Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
Alumni Association; KSU Ice Arena; KSU Museum (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Health Sciences (4)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
Music (1)
Town-Gown (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni Association; KSU Ice Arena; KSU Museum (1)
2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Feb. 10-16, 2012 02/09/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

MUSEUMS Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until...


Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
West Side Real Estate News & Notes (Ferut) 02/09/2012 Leader Publications - Online Text Attachment Email

...built home that actually is affordable while giving the ability to be built on a full basement,” said Ferut, who is also professor of architecture at Kent State University. “This home is expected to be 60 [percent to] 70 percent more efficient than the typical home. This is achieved through ‘super...


Biological Sciences (1)
Penn Med finds new vaccine for breast cancer 02/10/2012 Daily Pennsylvanian - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...cure cancer is less invasive, would have fewer side effects and would probably be a less toxic alternative for cancer patients. Furthermore, she cited Kent State University's Gary Koski — a collaborator on the study — in saying that vaccine treatments would be more cost-effective. The vaccine...


Health Sciences (4)
Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) 02/10/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) 02/10/2012 Sacramento Bee, The Text Attachment Email

Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) 02/09/2012 PR Newswire - Online Text Attachment Email

...reduces physical activity among children, which may increase risk of obesity. KENT, Ohio , Feb. 9, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New research from Kent State University 's Dr. Jacob Barkley , Assistant Professor of Exercise Science, demonstrates that social exclusion results in decreased physical...

Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) 02/10/2012 Healthnewsdigest.com Text Attachment Email


KSU at Salem (1)
the most recent research (Toepfer) 02/09/2012 Mother Nature Network Text Attachment Email

...good for your health. If you don't want to voice your gratitude, writing a letter may do the trick, according to various studies by Steve Toepfer of Kent State University at Salem and his colleagues. "If you are looking to increase your well-being through intentional activities, take 15 minutes...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Comedian John Caparulo 02/09/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...on the hit E!  series "Chelsea Lately," stand-up comedian John Caparulo will appear in concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas County in New Philadelphia. Tickets, $16 to $24, may be ordered at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac and 330-308-6400.


KSU Foundation; Town-Gown (1)
A sunny day for work on the KSU hotel 02/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Music (1)
Kent State Orchestra to Present Eclectic Concert Sunday 02/10/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
Portage development board targets existing firms 02/10/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Wick Poetry Center (1)
Wick Poetry Center Hosts Poets Jody Rambo and Elizabeth Breese 02/09/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Wick Poetry Center Hosts Poets Jody Rambo and Elizabeth Breese Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center will host poets Jody Rambo and Elizabeth Breese on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 306 ABC of...


News Headline: 2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Feb. 10-16, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MUSEUMS

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5. Exhibit: On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life. An exhibit about the material circumstances and domestic life during the Civil War and in the years that followed. Display of women's and children's costumes, which is supplemented with related photographs, decorative arts and women's magazines. In observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Through Sunday, Aug. 26. Exhibit: A Day at the Beach. A selection of garments worn near and at the beach between the 1860s and 1910s. Through Sunday, Oct. 7.

Just for fun

Kent State University. Ice Arena, 650 Loop Road (off Summit Road). kent.edu/icearena/index.cfm. Kent State Alumni Association's Flash Ice Fest. 6-8:15 p.m. Saturday. $7, adult Alumni Association; $9, adult nonmembers; $5, children ages 12 and under. Includes pizza and pop, skate rental and ice skating. Details: go to ksualumni.org.

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News Headline: West Side Real Estate News & Notes (Ferut) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Leader Publications - Online
Contact Name: Maria Lindsay
News OCR Text: 2/9/2012 - West Side Leader

DOWNTOWN AKRON — Construction is under way on a super energy-efficient straw bale home in Downtown Akron.

On Feb. 18 and 19 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., homeowner Patricia Maher, Calvin Smith, of Calvin Smith Builders, and architect Joe Ferut will host an open house at the building site, located at 181 N. Maple St. Visitors will be able to observe the construction of the straw bale walls and stuff the window openings with straw-and-clay “cob.”

This home is one of two straw bale homes to be built on North Maple Street, according to Maher. The design incorporates both modern and ancient techniques of home-building to create an extremely airtight, energy-efficient house. Straw bale and earth plaster have been used for centuries to build houses, but rarely has that method been combined with a wood frame, a full basement and supplemental super insulation, said Maher.

In addition, it is unusual to see green building occur in urban areas, according to Maher.

“Thanks to the redevelopment of the Northside District by the city of Akron and the green building rebates the city is making available, this type of building was affordable and possible to do downtown,” said Maher. “There is a wonderful team working on this house — Calvin Smith Builders of LaGrange is doing a fantastic job turning architect Joe Ferut's inspired design into reality. Local interior designer Marcia Wolff has helped tremendously with the fine points of straw bale work and plastering.

“I'm excited to be part of this community,” Maher added. “This neighborhood will be a model for green building, with Rebecca Johnson's straw bale house next door and other green homes already in the area.”

“We are so excited for the public to finally see a straw built home that actually is affordable while giving the ability to be built on a full basement,” said Ferut, who is also professor of architecture at Kent State University. “This home is expected to be 60 [percent to] 70 percent more efficient than the typical home. This is achieved through ‘super insulation' [two to three times the code], extreme air tightness through careful detailing, craftsmanship and passive solar heating from the sun.”

Maher recently moved to Akron from Boston and is a homeopath. For more details, contact her at 617-407-1604 or email info@strawbalehouses.net.

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News Headline: Penn Med finds new vaccine for breast cancer | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Pennsylvanian - Online, The
Contact Name: Laura Cofsky
News OCR Text: The four-week vaccine regimen proved effective in 85 percent of subjects with a form of breast cancer

The cure for cancer remains unknown, but researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine may have developed a way to stop one kind of cancer in its tracks.

The study, led by Brian Czerniecki, Co-Director of the Rena Rowan Breast Center and Surgical Director of the Immunotherapy Program for the Abramson Cancer Center, found that giving women with early stages of ductal carcinoma in situ — a type of breast cancer — a four-week vaccine regimen resulted in a dramatic improvement of symptoms for 85 percent of test subjects.

The vaccines also successfully eradicated cancer cells in 20 percent of participants.

The study was performed on It was performed on 27 women with HER2-positive DCIS. DCIS is a form of early breast cancer. Results from this study can be applied to breast cancer prevention and treatment, Czerniecki wrote in an email.

Lynn Ayre, Director of Cancer Research at the American Cancer Society, is optimistic about the results of Czerniecki's study.

“There's much vaccine activity going on in the medical community,” she said. “Some say a breast cancer vaccine will be here in our lifetime.”

Furthermore, the use of vaccines could reduce the need for surgery and radiation, Czerniecki wrote.

The vaccines are made from a combination of anti-HER2 dendritic cells and the patients' own white blood cells.

“Dr. Czerniecki is trying to train the body's immune system to react to cancer cells the same way it'd react to infection,” Ayres said. The hope is that the vaccines would cause the body to fight cancer cells itself, she added.

Using vaccines as a potential treatment for cancer is a new area of cancer research.

“This vaccine will be personalized for the patient,” Ayres said. “In the future, treatments will be much more personalized.”

Czerniecki does not see any potential ethical problems with this treatment and concludes from his research that the vaccine regimen is feasible.

Ayres said using vaccines to cure cancer is less invasive, would have fewer side effects and would probably be a less toxic alternative for cancer patients. Furthermore, she cited Kent State University's Gary Koski — a collaborator on the study — in saying that vaccine treatments would be more cost-effective.

The vaccine is still seeking FDA approval and Czerniecki needs to expand his study to include more participants, Ayres said. She added that the research will eventually extend into treating invasive forms of breast cancer.

However, the study's eighty-five percent success rate “fantastic,” and “we can expect a cure to DCIS in five years,” she said.

“It opens the possibility of either preventing recurrence of breast cancer or primary prevention of estrogen independent breast cancer,” Czerniecki wrote.

But Ayres has even higher hopes for this research. “This vaccine could also help other kinds of cancer, not just breast cancer,” she said.

In addition, the results of the study may also have a positive impact on philanthropic causes toward breast cancer research.

College junior Alexis Mayer, who is planning a breast cancer awareness event in March, said this study could result in more people giving to charitable organizations, especially ones that support women with DCIS.

“In general people are more likely to give to causes that could be successful,” she said. “People like positive results.”

Teach for America receives mixed reviews from academic community

Interdisciplinary majors gaining popularity in College

For some, interdisciplinary majors offer a unique opportunity to learn about a wider variety of subjects, while others believe these majors are too simplistic and not specialized enough.

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News Headline: Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University exercise science prof's study appears March 2012 issue of Pediatrics.

New research from Dr. Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor of exercise science at Kent State University, demonstrates that social exclusion results in decreased physical activity among children.

The study, “The Effect of Simulated Ostracism on Physical Activity Behavior in Children,” appears in the March 2012 issue of Pediatrics and is available online.

Barkley launched his study to examine whether ostracism results in reduced physical activity behaviors. It builds on past findings that simply recognize an association between social exclusion and reduced activity.

Barkley's team asked children ages 8-12 to play a virtual ball-toss computer game, Cyberball, telling children the game was played over the internet with two others.

In half the sessions, children were excluded from receiving the ball for most of the game. In the other half, children received the ball one-third of the time.

Each child played the game once under each condition and was then immediately placed in a gymnasium to choose any sedentary or physical activity while researchers observed and measured behaviors.

Physical versus sedentary activity measurements taken immediately after playing under each condition revealed ostracism elicits decreased physical activity participation in children – reducing accelerometer counts by 22 percent and increasing time allocated to sedentary behaviors by 41 percent.

“Our findings demonstrate the direct negative impact of social exclusion on the likelihood to be physically active,” Barkley said. “Even a brief experience of ostracism immediately impacts levels of physical activity, whether or not a child is overweight."

He said more research is needed to better understand what initiates the cyclical relationship.

"Social exclusion reduces interest in physical activity behaviors, decreased activity may produce further ostracism, and so on. However, we now know sedentary activity in children can result from one instance of ostracism,” Barkley explained.

Barkley received his bachelor of science in physical education (concentration in exercise physiology) from the State University of New York College at Brockport in 1998.

He then earned both his master's of science (2002) and doctor of philosphy (2007) in exercise science from SUNY University at Buffalo. Barkley's work includes multiple studies examining how social interaction, variety of equipment and “exergames” affect physical activity behavior in children, adolescents and adults.

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News Headline: Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Sacramento Bee, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Feb. 9, 2012 -- Peer adversity reduces physical activity among children, which may increase risk of obesity.

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 9, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New research from Kent State University's Dr. Jacob Barkley, Assistant Professor of Exercise Science, demonstrates that social exclusion results in decreased physical activity among children. The study, "The Effect of Simulated Ostracism on Physical Activity Behavior in Children," appears in the March 2012 issue of Pediatrics, and is available online.

Dr. Barkley launched his study to examine whether ostracism results in reduced physical activity behaviors. It builds on past findings that simply recognize an association between social exclusion and reduced activity.

Dr. Barkley's team asked children ages 8-12 to play a virtual ball-toss computer game, Cyberball, telling children the game was played over the Internet with two others. In half the sessions, children were excluded from receiving the ball for most of the game. In the other half, children received the ball one-third of the time. Each child played the game once under each condition and was then immediately placed in a gymnasium to choose any sedentary or physical activity while researchers observed and measured behaviors.

Physical versus sedentary activity measurements taken immediately after playing under each condition revealed ostracism elicits decreased physical activity participation in children – reducing accelerometer counts by 22 percent and increasing time allocated to sedentary behaviors by 41 percent.

"Our findings demonstrate the direct negative impact of social exclusion on the likelihood to be physically active," says Dr. Barkley. "Even a brief experience of ostracism immediately impacts levels of physical activity, whether or not a child is overweight.

"More research is needed to better understand what initiates the cyclical relationship. Social exclusion reduces interest in physical activity behaviors, decreased activity may produce further ostracism, and so on. However, we now know sedentary activity in children can result from one instance of ostracism."

Dr. Jacob Barkley received his B.S. in Physical Education (concentration in Exercise Physiology) from the State University of New York College (SUNY) at Brockport in 1998. He then earned both his M.S. (2002) and Ph.D. (2007) in Exercise Science from SUNY University at Buffalo. Dr. Barkley's work includes multiple studies examining how social interaction, variety of equipment and "exergames" affect physical activity behavior in children, adolescents and adults.

Contact:Kayleigh Fitch440.333.0001 ext. 105kayleigh@sweeneypr.com

SOURCE Kent State University

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News Headline: Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: PR Newswire - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity

KENT, Ohio, Feb. 9,...

Peer adversity reduces physical activity among children, which may increase risk of obesity.

KENT, Ohio , Feb. 9, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New research from Kent State University 's Dr. Jacob Barkley , Assistant Professor of Exercise Science, demonstrates that social exclusion results in decreased physical activity among children. The study, "The Effect of Simulated Ostracism on Physical Activity Behavior in Children," appears in the March 2012 issue of Pediatrics, and is available online.

Dr. Barkley launched his study to examine whether ostracism results in reduced physical activity behaviors.  It builds on past findings that simply recognize an association between social exclusion and reduced activity.

Dr. Barkley's team asked children ages 8-12 to play a virtual ball-toss computer game, Cyberball, telling children the game was played over the Internet with two others. In half the sessions, children were excluded from receiving the ball for most of the game. In the other half, children received the ball one-third of the time. Each child played the game once under each condition and was then immediately placed in a gymnasium to choose any sedentary or physical activity while researchers observed and measured behaviors.

Physical versus sedentary activity measurements taken immediately after playing under each condition revealed ostracism elicits decreased physical activity participation in children _ reducing accelerometer counts by 22 percent and increasing time allocated to sedentary behaviors by 41 percent.

"Our findings demonstrate the direct negative impact of social exclusion on the likelihood to be physically active," says Dr. Barkley. "Even a brief experience of ostracism immediately impacts levels of physical activity, whether or not a child is overweight.

"More research is needed to better understand what initiates the cyclical relationship. Social exclusion reduces interest in physical activity behaviors, decreased activity may produce further ostracism, and so on. However, we now know sedentary activity in children can result from one instance of ostracism."

Dr. Jacob Barkley received his B.S. in Physical Education (concentration in Exercise Physiology) from the State University of New York College ( SUNY) at Brockport in 1998.  He then earned both his M.S. (2002) and Ph.D. (2007) in Exercise Science from SUNY University at Buffalo. Dr. Barkley's work includes multiple studies examining how social interaction, variety of equipment and "exergames" affect physical activity behavior in children, adolescents and adults.

Contact:

Kayleigh Fitch

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News Headline: Shunned Children Exercise Less, at Greater Risk for Obesity (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Healthnewsdigest.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Peer adversity reduces physical activity among children, which may increase risk of obesity

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - KENT, Ohio, Feb. 9, 2012 -- New research from Kent State University's Dr. Jacob Barkley, Assistant Professor of Exercise Science, demonstrates that social exclusion results in decreased physical activity among children. The study, "The Effect of Simulated Ostracism on Physical Activity Behavior in Children," appears in the March 2012 issue of Pediatrics, and is available online.

Dr. Barkley launched his study to examine whether ostracism results in reduced physical activity behaviors. It builds on past findings that simply recognize an association between social exclusion and reduced activity.

Dr. Barkley's team asked children ages 8-12 to play a virtual ball-toss computer game, Cyberball, telling children the game was played over the Internet with two others. In half the sessions, children were excluded from receiving the ball for most of the game. In the other half, children received the ball one-third of the time. Each child played the game once under each condition and was then immediately placed in a gymnasium to choose any sedentary or physical activity while researchers observed and measured behaviors.

Physical versus sedentary activity measurements taken immediately after playing under each condition revealed ostracism elicits decreased physical activity participation in children - reducing accelerometer counts by 22 percent and increasing time allocated to sedentary behaviors by 41 percent.

"Our findings demonstrate the direct negative impact of social exclusion on the likelihood to be physically active," says Dr. Barkley. "Even a brief experience of ostracism immediately impacts levels of physical activity, whether or not a child is overweight.

"More research is needed to better understand what initiates the cyclical relationship. Social exclusion reduces interest in physical activity behaviors, decreased activity may produce further ostracism, and so on. However, we now know sedentary activity in children can result from one instance of ostracism."

Dr. Jacob Barkley received his B.S. in Physical Education (concentration in Exercise Physiology) from the State University of New York College (SUNY) at Brockport in 1998. He then earned both his M.S. (2002) and Ph.D. (2007) in Exercise Science from SUNY University at Buffalo. Dr. Barkley's work includes multiple studies examining how social interaction, variety of equipment and "exergames" affect physical activity behavior in children, adolescents and adults.

Web Site: http://www.kent.edu

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News Headline: the most recent research (Toepfer) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mother Nature Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: improve your world

Thursday, February 9, 2012

Research shows being thankful is good for your health

Even the simple act of writing a thank you note increased participants' levels of happiness and life satisfaction.

By Remy Melina, LiveScience Tue, Nov 22 2011 at 11:58 AM EST

FAMILY GATHERING: Counting your blessings this Thanksgiving won't just cheer you up — it can improve your health and energy levels as well. (Photo: DeaPeaJay /Flickr)

Rather than rolling your eyes when it's your turn to bow your head and give thanks, try being grateful. The result just might be good for you. From boosting your mood to improving your relationships, research shows that being thankful is good for your health.

If you don't want to voice your gratitude, writing a letter may do the trick, according to various studies by Steve Toepfer of Kent State University at Salem and his colleagues.

"If you are looking to increase your well-being through intentional activities, take 15 minutes three times over three weeks and write letters of gratitude to someone," Toepfer said in a statement, referring to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Happiness Studies.

Toepfer and his colleagues had 219 students with an average age of 25 fill out questionnaires to gauge their well-being, returning to the lab to fill out the survey three more times, with each visit about a week apart. Some of the students wrote a letter of gratitude each time they returned to the lab, while the control group didn't write about being thankful .

"The letter writers were instructed to write a letter of gratitude to anyone they wanted, however, the letter couldn't be trivial and it couldn't be a 'thank you' note for a gift or 'thanks for saying hello to me this morning,'" Toepfer said. "The participants had to write about something that was important to them."

The results showed that the subjects' levels of happiness and life satisfaction improved after each letter they wrote. In addition, depressive symptoms decreased over time with the letter writing.

Similarly, in a study published in 2010, researchers from the University of California, Riverside, and Duke University in Durham, N.C., asked 220 participants ages 20 to 71 years to write letters of gratitude over a 6-week period, while the control group was asked to list their past experiences. The study found that participants who wrote letters of gratitude demonstrated larger increases in life satisfaction than the subjects in the control group.

Counting your blessings doesn't just cheer you up - it can improve your health and energy levels as well.

A 2007 study conducted by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and the Mississippi University for Women found that organ-transplant recipients who kept "gratitude journals" listing five things or people that they were grateful for each day scored better on measures of general health, mental health and vitality than those who only made routine notes about their days. The study was presented at an annual meeting of the American Psychological Association.

"We found that increased feelings of gratitude can cause people's well-being and quality of life to improve," study researcher Robert Emmons, a professor who specializes in the study of gratitude at UC Davis, said in a statement.

A successful relationship may depend on your gratitude, it seems. Research reported in 2010 looking at more than 65 couples who were in satisfying and committed relationships showed that each couple's relationship quality corresponded with one partner's feelings of gratitude . Researchers tracked the day-to-day fluctuations in relationship satisfaction among the couples and found that on the day that one partner expressed feelings of gratitude, both partners experienced a positive emotional response.

For some couples, these positive feelings lasted until the next day. The findings suggest that everyday gratitude serves as an important relationship-maintenance mechanism and can help to strengthen romantic bonds, according to the researchers.

"We are all walking around with an amazing resource: gratitude," said Toepfer, author of the Kent State University study. "It helps us express and enjoy, appreciate, be thankful and satisfied with a little effort. We all have it, and we need to use it to improve our quality of life."

You can follow LiveScience writer Remy Melina on Twitter @remymelina . Follow LiveScience for the latest in science news and discoveries on Twitter @livescience and on

Facebook

.

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News Headline: Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Comedian John Caparulo | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Dan Kane

A regular on the hit E!  series "Chelsea Lately," stand-up comedian John Caparulo will appear in concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas County in New Philadelphia. Tickets, $16 to $24, may be ordered at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac and 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: A sunny day for work on the KSU hotel | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Contractors work on the recently poured concrete at the site of the Kent State University hotel and conference center in downtown Kent Thursday afternoon. The planned 95-room hotel, with an attached conference center that will hold up to 300 people, is expected to open in spring 2013. The $15 million project, located at the intersection of DePeyster Street and Haymaker Parkway, is a joint venture of the KSU Foundation and the Columbus-based Pizzuti Companies.

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News Headline: Kent State Orchestra to Present Eclectic Concert Sunday | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Rock and Peace" will feature performances by 2011 concerto competition winners.

The Kent State University Hugh A. Glauser School of Music's Orchestra will continue its season with "Rock and Peace" led by Director Liza Grossman at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at University Auditorium in Cartwright Hall.

The performance will include an eclectic program of classical and contemporary music. Patrons can expect to hear:

"Sizzle" by Cleveland composer Margaret Brouwer
"Dragon and Phoenix Overture" by Grammy award-winning Tan Dun
"Kashmir" by Led Zeppelin
In addition, guests will hear the undergraduate and graduate winners of the 2011 Concerto Competition, which took place at the School of Music in December. Winners Lindsey Sandham and Alexandre Marr will perform their selected pieces with the orchestra.

Sandham, who is a vocal graduate student, will perform "Ach ich fuhl's" from Mozart's Magic Flute. She has performed in the opera program for the school.

Marr, a sophomore fashion merchandising major and piano minor, will perform Rachmoninoff's “Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor.” Marr, an Ohio native, has been playing the piano since he was 11 years old and studies the instrument with Kent State Artist-in-Residence Donna Lee.

Marr is a transfer student from Case Western Reserve University, where he competed in the Symphony Concerto Competition and won last year. He also competed in the Solon Young Artists Concerto Competition 2011 and received third place.

“I have always dreamed of performing this concerto with an orchestra, and I am delighted that I finally have the opportunity to do so,” Marr said.

Tickets will be available at the door. Adults and seniors are $10 and students are $5 with a valid college ID. Cash or check only. For more information, call the School of Music at 330-672-2172.

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News Headline: Portage development board targets existing firms | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By ROGER J. DI PAOLO | RECORD-COURIER EDITOR

ERHART: VISITATION PROGRAM IS
A KEY STRATEGY FOR AGENCY

The mission of the Portage Development
Board goes beyond encouraging
new employers to locate in Portage
County.
The economic development agency,
which is marking its first anniversary
this month, also is committed to
working with existing employers to
make sure they remain here.
A business visitation program, targeting
about 300 firms located in the
county, is an element of the business
retention strategy, according to Brad
Ehrhart, president of the board.
“Most of our economic growth
comes from within our community,
about 80 percent of it,” Ehrhart told
a Kent Area Chamber of Commerce
breakfast gathering Thursday at the
Pufferbelly Ltd., in downtown Kent.
Having representatives of the board
touch base annually with existing
businesses as part of the visitation
program will help to
ensure that the needs
of existing employers
are dealt with, he
said.
“We hope to identify
potential opportunities,
and even potential
threats” to
businesses, Ehrhart
told about 65 Chamber members and
their guests.
Identifying “major business
climate issues,” such
as health care and finding
skilled workers, is another
element of business retention,
said Ehrhart, who was
hired to head the agency in
September 2011.
Plans are in the works
for creation of an industrial
roundtable to focus
on discussing such concerns
“and perhaps coming
up with solutions that
are Portage County-oriented,”
he said.
In addition to working
with existing companies,
the development board
also is interested in attracting
new employers
to the county, “companies
that bring wealth into the
community by selling services
outside the community,”
said Ehrhart.
Portage County has
many key assets in terms
of economic development,
he said, including a diverse
business mix, proximity
to interstate highways
and railroads and a competitive
edge in technology.
The presence of Kent
State University, Northeast
Ohio University of
Medicine and Hiram College
also is a great help in
attracting businesses.
Workforce development
is a challenge, however.
Finding qualified workers
for some prospective employers,
such as manufacturing
firms, can be difficult,
he said.
“We still make things in
this country,” he said, “But
we've forgotten about that.
We've denigrated skill bases.”
Employers “need people
who can read blueprints,
who can weld, who
can make things,” said Ehrhart,
who added that Maplewood
Career Center and
Fortis College in Ravenna
are assets in terms of job
training.
Ehrhart noted that the
37 members of the development
agency's board
of directors include representatives
of communities
throughout the county as
well as major employers.
“We work with companies
of all sizes, from momand-
pop operations to major
firms,” he said, adding
that all can contribute to a
healthy local economy.

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News Headline: Wick Poetry Center Hosts Poets Jody Rambo and Elizabeth Breese | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wick Poetry Center Hosts Poets Jody Rambo and Elizabeth Breese

Kent State University's Wick Poetry Center will host poets Jody Rambo and Elizabeth Breese on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 306 ABC of the Kent Student Center.

Jody Rambo, an M.F.A. graduate from Colorado State University, teaches creative writing at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio. She won the 2009 Wick Chapbook Competition for Ohio Poets with her chapbook, Tethering World. Elizabeth Breese's chapbook, The Lonely-Wilds, was also a winner of the 2009 Wick Chapbook Competition

For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/wick/events/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=1A4E664E-BE1A-EB43-35530A9E8B96ED2F or call the Wick Poetry Center at 330-672-2067.

Cost: Free

Contact: Nicole Robinson, 330-672-2101, nlrobin1@kent.edu

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