentation to support a raise is essential when talking to your boss," she said.

"It can be an emotional issue, but stay focused on the facts, including the salary research and your own performance examples," Miller said.

While doing research is key, knowing the company's policy in awarding raises is equally as critical. Some companies rely on yearly reviews to hand out raises; others are automatic.

"This depends on the company's policy," Ritter said. "Some companies only permit raises at the time of a yearly review, while others allow them anytime during the year."

Miller agreed.

"It depends on the company culture. Some companies assess performance and salary at different times. They feel that performance discussions are very important to growth and development, and those discussions can become minimized if the salary discussion is included too," she said.

"Others lump them together. It's best to gauge how your company handles each process and follow the timelines."

What happens when the employee doesn't get approved for a raise?

"Know if there are options other than raises such as tuition reimbursement," Ritter said. "Know where you are at in your salary range. If you are close to the top, then you should be asking for a promotion rather than a raise."

Warren Weather Forecast, OH

Return to Top



News Headline: 2Do: museums, parks, family events and more for Jan. 27-Feb. 2, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MUSEUMS

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5. Exhibit: On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life. An exhibit about the material circumstances and domestic life during the Civil War and in the years that followed. Display of women's and children's costumes, which is supplemented with related photographs, decorative arts and women's magazines. In observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Through Sunday, Aug. 26. Exhibit: A Day at the Beach. A selection of garments worn near and at the beach between the 1860s and 1910s. Through Sunday, Oct. 7.

Return to Top



News Headline: Storytime at Kent State Library | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Vice President for Administration Gregg Floyd
has Rien Dre Tidmore help him read “How Do Dinosaurs Go To
School” at the Reinberger Children's Library Center in the School
of Library and Information Science. Floyd and his wife, Janet, recently
hosted the story time session for children from KSU's Child Development
Center.

Return to Top



News Headline: COPE program seeks grandmothers for project on raising grandchildren | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Baltimore Times Inc. Newspapers - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BALTIMORE— To learn the best ways that grandparents can cope with the challenge of raising their grandchildren, the University of Maryland School of Social Work (SSW) is recruiting participants for a project funded by a $2.5 million grant to the school and collaborators in Ohio, Texas and California. The grant from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing

Research will fund a four-year study called Project COPE (Caring for Others as a Positive Experience).

About 2.5 million grandparents in the United States are responsible for providing shelter, food, and clothing and, in other ways, meeting the needs of grandchildren under age 18 who were living with them, according to U.S. Census data.

It's a tough task, according to Frederick Strieder, PhD, Clinical Associate Professor at the SSW and director of Grandparent Family Connections, a nonprofit that helps Baltimore residents who find themselves carrying out parental roles under difficult and often unexpected circumstances. He knows the grandparents' experiences vary tremendously; there are even some great-grandparents, in their seventies and eighties, who are raising infants.

At the SSW, Strieder is the principal investigator for COPE Maryland, which will enroll grandmothers who have custodial responsibility for grandchildren between the ages of four and 12, in the total absence of the birth parents. “It's not like raising your own from the beginning,” he says. “Based on the children's experiences, you have to undo and redo some important basics in relating.”

Children have been neglected or undergone trauma, or perhaps come into an elder's care because of a parent's death, illness from AIDS, or incarceration. “All these reasons are why grandparents step up,” he says, despite financial and personal demands and the demands of raising children who've been through some tough times.

“Across demographic groups, the challenge they face is the same,” he says. Nationally, a third of these grandparents are above age 60, 13 percent are younger than 45, and the rest fall in the ages in between. The financial and other pressures are greatest for those living in poverty.

The national study, which will enroll more than 500 grandmothers is led by project principal investigators, Gregory Smith Ph.D. professor at Kent State University and Bert Hayslip, PhD. regents professor of Psychology at the University of North Texas.

In Maryland, 126 grandmothers are being recruited in Baltimore City, Baltimore County and Prince George's County and surrounding areas, according to Patricia Greenberg, MA, COPE Research Project Manager at the SSW. They will meet in small groups for a 10 week-period at convenient neighborhood settings, with childcare and a meal provided at no charge to participants. Each group will be led by a peer grandparent and a group leader who has been trained as facilitators.

Grandmothers will be assigned to one of three interventions— learning coping skills to help them handle the demands of raising grandchildren, learning new and improving old parenting skills, or participating in a support group with peers. As part of the study to determine which methods work best, each grandmother and one grandchild will be interviewed before and after the sessions and over a period of up to two years afterward. The grandmothers will be compensated for participating in these interviews.

This effort not only helps the individuals and the youngsters who depend on them but will provide data to help many others in the future. For more information go to www.ssw.umaryland.edu/cope or call toll-free 855-462-8766.

Return to Top



News Headline: Effects of early albuterol (salbutamol) administration on the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms. | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/29/2012
Outlet Full Name: BioPortfolio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Summary

The present study examined whether the use of albuterol within hours of a motor vehicle accident (MVA) impacted subsequent posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Participants receiving albuterol had less severe overall PTSS and hyperarousal symptoms at 6 weeks and less severe reexperiencing symptoms at 1 year post-MVA than those who did not receive albuterol.

Affiliation

Department of Psychology, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA; Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Journal Details

Name: Psychiatry research

ISSN: 0165-1781

Pages: 296-8

Links

MESH Definitions

Albuterol

A racemic mixture with a 1:1 ratio of the r-isomer, levalbuterol, and s-albuterol. It is a short-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist with its main clinical use in ASTHMA.

Administration, Topical

The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.

Tert-butylhydroperoxide

A direct-acting oxidative stress-inducing agent used to examine the effects of oxidant stress on Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction in vascular endothelial cells. It is also used as a catalyst in polymerization reactions and to introduce peroxy groups into organic molecules.

Early Growth Response Protein 3

An early growth response transcription factor that is essential for the development of MUSCLE SPINDLES.

Drug Labeling

Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.

PubMed Articles

18747 Associated PubMed Articles

Return to Top



News Headline: Book to toast Ray's Place, a Kent fixture (O'Connor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/28/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A book celebrating 75 years of locally owned, downtown Kent restaurant and pub Ray's Place will share the stories of its employees and customers over the years.

Kent State University Associate Professor Patrick O'Connor of the School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies, and author of the book, is seeking contributions to the publication that will celebrate the restaurant as it marks its 75th anniversary.

“A lot of changes have taken place in downtown Kent, but here is one restaurant that has been here a long time and has been a magnet for Kent State alumni, staff and students,” O'Connor said. “I marvel at how popular Ray's Place is, especially during Homecoming, and the tremendous loyalty of its customers. Sharing the stories of the restaurant's employees and customers for the past 75 years is something unique and worth celebrating.”

The bulk of the book will feature fond, funny, sentimental or weird memories of Ray's Place shared by employees and customers. Submissions for the book can be made via the Ray's Place website. An option to submit memories anonymously is also available on the website.

“Whether you remember going into Ray's, but never remembered coming out, as one anonymous contributor stated, your story could help build this memory book that transcends generations,” O'Connor said.

Contributors also have the opportunity to suggest a title for the book, which will be published in spring 2013 by Black Squirrel Books Æ, an imprint of the Kent State University Press. Proceeds from the book will support the Ray's Place Entrepreneurship Scholarship program for Kent State University's College of Business Administration.

Charles Thomas, owner of Ray's Place and Kent State College of Business Administration alumnus, who gave his blessing for the book, said celebrating 75 years shows that the business has stood the test of time.

“For many years, Ray's Place has provided Kent State students, faculty and staff, and the Kent community a place they can go to for great food, drink and fun,” Thomas said. “It has also been a place where they can come back to after graduation. Kent State and Ray's Place complement each other ... we both run a fine institution. Whenever Kent State officials travel around the country to meet alumni, often times, one of the first questions they get is ‘How is Ray's Place?'”

O'Connor's son is also involved in producing the book. Patrick O'Connor, a KSU alumnus and former political cartoonist for the Daily Kent Stater, KSU's student newspaper, will provide illustrations for the book.

© 2012 Vindy.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Audition list for Jan. 27 and beyond | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University. Seeking an African American boy age 6-9 and no higher than 45 inches for the role of Coalhouse Walker III in "Ragtime." The role is non-speaking and appears at the end of the play. Performances: Feb. 17-25 in KSU's Music & Speech Building's E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent. For an appointment, call Eric van Baars at 330-672-0102 or email fvanbaar@kent.edu. Lake Erie College, Royce Hall for Fine and Performing Arts' C.K. Rickel Theatre, 391 W. Washington St., Painesville. Seeking men and women for two upcoming productions: "Short Play Festival" (March 23-25) and Sam Bobrick's "Are You Sure?" (April 19-22). 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7 and Wednesday, Feb. 8. Come prepared to improv and read from script. Details: contact Dr. Jaffe at jjaffe@lec.edu or call 440-375-7451.

Return to Top



News Headline: Historic district zone eyed for downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 01/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “Welcome to Historic Downtown Kent.”

That's a sign Kent residents could see in the near future if Kent City Council and the state of Ohio approve a plan to designate a historic district in the city.

City Manager Dave Ruller said the exact size and scope of the district has not been determined yet, although it will include the old Kent Hotel, which the city sold to developer Ron Burbick in November.

“Our intention is to start small — two or three blocks, possibly,” Ruller said.

Burbick plans to restore the hotel, built in 1920 at the corner of East Main and DePeyster streets, to usable condition and donate any profits he makes from the building to area non-profits.

Ruller said the city's administration told Burbick they would examine the possibility of engaging what the Ohio Historic Preservation Office calls its Certified Local Government program.

“There are multiple funding opportunities within (the program) as well as tax credits,” Ruller said.

The state historic preservation office offers competitive grants for up to 60 percent of costs for acquisition, development or other projects in historic districts as long as the community or developer pays the other 40 percent.

While creating a historic district would allow developers planning a building project to seek out tax credits and funding, it would also give teeth to the city's Architectural Review Board, which has been in existence for more than 30 years in an advisory capacity.

The role of the board currently is to make suggestions and issue “certificates of appropriateness” for building projects in the city. Ruller said the board could “compel developers to make changes” to projects in the historic district if the legislation passes.

The argument that a municipality can designate a historic district with special guidelines and regulations for builders can be controversial, with one case on the subject even making it to the U.S. Supreme Court.

According to the the historic preservation office's website, the court's 1978 decision in the case of Penn Central Transportation Company vs. New York City “upheld the concept that a city can enact land use controls that preserve the aesthetic features of a city, including the areas that have special historical, archaeological and architectural significance.”

Doug Fuller, the Kent architect working with Burbick on the hotel renovation and a member of the Architectural Review Board, said he believes a historic district with new regulations would not hinder downtown development.

“Most developers like to come into a come into a community that has some standards,” Fuller said. “It assures them that when they come in...the owners around them will maintain some quality level.”

Fuller said that the city already has maintenance ordinances and style guidelines for downtown Kent, so new standards for a historical disrict would likely not be a drastic step forward.

Burbick's Acorn Alley development, which Fuller designed, and three other construction projects under way in downtown Kent — the Fairmount Properties block, the KSU hotel and PARTA's transit facility — all share common design elements, including the same shade of brick.

“(It's) those people who don't care about their property, they'll probably object,” Fuller said, noting the board could also delay demolition projects in the district.

Ruller said the purpose of the proposal is not to “delay or impede” future developments in downtown Kent. He said the main goal is to give Burbick every possible advantage in redeveloping the hotel.

“”Part of the reason we sold him the building is he delivers high quality projects and quickly,” Ruller said. “We want to do anything we can to facilitate that.”

Kent City Council is set to discuss the possibility of a historic district in downtown Kent at its Wednesday meeting. If they approve the proposal, it will be sent to the historic preservation office for review and certification.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus