Report Overview:
Total Clips (38)
Admissions (1)
Alumni (3)
Alumni; Art, School of (2)
Alumni; KSU Ice Arena (1)
Alumni; Students (1)
Athletics (2)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Liquid Crystal Institute; Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (2)
College Tech Prep (2)
Fashion Design; Students (1)
Higher Education (2)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Music (1)
Psychology (4)
Students (3)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
CollegeWeekLive Now Connects Students and Colleges Live Online, Every Day 02/06/2012 Markets.financialcontent.com Text Attachment Email

...have been quick to take advantage of CollegeWeekLive AlwaysON. The following universities are among the initial members of the exclusive beta launch. Bowling Green State University Colorado Mesa University CUNY, Hunter College Dallas Baptist University FIDM Florida Atlantic University...


Alumni (3)
New exhibit explores Jefferson's slave ownership 02/04/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Jefferson and Hemings through their son Madison Hemings, said he has known about his ancestors for years from stories told by his mother and grandmother. The Kent State graduate co-wrote the book Jefferson's Children: The Story of One American Family. Having such an exhibit at the Smithsonian is a breakthrough,...

Maria Scali – Cleveland news & weather from WJW Television FOX 8 02/05/2012 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...immigrant Italian parents. She grew up in Garfield Heights, and went on to graduate third in her class from Garfield Heights High School. Maria attended Kent State University and graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Telecommunications. One week after graduating from KSU, Maria...

Professor utilizes wealth of business knowledge in the classroom 02/05/2012 BG News - Online Text Attachment Email

...fired on a Tuesday ... He thought I was trying to start a union, which is absurd," Poor said. Yet, Poor's career path soon changed as he attended Kent State University to study industrial education, but not until the spring quarter of the following year, due to his poor grades. "I was...


Alumni; Art, School of (2)
Kent artist, "character' Robert E. Wood dies 02/06/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Robert Wood, Kent Artist and Cultural Icon, Has Died 02/06/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Alumni; KSU Ice Arena (1)
Kent State Alumni Association Holds Ice Skating Event Feb. 11 02/05/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Alumni Association Holds Ice Skating Event Feb. 11 The Kent State University Alumni Association will hold its Flash Ice Fest event...


Alumni; Students (1)
KSU student, Kent historian apply for vacant council seat 02/04/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Two applications are in for the Kent council-at-large seat left vacant by Erik Valenta's resignation. So far, Erik Clarke, a Kent State University student, and Jon Ridinger, a local substitute teacher, Kent history blogger and private piano teacher, are the only two who...


Athletics (2)
Flashes clinch MAC title over EMU (Andrassy) 02/06/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU wrestlers capture MAC regular-season title (Andrassy) 02/06/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
HONORS 02/05/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

Reimagine Cleveland wins national planning excellence award for sustainability innovation 02/06/2012 Freshwater Cleveland Text Attachment Email


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Liquid Crystal Institute; Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (2)
KENT STATE TO HOST STEM PROJECT FAIR ON FEB. 11 (Moerland, Selinger) 02/06/2012 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE TO HOST STEM PROJECT FAIR ON FEB. 11 (Moerland, Selinger) 02/03/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb.3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Science, technology, engineering and math - commonly referred to as STEM fields - will...


College Tech Prep (2)
College Tech Prep Initiatives event on Feb. 16 for parents, students 02/05/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...at www.sixdistrict.com. Parents and students can tour the labs, meet the instructors and hear from current students. University partners, including Cleveland State University's Fenn College of Engineering, Cuyahoga Community College, Kent State University and The University of Akron,...

College Tech Prep Initiatives event for parents, students 02/05/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...at www.sixdistrict.com . Parents and students can tour the labs, meet the instructors and hear from current students. University partners, including Cleveland State University's Fenn College of Engineering, Cuyahoga Community College, Kent State University and The University of Akron,...


Fashion Design; Students (1)
Wrangler Producing Shirt Designed by Kent State Student (Grieder) 02/06/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Higher Education (2)
Uncle Sam, Rock 'N' Roll, and Higher Education 02/03/2012 Cato Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...parties) at Vassar, to "Poets Who Sing" at Washington University, to "Ultimate Frisbee" at the University of Massachusetts, and "Dance Roller Skating" at Kent State. Yes, and all of the courses mentioned are for academic credit. Charles J. Sykes is the author of ProfScam: Professors and the Demise...

Graduate School at Ohio University, Studying in the Midwest of the USA 02/04/2012 Pressbox - Online Text Attachment Email

Ohio University has a huge variety of universities and colleges, both for undergraduate and graduate studies. There are a diverse range of programs...


KSU at Stark (2)
Religion briefs for Feb. 4 02/03/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Religion briefs for Feb. 4 During February, Keith S. Lloyd, an English professor at Kent State University, will be a guest instructor at 9:15 a.m. Sundays at Christ Presbyterian Church at 530 Tuscarawas St. W in Canton. Lloyd will...

'Stark Realities' exhibit at KSU-Stark through February 02/03/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TWP. - The Stark Realities exhibit, showcasing artwork of various media, will be on display through Feb. 29 in the Main Hall Art Gallery at the Kent State University Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. The free exhibit will be open to the public from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
YSU can't spin the bad news 02/05/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...question is already having to justify its existence in the competitive arena of higher education. The 3.8 percent drop in the number of students attending Youngstown State University this Spring semester compared with the Spring 2011 semester (13,698 vs. 14,253) gives pause. Last Fall's numbers reflected...


KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Annual Engineering Expo set at KSU Tusc 02/05/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

with Totally Local Yellow Pages Posted Feb 05, 2012 @ 06:52 PM In celebration of National Engineers Week, Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will conduct the 30th annual Engineering Technology Opportunity Expo. The free expo is...

'Freedom Bound' Friday at Performing Arts Center 02/04/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Pages Posted Feb 03, 2012 @ 11:42 PM An original play titled “Freedom Bound” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. Presented as part of the Performing Arts Center's family series, “Freedom Bound” tells the tale of the most...

Kent State Tuscarawas sets Information Night 02/04/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will host Information Night 2012 at 6 p.m. March 8  in the Founders Hall auditorium at 330...

Freedom Bound at Kent State Tusky 02/03/2012 Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The Text Attachment Email

An original play, Freedom Bound will be performed at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. Presented as part of the Performing Arts Center's family series, Freedom Bound tells the...


KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
Downtown Construction Projects Moving at Good Clip 02/06/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


KSU Museum (1)
Maltz Museum in Beachwood shows "Project Mah Jongg" through April 02/03/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...night. There's a group of lifelong friends and they still play together. There's someone who carries a set in her trunk. It's a game of friendship.” The Kent State University Museum loaned the Maltz Museum couture by Dior, Paulene Trigere and Charles James. The costumes were used with a display recreating...


Music (1)
Concerto Competition Winners Featured at Upcoming Orchestra Concert 02/06/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Concerto Competition Winners Featured at Upcoming Orchestra Concert The Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music's Orchestra will continue its season with "Rock and Peace" led by Orchestra Director Liza Grossman...


Psychology (4)
Today's Top Medical Stories for February 6, 2012 02/06/2012 KOLR-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...past 10 years - but doctors say it's still too high. And children left out of group activities - tend to be less active on their own. Researchers at Kent State University rigged a game so some children were not able to participate. Later when those same kids had an opportunity to do a physical...

Researchers at Kent State University Publish New Data on Neuroscience 02/03/2012 OBGYN & Reproduction Week - Online Text Attachment Email

...function. Rather, MCI patients in this sample declined in performance on several tests sensitive to Alzheimer's disease," wrote L.A. Miller and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "Examined in the context of past work, it appears exercise may be beneficial prior to the onset...

Research from Kent State University Provides New Data on Heart Failure 02/06/2012 Cardiovascular Week Text Email

According to the authors of a study from Kent, Ohio, "Heart failure (HF) is a disabling disease that often affects instrumental activities of daily living...

Researchers at Kent State University Publish New Data on Neuroscience 02/06/2012 Cardiovascular Week Text Email

...function. Rather, MCI patients in this sample declined in performance on several tests sensitive to Alzheimer's disease," wrote L.A. Miller and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "Examined in the context of past work, it appears exercise may be beneficial prior...


Students (3)
KSU student blames broken heart for crime 02/05/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A broken heart and a broken window recently led a Kent State University student to plead guilty to burglary charges for illegally entering his ex-girlfriend's Franklin Township apartment in October...

20 will seek opportunity to compete at Miss Ohio 02/04/2012 News-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

...2011 Heather Waterman and Miss Mansfield Outstanding Teen 2011 Morgan Kindred. The contestants are: » Jelisa Barringer of Columbus, a senior at Central State University majoring in public relations. She will perform a jazz vocal selection. Her platform is "Preparing Peers for the Professional...

20 will seek opportunity to compete at Miss Ohio 02/03/2012 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...2011 Heather Waterman and Miss Mansfield Outstanding Teen 2011 Morgan Kindred. The contestants are: » Jelisa Barringer of Columbus, a senior at Central State University majoring in public relations. She will perform a jazz vocal selection. Her platform is "Preparing Peers for the Professional...


Town-Gown (2)
KSU Esplanade eyed as location for veterans memorial 02/05/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...little (less) off the beaten track," Ruller said. So city officials suggested a location that will be literally at the end of a well-traveled path: The Kent State University Esplanade extension. In a downtown development meeting, Kent officials asked Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority...

Plans For Fallen Veterans' Memorial Continually Evolving 02/06/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: CollegeWeekLive Now Connects Students and Colleges Live Online, Every Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Markets.financialcontent.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Enhanced AlwaysON Platform and Mobile Chat Application Enable Students to Connect to Colleges Anytime, Anywhere via www.CollegeWeekLive.com

BOSTON, Feb. 2, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Anticipating 1,000,000 college visits in 2012, CollegeWeekLive will open its doors 365 days a year to create AlwaysON, a live channel where students and colleges meet online. CollegeWeekLive AlwaysON features weekly expert presentations, unlimited access to colleges, unlimited chat sessions, and online visits organized by both colleges and high school counselors. Speakers such as Dr. Gary Gruber, Harlan Cohen, and Ted Fiske will host monthly webcasts.

Students search for colleges every day, but are often frustrated to find they can't have a meaningful conversation unless that college is one of the few that visit their high school. "I like being able to interact with someone live versus waiting for an answer via email or mail," said Bri Falcon, a student in Connecticut. International and out-of-state students who can't travel to college campuses are often left without any reasonable options.

While the largest segment of college admissions inquiries is initiated online, most colleges spend less than the cost of one traveling admissions representative online. Despite $300,000 to $3 million spent annually on staff and travel to high schools, colleges reach just 10% of high schools and reach an even smaller fraction of college-bound students through visits to high schools. Sending admissions staff to visit high schools is expensive and time consuming, and is not effective in a wired world.

What's more, high schools may feel that college admission visits disrupt class schedules and create a scheduling burden for guidance staff that is overworked and undermanned. High school counselors argue that students connect to a mere handful of colleges through these visits, when they should be considering a wider range of higher education possibilities.

CollegeWeekLive offers instant gratification in an AlwaysON world. Colleges can now engage with students actively researching their school and answer admissions questions easily and personally online. Colleges can now build a connection with prospective students at every step of the admissions process via CollegeWeekLive, from initial awareness to evaluation, to application and final enrollment.

With CollegeWeekLive AlwaysON, any of the 20,000 high schools in the CollegeWeekLive Counselor NetworkÔ may request online visits with colleges that their students have expressed interest in, eliminating the need for onsite visits. Counselors will now be notified of which colleges are available at CollegeWeekLive each week, and if a member college isn't available, counselors can request an online visit. "It's been a delight to watch my students grow as they chat with admissions counselors and current students live," said Jennifer Restauri, a counselor in Texas.

Likewise, CollegeWeekLive participating colleges can schedule their own online visits with high schools anywhere worldwide, and reach CollegeWeekLive's current audience of 450,000 students in 191 countries while also taking advantage of CollegeWeekLive's established calendar of online admissions events.

Colleges have been quick to take advantage of CollegeWeekLive AlwaysON. The following universities are among the initial members of the exclusive beta launch.

Bowling Green State University

Colorado Mesa University

CUNY, Hunter College

Dallas Baptist University

FIDM

Florida Atlantic University

Holy Names University

Kent State

Kettering University

Knox College

Lawrence Technological University

LIU Brooklyn

Michigan Technological University

Mississippi State University

Mount St. Mary's University

Oregon Institute of Technology

Illinois Institute of Technology

Pepperdine University

Stony Brook University

Syracuse University

University of California, Davis

University of California, Santa Barbara

University of Chicago

University of Houston

University of Idaho

University of Louisville

University of Melbourne

University of North Florida

University of North Texas

University of Oklahoma

University of Oregon

University of Tampa

University of Tennessee, Knoxville

University of Vermont

Western Michigan University

William Patterson University

"When students make real connections with college reps they are most likely to enroll," said Robert Rosenbloom, president and CEO of CollegeWeekLive. "AlwaysON will enable colleges to have more live conversations than ever before. Colleges will create compelling events on the fly and get more students to respond at every stage of the process." AlwaysON member colleges can now leverage unlimited text and video chat to schedule online visits with the high schools they don't visit."

Colleges need to be available when and where students search, and for many students that is from their smart phone. The release of CollegeWeekLive's mobile chat application for iPhone, iPad, and Android is central to CollegeWeekLive AlwaysON. "This is the first mobile chat application designed for college admissions," said Rosenbloom. "Students browsing for colleges while on the bus ride home will be able to chat with college representatives, providing the type of immediate response this generation expects. The seamless integration with AlwaysON enables colleges to go mobile without any additional cost."

For more information on CollegeWeekLive and AlwaysON, please contact 617-938-6023 or colleges@collegeweeklive.com.

If you are a member of the media and would like to hear more about CollegeWeekLive, please contact Press(at)CollegeWeekLive.com. Colleges and universities or student services providers interested in participating should contact 617.938.6023 or Exhibit(at)CollegeWeekLive.com.

CollegeWeekLive is the leading channel for live conversations with prospective students. Colleges can now reach far more high schools than they could visit in person, engage students in an online environment they prefer, and improve results at every stage of the enrollment process.  CollegeWeekLive is an efficient channel for colleges to make real connections with students. Since 2007, hundreds of thousands of students from 191 countries have visited CollegeWeekLive to seek out expert advice on their college choice.

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News Headline: New exhibit explores Jefferson's slave ownership | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WASHINGTON: Thomas Jefferson wrote "all men are created equal" to declare U.S. independence from Britain, yet he also freed only nine of his more than 600 slaves during his lifetime.

That contradiction between ideals and reality is at the center of a new exhibit as the Smithsonian Institution continues developing a national black history museum. It offers a look at Jefferson's Monticello plantation in Virginia through the lives of six slave families and artifacts unearthed from where they lived.

The exhibit, Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello: Paradox of Liberty, was developed with Monticello and will be on view at the National Museum of American History through mid-October. It includes a look at the family of Sally Hemings, a slave. Most historians believe she had an intimate relationship with the third president and that he fathered her children.

Museum Director Lonnie Bunch said his staff can test ideas by building exhibits before the National Museum of African American History and Culture is finished.

It will be the first museum added to the National Mall since 2004. A groundbreaking is planned for Feb. 22, and it's scheduled to open in 2015 near the Washington Monument.

Bunch said museum officials want to see how the public responds to subjects, such as slavery, as they try to present history for the widest possible audience.

Slavery is still the "last great unmentionable" in public discourse but central in shaping American history, he said.

"This is a story we know we have to tell, and this is a story we know is going to be difficult and going to be challenging, but this new museum has to tell the story," he said. "In many ways, the Smithsonian is the great legitimizer, so if we can wrestle with slavery and Jefferson, other people can."

A portion of the exhibit devoted to the Hemings-Jefferson story marks the first time the subject has been presented on the National Mall.

Curators stopped short of making a definitive statement in the exhibit about the relationship, but they wrote that it was probably an intimate one, based on documentary and genetic evidence.

"On the one hand, it's not a breakthrough for scholars. We've known this for a long time," Bunch said. "I think that the public is still trying to understand it."

Many artifacts, including tools and kitchen ceramics, are on public view for the first time, exploring the work and lives of slave families who lived on Jefferson's plantation. Among the pieces is a chair built by John Hemings, Sally Hemings' brother, to replicate a set of French chairs at Monticello.

While such items may have been seen by 450,000 people a year at Monticello, they are accessible to millions of visitors at the Smithsonian, curators said.

In the exhibit, oral histories from descendants of Jefferson's slaves reveal stories passed down through families for generations, along with detailed records kept by Jefferson.

For example, Jefferson bought George and Ursula Granger and their sons as slaves in 1773, and Ursula became a "favorite housewoman" of his wife. Jefferson eventually made George Granger the overseer of Monticello, the only slave to rise to that position and receive an annual wage.

Later, the first baby born in the White House was the son of Wormley and Ursula Hughes, who belonged to Jefferson.

"We can begin to understand slavery, not as an abstraction but through the stories of individuals and families who were surviving within a system that denied their humanity," said Leslie Green Bowman, president of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation that runs Monticello.

A related website will showcase the Getting Word oral history project.

Curators also explore the importance of slavery in early U.S. history and Jefferson's views on enslavement, which he called an "abominable crime."

The small laptop portable desk he used to draft the Declaration of Independence is placed front and center in the exhibit, borrowed from the Smithsonian's permanent presidential gallery.

Shannon Lanier, 32, of New York City, a ninth-generation descendant of Jefferson and Hemings through their son Madison Hemings, said he has known about his ancestors for years from stories told by his mother and grandmother. The Kent State graduate co-wrote the book Jefferson's Children: The Story of One American Family.

Having such an exhibit at the Smithsonian is a breakthrough, he said, because it's past time for more people to know about Jefferson's history with slavery.

"This is a great catalyst for conversation," he said, standing near a bronze statue of Jefferson. "It's really hard for people to understand slavery and Thomas Jefferson. He was a president. Why couldn't he set them free?

"This helps enlighten people about ... how complex it was."

Bill Webb of New York City learned only in 2006 that his ancestor Brown Colbert was a slave connected to Monticello as the grandson of Elizabeth Hemings, Sally Hemings' mother - a discovery he called "mind blowing."

"On any research that you do, I think it's exciting. But with slavery, it's certainly disturbing sometimes," he said. "But it's fact. It's good to know from whence one comes."

As for Jefferson, Webb said he was "a product of his time."

Until the mid-1980s, Monticello avoided the topic of slavery. But decades of research and archaeology at the site, along with an oral history project begun in 1993 with descendants of slaves, helped piece together a fuller picture of slave life, said Monticello Curator Elizabeth Chew.

"Twenty years ago, we could not have done this show," she said.

Smithsonian Curator Rex Ellis said understanding Jefferson's place in history requires a deeper understanding of his entanglement with 607 enslaved men, women and children.

"We have to give voice to them," Ellis said. "They represent the community who brought him to his father on a pillow when he was born to those who adjusted the pillow under his head when he died."

National Museum of African American History and Culture: http://nmaahc.si.edu/.

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News Headline: Maria Scali – Cleveland news & weather from WJW Television FOX 8 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Maria Scali

Reporter

Maria is truly one of Cleveland's Own. This veteran news broadcaster has lived and worked in Northeast Ohio her entire life.

Maria was born in Cleveland to immigrant Italian parents. She grew up in Garfield Heights, and went on to graduate third in her class from Garfield Heights High School.

Maria attended Kent State University and graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Telecommunications.

One week after graduating from KSU, Maria started working as a Desk Assistant at WKYC-TV. After 2 1/2 years there, she went on to become a Producer/ Director/ Reporter at WYTV-TV in Youngstown.

But, the bulk of Maria's broadcast career has been spent here at WJW Fox 8 News.

She has been a Newscast Producer, Planning Producer, Special Projects Producer, Assignment Editor and Field Producer.

She has received several emmy nominations and broadcast awards for her writing and producing.

Maria is married and has two teenage children.

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News Headline: Professor utilizes wealth of business knowledge in the classroom | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: BG News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hamilton Endowed Professor of Entrepreneurship Gene Poor

initially had no plans of going to college, but his decision

quickly changed.

Poor became a successful business man, taught at the College of

Technology, was invited by College of Business to teach

entrepreneurship and wrote numerous books.

Growing up in Lorain, Ohio, Poor didn't pay much attention in

school, as he planned to work for his father full-time after high

school.

He had no intentions of going to college, but despite his

father's encouragement to quit high school and work for him full

time, his mother didn't allow it.

However, after "barely" graduating high school, Poor headed to

work with his dad at a Pepsi Cola company.

"I headed to work Monday and was fired on a Tuesday ... He

thought I was trying to start a union, which is absurd," Poor

said.

Yet, Poor's career path soon changed as he attended Kent State

University to study industrial education, but not until the spring

quarter of the following year, due to his poor grades.

"I was a lost soul. Two high school teachers saw more in me than

I saw in myself. They encouraged me to go to college, and I said,

‘If you sign me up, I'll go,'" Poor said.

As a student at Kent State University, Poor met a professor who

changed his life. He admired his job as a professor and was

promised a job at Kent University following graduation.

Poor graduated in 1966 with a master's degree in industrial

education. He then got at a job at Kent State University as

professor for two years.

Randy Starkey, the first student Poor taught at Kent State

University, currently works for Poor at his company, Life

Formations.

Starkey views Poor as a mentor and a friend and has learned many

things from Poor, including one that has served him best - problem

solving both by example and instruction.

"Poor's the finest character imaginable. ... He's the kind of

person who has a lot of friends and you know you can always call

him," Starkey said.

After a protest shooting about the Vietnam War in 1970, Poor

decided to leave Kent State University and set his sights on

Bowling Green.

Poor choose to teach at the University after hearing a professor

who taught at the University speak at a conference. Poor admired

the speaker's "speaking style."

After settling in at the University, Poor earned his doctorate

degree in higher education and planned to teach.

Poor first taught at the College of Technology in the Visual

Communication Technologies program.

Stephen Jenkins, an adjunct instructor at the College of

Technology, said what makes Poor special is being successful and

believing in the things he's talking about.

"He helps students understand what their dream is and take

practical steps to pursue that dream," Jenkins said.

About eight years ago, Poor was invited to join the College of

Business, as it was looking for an entrepreneur. Since he started a

lot of businesses - including Life Formations, Easy Street Cafe on

South Main Street and some consulting firms - Poor was a great

fit.

"One of the things I tell my students is that they shouldn't get

to know professors, because they changed my life. ... I was

initially going to be a truck driver and didn't know what college

was about," Poor said.

At a recent high school reunion, Poor asked one of his former

classmates about who surprised him the most, and the classmate

replied that it was Poor, because he changed the rules.

"I was the wildest card of the bunch. ... My life went from

least likely to graduate from high school to probably the only

person with a Ph.D.," Poor said.

While currently teaching entrepreneurship at the University,

Poor explains to his students that they're the average of five

friends they "run around" with. When Poor stopped "running around"

with his friends and instead "ran around with" professors, it made

sense for him to be around people who helped him get to where he

wanted to go.

"One of the things I say in class is that 80 percent of you want

to be rich and 50 percent want to be famous, but you don't run

around with famous or rich people," Poor said.

Poor also tells his students there are two important days in

their lives: the day they were born, and the day they figure out

what they were meant to do.

Poor encourages his students to do what fulfills them and

believes that the first job they get can cast their fate, because

following graduation people take the first job they get and can

quickly get caught up with marriage and children, he said.

"There's dignity in all work. I would have been happy as a truck

driver, but I wouldn't have known what was possible," Poor

said.

While teaching, Poor also tries to entertain his students and

believes that professors have to give it all they've got because

they're in competition with other things their students are

interested in.

"It's show business with an agenda," Poor said.

Poor insists that there are a lot of great teachers at the

University and believes students should go to lunch with a

professor every semester because if they're not, they're missing

the biggest "heart" of college education.

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News Headline: Kent artist, "character' Robert E. Wood dies | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent artist and community fixture Robert E. Wood, known for his idiosyncratic behavior but also for his artistic talent and contributions to the city's artistic community, has died.
Wood, 68, died of a heart attack Sunday morning, friends and acquaintances said. He had lived in Kent since the mid-1960s.
While most well-known in Kent by his colorful nickname, Wood also was an incredibly talented artist. A staple at Kent's Haymaker Farmers Market, he frequently sold his art there and at Art in the Park at Fred Fuller Park.
Marilyn Sessions, who works at Hometown Bank in Kent, said she would help Wood, who took public transportation or walked where he needed to go, get his artwork to Art in the Park, the annual event at Fred Fuller Park.
“He was my ‘date' for Right at Home,” the Coleman Foundation's annual art benefit, Sessions said. “He was a featured artist there and I always made sure he was able to get there.”
Wood moved to Kent from Struthers in Mahoning County in the 1960s and earned two art degrees at Kent State University. His training and time made him into a very mature artist, said F. John Kluth, who developed a friendship with Wood as members of the Kent art community.
Kluth, who owns the FJKluth Gallery on North Water Street in Kent, said in the 15 years the men knew each other, he often used Wood as a resource on artists and their exhibits.
“On a number of occasions, I took him to art exhibits where we had submitted his works,” Kluth said. “And he would go around and study each painting to such an extent that I could ask him, if I saw a notice about some artist having a show, ‘Do you recall this person?' And he would say ‘Oh yes, he was in that show ...' He could remember who was in what show that he went to. He had a very good memory for those kinds of things.”
Calling Wood “quite a character,” Kluth said he only learned Sunday that some of the unique characteristics of Wood's personality were a result not of psychological disabilities, but physical imbalances in his brain chemistry.
“I'd known him for about 15 years, and what I've known is a person who was very, very focused on his art, very dedicated to it. He exhibited in some good exhibits, won some prizes, and he was recognized by the local community as a very good artist. But he was marching to his drummer, not someone else's,” Kluth said.
One person who had a surprise encounter with Wood was Steve Wiandt of Ravenna. Wiandt, whose wife plays in Kent's CommUniversity Band, was attending a concert at Home Savings Bank Plaza in Kent last July when he saw Wood, with his long hair and beard, sitting at a picnic table drawing.
Wiandt said he struck up a conversation with Wood, who was sketching with markers, and complimented his work, saying it reminded him of Henry Koerner, a painter and illustrator Wiandt studied under at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.
“He said he'd heard of him,” Wiandt said. “He was very quite, polite. He didn't thank me for complimenting him but wasn't rude either. I felt he was very approachable.”
Kluth said he is saddened Wood's art is not displayed publicly in Kent, but is “pleased with the fullness he got out of his life.”
Wood “was very good at going to concerts, events and plays and art openings at the university and in the community,” Kluth said. “He was a very faithful patron of the arts.”
Kluth said he was told Wood would go to events at KSU and “was the only one who had the guts to ask a question of the speaker. These guest artists would come and they would intimidate everyone but Robert.”
Wood “lived frugally,” she said, and shunned government assistance. “He didn't want it,” Sessions said.
And while he could sometimes portray “a gruff exterior,” Wood was “such a gentle, kind person,” Sessions said.
Kluth said as a gallery owner, the story he likes to tell most about Wood is when he tried to encourage him to appeal to the customer base in Kent to make more money off his art.
“He consistently refused,” Kluth said. “He said ‘I am an artist and I'm going to do it my way.' He was very consistent in doing that. He hardly ever appealed to the customer or patron. He was purse. In his mind, he was a pure artist.”
Wood “was a community asset I think a lot of people missed out on,” he added.
Wood has living relatives, but was not in contact with them at the time of his death, Kluth said. An informal celebration of Wood's life and artwork is planned at the Kent Winter Market on Feb. 21, and more information will be made available on the market's Facebook page. The market is located at Lucky Penny Creamery, 632 Temple Ave., off Lake Street.

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News Headline: Robert Wood, Kent Artist and Cultural Icon, Has Died | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Art gallery owner believes community needs to determine what will become of Wood's life work.

John Kluth, owner of FJ Kluth Art Gallery, was surprised Sunday morning to receive a call from Robinson Memorial Hospital informing him that iconic Kent resident Robert Wood had died. Unbeknownst to Kluth, Wood had listed him as his emergency contact.

“They said it was a cardiac event and that he died pretty quickly, which is kind of a relief to me because as he has gotten older he's been more of a concern for how he took care of himself. I guess that's over now,” Kluth said.

Lt. Patrick Edwards of the Kent Fire Department confirmed that a squad responded to a 5:04 a.m. call to Woods' 401 Summit Gardens home and transported him to Robinson.

What happens next – in terms of a memorial service or what will become of Wood's decades of artwork – is a mystery to Kluth.

“I don't know what my responsibility or role is. There is a lawyer in Ravenna … who should be contacted. I'm assuming he'll be able to straighten out the legalities of this to determine ... next of kin and so forth,” Kluth said. “(Wood) was always by himself – and I really didn't ever pry into his personal affairs.”

Kluth thinks Wood may have listed him as his emergency contact years ago, when Wood regularly used Kluth's art gallery phone and would give out the number as his own. “For a long time I was his phone number and received all his personal calls, from doctors and other people,” Kluth explained.

Wood had lived in Kent since the 1960s and had been active in the art scene since he stepped foot on this black squirrel soil, Elaine Hullihen reported in a Kent Patch feature story about Wood's career.

Wood moved to Kent from his hometown of Struthers, OH, and earned his bachelor's degree in studio art in 1968. That was followed by a master's degree in painting in 1973 from Kent State University.

However, many Kent residents and Kent State students did not know Wood as an artist, but as the hippie-looking man who used to flip off passing motorists from various intersections in town. He developed a cult following of sorts for that behavior, and he told Hullihen last fall that he didn't like the resulting nickname.

Kluth and Wood got to know each other about 15 years ago, when Kluth's former Open Space Art Gallery was located in the Johnson Building on North Mantua Street, where Wood rented a small apartment. The 1906 building was demolished to make way for the Sheetz gas station at the intersection of North Mantua and Fairchild Avenue.

“Having the gallery there was a great convenience to Robert. He would come in and use the phone and the computer, so he was there a lot,” Kluth said, adding that Wood moved to Summit Gardens when the Johnson Building was sold.

When Kluth opened his new FJ Kluth Art Gallery at 300 N. Water St., he continued to allow Wood to store his artwork there.

“He was a regular (vendor) at the (Haymaker) Farmers' Market, but he stored his materials here. I have a dolly he would load up with his stuff and push it over to the farmers' market, do his thing, then push it back here. So in warmer weather I was seeing him once a week,” Kluth said.

The Rev. Melissa Carvill-Ziemer of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Kent shared the news of Wood's passing with her congregation this morning. Kluth, a church member, has talked with Carvill-Ziemer numerous times Sunday in an attempt to figure out what will become of Wood and his artwork.

Carvill-Ziemer said Wood was a “friend of the congregation” who would attend services periodically and social events frequently. The church has displayed Wood's artwork in its sanctuary.

“He was very interested in philosophy and intellectually oriented material, so when I would have a sermon along those lines he would attend. If he missed it, he'd ask me for a copy of the manuscript when we would run into each other at the farmers' market. Then, the next time I'd see him, he would offer commentary on it,” she chuckled.

Kluth said the community needs to determine what will become of Wood's life work.

“As a community, we need to consider whether his art is of lasting value and needs to be preserved in some context,” Kluth said. “If the community decides that they want to memorialize him with some kind of an exhibit, I have control of a considerable amount of his work because it's stored here at the gallery – but it's not truly mine.”

While Kluth said he “wasn't very successful at selling” Wood's artwork when he was alive, he's already turned away customers today who had heard about his death.

“Some people came in to buy it today but I didn't want to sell it to them because we need to think about the impact of his art on the community. We have to consider his legacy,” Kluth said.

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News Headline: Kent State Alumni Association Holds Ice Skating Event Feb. 11 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Alumni Association Holds Ice Skating Event Feb. 11

The Kent State University Alumni Association will hold its Flash Ice Fest event on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Ice Arena. This event is open to both Kent State University alumni and other members of the public. Flash Ice Fest will be an evening of ice skating and more.

Doors open at 6 p.m., and pizza and pop will be served. There will be ice skating from 6:45 to 8:15 p.m. The entry cost covers pizza, pop, skate rental and ice skating.

Register online at www.ksualumni.org by Feb. 3. For more information, visit www.ksualumni.org.

Cost: $7 for adult members of the Alumni Association, $9 for adult nonmembers, $5 for children (12 and under) of Alumni Association members, and $7 for children of nonmembers.

Contact: Kent State University Alumni Association 1-888-320-5368

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News Headline: KSU student, Kent historian apply for vacant council seat | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two applications are in for the Kent council-at-large seat left vacant by Erik Valenta's resignation.

So far, Erik Clarke, a Kent State University student, and Jon Ridinger, a local substitute teacher, Kent history blogger and private piano teacher, are the only two who have applied. The city began accepting applications on Wednesday.

Former Cortland Mayor Melissa Long, who nearly took Garret Ferrara's Ward 1 seat in a close November election, and former Kent Councilman Rick Hawksley have also expressed interest in the council position.

Clarke, a 20-year-old public policy major and urban planning minor at KSU, has experience working with city government.

"I've got quite the reputation in Lake County," he said, noting that he helped manage local campaigns from 2007 to 2009 for Mentor councilmen Ray Kirchner and Scott Marn and worked under three city managers.

Clarke said he outlined a plan for Mentor's new business incubator, sat through three years of budget meetings for the city and helped make Mentor's government website more transparent.

"Mentor is more transparent now than it ever was," he said, adding that word-for-word legislation is now posted on the website. "The easiest thing to do is create transparency. That could be done in a week (in Kent.)"

Clarke said his experience learning how Mentor's budget works would make him a benefit to council. As Kent's economy grows and continues to attract new business, he said he can lend a hand with ensuring the budget stays balanced.

"I can add an economic background to council and you can never have enough of it," he said. "I'm excited to serve in any capacity that the city of Kent can offer. Whatever is best for the city of Kent, I'm fine with."

In addition to substitute teaching and music lessons, Ridinger, a lifelong Kent resident and KSU graduate, is involved with the Kent Historical Society, runs a Kent history blog and wrote the Wikipedia pages for both the city of Kent and Kent Theodore Roosevelt High School.

"I definitely love Kent, so I often tell people I'm one of Kent's biggest cheerleaders," Ridinger said. "I want Kent to be a great place for business, a great place for residence and a great place for students."

Ridinger said although he doesn't always attend council meetings, he stays up to date on what actions council takes. While earning his minor in political science, Ridinger said he took classes on how city governance works.

"There will be things that I learn, the finer details," he said. "I'm pretty comfortable with how it fits together."

Ridinger said his experiences as both Kent resident and former KSU student can help to continue bridging the gap between the university and city.

"Some students and residents are still standoffish and I want to continue to build that relationship," he said. "The partnership is mutually beneficial," Ridinger said. "It's finally getting nurtured, but it's been neglected for so long."

To qualify for a council position, a candidate or applicant "shall hold no other elected or appointed public office except that of notary public, of a member of the State Militia or Reserve Corps of the Armed Forces of the United States unless call to full-time military service therein for a period exceeding thirty consecutive days, and a member of the City Board of Health by appointment," according to chapter seven of Kent's charter.

Applications for the vacant council position are available online at www.kentohio.org and at the mayor's office at 217 East Summit St. They will be accepted until 4 p.m. Feb. 14. Council will conduct interviews during a work session on Feb. 15 and fill the seat later that night.

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News Headline: Flashes clinch MAC title over EMU (Andrassy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bedelyon and Clotpon lead Kent State team to championship for second time in 4 years

Kent: Kent State University won its second outright Mid-American Conference regular season title in the last four years with a 28-10 win over Eastern Michigan (13-6, 2-2) Sunday afternoon at the M.A.C. Center.

The Golden Flashes (12-4, 5-0) won all but two matches in wrapping up an undefeated MAC season.

Coach Jim Andrassy has now led KSU to at least a share of the MAC regular season title in three of the past four years.

Still, he has his sights set on loftier goals, speaking of the tournament championship as well as nationals.

“For us, this is just Step 1 to other things we're hoping to accomplish,” Andrassy said. “It isn't what we set our goals at the beginning of the year, but it's very important for our administration to win this.”

This title is more impressive when considering it was done without a national champion, Dustin Kilgore, who is taking an Olympic redshirt.

Seniors Brendan Barlow and Marcel Clotpon rejected the notion, however, that Kilgore's absence would put a dent in KSU's chances.

“We have great wrestlers, one guy doesn't make the team, and that's all there is to it,” Barlow said.

Clotpon added, “We expected our senior year to go just as planned, expected to keep winning MAC titles.”

Senior Nic Bedelyon (125 pounds) opened the day with a pin of EMU's Jared Germaine at 2:22.

“I feel like if I have a good match and get it going, our team will do good,” Bedelyon said. “I think it starts with me. I just gotta go out and get it done and get it started.”

After EMU's Andrew Novak won a major decision, 13-5, KSU's Tyler Small notched two takedowns en route to a 7-0 regular decision in the 141-pound class.

Clotpon, who has been stepping in for senior Ian Miller at 149 pounds, took an 8-2 regular decision to put KSU up 12-4.

Miller is the No. 1 wrestler in the MAC in his weight class but has been out with a concussion the past week. Andrassy hopes to be able to make a decision Tuesday on Miller's status.

Clotpon feels he is just as capable should Miller remain on the sidelines.
“It happens, you lose your spot sometimes [but] whatever, as long as we get the win,” Clotpon said. “I still feel like I'm one of the top 30 wrestlers in the country.”

Andrassy has the luxury of exceptional depth at that position, boasting two of the better wrestlers in the conference. He has also valued how Clotpon has handled being replaced in the lineup and then being asked to step in again.

“That shows you what a professional he is,” Andrassy said. “I can tell you what most college students are doing this time of year, and he just trains hard, doesn't miss practice. For what he's done today, that speaks volumes on what kind of a kid he is.”

Senior Ross Tice is also coming around at just the right time. Tice had been struggling with breathing issues and anxiety after a knee injury in December derailed his season.

Tice won a 13-8 regular decision over EMU's Lester France behind a 5-point move (takedown and near fall) just before the end of the second period.

“I just believed in myself more,” Tice said. “I believed I wasn't gonna get tired and slow down.”

Kent State expects to be the No. 4 or No. 3 seed at the National Dual Regionals Saturday in Piscataway, N.J., depending on today's final polls.

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News Headline: KSU wrestlers capture MAC regular-season title (Andrassy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's wrestling seniors couldn't have written a better script for their final competition at the M.A.C. Center on Sunday.

The Golden Flashes (12-4, 5-0 MAC) won eight matches, including victories by all four seniors in the lineup, in downing Eastern Michigan (13-6, 2-2) 28-10.

The victory capped off an undefeated conference season for the Flashes, extended Kent State's winning streak to 10 and secured the Flashes' second outright MAC title in the last four years.

“Step one is accomplished,” KSU coach Jim Andrassy said. “And doing it at home is a great thing. Now we have to focus on some other things.”

Sunday's “step one” began with a first-period pin by senior Nic Bedelyon. Already leading 5-0,Bedelyon got in on a shot, brought Jared Germaine's leg up and turned it into a cradle from the standing position.

“I've got to open up, keep shooting and attacking,” Bedelyon said of the difference between Sunday and his other recent matches. “I feel like if I can get things going, our team's going to do well.”

After Tyler Small scored an impressive 7-0 win over Corey Phillips, Marcel Clopton became the second KSU senior to go out on a high note. With takedowns in all three periods, Clopton earned a 9-2 victory over Jaylyn Bohl, who was the No. 3-ranked 149-pounder in the MAC.

“What Marcel has done this weekend shows how much of a professional he is,” Andrassy said of Clopton being in the lineup for the first time all season. “It speaks volumes of what kind of kid he is. He's always ready to go. And I'm really proud of him.”

Junior Mallie Shuster scored a critical reversal in the final seconds of the first period and another in the final minute of the match to top Aaron Sulzer 7-6. The win gave the Flashes a commanding 15-4 lead.

“Mallie's as good as anyone in the conference,” Andrassy said.

Senior Ross Tice trailed Lester France 7-3 midway through the second period before hitting a five-point headlock. Tice scored another takedown in the third on his way to a 13-8 win.

Junior Casey Newburg claimed his second major decision of the weekend and his eighth of the season with a 13-5 win over Phillip Joseph. Newburg piled up five takedowns and collected two stalling points.

Junior Keith Witt got in a on a first-period shot for a takedown, which made the difference in a 4-2 victory over Nick Whitenburg.

Heavyweight Brendan Barlow capped off a 4-for-4 day for Kent State's senior class with a 3-2 win over Wes Schroeder. Barlow hoisted Schroeder up in the air for a key first-period takedown.

Sunday was the first time the Flashes clinched an outright conference crown on their home mat since 1989.

Kent State will compete in the National Dual Championships on Saturday in Piscataway, N.J. The Flashes will be either the No. 3 or No. 4 seed at the six-team regional and will find out who their first opponent will be on Monday.

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News Headline: HONORS | Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Neighborhood Progress Inc. has received the American Planning Association's National Planning Excellence Award for Innovation in Sustaining Places, along with its partners, for the creative land reuse initiative Re-Imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland. Re-Imagining is a program that implements alternative land use strategies including orchards, vineyards, pocket parks and market gardens, led jointly by Neighborhood Progress along with the city of Cleveland, Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and LAND Studio (formerly ParkWorks).

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News Headline: Reimagine Cleveland wins national planning excellence award for sustainability innovation | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Freshwater Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Defying a Rust Belt reputation may not have been the primary goal of Re-Imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland, but winning a National Planning Excellence Award from the American Planning Association proves the local initiative is well on its way.

Re-Imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland began in 2008 with a singular goal: bring Cleveland's neighborhoods back, one vacant lot at a time. Led by the City of Cleveland and urban development organization Neighborhood Progress, the program pairs with Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative to envision innovative uses, including alternative energy generation and ecosystem revitalization, for vacant spaces throughout the city.

The American Planning Association recognized the collaborative effort for its non-traditional approach to greening Cleveland, awarding organizers for engaging the community with city-wide workshops and securing funding for nearly 60 vacant land pilot projects.

APA's National Planning Excellence, Achievement, and Leadership Awards honor the best planning efforts and individuals that create communities of lasting value. The 2012 award recipients will be honored at a special luncheon held during APA's National Planning Conference.

Re-imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland
Cleveland, Ohio

Re-Imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland is a collaborative effort to address the issues of persistent population decline and large-scale urban vacancy while positioning the city for sustainable future development. Cleveland has approximately 20,000 vacant lots that negatively impact property values and quality of life for residents. The initiative is led by the City of Cleveland, Neighborhood Progress Inc., ParkWorks, and support of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative along with 30 other community-based groups.

The initiative addresses vacancy issues by introducing non-traditional urban land uses to city neighborhoods. There are three broad categories for the land uses: seeing vacant lots as opportunities for future development; restoring green infrastructure and reclaiming badly damaged ecosystems; and employing productive landscapes using vacant land for agriculture and alternative energy generation. Community engagement was achieved through workshops held throughout the city, a vacant land ideas-to-action booklet, and a grant program that distributed nearly $600,000 in funding for 56 vacant land pilot projects conducted by local residents and community organizations.

Jury
The 2012 National Planning Awards jury was co-chaired by Marie L. York, FAICP and Ann C. Bagley, FAICP.

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News Headline: KENT STATE TO HOST STEM PROJECT FAIR ON FEB. 11 (Moerland, Selinger) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent, Ohio — Science, technology, engineering and math – commonly referred to as STEM fields – will be in spotlight when Kent State University hosts the Hudson STEM Project Fair on Saturday, Feb. 11, from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The science fair, spotlighting the work of students in grades 4 through 12, will be held in the Kent Student Center Ballroom and Balcony on the Kent Campus. It is free and open to the public. Project display area is open to the public for viewing from noon to 2:30 p.m. The area is closed during the morning judging.

“We are pleased to host this event highlighting the importance of STEM education,” said Dr. Timothy Moerland, dean of Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences. “Kent State is committed to expanding opportunities in these fields, which are critical in terms of job growth and economic development.”

Student displays will feature poster boards, notebooks detailing their research methods and some lab demonstrations. There are 375 students registered for the event, with 250 projects to be featured – some of which are group efforts.

The event is sponsored by Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences and organized by the Hudson STEM Alliance and the Six District Educational Compact.

Flash, Kent State's mascot, will be on hand from10 to 11 a.m. to meet with families and cheer on the proceedings. While on campus, high school students also will have the opportunity to attend “Explore Kent Science Day,” hosted by Kent State's departments of biology, chemistry, and physics.

“There will be some amazing projects on display,” said Dr. Robin Selinger, professor of chemical physics at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute and president of the Hudson STEM Alliance. “Last year, one of our local students went on to regional and state competitions and then to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Los Angeles. I can't wait to see what projects our kids have come up with this year.”

The Hudson STEM Alliance is an advocacy group of parents and community members dedicated to promoting interest and participation in STEM activities.

“Hands-on experience with a research project is a great way for students to prepare for careers in science and engineering,” Selinger said. “We hope many of these students will be inspired to take advanced science and math courses in high school, go on to STEM majors in college, and maybe even earn a masters or Ph.D. Some of our most advanced local high school students enroll in college-level STEM courses and science internships through Kent State's Post Secondary Enrollment Options Program.”

For more information on Kent State's Post Secondary Enrollment Options program, visit www.kent.edu/dualenrollment.

For more information on the Hudson STEM Project Fair hosted by Kent State, visit www.hudsonstemalliance.org.

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News Headline: KENT STATE TO HOST STEM PROJECT FAIR ON FEB. 11 (Moerland, Selinger) | Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb.3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Science, technology, engineering and math - commonly referred to as STEM fields - will be in spotlight when Kent State University hosts the Hudson STEM Project Fair on Saturday, Feb.11, from 8 a.m.to 3:30 p.m.

The science fair, spotlighting the work of students in grades 4 through 12, will be held in the Kent Student Center Ballroom and Balcony on the Kent Campus.It is free and open to the public.Project display area is open to the public for viewing from noon to 2:30 p.m.The area is closed during the morning judging.

"We are pleased to host this event highlighting the importance of STEM education," said Dr.Timothy Moerland, dean of Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences."Kent State is committed to expanding opportunities in these fields, which are critical in terms of job growth and economic development."

Student displays will feature poster boards, notebooks detailing their research methods and some lab demonstrations.There are 375 students registered for the event, with 250 projects to be featured - some of which are group efforts.

The event is sponsored by Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences and organized by the Hudson STEM Alliance and the Six District Educational Compact.

Flash, Kent State's mascot, will be on hand from10 a.m.to 11 a.m.to meet with families and cheer on the proceedings.While on campus, high school students also will have the opportunity to attend "Explore Kent Science Day," hosted by Kent State's departments of biology, chemistry, and physics.

"There will be some amazing projects on display," said Dr.Robin Selinger, professor of chemical physics at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute and president of the Hudson STEM Alliance."Last year, one of our local students went on to regional and state competitions and then to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Los Angeles.I can't wait to see what projects our kids have come up with this year."

The Hudson STEM Alliance is an advocacy group of parents and community members dedicated to promoting interest and participation in STEM activities.

"Hands-on experience with a research project is a great way for students to prepare for careers in science and engineering," Selinger said."We hope many of these students will be inspired to take advanced science and math courses in high school, go on to STEM majors in college, and maybe even earn a masters or Ph.D.Some of our most advanced local high school students enroll in college-level STEM courses and science internships through Kent State's Post Secondary Enrollment Options Program."

For more information on Kent State's Post Secondary Enrollment Options program, visit www.kent.edu/dualenrollment.

For more information on the Hudson STEM Project Fair hosted by Kent State, visit www.hudsonstemalliance.org.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: College Tech Prep Initiatives event on Feb. 16 for parents, students | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Interested students and their families can learn more about College Tech Prep Initiatives offered at Roosevelt High School at a special event Feb. 16, at 6:30 p.m.

Called "Conversation with Parents and Tenth Grade Students ... Career-Technical Education Programs," the event is hosted by the Six District Educational Compact. College Tech Prep equips students for high-skill, high-wage careers, prepares students with college prep academics and college credit opportunities for high school coursework.

The event features Compact College Tech Prep Initiatives, including Athletic Health Care and Fitness, Business Management, Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing, Construction Technologies, Cosmetology, Electronics Technology, Engineering Academy, Forestry and Landscape Management, Health Careers Technologies, Marketing Management, Teaching Professions and Wood Product Technologies and Cabinetry.

Students from all Compact high schools, including Cuyahoga Falls, Hudson, Kent, Stow-Munroe Falls, Tallmadge and Woodridge, are eligible to apply for these College Tech Prep offerings and should see their high school counselor for details. An online application for programs will be available soon at www.sixdistrict.com.

Parents and students can tour the labs, meet the instructors and hear from current students. University partners, including Cleveland State University's Fenn College of Engineering, Cuyahoga Community College, Kent State University and The University of Akron, will be on hand.

The Six District Educational Compact provides career and technical programs, services and resources for Cuyahoga Falls, Hudson, Kent, Stow-Munroe Falls, Tallmadge and Woodridge School districts.

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News Headline: College Tech Prep Initiatives event for parents, students | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Interested students and their families can learn more about College Tech Prep Initiatives offered at Roosevelt High School at a special event Feb. 16, at 6:30 p.m.

Called "Conversation with Parents and Tenth Grade Students ... Career-Technical Education Programs," the event is hosted by the Six District Educational Compact. College Tech Prep equips students for high-skill, high-wage careers, prepares students with college prep academics and college credit opportunities for high school coursework.

The event features Compact College Tech Prep Initiatives, including Athletic Health Care and Fitness, Business Management, Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing, Construction Technologies, Cosmetology, Electronics Technology, Engineering Academy, Forestry and Landscape Management, Health Careers Technologies, Marketing Management, Teaching Professions and Wood Product Technologies and Cabinetry.

Students from all Compact high schools, including Cuyahoga Falls, Hudson, Kent, Stow-Munroe Falls, Tallmadge and Woodridge, are eligible to apply for these College Tech Prep offerings and should see their high school counselor for details. An online application for programs will be available soon at www.sixdistrict.com .

Parents and students can tour the labs, meet the instructors and hear from current students. University partners, including Cleveland State University's Fenn College of Engineering, Cuyahoga Community College, Kent State University and The University of Akron, will be on hand.

The Six District Educational Compact provides career and technical programs, services and resources for Cuyahoga Falls, Hudson, Kent, Stow-Munroe Falls, Tallmadge and Woodridge School districts.

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News Headline: Wrangler Producing Shirt Designed by Kent State Student (Grieder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A work-wear garment created by a Kent State University fashion merchandising major will be available for purchase in the Wrangler Christmas 2012 catalog.

Garrettsville native Shannon Gallagher, a fifth-year fashion merchandising major and entrepreneurship minor, designed the garment in her product development class.

The Western-style work-wear shirt is long-sleeved with a designed yoke, shirt-type collar, flapped breast pockets and decorative stitching. It is designed for men and has been produced by Wrangler from a concept to a wearable piece.

Gallagher's motivation came from her rural upbringing and experience on a farm.

“My inspiration came from my lifestyle of living on a farm and what my brother and father would wear. I've raised and showed livestock for years and this design came from there,” the 22-year-old explained.

Gallagher credits Kent State Professor Trista Grieder for her success with Wrangler. She said Grieder “played a huge role” in her achievement because Grieder's project proposal was encouraging – and she also submitted Gallagher's design to her contact at Wrangler for review.

“Shannon came to me with her passion for the Western customer early in the spring semester of 2010. She had tried to design lines for this customer before and knew I had worked for (Wrangler) in my industry background,” Grieder said. “This was Shannon's chance to shine.”

Grieder helps to prepare students in using product development industry sheets, Illustrator, Photoshop and many other industry-wide resources. Her students learn that merchandisers and designers are partners in the creation of fashion and that a large network can be the foundation for future successes.

“I try to guide the product development class into other directions than just women's wear. Due to the continuous friendship with my past mentor at Wrangler, we embarked on a men's Western shirt project. Shannon's project stood out, and they decided to manufacture her design,” said Grieder.

“(Trista) Grieder emailed me and it took reading it three times and having my mom read the email to me to believe it was real,” Gallagher said. “It was even more exciting when she sent the email about my shirt design actually (being) produced and in her office where I could finally see and touch it!”

Gallagher has received praise and support from her family and friends. She said her father and brother “are excited to buy the shirt next Christmas and are proud to be part of the inspiration.” Although Gallagher is unsure what the future holds after graduation, she is looking forward to “graduating with honors” in May.

During her free time, Gallagher enjoys sewing, scrapbooking and photography. She also dedicates her time to teaching children to sew through 4-H clubs and programs. She stays involved in the fashion community by engaging in local entrepreneurship organizations, 4-H, leadership programs and scholarly groups.

She currently works as an independent Mary Kay consultant, a teacher at the Looking Glass Learning Center and a sales associate at the Longaberger Factory Store.

Grieder joined the Kent State Fashion School faculty in fall 2010 and has been in the business for more than 13 years. She earned her bachelor of arts in costume design from Kent State and her master's of science in higher education in online teaching and learning from Kaplan University.

Her industry experience includes working with such companies as Wrangler Jeans, Dillard's, Augusta Sportswear and Mountain High Hosiery. Grieder has spent most of her career in product development and CAD. One of her greatest successes was winning an award for designing a women's jean for Wrangler, which sold in record numbers.

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News Headline: Uncle Sam, Rock 'N' Roll, and Higher Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cato Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The instructor stands at the piano and fingers the chords to "In the Still of the Night." Five young men in the second row rumble the bass line, "Yeh-up . . . yuh-yep . . . yeh-hup . . . yuh-yup. . . ." About 10 young women scattered around the classroom sway and purse their lips, doo-wopping, "Shoo-shoo, shoo be doo . . . shoo-shoo, shoo be dooo shoo-shoo, shoo be doo wop, wop, wop, wop. . . ."(1)

Welcome to the groves of academe, in this case the University of Georgia's Music 418, "History and Analysis of Rock Music." If you've been away for a while, you might not immediately recognize the new face of American scholarship, or the other innovations of the modern university. Although notable for its progressive approach to class discussion, Music 418 is not, unfortunately, atypical of the nuggets of wisdom offered throughout the catalogs of the nation's institutions of higher learning.

Students making their way through the academic shopping mall of the modern university's curriculum are tempted with options ranging from the "Sociology of Sociability" (the study of parties) at Vassar, to "Poets Who Sing" at Washington University, to "Ultimate Frisbee" at the University of Massachusetts, and "Dance Roller Skating" at Kent State. Yes, and all of the courses mentioned are for academic credit.

Charles J. Sykes is the author of ProfScam: Professors and the Demise of Higher Education (Regnery Gateway, 1988) and The Hollow Men: Politics and Corruption in Higher Education, to be published this fall by Regnery Gateway.

At the University of Illinois, students can work toward their B.A. by taking "Pocket Billiards" or the "Anthropology of Play," which is described as "the study of play with emphasis on origin, diffusion, spontaneity, emergence, and diversity." Auburn University offers a course in "Recreation Interpretive Services," which is described as "principles and techniques used to communicate natural, historical, and cultural features of outdoor recreation to park visitors." Occasionally, students stumble upon the mother lode, such as those lucky few who enrolled in "Applied Social Theory and Qualitative Research Methodology" at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Known affectionately as "Deadhead 101," its course materials consist of Grateful Dead cassettes and reviews of past shows. Students are required to attend Grateful Dead concerts to "observe the subculture that surrounds the band."(2)

Students fortunate enough to gain admission to California State University's "Music Video 454" can sit at the feet of Professor Alan Bloom, who declares, "I want students thinking about television." Or at least about MTV. The class's only textbook is the Rolling Stone Book of Rock Video, and one class project has been a field trip to Hollywood where the students acted as extras in rock videos, for credit. On slower days, they have analyzed videotapes of Weird Al Yankovic singing "Dare to Be Stupid."(3)

Even those offerings, however, pale in comparison with the by-now-legendary "Rock 'n' Roll Is Here to Stay" at Brown. An article in the New Republic by former Brown student Philip Weiss quoted one student enthusing, "You could go to class and listen to the White Album," to which another student responded, "You don't have to go to class. I'd turn on the stereo and raise my hand in bed."(4)

Such random anecdotes of scholarly whimsicality could perhaps be dismissed as isolated aberrations that are unrepresentative of higher education as a whole. But there is more troubling evidence.

For most of the past decade, tuition has risen far faster than inflation, far outpacing the growth in family income. By 1990, the cost of four years at an elite private college had passed the median price of a house in the United States. But a survey sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1989 found that a majority of college seniors would flunk even a basic test on Western cultural and historical literacy: 25 percent could not distinguish between the thoughts of Karl Marx and the United States Constitution (or between the words of Winston Churchill and those of Joseph Stalin), 58 percent did not know Shakespeare wrote The Tempest, and 42 percent could not place the Civil War in the correct half-century. Most seniors were unable to identify the Magna Carta, Reconstruction, or the Missouri Compromise; they were "clearly unfamiliar" with Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Dostoevski's Crime and Punishment, and Martin Luther King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail."(5)

There once was a time when employers could be reasonably certain that college graduates had a basic sense of the world and, as a minimum, could write a coherent business letter. That is simply no longer the case.

Fewer than 15 percent of the seniors who were tested on their knowledge of world affairs in 1981 could answer even two-thirds of the questions correctly. Not a single student scored higher than 84 correct answers out of a total of 101 questions. Most ominously, the group that scored lowest was education majors, who averaged a pathetic 39.8.(6)

Another survey found that 75 percent of college students had studied a foreign language at one time or another, but that only 7 percent felt they could understand a native speaker.(7) Occasional surveys of college students' knowledge of geography have yielded horrific results. A 1984 survey of University of North Carolina students found that 69 percent could not identify a single African country between the Sahara and South Africa (there are 28), fewer than 50 percent could name the two largest states in the United States; 88 percent could not identify the five Great Lakes, and only 27 percent knew that Manila is located in the Philippines. In 1987, a survey at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh found that 25 percent of the students in a geography class could not locate the Soviet Union on a world map. On a map of the 48 contiguous states, only 22 percent could identify 40 states or more.(8)

Of course, a liberal education is not merely the knowledge of a set of facts. It is certainly more important to understand the intellectual roots of the American Revolution than the dates of various battles. But evidence suggests that American college students know neither.

All of this is shocking, but perhaps not surprising, given the priorities and the structure of the modern American university. Put bluntly, our universities feel they have more important things to do than actually ensure that their students learn anything.

A staff member of the National Commission on Excellence in Education, for example, found that few two- or four-year colleges required that a student demonstrate "true proficiency in anything as a condition for receiving a degree, fewer still that set clear learning objectives and unambiguous standards for academic performance. . . ." In fact, the American Council on Education found that only 15 percent of universities require tests for general knowledge, only 17 percent for critical thinking, and only 19 percent for minimum competency.(9) Some students at major universities report that they have gone three or even four years without ever writing a paper.(10)

Not surprisingly, Ernest Boyer of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Learning complained in 1987 that American colleges had become "more successful in credentialing than in providing a quality education for their students."(11)

This brings us to the central paradox of American higher education in 1990, in which more and more is being spent for less and less. In large measure this is the inevitable consequence of federal policies toward higher education that have pursued wildly contradictory goals.

While the government has encouraged the largest possible number of students to attend institutions of higher education, it has simultaneously guaranteed that many of those students will receive--at best--a mediocre education. For higher education, the embrace of federal largess has proven to be a classic Faustian bargain. The legacy of federal intervention in higher education includes the following:

-- The flight from teaching by the nation's professoriate;

-- The explosion of "research"--much of which is worthless, if not meretricious;

-- The infusion of the federal bureaucracy into the universities, which have embraced the giantism of their

federal mentors;

-- The growth of a culture of academic entitlement in which university professors come to believe they have an inherent right to public support to pursue their own interests, regardless of the impact on students; and

-- The distortion of undergraduate education and the curriculum into a crude numbers game that virtually dictates the breakdown of academic integrity and standards.

That is certainly not the case on every campus; there are many institutions where teaching--and learning--are still the top priorities. But they are seldom the ones who have been most penetrated by the generosity of the federal government.

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News Headline: Graduate School at Ohio University, Studying in the Midwest of the USA | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Pressbox - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio University has a huge variety of universities and colleges, both for undergraduate and graduate studies. There are a diverse range of programs for study, from the arts, to business courses to science subjects at the University of Ohio. It is likely that you will find something to suit your future career, whatever your interests at ohio university graduate school .

Ohio University is a public university in the Midwestern United States, founded in 1804. The University offers more than 188 master's and 58 doctoral programs in the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business, Scripps College of Communication, Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education and Human Services, Russ College of Engineering and Technology, Fine Arts, College of Health Sciences and Professions, Center for International Studies, and the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs. Ohio University is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and a number of professional accrediting associations.

There are many other universities and colleges in the stte of Ohio, including Ohio State University. Ohio State Univeristy is one of the largest universities in the country, and the states highest ranked public school. Other institutions ranked among the top public univerisites in the country include, the University of Cincinnati, Kent State University, Miami University and Youngstown State University.

The geographic location of Ohio, being a Midwestern state in the USA, is an asset for economic growth and expansion. A great deal of cargo and business traffic pass through its borders, as Ohio links Northeast to Midwest. Lake Erie is to the North of Ohio, giving Ohio 312 miles of coastline. To the east of Ohio is the large state of Pennsylvania, Michigan is northwest of the state, and Canada is North. The state of Indiana is located west of Ohio, whilst Kentucky borders the south and West Virginia, the south-east. A vast proportion of Ohio shows a geographical feature known as 'glaciated plains', which has the result of making much of the state very flat. However some parts, do feature rugged hills and forests. The climate of Ohio is a humid continental climate. Summer-time in Ohio is typically hot and humid. Winters range from cool to cold, and rain is moderate year-round. Severe weather is not uncommon.

There are so many different factors to weigh up, when making the important decision of choosing a gradute school at which to study. When deciding on a graduate school it is important to do you research. The subjects offered by that university the length of the course, the cost of study are all other factors to consider. ohio university graduate school might be an option for you.

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News Headline: Religion briefs for Feb. 4 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Religion briefs for Feb. 4

During February, Keith S. Lloyd, an English professor at Kent State University, will be a guest instructor at 9:15 a.m. Sundays at Christ Presbyterian Church at 530 Tuscarawas St. W in Canton. Lloyd will be covering several topics, including the various types of literature found in Scripture, and its historic context. He holds a doctorate in rhetoric and composition from the University of Louisville.

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News Headline: 'Stark Realities' exhibit at KSU-Stark through February | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -

The Stark Realities exhibit, showcasing artwork of various media, will be on display through Feb. 29 in the Main Hall Art Gallery at the Kent State University Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

The free exhibit will be open to the public from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. The Stark Realities exhibit will feature works by local artists Kevin Anderson, Diane Belfiglio, Patrick Buckohr, Joseph Close, Frank Dale, Rick Huggett, Sherri Hornbrook, Ted Lawson, Nancy Steward Matin, Stephen McNulty, Patricia Zinsmeister Parker and Michael Weiss.

The community is invited to a reception in the Main Hall Art Gallery to meet the artists from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Feb. 9. For more information about the Kent State Stark art galleries or the art program, call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/art.

The Stark Realities exhibit, showcasing artwork of various media, will be on display through Feb. 29 in the Main Hall Art Gallery at the Kent State University Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

The free exhibit will be open to the public from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. The Stark Realities exhibit will feature works by local artists Kevin Anderson, Diane Belfiglio, Patrick Buckohr, Joseph Close, Frank Dale, Rick Huggett, Sherri Hornbrook, Ted Lawson, Nancy Steward Matin, Stephen McNulty, Patricia Zinsmeister Parker and Michael Weiss.

The community is invited to a reception in the Main Hall Art Gallery to meet the artists from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Feb. 9. For more information about the Kent State Stark art galleries or the art program, call 330-499-9600 or visit www.stark.kent.edu/art.

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News Headline: YSU can't spin the bad news | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Perhaps in the rarefied air of academia a decline in enrollment isn't worth losing sleep over. But in the real world, a loss is a loss is a loss — that cannot be ignored. It's especially troubling when the institution in question is already having to justify its existence in the competitive arena of higher education.

The 3.8 percent drop in the number of students attending Youngstown State University this Spring semester compared with the Spring 2011 semester (13,698 vs. 14,253) gives pause. Last Fall's numbers reflected a 4.3 percent decline from the Fall of 2010 — 14,540 vs. 15,194.

Meanwhile, Kent State University's Trumbull campus has recorded eight straight semesters of increased enrollment. This Spring, the branch campus is boasting a 7 percent spike compared with the same time last year. The 3,255 students on campus represent the highest number on record.

Expectation

Eastern Gateway Community College, which is also operating in the Mahoning Valley, had not reported its figures last week, but there's an expectation that the results will be encouraging for the fledging two-year institution in the Valley.

That's why YSU's attempt to downplay the enrollment loss is not persuasive. The facts tell the story.

Fact: Last year, after contentious contract talks and a threat of a strike by the faculty, the board of trustees approved three-year contracts with the unions that include a 2 percent wage increase in the third year. There's a freeze in the first two years.

Fact: During the contract talks, the administration contended that YSU faced a $7 million deficit caused by the reduction in state funding and a decline in enrollment last Fall.

Fact: While the faculty, in particular, bemoaned the anemic contract, the previous three-year pact was a boondoggle for the campus community.

For the 2008-09 school year, there was a 2.8 percent increase in the base salary; a bonus, which resulted in a full professor, for example, receiving $1,800 that was added to the base salary; an increase in longevity pay of $50 for each year of service for a member of the faculty union hired before June 1, 2008. It has been calculated that the entire first-year package resulted in an 8 percent increase.

For the second and third years, faculty members received increases of 3.5 percent to their new base salaries.

The contracts for the classified employees, who also received bonuses, professional staff, police and administrators were just as lucrative.

Fact: In order to address the financial challenges confronting the university, the trustees, at the behest of the administration, raised tuition for undergraduate and graduate students for the 2011-2012 academic year.

As a result, undergraduate students who live in Ohio are paying $126 more — from $3,600 to $3,726 — per semester; for full-time students living in the 10-county region considered the Western Pennsylvania Advantage area, tuition went up $131 per semester, from $3,700 to $3,831; full-time students living in the 15-county regional service area in Pennsylvania, New York and West Virginia saw a $193 per-semester increase, and full-time, out-of-state students outside of that region are paying $268 more a semester.

Full-time, in-state graduate students are paying $167 more, to $4,956. Full-time, out-of-state tuition for graduate students increased $172 a semester, from $4,888 to $5,060.

Fact: Those increases came on the heels of a 3.5 percent tuition hike in the 2010-11 academic year.

YSU's reality

Is it any wonder that enrollment is dropping? The argument is made that even with the higher tuition, YSU is still cheaper than most of the public universities and colleges in Ohio. That argument ignores the reality of Youngstown State: It's an open admissions, urban institution that caters to a population of many first-time college goers. In addition, many must work in order to afford the ever increasing cost of higher education.

In his State of the Union speech last week, President Barack Obama echoed the sentiments of many students and parents when he said, “When kids do graduate (from high school), the most daunting challenge can be the cost of college. ... It's not enough for us to increase student aid. We just can't keep subsidizing skyrocketing tuition; we'll run out of money.”

© 2012 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.

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News Headline: Annual Engineering Expo set at KSU Tusc | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: with Totally Local Yellow Pages

Posted Feb 05, 2012 @ 06:52 PM

In celebration of National Engineers Week, Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will conduct the 30th annual Engineering Technology Opportunity Expo.

The free expo is open to the public from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Feb. 23 in the Performing Arts Center on the campus at 330 University Drive NE.

The Kent State Tuscarawas Cyber Center co-sponsors the event with cyber clubs from Carrollton, Claymont, Coshocton County Career Center, Dover, Indian Valley, New Philadelphia, Newcomerstown, Sandy Valley, Strasburg and Tuscarawas Valley high schools. The Expo is intended to increase exposure for high school students to opportunities in manufacturing-related fields and interactive digital technology.

Participating companies will have representatives from their management, personnel and manufacturing sectors available to address questions regarding jobs, skill requirements and career opportunities in engineering. They also will have displays featuring information on various products they manufacture.

Kent State Tuscarawas personnel will be available to discuss the academic preparation needed for jobs in engineering and technology fields.

During the Expo, Kent State Tuscarawas will present awards to high school students who won six competitions. Participants from 15 area high schools were trained in digital electronics, computer-aided drafting (CAD), multimedia, robotics, animation design and video game design. Awards to the top five winners, which include cash and scholarships, will be presented at about 6:30 p.m., with all participants being recognized.

High school students also will participate in the Bridge Contest, co-sponsored by the Kent State Tuscarawas Engineering Technology Department and the Tuscarawas Valley Society of Professional Engineers. The testing and judging will take place at the Expo. First- and second-place winners earn the opportunity to compete in the international bridge contest in Las Vegas in the near future.

For more information, call Dr. Kamal Bichara, director of engineering technologies, at 330-339-3391, ext. 47457.

In celebration of National Engineers Week, Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will conduct the 30th annual Engineering Technology Opportunity Expo.

The free expo is open to the public from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Feb. 23 in the Performing Arts Center on the campus at 330 University Drive NE.

The Kent State Tuscarawas Cyber Center co-sponsors the event with cyber clubs from Carrollton, Claymont, Coshocton County Career Center, Dover, Indian Valley, New Philadelphia, Newcomerstown, Sandy Valley, Strasburg and Tuscarawas Valley high schools. The Expo is intended to increase exposure for high school students to opportunities in manufacturing-related fields and interactive digital technology.

Participating companies will have representatives from their management, personnel and manufacturing sectors available to address questions regarding jobs, skill requirements and career opportunities in engineering. They also will have displays featuring information on various products they manufacture.

Kent State Tuscarawas personnel will be available to discuss the academic preparation needed for jobs in engineering and technology fields.

During the Expo, Kent State Tuscarawas will present awards to high school students who won six competitions. Participants from 15 area high schools were trained in digital electronics, computer-aided drafting (CAD), multimedia, robotics, animation design and video game design. Awards to the top five winners, which include cash and scholarships, will be presented at about 6:30 p.m., with all participants being recognized.

High school students also will participate in the Bridge Contest, co-sponsored by the Kent State Tuscarawas Engineering Technology Department and the Tuscarawas Valley Society of Professional Engineers. The testing and judging will take place at the Expo. First- and second-place winners earn the opportunity to compete in the international bridge contest in Las Vegas in the near future.

For more information, call Dr. Kamal Bichara, director of engineering technologies, at 330-339-3391, ext. 47457.

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News Headline: 'Freedom Bound' Friday at Performing Arts Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: with Totally Local Yellow Pages

Posted Feb 03, 2012 @ 11:42 PM

An original play titled “Freedom Bound” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

Presented as part of the Performing Arts Center's family series, “Freedom Bound” tells the tale of the most important incident in the history of the Underground Railroad in Ohio.

The show follows the story of Addison White, a slave who escaped from Kentucky and traveled the Underground Railroad north to Ohio. There, he is befriended by a farmer who lets White live in his barn and teaches him to read and write.

“Freedom Bound” uses drama, music, riddles and rhyme to create characters that emerge from the past and bring the Underground Railroad to life right before your eyes.

Tickets range in price from $17 to $24, with children's tickets $10. Tickets can be purchased in person at the Performing Arts Center box office, at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400.

The box office is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive NE.

An original play titled “Freedom Bound” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

Presented as part of the Performing Arts Center's family series, “Freedom Bound” tells the tale of the most important incident in the history of the Underground Railroad in Ohio.

The show follows the story of Addison White, a slave who escaped from Kentucky and traveled the Underground Railroad north to Ohio. There, he is befriended by a farmer who lets White live in his barn and teaches him to read and write.

“Freedom Bound” uses drama, music, riddles and rhyme to create characters that emerge from the past and bring the Underground Railroad to life right before your eyes.

Tickets range in price from $17 to $24, with children's tickets $10. Tickets can be purchased in person at the Performing Arts Center box office, at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400.

The box office is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive NE.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas sets Information Night | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will host Information Night 2012 at 6 p.m. March 8  in the Founders Hall auditorium at 330 University Drive NE.

The free event gives prospective students the opportunity to learn about the university's admission process, academic majors, financial aid and career exploration. Participants can tour the campus and sit in on a class.

Information Night is open to high-school juniors and seniors, recent high-school graduates, veterans, adult students and people who have attended college but haven't completed a degree.

The $30 application fee will be waived for people who apply for admission to Kent State Tuscarawas during the event.

Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will host Information Night 2012 at 6 p.m. March 8  in the Founders Hall auditorium at 330 University Drive NE.

The free event gives prospective students the opportunity to learn about the university's admission process, academic majors, financial aid and career exploration. Participants can tour the campus and sit in on a class.

Information Night is open to high-school juniors and seniors, recent high-school graduates, veterans, adult students and people who have attended college but haven't completed a degree.

The $30 application fee will be waived for people who apply for admission to Kent State Tuscarawas during the event.

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News Headline: Freedom Bound at Kent State Tusky | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An original play, Freedom Bound will be performed at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. Presented as part of the Performing Arts Center's family series, Freedom Bound tells the tale of the most important incident in the history of the Underground Railroad in Ohio. The show follows the story of Addison White, a slave who escaped from Kentucky and traveled the Railroad north to Ohio. There is he befriended by a farmer who lets White live in his barn and teaches him to read and write. Freedom Bound uses drama, music, riddles and rhyme to create characters that emerge from the past and bring the Underground Railroad to life right before your eyes. Tickets range in price from $17- $24, with children's tickets $10. Purchase tickets now in person at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Downtown Construction Projects Moving at Good Clip | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Patch photo gallery chronicles three weeks of change and progress.

Several downtown construction projects are moving at a good clip, compliments of unseasonably warm winter temperatures and very little snow.

Leading the construction race is Fairmount Properties' "Building A," which is now framed in at the corner of Haymaker Parkway and South Water Street. City Manager Dave Ruller reported in his Kent 360° blog last Sunday that Fairmount's plumbing contractor is busy laying out the interior pipe network.

Fairmount is working to meet a deadline of opening the 13,000-square-foot "Building A" by late August for corporate tenant Davey Resource Group, which will relocate its 60 to 70 employees from Stow to the new structure.

Running a close second is Fairmount's "Building B," which is rising at the corner of Erie and South Water streets. AMETEK will move about 80 employees from its Lake Street facility to the 40,000-square-foot "Building B."

Ruller reported that Fairmount is looking to pour the second- and third-floor slabs in "Building B" starting this coming week.

Kent officials broke ground Aug. 9 with Fairmount, its Cleveland-based development partner, on the $29 million, 185,000 square foot mixed-use project. It will include at least three different buildings in the block bordered by Haymaker Parkway, Erie, South DePeyster and South Water streets.

Coming in third in the construction race is the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center at the corner of South DePeyster and Haymaker-Parkway. Contractors there have been busy pouring footers for the basement.

The Kent State Foundation and Columbus hotelier The Pizzuti Companies broke ground in September on the hotel, which could open as early as next year.

Ruller said Pizzuti has placed its order for all of the hotel's structural steel and should be getting permits from the city to erect that steel in the next couple weeks. Pizzuti and Kent State are finalizing the interior design selections for the hotel, he said.

Finally, grading contractors have been busy preparing the site for PARTA's $26 million Kent Central Gateway transit center at Erie and DePeyster streets, for which ground was broken April 4.

The center, which will feature 10 bus bays, more than 300 parking spaces and about 20,000 square feet of retail space, is being paid for largely by a $20 million federal transportation grant. The target opening date is late 2012.

Ruller said PARTA's plans for the new large retaining wall to run behind the facility are expected to be submitted to city staff for review and approval this week. PARTA officials will be going out to bid for their concrete, HVAC and other trades contracts over the course of the next month, he said

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News Headline: Maltz Museum in Beachwood shows "Project Mah Jongg" through April | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Faith Boone
News OCR Text: Enlarge Jim Olexa, Sun News The game of mah jongg is played with 152, ornately decorated tiles. Maltz Museum Executive Director Judi Feniger said the game looks like dominos, but plays more like gin rummy. She also said people have been purchasing old tiles off of eBay, drilling holes in them and making jewelry. Project Mah Jongg gallery (10 photos)

BEACHWOOD -- Mah Jongg, a game considered to be an expression of identity, fantasy and memory has made its way to the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage.

The “Project Mah Jongg” exhibit at the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage, 2929 Richmond Road, opened on Jan. 24 and will be available for viewing through April 22.

The exhibit, created by the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York City, explores the traditions, history and meaning of the game. The Maltz Museum was able to pick up the traveling version of the exhibit before it makes its way to California.

The exhibit includes artwork by Christopher Niemann, Isaac Mizrahi, Maira Kalman and Bruce McCall as well as vintage game sets made of bone, Bakelite and bamboo, spin off pieces such as packs of mah jongg playing cards and other memorabilia.

Area Clevelanders donated the vintage sets and rule cards dating back to the 1950s, as the rules evolve to keep the game competitive.

According to Maltz Museum Executive Director Judi Feniger, who considers herself still a student of the game of mah jongg, the game looks like dominos because of its 152 ornately created tiles, but plays much like gin rummy with regard to making hands out of suits and sets. She said the game, which is always played with four people, is complicated because of the many different combinations that can be made.

“People who play mah jongg play regularly,” Feniger said. “It's very social and it can be about food and eating. People will get together for lunch or play in the evening with a cocktail.”

Cleveland players relate game tales

Not only are there stories on the museum's website about different people who have played or watched their parents play over the years, but there is also a documentary within the exhibit created by native Clevelander Amy Wasserstrom Cummings and John Cummings complete with even more stories from Northeast Ohioans.

The documentary, titled “May the Tiles Be with You: Cleveland's Love Affair with Mah Jongg,” explains the connections Clevelanders have with weekly games, long-standing traditions and tells multi-generational stories.

“We found all different people around town. We had 8-9 foursomes and there are groups that go back 50 years who still play together,” Feniger said. “We found a group of young girls just learning. We found two couples with Caucasian men and Asian women who play the Chinese version of the game, which is different.

“There was family who used it for their family game night. There's a group of lifelong friends and they still play together. There's someone who carries a set in her trunk. It's a game of friendship.”

The Kent State University Museum loaned the Maltz Museum couture by Dior, Paulene Trigere and Charles James. The costumes were used with a display recreating an afternoon game of mah jongg in the early 1950s.

Bringing people together

Feniger said the exhibit is a way to reach multiple ethnic groups and get people communicating.

“The core exhibition is a wonderful look back at the history and the different games and the many things that have been made with the mah jongg motif,” she said. “We have jewelry in our store made with tiles. Beyond playing the game, it's about the beauty of the tiles.

“We thought this was a great way to showcase a culture popular with Jewish women and has a great length with the Asian community. We also found regionally, because we are the only Midwest area scheduled, we have groups coming from Columbus, Detroit and Pittsburgh because if you're interested or are a mahj player, you want to see it.

“They can come to the gallery and they can play here.”

Special events and exhibit visits

The exhibit will also have several special features including a mah jongg tournament on Feb. 13. There will be trips on Feb. 15, March 14 and April 17 called “Mah Jongg Cross Cultural Exchange,” allowing participants to go to a Chinese restaurant for a game.

The “A Brief History of Mah Jongg” play will be presented on March 7 and a musical ensemble of “The Melodies of Mah Jongg” will occur on March 21.

Drop-in tours for “Project Mah Jongg” are available at 2 p.m. on Sundays and group tours are available by advance registration daily.

Tables can be reserved for games as well where museum members and others can play for free.

Non-members will be charged $5 per visit. The fee includes admission to the exhibit and a game at any of the four available tables. Reservations can be made for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 1:30-4:30 p.m. or 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Wednesdays only.

Regular admission including access to the museum and the exhibit are free for museum members and children under age 5, $12 for adults, $10 for seniors 60 or older and children ages 12 and up and $5 for children ages 5-11.

Ticket packs of 35 or more can be purchased for $7 per ticket and players passes are $20. Players passes include unlimited visits through April 22 and store and public program discounts.

Mah Jongg sets can be purchased in the museum's gift shop for $45-$145.

The exhibit is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesdays and from noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays.

For more information, visit maltzmuseum.org or call (216) 593-0576.

See more Beachwood news at cleveland.com/beachwood

Contact Boone at (216) 986-5472

fboone@sunnews.com

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News Headline: Concerto Competition Winners Featured at Upcoming Orchestra Concert | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Concerto Competition Winners Featured at Upcoming Orchestra Concert

The Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music's Orchestra will continue its season with "Rock and Peace" led by Orchestra Director Liza Grossman at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12, University Auditorium in Cartwright Hall.

The performances will include classical and contemporary music. In addition, guests will hear the undergraduate and graduate winners of the 2011 Concerto Competition, which took place in the School of Music in December. Winners Lindsey Sandham and Alexandre Marr will perform their selected pieces with the orchestra.

Tickets will be available at the door. For more information please call the School of Music at 330-672-2172.

Cost: Adults and seniors are $10 and students are $5 with a valid college ID. Cash or check only.

Contact: Effie A. Tsengas, etsengas@kent.edu, 330-672-8398

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News Headline: Today's Top Medical Stories for February 6, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: KOLR-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scientists have discovered a gene that raises the risk of stroke. British researchers say people who inherited the gene from both parents had double the risk. Doctors say a better understanding of how the gene works could lead to new screening techniques and drugs to treat and even prevent strokes.

Fewer teenagers are being exposed to second hand smoke riding in cars. A new study in pediatrics found 23 percent of students have recently driven in a car with someone smoking. That number has fallen significantly over the past 10 years - but doctors say it's still too high.

And children left out of group activities - tend to be less active on their own. Researchers at Kent State University rigged a game so some children were not able to participate. Later when those same kids had an opportunity to do a physical activity on their own - they instead did something sedentary. Doctors say this social dynamic may be a contributing factor in the obesity epidemic.

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News Headline: Researchers at Kent State University Publish New Data on Neuroscience | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: OBGYN & Reproduction Week - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2012 FEB 6 -- A new study, "Structured exercise does not stabilize cognitive function in individuals with mild cognitive impairment residing in a structured living facility," is now available. According to the authors of recent research published in the The International Journal of Neuroscience, "Exercise has been shown to have positive effects on the brain and cognition in healthy older adults, though no study has directly examined possible cognitive benefits of formal exercise programs in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) living in structured facilities. Thirty-one participants completed neuropsychological testing and measures of cardiovascular fitness at baseline and after 6 months of a structured exercise program that included aerobic and resistance training."

"While exercise improved cardiovascular fitness in persons with MCI, there was no improvement in cognitive function. Rather, MCI patients in this sample declined in performance on several tests sensitive to Alzheimer's disease," wrote L.A. Miller and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Examined in the context of past work, it appears exercise may be beneficial prior to the onset of MCI, though less helpful after its onset."

Miller and colleagues published their study in The International Journal of Neuroscience (Structured exercise does not stabilize cognitive function in individuals with mild cognitive impairment residing in a structured living facility. The International Journal of Neuroscience, 2011;121(4):218-23).

For additional information, contact L.A. Miller, Dept. of Psychology, Kent State University, Kent Hall, Kent, Ohio 44242, United States.

Copyright 2012, NewsRx.com.

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News Headline: Research from Kent State University Provides New Data on Heart Failure | Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cardiovascular Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to the authors of a study from Kent, Ohio, "Heart failure (HF) is a disabling disease that often affects instrumental activities of daily living (instrumental ADLs). Despite high rates of disability in this population, little is known about the effects of cognitive impairment on instrumental ADLs in this population."

"The current study examined whether cognitive functioning predicts instrumental ADL performance in persons with HF. Persons with HF (N = 122; 68.49 [SD, 9.43] years; 35.2% female) completed neuropsychological testing, fitness assessment, and self-reported instrumental and basic ADL function as part of a larger protocol. Neuropsychological tests included the Mini-Mental State Examination and Trail Making Tests A and B. The 2-minute step test estimated fitness. Instrumental and basic ADL function was based on self-report on the Lawton-Brody Activities of Daily Living Scale. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to determine the independent contribution of cognitive function to ADLs in HF. Heart failure patients reported high rates of impairments in instrumental ADLs, but indicated requiring little or no assistance with basic ADLs. Cognitive function showed incremental predictive validity for driving (R-2 change =.07, P = .03) and medication management (R 2 change = .14, P

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News Headline: Researchers at Kent State University Publish New Data on Neuroscience | Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cardiovascular Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study, "Structured exercise does not stabilize cognitive function in individuals with mild cognitive impairment residing in a structured living facility," is now available. According to the authors of recent research published in the The International Journal of Neuroscience, "Exercise has been shown to have positive effects on the brain and cognition in healthy older adults, though no study has directly examined possible cognitive benefits of formal exercise programs in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) living in structured facilities. Thirty-one participants completed neuropsychological testing and measures of cardiovascular fitness at baseline and after 6 months of a structured exercise program that included aerobic and resistance training."

"While exercise improved cardiovascular fitness in persons with MCI, there was no improvement in cognitive function. Rather, MCI patients in this sample declined in performance on several tests sensitive to Alzheimer's disease," wrote L.A. Miller and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "Examined in the context of past work, it appears exercise may be beneficial prior to the onset of MCI, though less helpful after its onset."

Miller and colleagues published their study in The International Journal of Neuroscience (Structured exercise does not stabilize cognitive function in individuals with mild cognitive impairment residing in a structured living facility. The International Journal of Neuroscience, 2011;121(4):218-23).

For additional information, contact L.A. Miller, Dept. of Psychology, Kent State University, Kent Hall, Kent, Ohio 44242, United States.

Copyright © 2012 Cardiovascular Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: KSU student blames broken heart for crime | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A broken heart and a broken window recently led a Kent State University student to plead guilty to burglary charges for illegally entering his ex-girlfriend's Franklin Township apartment in October 2011, assaulting her and stealing some of her belongings.

Irayel R. Williams, 18, of Cleveland, recently pleaded guilty in Portage County Common Pleas Court to burglary, a third-degree felony. Following a pre-sentence investigation, he faces one to three years in prison at sentencing in Judge Laurie Pittman's courtroom.

Williams, a freshman biology major, was arrested Oct. 25, 2011, by Portage County sheriff's deputies responding to a 911 call from a female resident of the Campus Pointe apartment complex on S.R. 59 just east of Kent.

Portage County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci said the caller told dispatchers her ex-boyfriend had broken a window and entered her apartment after she refused to let him in through the door. Dispatchers heard Williams screaming at the woman in the background and the call disconnected, he said.

Responding deputies saw Williams in a nearby parking lot and gave chase. Vigluicci said Williams refused to comply with their commands, was verbally abusive and had to be tackled, Vigluicci said.

Williams "repeatedly told deputies to 'Shoot me,'" he said. Deputies recovered the victim's laptop computer, digital camera and KSU ID card from him following his arrest.

Vigluicci said Williams told sheriff's detectives his ex-girlfriend broke off their two-year relationship, refused to take his calls or see him when he showed up her apartment and took the items "because he figured she'd have to talk to him" if he did, Vigluicci said.

Kent Fire Department paramedics treated Williams for injuries to his hands he suffered when he broke the victim's window. As they did, Williams asked paramedics and deputies if "they knew what it was like to have a broken heart" and that "in addition to the cuts on his hand, he had been 'stabbed in the heart,'" Vigluicci said.

Williams received further treatment for his wounds at Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna. His blood was found on the walls and carpet in the victim's apartment, Vigluicci said.

Williams still is enrolled as a student on the Kent campus, according to KSU's online student directory.

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News Headline: 20 will seek opportunity to compete at Miss Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald - Online
Contact Name: Lou Whitmire News Journal
News OCR Text: MANSFIELD -- Twenty women from across the Buckeye State will compete to become the new Miss Mansfield 2012 or the new Miss North Central Ohio 2012 on Saturday night at Mansfield Senior High School.

Before the night is over, seven teenagers from across Ohio will compete for the title of Miss Mansfield's Outstanding Teen 2012.

These three titleholders will compete at the Miss Ohio Scholarship Program and Miss Ohio's Outstanding Teen Program in June at the Renaissance Theatre.

Pageant organizers said this year's production is the largest in the history of the program, with contestants from Mansfield and every corner of the state.

There will be 29 little girls competing in the Little Miss Snowflake Pageant for the titles of Wee Miss Snowflake 2012, Tiny Miss Snowflake 2012, Little Miss Snowflake 2012 and Junior Miss Snowflake 2012. The Little Miss Snowflake Pageant is at 1 p.m. Saturday.

Doors open for the other shows at 6 p.m. and pre-show begins at 6:30 p.m.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children 10 and younger. Tickets may be purchased the day of the event at Mansfield Senior High School's east side student parking entrance. Tickets purchased for the Little Miss Snowflake Pageant can be used for admission to the evening scholarship programs.

The theme for the 2012 Miss Mansfield, Miss North Central Ohio and Miss Mansfield's Outstanding Teen Programs will be "Crown With A Heart," which will end with the crowning of the 2012 titleholders.

Featured performers for the program include: Miss Ohio 2011 Ellen Bryan, Miss Ohio Outstanding Teen 2011 Kelsey Barrett, Miss Mansfield 2011 Ashley Warholic, Miss North Central Ohio 2011 Heather Waterman and Miss Mansfield Outstanding Teen 2011 Morgan Kindred.

The contestants are:

» Jelisa Barringer of Columbus, a senior at Central State University majoring in public relations. She will perform a jazz vocal selection. Her platform is "Preparing Peers for the Professional World."

» Emalie Moyer of Canton, a senior at Bellevue High School. She will perform a modern dance. Her platform is "Students Everywhere Reaching Volunteer Excellence."

» Alexis Lewis of Sandusky, a senior at Perkins High School. She will perform a jazz dance selection. Her platform is "I-OPEN International Outreach Program for Education in Nigeria."

» Erica Travis of Zanesville, a graduate of Zanesville High School who wants to major in business. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Celiac Disease Awareness."

» Anjelica Francisco of Cincinnati, a student at Eastern Michigan University majoring in clinical social work. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Prevention of Youth Violence and Intimidation."

» Alyssa Waldman of Defiance, a junior from the Otterbein University majoring in music and vocal performance. She will perform a classical vocal selection. Her platform is "Silence Isn't Golden: It's Abuse."

» Jenna Fowls of Warsaw has a master's degree in counseling from Malone University. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Dating Violence."

» April O'Brien of Columbus, a graduate of Bethany College with a master's degree in education. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Netsmartz: Internet Safety."

» Veronica Wende of Lima, a sophomore at Hillsdale College majoring in musical field. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Shine On, Through Tissue and Organ Donation."

» Loren Baker of Mansfield, a sophomore at University of Toledo majoring in nursing specializing in neonatal. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Body Love -- Inspiring Confidence, Acceptance and Love for YOUR Body."

» Rebecca Jones of Mansfield, a freshman at Ohio Dominican University majoring in fine art. She will perform a pop rock vocal selection. Her platform is "Alz-heimer's Association Funding."

» Alicia Huyghe of Urichsville, a senior at Cleveland State University majoring in public relations. She will perform a tap dance. Her platform is, "Get Kids Active! The Fight Against Childhood Obesity."

» Anna Beckman of Ashville, a junior at Otterbein University majoring in veterinary medicine. She will perform martial arts. Her platform is "Animal Rights."

» Cayla Hellwarth of Celina, a junior at The Ohio State University majoring in marketing and international business. She will perform a classic vocal selection. Her platform is "Help Sustain Life -- The American Red Cross."

» Allison Vance of Mount Gilead, a sophomore at The Ohio State University majoring in nursing, specializing in neonatal. She will perform a Broadway vocal selection. Her platform is "Suicide Prevention Awareness."

» Danielle Hackler of Galion, a sophomore at The Ohio State University majoring in education. She will perform a lyrical dance. Her platform is, "A Healthy You is a Happy You."

» Courtney Fraley of Mansfield, a freshman at Baldwin-Wallace College majoring in public relations. She will perform a drum selection. Her platform is "Epilepsy Awareness."

» Ashliegh Jarzenski of Canal Fulton, a sophomore at Ashland University majoring in strategic communications. She will perform a baton selection. Her platform is "Building Hope for a Better Future."

» Gabrielle Bailey of Dover, a student at Kent State University majoring in dance. She will perform a contemporary dance. Her platform is "Take a Stand Against Domestic Violence."

» Chelsi Howman of Ashland, a freshman at Mount Union College majoring in middle childhood education. She will perform a banjo selection. Her platform is "Stop Bullying Now: Take a Stand! Lend a Hand!"

Teen contestants

» Samantha Garlock of Lima, Lima Central Catholic High School. She will perform a baton selection. Her platform is "SOLD on Learning -- Students Overcoming Learning Differences."

» Siena Shirer of Adamsville, Tri-Valley High School. She will perform ballet on pointe. Her platform is "The Benefits of 4-H: The Revolution of Responsibility."

» Amelia Hitchens of Newark, Newark Catholic High School. She will perform a magic routine. Her platform is "The Magic of Volunteering."

» Brittany Abrams of Mansfield, Lexington High School. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Volunteering from the Heart."

» Melanie Drews of Bay Village, Bay Village High School. She will perform a piano selection. Her platform is "Empowering Today's Young Women for a Healthier Self Image and High School."

» Emily Tabor of Parma Heights, St. Joseph Academy. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Ready, Set, Go Pink! -- Breast Cancer Awareness."

» Abigail Kaufman of Lexington, Lexington High School. She will perform a dance en pointe. Her platform is "S.O.S. (Save Our Skin) The Dangers of Skin Cancers and Prevention in Teenagers."

Little Miss Snowflake Contestants

Wee Miss Snowflake: Chloe Holladay, Kylie Schaefer, Makenna Greene, Piper Jordan, Valynn Parsons and Zykeiria McDaniel.

Tiny Miss Snowflake: Addison Woogerd, Alaina Rice, Ariyah Tufts, Bella-Paris Heichel, Blakleigh Michalovich, Kaitlyn Davies, Natalie Kennard, Payton Burgess and Zoey Elizabeth Strom.

Little Miss Snowflake: Amadia Aguirre, Aubrae Clifton, Ava Storch, Breanna Kaylee Schwark, Izzie Willacker, Juliana-Payton Heichel, Julianne Smith, Olivia Balkin, Sarah Hahn and Tess Gerhardt.

Junior Miss Snowflake: Madeline Pack, Madison-Paige Heichel, Olivia Anderson and Victoria Knapke.

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News Headline: 20 will seek opportunity to compete at Miss Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name: Lou Whitmire News Journal
News OCR Text: MANSFIELD -- Twenty women from across the Buckeye State will compete to become the new Miss Mansfield 2012 or the new Miss North Central Ohio 2012 on Saturday night at Mansfield Senior High School.

Before the night is over, seven teenagers from across Ohio will compete for the title of Miss Mansfield's Outstanding Teen 2012.

These three titleholders will compete at the Miss Ohio Scholarship Program and Miss Ohio's Outstanding Teen Program in June at the Renaissance Theatre.

Pageant organizers said this year's production is the largest in the history of the program, with contestants from Mansfield and every corner of the state.

There will be 29 little girls competing in the Little Miss Snowflake Pageant for the titles of Wee Miss Snowflake 2012, Tiny Miss Snowflake 2012, Little Miss Snowflake 2012 and Junior Miss Snowflake 2012. The Little Miss Snowflake Pageant is at 1 p.m. Saturday.

Doors open for the other shows at 6 p.m. and pre-show begins at 6:30 p.m.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children 10 and younger. Tickets may be purchased the day of the event at Mansfield Senior High School's east side student parking entrance. Tickets purchased for the Little Miss Snowflake Pageant can be used for admission to the evening scholarship programs.

The theme for the 2012 Miss Mansfield, Miss North Central Ohio and Miss Mansfield's Outstanding Teen Programs will be "Crown With A Heart," which will end with the crowning of the 2012 titleholders.

Featured performers for the program include: Miss Ohio 2011 Ellen Bryan, Miss Ohio Outstanding Teen 2011 Kelsey Barrett, Miss Mansfield 2011 Ashley Warholic, Miss North Central Ohio 2011 Heather Waterman and Miss Mansfield Outstanding Teen 2011 Morgan Kindred.

The contestants are:

» Jelisa Barringer of Columbus, a senior at Central State University majoring in public relations. She will perform a jazz vocal selection. Her platform is "Preparing Peers for the Professional World."

» Emalie Moyer of Canton, a senior at Bellevue High School. She will perform a modern dance. Her platform is "Students Everywhere Reaching Volunteer Excellence."

» Alexis Lewis of Sandusky, a senior at Perkins High School. She will perform a jazz dance selection. Her platform is "I-OPEN International Outreach Program for Education in Nigeria."

» Erica Travis of Zanesville, a graduate of Zanesville High School who wants to major in business. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Celiac Disease Awareness."

» Anjelica Francisco of Cincinnati, a student at Eastern Michigan University majoring in clinical social work. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Prevention of Youth Violence and Intimidation."

» Alyssa Waldman of Defiance, a junior from the Otterbein University majoring in music and vocal performance. She will perform a classical vocal selection. Her platform is "Silence Isn't Golden: It's Abuse."

» Jenna Fowls of Warsaw has a master's degree in counseling from Malone University. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Dating Violence."

» April O'Brien of Columbus, a graduate of Bethany College with a master's degree in education. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Netsmartz: Internet Safety."

» Veronica Wende of Lima, a sophomore at Hillsdale College majoring in musical field. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Shine On, Through Tissue and Organ Donation."

» Loren Baker of Mansfield, a sophomore at University of Toledo majoring in nursing specializing in neonatal. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Body Love -- Inspiring Confidence, Acceptance and Love for YOUR Body."

» Rebecca Jones of Mansfield, a freshman at Ohio Dominican University majoring in fine art. She will perform a pop rock vocal selection. Her platform is "Alz-heimer's Association Funding."

» Alicia Huyghe of Urichsville, a senior at Cleveland State University majoring in public relations. She will perform a tap dance. Her platform is, "Get Kids Active! The Fight Against Childhood Obesity."

» Anna Beckman of Ashville, a junior at Otterbein University majoring in veterinary medicine. She will perform martial arts. Her platform is "Animal Rights."

» Cayla Hellwarth of Celina, a junior at The Ohio State University majoring in marketing and international business. She will perform a classic vocal selection. Her platform is "Help Sustain Life -- The American Red Cross."

» Allison Vance of Mount Gilead, a sophomore at The Ohio State University majoring in nursing, specializing in neonatal. She will perform a Broadway vocal selection. Her platform is "Suicide Prevention Awareness."

» Danielle Hackler of Galion, a sophomore at The Ohio State University majoring in education. She will perform a lyrical dance. Her platform is, "A Healthy You is a Happy You."

» Courtney Fraley of Mansfield, a freshman at Baldwin-Wallace College majoring in public relations. She will perform a drum selection. Her platform is "Epilepsy Awareness."

» Ashliegh Jarzenski of Canal Fulton, a sophomore at Ashland University majoring in strategic communications. She will perform a baton selection. Her platform is "Building Hope for a Better Future."

» Gabrielle Bailey of Dover, a student at Kent State University majoring in dance. She will perform a contemporary dance. Her platform is "Take a Stand Against Domestic Violence."

» Chelsi Howman of Ashland, a freshman at Mount Union College majoring in middle childhood education. She will perform a banjo selection. Her platform is "Stop Bullying Now: Take a Stand! Lend a Hand!"

Teen contestants

» Samantha Garlock of Lima, Lima Central Catholic High School. She will perform a baton selection. Her platform is "SOLD on Learning -- Students Overcoming Learning Differences."

» Siena Shirer of Adamsville, Tri-Valley High School. She will perform ballet on pointe. Her platform is "The Benefits of 4-H: The Revolution of Responsibility."

» Amelia Hitchens of Newark, Newark Catholic High School. She will perform a magic routine. Her platform is "The Magic of Volunteering."

» Brittany Abrams of Mansfield, Lexington High School. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Volunteering from the Heart."

» Melanie Drews of Bay Village, Bay Village High School. She will perform a piano selection. Her platform is "Empowering Today's Young Women for a Healthier Self Image and High School."

» Emily Tabor of Parma Heights, St. Joseph Academy. She will perform a vocal selection. Her platform is "Ready, Set, Go Pink! -- Breast Cancer Awareness."

» Abigail Kaufman of Lexington, Lexington High School. She will perform a dance en pointe. Her platform is "S.O.S. (Save Our Skin) The Dangers of Skin Cancers and Prevention in Teenagers."

Little Miss Snowflake Contestants

Wee Miss Snowflake: Chloe Holladay, Kylie Schaefer, Makenna Greene, Piper Jordan, Valynn Parsons and Zykeiria McDaniel.

Tiny Miss Snowflake: Addison Woogerd, Alaina Rice, Ariyah Tufts, Bella-Paris Heichel, Blakleigh Michalovich, Kaitlyn Davies, Natalie Kennard, Payton Burgess and Zoey Elizabeth Strom.

Little Miss Snowflake: Amadia Aguirre, Aubrae Clifton, Ava Storch, Breanna Kaylee Schwark, Izzie Willacker, Juliana-Payton Heichel, Julianne Smith, Olivia Balkin, Sarah Hahn and Tess Gerhardt.

Junior Miss Snowflake: Madeline Pack, Madison-Paige Heichel, Olivia Anderson and Victoria Knapke.

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News Headline: KSU Esplanade eyed as location for veterans memorial | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Plans for how Kent will honor U.S. Army Spc. Adam Hamilton, a native of the city killed in Afghanistan last summer, are continuing to evolve.

After hearing the city planned to honor the fallen soldier, Hamilton's family requested Kent instead find a way to honor all of the city's veterans, something they thought he would appreciate more than an individual honor.

"There was a general recommendation to look at an area down by the Kent Dam that could be designated in honor of veterans in one form or another," City Manager Dave Ruller said.

The family was appreciative of the suggestion, but they requested a location "a little (less) off the beaten track," Ruller said.

So city officials suggested a location that will be literally at the end of a well-traveled path: The Kent State University Esplanade extension.

In a downtown development meeting, Kent officials asked Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority officials if they had any plans for the piece of land at the back of their future transit center where Haymaker Parkway, Erie Street and the Esplanade come together.

"I think the concept we're looking at is a flagpole commemorating each branch of service," Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala said.

Ruller said both PARTA officials and Hamilton's family were excited at the prospect, adding that PARTA planned to use the space for public art or sculpture even before the city suggested the memorial.

Even with enthusiasm for the memorial at the PARTA site, Ruller said the city still has not ruled out the Kent Dam memorial or another suggestion to dedicate a portion of the Portage Hike and Bike Trail to Kent's veterans.

"The key to all of this seems to be (to create something) respectfully and tastefully done - something really worthy of the loss those families have to deal with."

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News Headline: Plans For Fallen Veterans' Memorial Continually Evolving | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Plans for a fallen veterans' memorial prompted by the May 28 death of U.S. Army Spec. Adam Hamilton of Kent continue to evolve, with city officials now considering the creation of a downtown plaza area featuring flags representing each branch of the military.

City Manager Dave Ruller updated City Council members Wednesday on the progress of evolving plans made by council's ad-hoc Veterans Memorial Committee. The committee was created in June not long after Hamilton, a 2007 Theodore Roosevelt High School graduate, was killed while serving in Afghanistan.

Since summer, memorial ideas have included naming a newly created park or a section of bike trail after Hamilton. Ruller said when the committee last met, there was talk of creating a memorial of some sort at Heritage Park near the dam.

Since then, Ruller and Mayor Jerry Fiala have met with Hamilton's father, Scott Hamilton, and Ruller has spoken by phone with Hamilton's mother, Nancy Krestan. Ruller said Hamilton's parents both favor a memorial honoring all veterans who have given the ultimate sacrifice.

And, Ruller said he agreed with their suggestion that such a memorial be created in a more visible location than Heritage Park.

That led officials to consider the triangular parcel of land that will be bounded by Haymaker-Parkway, Erie Street and the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center now under construction on DePeyster Street.

Ruller said officials from PARTA, which is currently building the Kent Central Gateway transit center just across Erie from the hotel, had already designated that triangular parcel as a park-like area featuring some type of art work to tie in with Kent State's “Art Walk along Sculpture Mile.” The university's new Esplanade extension will enter the downtown nearby.

Ruller said John Drew, PARTA general manager, is “very interested in continuing conversations” about using the triangular parcel for a veterans' memorial, and that Scott Hamilton thought the idea was “fantastic.”

Fiala said the memorial concept currently in favor involves a plaza area with flagpoles representing each branch of the military, similar to the brick “courtyard of honor” that is just one aspect of the Ohio Fallen Heroes Memorial in Sunbury, Ohio. Benches would allow visitors to sit and reflect.

Fiala said the Sunbury courtyard is “more tastefully done” then the Portage County Veterans' Memorial Plaza located in the front lawn of the Portage County Courthouse in Ravenna.

Ruller said he's looking into funding for the memorial, and that Scott Hamilton said he would help with a fundraising campaign.

“As the mayor noted, the key to all of this seems to be respectfully, tastefully done – something that's really worthy of the loss that those families have (undergone),” Ruller said.

Community input on the memorial plans is something city officials welcome, particularly from veterans and veteran organizations, Ruller pointed out.

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