Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Health Sciences (3)
Higher Education (2)
Jewish Studies (1)
KSU at Stark; Sustainability (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Safety (1)
Students; Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

College of Nursing (CON) (1)
SuperScholar.org Publishes First Annual Smart Choice Ranking of Schools for Online Nursing Degrees 02/07/2012 PR Newswire - Online Text Attachment Email

...Gonzaga University Department of Nursing Grand Canyon University Indiana State University College of Nursing, Health, and Human Services Kent State College of Nursing Liberty University Loyola University New Orleans School of Nursing Nebraska Methodist College or Nursing...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
A model for the citizens? (VanGeest) 02/07/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Bright Spots: Feb. 2, 2012 02/07/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Health Sciences (3)
Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkley) 02/07/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Ostracized Children Are Less Likely To Be Physically Active 02/06/2012 American Academy of Pediatrics Text Attachment Email

...“The Effect of Simulated Ostracism on Physical Activity Behavior in Children,” in the March 2012 Pediatrics (published online Feb. 6), researchers from Kent State University in Ohio asked 19 children between the ages of 8 and 12 years to play a virtual ball-toss computer game, telling each child he...

Social Exclusion Impacts Child Physical Activity Behaviors 02/06/2012 MD News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Pediatrics. (HealthDay News) —To investigate the effects of stimulated ostracism on children's physical activity behavior, Jacob E. Barkley, Ph.D., of Kent State University in Ohio, and colleagues conducted two experimental sessions in 19 children (11 boys, 8 girls; age 11.7 ± 1.3 years) who played...


Higher Education (2)
State committee digs through public colleges' capital wish lists (Lefton) 02/07/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Panel says middle school students should start thinking about college 02/07/2012 News-Herald Text Attachment Email


Jewish Studies (1)
VALENTINE'S DAY PROGRAM AT KENT STATE TO DISCUSS THE CONNECTION BETWEEN LOVE AND THE JEWISH BIBLE, FEB. 14 (Kessler) 02/06/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Feb.6 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's Jewish Studies Program continues its Lunch and Learn series...


KSU at Stark; Sustainability (1)
KSU-Stark, Stark State compete in 'RecycleMania' 02/06/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark and Stark State College will compete against other colleges and universities nationally in the 2012 RecycleMania Tournament,...


KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Atwood Lodge looks for spring reopening 02/07/2012 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

Sorting out solutions for high-traffic University Drive (Andrews) 02/06/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

TIMES-REPORTER PAT BURK n Traffic builds up on University Dr. as classes from Buckeye Career Center and Kent State University Tuscarawas let out Thursday in New Philadelphia. Posted Feb 06, 2012 @ 01:47 PM Local officials are hopeful that a report...

Task force is formed to attract business here 02/06/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...director of the Tuscarawas County Port Authority; Tuscarawas County Commissioners Chris Abbuhl, Kerry Metzger and Jim Seldenright; Gregg Andrews, dean of Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia; and Wendy Zucal, executive director of the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum. Lauber said...


Safety (1)
Ravenna seeks grant for joint dispatch center 02/07/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Students; Town-Gown (1)
Annual 'Make Mine with Ice' Exhibition is Saturday at Hometown Plaza 02/07/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: SuperScholar.org Publishes First Annual Smart Choice Ranking of Schools for Online Nursing Degrees | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: PR Newswire - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SuperScholar.org Publishes First Annual Smart Choice Ranking of Schools for Online Nursing Degrees

SAN ANTONIO , Feb. 7, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Online education and career information website SuperScholar published its first annual "Smart Choice" ranking of the top 25 schools for online nursing degrees. The ranking can be found at http://www.superscholar.org/rankings/online/best-nursing-schools/ .

SuperScholar editors developed the Smart Choice ranking as a tool to help prospective students make a smart choice about where to invest in their education. The ranking helps fill a void in quality, unbiased rankings and reviews of online nursing schools. In order to be considered for inclusion in the ranking, an institution had to be a regionally accredited college or university listed in the National Center for Education Statistics database and offer an online nursing degree program accredited by either the CCNE or NLNAC. The nursing schools that met this initial accreditation criterion were then evaluated based on reputation and prestige, program quality, student satisfaction and cost. The result is a ranking of online nursing schools that offers prospective students a helpful tool for making a smart choice about where to earn an online nursing degree.

The University of Illinois at Chicago in Chicago, Illinois , earned the honor of the top Smart Choice school for an online nursing degree. Other ranked schools include (in alphabetical order):

Anna Maria College

Benedictine University

Chamberlain College of Nursing

Clarkson College

Drexel University

College of Nursing and Health Professions

Georgetown University

Department of Nursing

Gonzaga University

Department of Nursing

Grand Canyon University

Indiana State University

College of Nursing, Health, and Human Services

Kent State College

of Nursing

Liberty University

Loyola University New Orleans

School of Nursing

Nebraska Methodist College

or Nursing and Allied Health

Robert Morris University

(PA)

Sacred Heart University

Department of Nursing

Saint Peter's College

Saint Xavier University

The

George Washington University

School of Nursing

University of Cincinnati

College of Nursing

University of Colorado Denver

University of Saint Mary

Vanderbilt University

School of Nursing

Walden University

Western Governors University

SuperScholar.org is a college and career website offering inspiring ideas and useful career advice for lifelong learners and connecting them to quality educational opportunities to further their educational and career goals. For more information, visit http://www.superscholar.org .

Media Contact:

James Arney

Return to Top



News Headline: A model for the citizens? (VanGeest) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By TIMOTHY MAGAW

With odds stacked against them, publicly owned hospitals wonder what future might hold

The MetroHealth System and its public hospital counterparts around the country are caught between a rock and a hard place.

With many facilities nearing the end of their useful lives, exploding charity care rolls and dwindling taxpayer support, these providers are finding it difficult to compete with their for-profit and nonprofit peers while continuing to care for the poor and compete for paying patients.

Some administrators at publicly controlled health care institutions throughout the country even are questioning whether the business models that have governed their operations for decades and, in some cases, centuries are becoming obsolete, at least in their current forms.

“Local governments are not flush with cash right now, and they're struggling with their own issues,” said MetroHealth CEO Mark Moran, who announced plans in December to step down from his post once a successor is named. “I've said it before: Public hospitals are an endangered species.”

However, a public hospital's business model isn't driven solely by how much money it receives from taxpayers or the regulatory requirements attached to being a public body, such as open records laws or the responsibility to contribute to public employees' lucrative retirement plans. In a large part, it's dependent upon the patients it serves.

For one, MetroHealth last year received a $36.1 million subsidy from the county but absorbed $131 million in uncompensated care, an increase of 14.8% from the previous year.

“That really drives the whole business model — it drives the resources we have to be available to invest in facilities, drives the resources we have to invest in service lines, and it determines what we're able to pay people,” Mr. Moran said.

It's an equation that can lead to casualties: In November, for example, MetroHealth laid off 104 employees and eliminated 151 vacant positions as it sought to head off heavy operating losses.

MetroHealth's financial troubles and uncertain future aren't unique among similar institutions.

In fact, nationwide, the number of publicly controlled hospitals around the country declined about 4.6% between 2006 and 2010, according to the most recent data from the American Hospital Association. On the contrary, the number of nonprofit institutions fell by less than 1% and the number of investor-owned hospitals increased by almost 14%.

Still gotta compete

Because of the financial losses public health care systems stomach by caring for the uninsured, which they're often required to do by law, many have found it difficult to reinvest in their facilities.

MetroHealth officials, for example, note it would cost $435 million over the next five years just to maintain the hospital's current facilities on West 25th Street in Cleveland, much less provide for expansion.

And with 32 million of the uninsured slated to be added to the insurance rolls across the country by 2014 under the federal health care overhaul, public hospitals are bracing for an even more competitive market. How it might pan out is anyone's guess, but some observers predict that the newly insured might migrate from the public hospitals they traditionally used and instead patron other health systems with newer facilities.

“If individual mandate is implemented, now (the newly insured) will not only have coverage but choice,” said Jonathan VanGeest, associate professor of health policy and management at Kent State University. “These very same hospitals that have been struggling for years now have to become competitive in that type of market. It's going to be a real challenge.”

Mr. Moran said the expansion of insurance coverage under health care reform could be viewed as a lifeline for public hospitals if those patients stick with the system. However, he added that it would be “unrealistic to expect that expansion of coverage is going to come without a reduction in reimbursements rates.”

Every health care system regardless of its ownership is interested in exploring new ventures that might generate more revenue in the challenging health care environment. However, being a publicly owned hospital presents its own set of constraints, according to Stephen Colecchi, president and CEO of Robinson Memorial Hospital in Portage County.

Robinson Memorial, which unlike some of its peers doesn't receive taxpayer support, is looking to drop its county-owned status and convert to a nonprofit. Simply put, dropping the county-owned status would offer the hospital more autonomy over its operations, allowing it to operate more in lockstep with hospitals owned by the Cleveland Clinic or Summa Health System.

Mr. Colecchi said the current arrangement prevents the hospital from entering into new business ventures with for-profit providers as other systems have done in the region. Likewise, being a public entity limits the types of investments the hospital can make.

“Over the years, we've left millions of dollars on the table in terms of investment,” Mr. Colecchi said.

Changing the perception

Meanwhile, many observers suggest that muscling up the payer mix with more commercial insured patients could be the saving grace for some public hospitals. Still, luring more patients with commercial insurance to a public hospital is challenging, particularly from a marketing standpoint.

MetroHealth already announced plans to invest heavily in a slate of new community health centers in the coming years, the first being a $23 million facility in Middleburg Heights.

MetroHealth, whose payer mix in 2011 was comprised of about 25% of the commercially insured, has been attempting to position itself as a provider offering the quality of a top-tier academic medical center at an affordable cost in order to lure in more paying patients who have a choice in the crowded market, Mr. Moran noted.

“That's a very different brand positioning than "taxpayer-assisted hospital for the poor,'” Mr. Moran noted.

Broward Health, the taxpayer-funded health system in Broward County, Fla., struggled with a similar problem and went so far as changing its name about five years ago. The system had been known as the North Broward Hospital District.

“Our research showed it was telling people if they had insurance, they wouldn't go there. It was in their mind,” said Sara Howley, Broward Health's chief communications and marketing officer. “We needed to do something to let everyone know we take care of everyone regardless of ability to pay.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Bright Spots: Feb. 2, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kate Ruque of Mentor, a senior at Kent State University who majors in fashion merchandising, has won a $30,000 Geoffrey Beene National Scholarship Award from the YMA Fashion Scholarship Fund.

She received the award Jan. 10 during the YMA FSF Geoffrey Beene National Scholarship Awards Gala, celebrating the organization's 75th anniversary, at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York. The nonprofit is made up of members of the fashion industry and is dedicated to promoting education of the fashion arts and business. Kent State is a member school of the organization.

To qualify for one of four, $30,000 Geoffrey Beene scholarship awards, students submit a case study in the preceding year for a preliminary scholarship award of $5,000. Any member schools with students who win a preliminary scholarship are able to nominate one student to compete for the bigger Geoffrey Beene scholarship awards.

Ms. Ruque's case study about fixing an ailing firm in the fashion industry took her to the final round of the competition.

“Our task in the competition was to find a retailer whose business was failing,” she said in a statement. “We then had to redesign their business plan. The company I chose was close to bankruptcy, so I had to spend a lot of time studying their financial statements in order to find the source of this problem.

She also redesigned the firm's marketing strategy and created a digital campaign.

Return to Top



News Headline: Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise.
A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically active.
These findings — published Monday in the American Academy of Pediatric's professional journal Pediatrics — could help shed light on contributing factors and potential solutions for the nation's childhood obesity epidemic.
“Ostracism appears to cause a reduction in physical activity,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State. “It could create a scenario where if you're an overweight or obese child, that ostracism could reduce your physical activity. As you get more ostracized, you get heavier, you get more ostracized because you got heavier and things get worse and worse.”
According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of children and adolescents are overweight.
Barkley got the idea for the study while watching his three sons, ages 3 to 7, playing in their backyard.
“I noticed when friends came over, the intensity of their activity increased dramatically,” he said. “After seeing that, I went and looked at the literature in terms of peer influence and physical activity behavior.”
Barkley found other studies showing a link between ostracism or bullying and a decline in physical activity. But previous research didn't show a clear cause and effect.
For example, one study determined that children who felt teased verbally or physically were less likely to be active and more likely to be overweight, Barkley said. “But does this peer victimization cause them to be less active, or [does] the fact that they're less active cause victimization?”
In his study, Barkley and his colleagues observed 19 boys and girls ages 8 to 12 who completed two experimental sessions at Kent State.
During one session, children playing a ball-toss computer game received the ball one-third of the time. During the other, the computer was programmed to exclude the children from receiving the ball most of the time.
After playing the computer games, the participants were taken to a gym, where they were allowed to choose sedentary or physical activities.
When they were excluded by the computer game, the study participants spent 41 percent more time with sedentary activities, such as reading books, coloring or playing matching games, the study found. When the children were included in the computer game, their physical activity level in the gym was 22 percent higher.
“I think it's really important that children have positive peer interaction in their life,” Barkley said.
Barkley is conducting follow-up research exploring whether positive peer interaction encourages physical activity.
Emotions-obesity link
The link between emotions and obesity is definitely strong, said Amy Stanford, a pediatric nurse practitioner in the Sports Medicine Center at Akron Children's Hospital.
Stanford works with the hospital's Future Fitness Clinic, which provides medical management for morbidly obese children. The hospital also runs Future Fitness Club programs at recreational centers throughout the region to encourage children to get active.
Patients in the clinic typically deal with a variety of self-image and self-esteem issues, she said.
“We try to encourage the kids to find things that they enjoy doing,” she said. “That doesn't always mean it has to be in a group. If there are things that get them moving and physically active that they can do with their families or with a best friend or even by themselves, we encourage that.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Ostracized Children Are Less Likely To Be Physically Active | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: American Academy of Pediatrics
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In a small study, researchers found that children who are ostracized, even for a brief period, are significantly more likely to choose sedentary activities over physical activity. For the study, “The Effect of Simulated Ostracism on Physical Activity Behavior in Children,” in the March 2012 Pediatrics (published online Feb. 6), researchers from Kent State University in Ohio asked 19 children between the ages of 8 and 12 years to play a virtual ball-toss computer game, telling each child he or she was playing the game over the Internet with two other children. In half of the sessions, the game was programmed to exclude the child from receiving the ball for the majority of the game. In the other sessions, the child received the ball one-third of the time.

Each child in the study played the game twice, once under each condition. After the game, the children were taken to a gymnasium, where they could choose any sedentary or physical activity they liked, while wearing an accelerometer. Researchers found children accumulated 22 percent fewer accelerometer counts and 41 percent more minutes of sedentary activity after being ostracized in the computer game, compared to when they were included. Study authors conclude that the results provide causal evidence that ostracism may reinforce behaviors that lead to obesity in children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults.

Return to Top



News Headline: Social Exclusion Impacts Child Physical Activity Behaviors | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: MD News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For children, simulated ostracism is associated with reduced participation in physical activity, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay News) —To investigate the effects of stimulated ostracism on children's physical activity behavior, Jacob E. Barkley, Ph.D., of Kent State University in Ohio, and colleagues conducted two experimental sessions in 19 children (11 boys, 8 girls; age 11.7 ± 1.3 years) who played a virtual ball-toss computer game (Cyberball). In one session, children experienced ostracism and in the other session they were exposed to the inclusion/control condition; the condition order was randomized. After playing Cyberball, children had free-choice access to physical and sedentary activities for 30 minutes in a gymnasium. Physical activity was assessed via accelerometery and sedentary time was assessed through observation. Children reported their liking for the activity session via a visual analog scale.

The researchers found that children accumulated significantly fewer (22 percent) accelerometer counts and 41 percent more minutes of sedentary activity after experiencing the ostracized condition compared to the inclusion condition. There was no significant difference for liking the activity sessions between the conditions.

"Simulated ostracism elicits decreased subsequent physical activity participation in children. Ostracism may contribute to children's lack of physical activity," the authors write.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Return to Top



News Headline: State committee digs through public colleges' capital wish lists (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By TIMOTHY MAGAW

Requests outpace cash, so group must prioritize improvement projects

Northeast Ohio's public colleges and universities shipped their renovation wish lists off to Columbus, and now hope their peers can come to a consensus about what most needs a-fixin'.

Time is of the essence in this process. Gov. John Kasich has asked a committee chaired by Ohio State University president Gordon Gee and made up of college presidents and the heads of associations representing Ohio's public colleges and universities to submit by Feb. 15 a list of renovation projects to be considered for inclusion in the state's next capital bill. That bill covers a two-year budget cycle beginning July 1.

The state's budget woes nixed a capital bill for the 2011-2012 biennium, but Gov. Kasich, according to his spokesman, plans to roll out an “austere” capital measure to lawmakers this spring. The prospect of a cash infusion for capital upgrades at higher education institutions, though likely small, is a welcome relief for college presidents who've received nothing for renovations since mid-2010.

Dr. Gee's six-member committee is charged with figuring out how to best divvy up what's expected to be a small pot of roughly $350 million among 37 institutions statewide for what they've deemed their highest renovation priorities. The pot is about $80 million less than what was doled out for higher education in the last capital bill, which covered fiscal 2009 and 2010.

“They will come to some sort of consensus on what they deem to be the most critical projects,” Kasich spokesman Rob Nichols said. “That strips an element of politics out of this process that should serve taxpayers very well amid an environment of very few resources.”

Bruce Johnson, a member of Dr. Gee's committee and president of the Inter-University Council, an advocacy group representing the state's 14 public universities, said the process of determining which projects to include in the list the committee will forward to Gov. Kasich “is going pretty well, but we haven't made the tough decisions yet.”

Representatives on the committee said they didn't have an aggregate figure for all the requested projects, but noted that the requests total more than what will be available from the state.

“Once our recommendations are finished, will all the college and university presidents like our recommendations? Well, that may be different story,” said Ron Abrams, a member of the committee and president of the Ohio Association of Community Colleges. “We think so because we're trying to be true to the principles and priorities established.”

Nothing too sexy

The types of projects Northeast Ohio colleges and universities are jockeying for are not expansive new construction initiatives, such as residence halls, student centers or recreation centers. Rather, they make up a relatively short list of much-needed fixes and renovations. Cleveland State University spokesman Joe Mosbrook said the university submitted to the committee a $12 million request to repair aging roofs, sidewalks and other crumbling infrastructure. However, Mr. Mosbrook noted, it would cost as much as $200 million to cover all the university's deferred maintenance needs.

Likewise, Cuyahoga Community College officials say it would cost as much at $75 million to address the bevy of maintenance needs across its system, according to an email from Peter Mac Ewan, Tri-C's vice president for facilities development and operations. Tri-C hopes to receive about $15 million for three renovation projects on two of its campuses.

Lakeland Community College president Morris Beverage, the only administrator from Northeast Ohio on Dr. Gee's committee, said the school in Kirtland asked for $2.2 million to refurbish half its aging science labs and an additional $1 million for other maintenance needs.

“All of us have capacity issues or maintenance issues that have been building up,” Dr. Beverage said. “I'm sure that all institutions could use even more capital funding than we're getting, but we appreciate what we have coming.”

Anything helps

University administrators haven't been shy in recent years about their desire to bring in more money to mend their aging facilities.

Cleveland State's Mr. Mosbrook said the lack of a capital budget for the 2011-2012 cycle was “a big loss” for the university considering it came on top of other cuts in state support for higher education. The university received about $12 million in the last round of state capital outlays — the same amount it hopes for this year.

Last spring, Kent State University president Lester Lefton also expressed his frustration with the lack of state money and told Crain's, “The reality is the state of Ohio has been unable to step up and ensure we have the kind of facilities that Ohio needs for its students”

As such, Kent State proposed in 2010 a $210 million bond sale to support a $250 million construction and renovation program on its main campus in Kent. The university looked to phase in a new student fee to pay for the borrowing, but the plan has sat dormant as lawmakers on the State Controlling Board, which must give the final OK on the proposal, expressed objections over the fee as higher education costs rise.

Dr. Lefton wouldn't indicate how the availability of capital funds would alter the university's previous proposal, but he said in a statement the university was “grateful to Gov. Kasich to have a capital budget, and I'm looking forward to working with the other presidents to come up with a solution that helps us address our deferred capital needs.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Panel says middle school students should start thinking about college | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Caitlin Fertal

Educators from multiple school districts in Lake and Geauga counties met recently with representatives of area colleges and universities to ask questions and discuss student success.

The panel of higher education included Notre Dame College, Lakeland Community College, Lake Erie College, Ursuline College, Kent State University, Cleveland State University, The University of Akron and John Carrol University.

The discussion last week took about three hours and covered topics ranging from how to ensure students are prepared for college to how to get parents engaged in a productive way.

Principals and guidance counselors from local schools as well as members from the Lake and Geauga Educational Services Centers asked questions related to how to best prepare students for college, and when that preparation should start.

The consensus was college conversations should begin in middle school so a student's high school career can be successful beginning as a freshman.

“Getting started at the middle school level is so important to get students excited about preparing to go on after high school and ‘what's next' and thinking about possible careers,” University of Akron representative Michele Stasitis said. “I think it's really, really important to start engaging early by talking to both students and parents.”

The importance of math, science and writing skills were emphasized as many colleges have students enroll who need to take remedial courses.

Dione DiMitro of Lakeland explained students can save valuable time and money by preparing more during high school and taking placement tests seriously.

She also said students who place in remedial courses are statistically less likely to reach their degree.

Other issues addressed included advanced placement courses and post-secondary courses, the college application process and support resources available to students on campus.

Something educators can take back to their students is the message that students need to take ownership of their education.

Cleveland State University representative Alexander Holt explained that the level of studying varies greatly from high school to college, and students need to put in the time in order to be successful.

Multiple college representatives expressed that parents often fill out college applications when the student should be doing so to experience some independence and responsibility in the process.

Officials highly recommend students visit a college campus before settling on that institution to make sure it is a good fit and to speak with admissions counselors along the way to stay on top of their responsibilities.

The Lake and Geauga Educational Services Centers also collaborated to earn a $50,000 grant from the Ohio Education Department that will be used to host similar discussions among area math and English teachers in the future.

Assistant Superintendent of the Geauga ESC Suzanne Allen said those conversations would take place among college professors and area teachers and provide a “really in-depth dialogue of curriculum alignment and expectation alignment.”

Speaking about the education majors in the local colleges, she said, “They're giving us our new teachers, so we want to make sure our new teachers coming out are prepared in all the methodologies we need.”

Return to Top



News Headline: VALENTINE'S DAY PROGRAM AT KENT STATE TO DISCUSS THE CONNECTION BETWEEN LOVE AND THE JEWISH BIBLE, FEB. 14 (Kessler) | Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb.6 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's Jewish Studies Program continues its Lunch and Learn series this Valentine's Day with an event titled "Love and Temptation in The Song of Songs."

Doron M.Kalir, Esq., adjunct professor at Siegal College of Judaic Studies in Cleveland, will present on Tuesday, Feb.14, from noon to 1 p.m.in the Kent Student Center, Room 310 A&B.The event is free and open to all.Attendees can bring their own lunch.Drinks and desserts will be provided.

"On Valentine's Day, people's thoughts turn to love," said Chaya Kessler, director of Kent State's Jewish Studies Program."The Jewish Studies Program sees this as an opportune time to explore the idea of love as it is expressed in the biblical text of the Song of Songs."

Kalir first studied law in Israel, where he obtained Bachelor of Law (cum laude) and Master of Law (summa cum laude) degrees.He then obtained another Master of Law degree from Columbia Law School (Kent Scholar - highest honors), where he also taught a seminar on Biblical Jurisprudence.Kalir lectures regularly on the biblical narrative.He blogs on the portion of the week at http://portionoftheweek.blogspot.com/.

The Lunch and Learn series is supported by a friend of the Jewish Studies Program, anonymously.

For more information regarding Kent State's Jewish Studies Program or Lunch and Learn, call Kessler at 330-672-8926 or visit www.kent.edu/CAS/JewishStudiesProgram.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU-Stark, Stark State compete in 'RecycleMania' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark and Stark State College will compete against other colleges and universities nationally in the 2012 RecycleMania Tournament, a friendly competition and bench-marking tool for college and university recycling programs to promote waste reduction activities to their campus communities, through March 30.

As some of the largest recyclers in Stark County, serving more than 29,000 students annually and with more than 1,500 employees combined, the competition provides Kent State Stark and Stark State an opportunity to build on the sustainability programs already in place, while creating greater awareness and promoting further participation among students, faculty and staff.

This is Kent State Stark's fourth year participating in the RecycleMania program.

Stark State's college-wide sustainability campaign of "reduce, reuse and recycle paper, plastic, glass and metal cans," is being supplemented during RecycleMania with an interoffice competition for faculty and staff, a daily Facebook trivia contest and discounts on "green" items in the College Store.  

In addition, Stark State student groups will make and sell recycled notebooks creating them from flattened cereal boxes and the unprinted sides of paper reclaimed from recycling bins.

Both campuses will regularly update their perspective websites throughout the RecycleMania campaign. Following the competition, the final results will be released to the media in early April.

Return to Top



News Headline: Atwood Lodge looks for spring reopening | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Jon Baker

DELLROY — About 10 groups -- both local and national -- are vying for the opportunity to operate Atwood Lake Resort and Conference Center for Carroll County, which is taking on ownership of the facility.

Commissioners are seeking proposals from interested parties and hope to have the facility open again by spring, or summer at the latest.

"Our intention is to try to select an operator that has a functional business plan to turn it back into a family resort," said Glenn Enslen, economic development director for Carroll County.

The 511-acre property, which includes the 104-room lodge, two golf courses and tennis courts, is key to the economic development of Carroll County. Before it was closed on Oct. 3, 2010, by its former owner, the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District, it employed 40 full- and part-time employees and had a payroll in excess of $1 million per year. The Carroll County Chamber of Commerce estimated that its economic impact on the region was about $7 million annually.

The MWCD made the decision to close the facility, built in 1965, because it had lost about $1 million a year in 2009 and 2010. Last June, the board of directors voted to raze the lodge but reversed its decision the following month after a public outcry over the decision.

The MWCD then offered to donate the facility to Carroll County, Kent State University at Tuscarawas or the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. The conservancy district voted in November to donate it to Carroll County, the only one of the three entities interested.

"The sense of relief exceeds the sense of excitement," Enslen said about his reaction to the deal. "Wow, we made it."

Officials predict that once the lodge reopens, it will do well financially because of the large number of oil and gas workers in the county who are in need of housing. "We're looking for a lucrative year with the help of the oil and gas industry," said Commissioner Tom Wheaton, who has been working with Enslen for three years to keep the facility from closing permanently.

Between 70 and 80 full-time equivalent jobs are expected to be created.

Kent State Tuscarawas will be a partner with the county in developing the facility.

"We assuredly welcome their presence at the lodge," Enslen said. "They'll have the opportunity to offer classes, operate a small business development center and any or all other opportunities they may bring to the table. When they do something, they do it right. We're welcoming them with open arms."

About 10 groups -- both local and national -- are vying for the opportunity to operate Atwood Lake Resort and Conference Center for Carroll County, which is taking on ownership of the facility.

Commissioners are seeking proposals from interested parties and hope to have the facility open again by spring, or summer at the latest.

"Our intention is to try to select an operator that has a functional business plan to turn it back into a family resort," said Glenn Enslen, economic development director for Carroll County.

The 511-acre property, which includes the 104-room lodge, two golf courses and tennis courts, is key to the economic development of Carroll County. Before it was closed on Oct. 3, 2010, by its former owner, the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District, it employed 40 full- and part-time employees and had a payroll in excess of $1 million per year. The Carroll County Chamber of Commerce estimated that its economic impact on the region was about $7 million annually.

The MWCD made the decision to close the facility, built in 1965, because it had lost about $1 million a year in 2009 and 2010. Last June, the board of directors voted to raze the lodge but reversed its decision the following month after a public outcry over the decision.

The MWCD then offered to donate the facility to Carroll County, Kent State University at Tuscarawas or the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. The conservancy district voted in November to donate it to Carroll County, the only one of the three entities interested.

"The sense of relief exceeds the sense of excitement," Enslen said about his reaction to the deal. "Wow, we made it."

Officials predict that once the lodge reopens, it will do well financially because of the large number of oil and gas workers in the county who are in need of housing. "We're looking for a lucrative year with the help of the oil and gas industry," said Commissioner Tom Wheaton, who has been working with Enslen for three years to keep the facility from closing permanently.

Between 70 and 80 full-time equivalent jobs are expected to be created.

Kent State Tuscarawas will be a partner with the county in developing the facility.

"We assuredly welcome their presence at the lodge," Enslen said. "They'll have the opportunity to offer classes, operate a small business development center and any or all other opportunities they may bring to the table. When they do something, they do it right. We're welcoming them with open arms."

Wheaton said the county has a memorandum of understanding with Kent State Tuscarawas that needs to be refined. It's important that the campus be involved. "Any vendor we've talked to is supportive of that," the commissioner said.

Both Wheaton and Enslen praised the MWCD for the job it has done in maintaining the lodge. "The MWCD has done a wonderful job of keeping it heated," Wheaton said. "You wouldn't know it's been closed."

Residents are eager for the lodge to reopen.

"I live outside of Dellroy, and every time I stop at the market in town, I get asked when it's going to reopen," Enslen said. "It shows the community is excited."

"People are biting at the bit - for the jobs and to go there to dinner again," Wheaton added. "It truly is theirs. If they don't use it, I don't know what else to do."

Return to Top



News Headline: Sorting out solutions for high-traffic University Drive (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TIMES-REPORTER PAT BURK n Traffic builds up on University Dr. as classes from Buckeye Career Center and Kent State University Tuscarawas let out Thursday in New Philadelphia.

Posted Feb 06, 2012 @ 01:47 PM

Local officials are hopeful that a report based on a traffic engineering study for University Drive NE, one of the city's fastest-growing, high-volume traffic areas, will help pave the way for its future development.

Field work for the study of the combined University Drive NE/East High Avenue area was completed late in 2011.

University Drive NE serves as a gateway to the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas, its Performing Arts Center, Buckeye Career Center vocational school, Kent Cove residential housing development and the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park.

It also is the route to "Trumpet in the Land," the county's outdoor historical drama, the Multi-County Juvenile Attention Center and the county dog pound.

Mayor Michael Taylor says the purpose of the study, and its subsequent report, is to not only address traffic issues of today, but also to take into consideration projected growth over the next 10 to 20 years.

Once the report is received, the mayor and a committee he has appointed -- known as the University Drive Committee -- will meet with representatives of the various University Drive NE stakeholders to share information and formulate a growth plan.

"Based upon the information in the study, some decision will be made -- on someone's part -- what to do," Taylor said.

The study could suggest widening University Drive, which currently is a two-lane former township road, or it could suggest that Kent State develope its own road and entrance out to East High Avenue, he added.

"Because there are different players in this potential development down there, and depending upon what the recommendation is from the traffic engineer, it's yet to be determined what could happen and when that will be," Taylor said.

"As with any project, anything that would involve the city would have to be looked at from our standpoint on: 'How could it be paid for and what would be a funding source?'"

Taylor added there have been no decisions made by City Council or the city to officially do anything.

"But we need to gather information and have it professionally prepared and presented so that if any decision is made to move forward ... to assign money to a project ... to look at taking on debt to do a project ... or any of those types of things, we feel that we have an accurate source of data to make a good decision," he said.

The field work was performed by TMS Engineers of Stow at a cost of $7,110. The city received a state grant of $3,555 to pay its half of the cost, and Kent State and Buckeye split the other half, with each contributing $1,777.

The study was begun during the early fall, when traffic volumes were at their highest as classes resumed at Buckeye Career Center and Kent State at Tuscarawas.

"Certainly we support the widening of University Drive, if that is what the consultants feel is the outcome here," said Dr. Gregg Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of KSU at Tuscarawas.

Andrews said KSU officials are concerned about traffic flows on University Drive, particularly related to its growing student population, as well as the future development in the area, such as residential housing, the technology park and continuing growth at Buckeye Career Center.

When he first arrived on campus 17 years ago, Andrews said there were about 1,000 students and there was no traffic light at University Drive NE and East High Avenue.

As enrollment grew and time passed, Andrews said it became critically important - in terms of traffic flows - that a signal be installed.

By working with city and Ohio Department of Transportation officials, Andrews saw that a signal was installed several years ago.

But since that time, traffic has steadily increased - and is projected to continue to increase, Andrews said. "I think we're at a point now where we need to definitely get our arms around the traffic flows on University Drive, because it will become in the future impossible if we don't," he added.

"So, we certainly would support the expansion or widening of University Drive if the traffic flows and traffic patterns warrant such a move," Andrews said.

In the university's master plan, a new entrance has been created off of East High Avenue, across from 21st Street, to the campus. However, that is a long-term vision for the campus and that is what master plans are all about, according to Andrews.

"It's something that long-term could be in the future of the campus ... it is a very expensive project because we would need to bridge the Beaverdam Creek," he added. Therefore, it is not part of any immediate plans.

Whether hiking trails or bike paths will be part of the overall expansion of the University Drive area remains to be seen.

"When you do master planning, you don't do the very specific kind of infrastructure ... basically what you look at is potential locations for buildings, the footprint that those buildings can be in terms of the land you have available, average parking lot size and where it could be located, etc.," Andrews said.

"The final design of a particular area then would include ... pedestrian walkways and bike paths and so on," he added.

"That's something we certainly are looking at and considering, especially given the important initiative in our community through Healthy Tusc," Andrews said.

Return to Top



News Headline: Task force is formed to attract business here | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/06/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Posted Feb 06, 2012 @ 12:45 PM

A new task force has been formed with the goal of making certain that Tuscarawas County is the preferred location for companies and individuals moving into eastern Ohio amid the blossoming oil and gas boom.

Tuscarawas County has many advantages that others don't have in the 10-county area where energy companies are currently exploring for oil and gas, said Mike Lauber, co-chairman of the task force.

Those advantages include easy access to Interstate 77, rail lines, roads, housing, schools and a robust Internet connectivity.

“With our infrastructural advantages, the Utica Shale play will have impacts on our community felt a century from now and may be as big as the coming of the Ohio & Erie Canal in the early 19th century, the arrival of the railroads in the late 19th century, the development of steel, coal and clay industries in the early 20th century, and the construction of I-77 in the mid-20th century,” Lauber said.

“The next three years will transform Tuscarawas County as we see our job inventory expand, population grow, property values increase – and the concomitant growth in schools, safety services, churches, restaurants, entertainment, etc. to meet the needs of this prospering community. We want to thoughtfully consider how best to manage that transformation, mitigating troublesome issues and leveraging positive ones.”

Other members of the task force include Mike Durbin, a Strasburg Realtor who is co-chairman; Bill Harding, former chief executive officer of Union Hospital, Dover; Scott Robinson, president of the Tuscarawas County Chamber of Commerce; Gary Little, executive director of the Tuscarawas County Community Improvement Corp.; Harry Eadon, executive director of the Tuscarawas County Port Authority; Tuscarawas County Commissioners Chris Abbuhl, Kerry Metzger and Jim Seldenright; Gregg Andrews, dean of Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia; and Wendy Zucal, executive director of the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum.

Lauber said the local impact of the oil and gas boom will be great. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources estimates that as many as 10,000 new jobs will be created in Tuscarawas County in the coming years. Chesapeake Energy, one of the key players in the development, plans to drill 12,000 wells in the 10-county area, he said.

On the plus side, the sale of mineral rights leases will create wealth for a number of residents. On the negative side, the addition of more people to the area will push up the cost of renting an apartment and could have a potential impact on the faith community and on safety services.

“That's going to create a variety of strains on the social fabric of our community,” Lauber said. “As a community, we just want to be intentional and thoughtful in our response to this opportunity.”

The task force will grapple with the issues of how the county will deal with the impact of the boom – both good and bad.

The task force's first event will bring community and education leaders together in May or June to delve into key topics associated with the gas and oil boom.

“The better job we do in preparing will help us be a relative winner,” Lauber said.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ravenna seeks grant for joint dispatch center | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DIANE SMITH | STAFF WRITER

The city of Ravenna is leading
several other communities
in seeking a grant for a
joint dispatch center in Portage
County.
Ravenna City Council has
approved an ordinance authorizing
Mayor Joseph Bica to execute
an application for a grant
from the Ohio Department of
Development's Local Government
Innovation Fund.
Service Director Kelly Engelhart
said the state has $45
million in grants and loans
to offer to communities who
can prove they would realize
a “significant cost savings” by
working together.
Ravenna would be the lead
agency on the grant. Other
partners include Kent, Aurora,
Streetsboro, the Portage
County Sheriff's Office and
Kent State University.
The deadline to apply for
the $100,000 grant is March 1,
and the city is expected to find
out if it was approved in July.
Engelhart said the grant
would likely pay for a consultant,
who would be charged
with drafting an implementation
plan “so we could become
a best practices model of 9-1-1
dispatch for the county.”
Once that is completed, the
communities could apply for
another loan to implement the
joint dispatch center. The implementation
plan is required
before the city could apply for
a loan for the project.
The dispatch center has
been a topic of conversation in
the county ever since the Fire-
Com dispatch center closed
its doors in 2009. The center,
based in Ravenna township,
was once the emergency dispatching
powerhouses that
sent emergency help to most
townships and villages in Portage
County.

Return to Top



News Headline: Annual 'Make Mine with Ice' Exhibition is Saturday at Hometown Plaza | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Kasha Legeza

Free ice-carving event will showcase skills of clubs from Kent State, University of Akron.

Looking for a fun winter activity for the whole family? Bundle up and head downtown Saturday afternoon for the 8th Annual "Make Mine with Ice" ice carving exhibition.

The free demonstration, set for 1 to 4 p.m. at the Hometown Plaza (formerly Home Savings Plaza), will showcase the skills of ice carving club members from Kent State University and The University of Akron.

The event will feature hot beverages and chili served by Anthony's Cafe and pastries made by Stahl's Bakery.

While snow would certainly add to the event's ambiance, it doesn't look promising, forecast-wise. The good news is that it should be plenty cold Saturday, so those ice chips will be flying.

The annual ice carving exhibition is a Downtown Innovative Community Event (D.I.C.E.) happening. D.I.C.E. is a grassroots partnership between Standing Rock Cultural Arts and downtown businesses whose purpose is to revitalize downtown Kent through cultural events.

For details about the "Make Mine with Ice" event, call 330-673-4970 or visit Standing Rock Cultural Arts' website.

All D.I.C.E. events are held at Hometown Plaza, located at the corner of Water and Main streets in downtown Kent. Upcoming events on the organization's 2012 calendar include:

June 29 – Sidewalk Cinema at dusk
July 27 – Sidewalk Cinema at dusk
August 11 – Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social from 1 to 4 p.m.
August 31 – Sidewalk Cinema at dusk
Oct. 20 – Cider Festival from 1 to 4 p.m.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus