Report Overview:
Total Clips (44)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (2)
Art, School of (1)
Board of Trustees; Town-Gown (2)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Nursing (CON); Students (1)
Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of; Jewish Studies (1)
Fashion Design; KSU Museum (1)
Geology (1)
Health Sciences; Psychology (1)
Higher Education (1)
Higher Education; KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (6)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
LGBT Studies (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (4)
Music (2)
Music; Theatre and Dance (3)
Office of General Counsel; WKSU (1)
Pan-African Studies (2)
Physics (2)
Town-Gown (2)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Arsenio Hall discusses Whitney Houston, 'Celebrity Apprentice' 02/18/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...and how the way to get good television is "to throw the real world at somebody from Hollywood." The real world has very much been in focus for the Kent State alumnus lately. While promoting his TV project, which begins a new season at 9 p.m. Sunday on NBC, he was dealing with the recent losses...


Alumni; Athletics (2)
Kent State welcomes College of Charleston and Antonio Gates for BracketBusters game Saturday (Senderoff) 02/20/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State goes for elite club in presence of Elite alumni (Senderoff) 02/20/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Art, School of (1)
The School of Art Continues Season with 65th Student Annual 02/17/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...with a reception on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 5 p.m. The event will be held in the School of Art Gallery located on the second floor of the Art Building at Kent State University and will feature work by Kent State art students. For more information, visit http://galleries.kent.edu. Cost: Free...


Board of Trustees; Town-Gown (2)
Kent State spares landmark May Prentice house (Euclide) 02/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is relocating and preserving the May Prentice house on Willow Street, rather than demolish it to make way for the KSU Esplanade...

Kent House With a History is Ready to Roll (Euclide, Vincent) 02/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


College of Arts and Sciences (AS) (1)
Schools: Stanton Students Excel at Hudson STEM Project Fair 02/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Probe of Vars death still ongoing in Kent 02/17/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Canfield said as of Thursday night, the department is still trying to determine if a crime took place when a car struck and killed the 88-year-old retired Kent State University professor. Police said Vars was crossing Fairchild Avenue at about 10 p.m. Jan. 31 when a car hit him. Kent Fire Department...


College of Nursing (CON); Students (1)
Pig Iron workshop set 02/19/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...well as meet her. The author recently became a registered nurse and floats between three hospitals while finishing her bachelor's degree in nursing at Kent State University.


Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of; Jewish Studies (1)
Sarah Lefton speaks Monday at Kent State 02/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Sarah Lefton, a successful businesswoman who turned her creativity into a career, will be at Kent State University on Monday to speak about her start-up business dedicated to raising worldwide Jewish literacy. Lefton will talk about her...


Fashion Design; KSU Museum (1)
Free Flick and Fashion Talk 02/19/2012 Scene - Online Text Attachment Email

...looks like he's still having more fun than anybody else in the room. Afterward, stick around for stylish conversation with Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, and William Perrine of KSU's Fashion School. It's free and open to the public, although registration is suggested via...


Geology (1)
The fracking boom (Wells) 02/17/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...hearing for how much is down there: "They're saying this will give us fifty years of freedom from foreign oil, or something like that I read?..." Kent State Geologist Neil Wells is a shale expert: "You'll read estimates of 500-trillion cubic feet of gas...which sounds like a lot, and is....


Health Sciences; Psychology (1)
Kent State Prof's Research To Help Those With Parkinson's (Ridgel; Glickman; Gunstad) 02/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Higher Education (1)
EDITORIAL: Product of collaboration 02/17/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...shale-gas industry grows, the panel recommends Stark State College receive $10 million for an Energy Industry Training Center. Among the many line items, the University of Akron is up for $16 million to renovate Zook Hall, a recognition of the need for long-term maintenance to protect the huge investment...


Higher Education; KSU at Stark; KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
University System's next chapter 02/17/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...gas and oil drilling boom. If state legislators approve the plan, it also will mean: • $685,000 for renovations to the fine arts building at the Kent State University Stark Campus • $615,000 in renovations to the Kent Stark library • $930,000 for classroom renovations at Kent Tuscarawas...


KSU at Salem (1)
Use of former school buildings very gratifying 02/20/2012 Salem News Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (6)
Business calendar 02/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Business calendar American Chemical Society, Akron Section: Careers in Chemistry: A Panel Discussion and Workshop - 2-5 p.m., Kent State University Stark, Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Featured speakers: Tama Drenski, Dominic Frisina, Elizabeth...

Plain resident revolutionizes fishing-knots problem 02/18/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...funding cycle. The Entrepreneur Launch commission worked with business start-up specialist JumpStart Inc. and the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University Stark campus on the process. Four finalists were invited to a formal presentation, with Jack Hooks emerging as the winner. ...

Happy FRIDAY!!!! Take in a silent film. 02/17/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Musical"; viewer discretion strongly advised due to gratuitous profanity, gore and adult subject matter; 8 to 10 p.m. today and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday; Kent State University Stark Campus, theater in Fine Arts building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; adults, $14; students younger than 17 and...

Photos: 'Evil Dead: The Musical' 02/18/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Photo Gallery Photos: 'Evil Dead: The Musical' Things are getting bloody at Kent State Stark as students are putting on 'Evil Dead: The Musical.' The show runs Feb. 17, 18, 23, 24 and 25 at 8 p.m. A pair of 2:30 p.m. shows...

VIDEO: A look inside 'Evil Dead: The Musical' 02/18/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

A look inside 'Evil Dead: The Musical' Kent State Stark is hosting a bloody live show -- 'Evil Dead: The Musical' -- which is based on a 1981 horror movie. http://www.wkyc.com/video/1458618553001/1/A-look-inside-Evil-Dead-The-Musical...

'Evil Dead: The Musical' screams to life at KSU Stark 02/17/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

The latest musical to land at Kent State Stark is creating a lot of buzz -- chain-saw buzz. Opening this weekend, "Evil Dead: The Musical" features elements you would never...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
YSU to get $9.4M for capital projects if Kasich approves state panel's report 02/18/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Youngstown State University would receive about $9.4 million for capital projects if recommendations from a state higher-education commission are...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Award-winning play 'Proof' on stage at Kent State Tuscarawas 02/17/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-Winning play “Proof” will be performed at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Everyone has parents and everyone aspires to be like them in some way. But what happens...


LGBT Studies (1)
Worship News - Feb. 19 02/19/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...in the Friends Room on March 5 at 7 p.m. The guest will be Dr. Molly Merryman, associate professor in the department of sociology and co-coordinator of Kent State University LGBT Studies. All friends, family members, allies and interested persons in the community are invited to attend this meeting...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Virtual Ed. Seen as Understudied (Ferdig) 02/17/2012 Education Week - Online Text Attachment Email

...immediately discounted because of the connection to for-profit endeavors. Richard E. Ferdig, a professor of research and information technology at Kent State University, in Ohio, who is the founder of the Virtual School Clearinghouse, a collaborative research project designed to collect data...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (4)
Albrecht Inc.'s business park in Stow adds ChemImage Corp. unit as tenant 02/17/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...Materials Program to help create a manufacturing operation for the company's liquid crystal-based technology. Albrecht said ChemImage is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute to produce the technology, and will become the second tenant of the business park to work with Kent...

Pittsburgh company locating unit in Stow 02/17/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Third Frontier Advanced Material Program. It was not immediately clear how many jobs ChemImage is creating locally. The imaging company is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute on imaging technology. Albrecht Inc. said Friday that ChemImage is the second tenant in the former...

BRIEF: Pittsburgh company locating unit in Stow 02/17/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...Third Frontier Advanced Material Program. It was not immediately clear how many jobs ChemImage is creating locally. The imaging company is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute on imaging technology. Albrecht Inc. said Friday that ChemImage is the second tenant in the former...

BRIEF: Pittsburgh company locating unit in Stow 02/17/2012 PredictWallStreet.com Text Attachment Email

...Third Frontier Advanced Material Program. It was not immediately clear how many jobs ChemImage is creating locally. The imaging company is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute on imaging technology. Albrecht Inc. said Friday that ChemImage is the second tenant in the former...


Music (2)
Mardi Gras celebration Sunday at Kent United Church of Christ 02/20/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University to Sponsor Youth Honors Band Series on Campus 02/18/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University to Sponsor Youth Honors Band Series on Campus Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music will continue...


Music; Theatre and Dance (3)
Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (Van Baars) 02/19/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975....

Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage 02/19/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975....

Ragtime | E. Turner Stump Theatre | Theatrical Events | Cleveland Scene 02/17/2012 Scene - Online Text Attachment Email

Phone: 330-672-2497 Price: $8 to $16 www.theatre.kent.edu Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011/2012 production season with Ragtime, based on the novel written by E. L....


Office of General Counsel; WKSU (1)
USPTO ISSUES TRADEMARK: FOLK ALLEY 02/17/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Feb.17 -- The trademark FOLK ALLEY (Reg.No.4098551) was issued on Feb.14 by the USPTO. Owner: Kent State University state university OHIO Office of General Counsel P.O.Box 5190 Kent OHIO 44242. The trademark application serial number 85342171...


Pan-African Studies (2)
BLACK HISTORY MONTH Scheduled events 02/19/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

TRUMBULL COUNTY Thursday: “The African Odyssey in Pre-Columbian America” lecture with Dr. George Garrison, 6 to 7 p.m. Kent State University, Classroom/Administration building, Room 202. Garrison is a tenured professor at Kent State University. His works are...

Professor to discuss odyssey 02/19/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

PROFESSOR TO DISCUSS AFRICAN ODYSSEY: Dr. George Garrison, a professor at Kent State University, will speak at 6 p.m. Thursday at Kent State Trumbull on ''The African Odyssey in Pre-Columbian America." Garrison will...


Physics (2)
Extraterrestrial life is planetarium topic 02/18/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

HAPPENING The Kent State University Planetarium will present the series, "The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence," at 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Feb. 24...

Kent State Planetarium Opens 2012 Series of Free Public Shows (Ellman) 02/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (2)
Downtown Kent entertainment district weighed 02/19/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...entertainment district would be within the $100 million downtown redevelopment, Smith said, which includes the Fairmount Properties block, Acorn Alley II, Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center and PARTA's Kent Central Gateway transit center. A D-5j liquor permit can be issued within a...

KSU Preserves Historic House 02/17/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Written by Larry States Rate this item Kent State University moving to save a piece of its history as it develops the Esplanade to connect the University with downtown Kent. Kent...


University Press (2)
'Beggars of Life' With Louise Brooks Screens in New York 02/17/2012 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

...of Life is based on the 1925 novelistic memoir of the same name by Jim Tully, a once celebrated "hobo author" whose own reputation is also on the rise. Kent State University Press in Kent, Ohio (Tully's one-time hometown) has launched an ambitious program of reissuing the author's books, including...

Louise Brooks in Beggars of Life in New York 02/18/2012 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...of Life is based on the 1925 novelistic memoir of the same name by Jim Tully, a once celebrated "hobo author" whose own reputation is also on the rise. Kent State University Press in Kent, Ohio (Tully's one-time hometown) has launched an ambitious program of reissuing the author's books, including...


News Headline: Arsenio Hall discusses Whitney Houston, 'Celebrity Apprentice' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland native Arsenio Hall was talking about his upcoming stint on Celebrity Apprentice, and how the way to get good television is "to throw the real world at somebody from Hollywood."

The real world has very much been in focus for the Kent State alumnus lately. While promoting his TV project, which begins a new season at 9 p.m. Sunday on NBC, he was dealing with the recent losses of two friends, singer Whitney Houston and producer and Soul Train host Don Cornelius.

The blow was even sharper, Hall said, because he imagined the best person to put together a tribute to Houston was Cornelius. And he had known both of them for many years; YouTube is laced with Houston's appearances on Hall's syndicated talk show, and he more than once hosted Soul Train specials.

Hall, who turned 56 on Sunday, was known mainly as a comedian when his talk show began in 1989. (It ended in 1994.) Houston was a huge star, but she began appearing with Hall early in the show's run.

"Whitney has always been such a great friend," Hall said, fondly recalling "the things she did for me in the early days of the talk show, because she was so supportive. And then we became buddies ...

"The first time we ever did anything, I remember, her father called me and said, ‘Hey, Whitney's in town, and she's not promoting a record or anything now ... but she really wants to do something.' I said, have her come on and walk out during the monologue. And she shows up. I'm doing the monologue, she walks out, and for me and this new, young show, it was amazing." The studio crowd roared, even more so when Houston joked she was pregnant with Hall's child.

"You can imagine the press it got," Hall said. "And she knew what she was doing for me by doing that." As for the baby talk, Hall said, "It couldn't be further from the truth, because I think she was dating Eddie [Murphy] at the time.

"I miss her," he said. "She was a lot of fun, a lot of fun." But he added in reference to her many problems, "It just got to be too much fun."

Cornelius, meanwhile, had made an impression on Hall long before he got into show business; he "was a Soul Train viewer as a kid in Cleveland. And it was the first time I saw a black man with [a TV credit saying] ‘created by,' ‘executive producer.' I had dreams from that point on: you know, that can happen ...

"When I came out here, he became my mentor," Hall said, "a guy I could call and ask about anything I was doing. ... It breaks my heart to think that he was so unhappy that he didn't want to be on this earth.

"I laughed with Don. As dry as Don can be with his personal cool that he projects, I've got a clip of me and him on Soul Train talking for about eight minutes, totally out of his Cornelius thing, and being very silly, actually, and it's one of my favorite pieces. I think I tweeted it the day he died." (You can find Hall on Twitter as @Arsenio­OFFICIAL.)

Hall said one of the greatest experiences of his career was hanging out with Cornelius and Michael Jackson when the producer was making a tribute to the star, with Hall hosting. Of course, Jackson is gone, too, but Hall did not get maudlin.

‘Nice to be here'

Told that these must be tough times, he said: "These are good times, man. With what we just saw with Whitney, it's nice to be healthy and it's nice to be here."

"Here" does not include a talk show - the entertainment world has changed too much from his heyday - but might involve more stand-up touring, including a return to Northeast Ohio.

And he'd like to try a Larry David-style TV comedy he dubs Curb Your Arsenio. But right now the big job is Celebrity Apprentice, a move back into what he called "the front of the show-business bus" after some relatively low-profile years concentrated on raising his son Arsenio Jr., now 12.

Tough question

Indeed, on Celebrity Apprentice, host and judge Donald Trump says to Hall: "I loved your show. I watched that show every night. What have you been doing lately?"

"Taking care of my son," Hall replies. "Doing stand-up here and there." Still, I asked him if Trump's question stung; after all, the talk show ended almost 18 years ago and Hall followed it with, among other things, an ABC sitcom, co-starring in a CBS action-drama and hosting a revival of Star Search.

But Hall said, "If they don't ask, you don't get to say what you've been doing lately."

And he's glad to let people know what he has been doing, since he had passed on some entertainment jobs to be more of a father, and even on Celebrity Apprentice, his son was on his mind.

"There are times when you're in the boardroom and your phone is vibratin' and I think Trump is about to fire me, and I think my son just got suspended, and I'm in hell right now," he joked.

But he had long thought Celebrity Apprentice would be a good fit.

"I watch Dancing With the Stars and that's not for me. There are people who dance and there are guys who are supposed to write jokes about people who dance. And I know some of my comic friends have done it, but comics aren't ever supposed to put on a ruffled shirt and dance. ...

"I don't want to be in a loincloth on an island trying to lift something. I don't want to fish with a spear. But I'll work for Penn Jillette," said Hall, referring to another member of the latest Celebrity Apprentice crew. (It also includes Adam Carolla, Debbie Gibson, George Takei, Tia Carrere, Victoria Gotti, Clay Aiken, Dee Snider, Lou Ferrigno and others.) And he is playing for the Magic Johnson Foundation, which is marking its 20th anniversary and is a favorite Hall charity associated with his close friend. (Hall will also be seen in The Announcement, an ESPN documentary about Johnson's making public his HIV diagnosis; it's due to air in March.)

The outgoing Hall stays out of the line of fire on the Celebrity Apprentice premiere.

"I felt like you would never play a team in any sporting situation without vetting the team, and watching film, so let me find out who is here," he said, taking his cue from appearances by previous players Holly Robinson Peete (who finished second her season) and Piers Morgan (who won his). "They seemed like good observers of the environment."

And he said what you see on the air is "very real."

"It makes sense when you understand the environment," he said. "You take all these divas and alpha males and you throw them in together. They usually can choose their friends and environment and they tell people what to do. They're never told what to do. ... [And] sometimes it's too hot. Air conditioning goes off. I don't know if it's a plot, a Trump plot, but sometimes it's very uncomfortable where you're at. The food doesn't arrive, your blood sugar's low, and after a couple weeks, there's something that just inherently happens.

"And I don't care what you think you're going to do - people start off saying ‘I'm not going to fight' - it just happens when the toilet's clogged up and there's four of you on a bus and it's raining out. It just happens. The environment breeds conflict. You don't need to fake it."

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State welcomes College of Charleston and Antonio Gates for BracketBusters game Saturday (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: With the Mid-American Conference race going down to the wire and Kent State still within striking distance of first place, the Golden Flashes can't afford to let their guard down.

When KSU plays the College of Charleston tonight at the M.A.C. Center in a BracketBusters game, coach Rob Senderoff believes the Golden Flashes (19-6, 9-3 MAC) will be up to the challenge.

“This year for us the fact that it's at home, that we have a chance to win our 20th game of the season and that we're coming in having won seven straight, we have a lot of things on the line that we're playing for,” Senderoff said. “So I think our kids will come out focused and play really hard.”

The Flashes have typically been up for their BracketBusters games, if for no other reason than no one wants to look bad on national television in the annual ESPN-sponsored event. Tonight's game is not being televised nationally, but will be televised regionally on SportsTime Ohio.

The Flashes have another big reason to play hard. In addition to attempting to reach the 20-win mark for 13th time in the past 14 seasons, KSU is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the 2002 NCAA Elite Eight team and its members. Former All-American forward and current NFL standout tight end Antonio Gates will be among those in attendance.

“Every day our kids see his jersey and the banner from that team,” Senderoff said. “Knowing that Antonio and some of the players from that team are coming back, I'm sure we'll play hard trying to show them we've been able to carry on this tradition.”

Senior forward Justin Greene agreed.

“That team was great, that's why they've got their jerseys hanging up in the rafters in the gym,” Greene said. “They went to the Elite Eight. No other team here has done anything like that. They were the greatest team to ever play here and we look up to those guys. We can't wait for them to get here. Hopefully we'll send them home with a smile and a win.”

Charleston (16-11, 8-8 in Southern Conference) had won four of its past five games before suffering a 78-63 defeat Wednesday at UNC Greensboro. The Cougars have three players averaging double figures in scoring, led by senior forward Antwaine Wiggins (16.3 points, 6.6 rebounds).

“They've also got a post player [6-foot-8, 240-pound sophomore forward] Trent Wiedeman, who is really good and would be one of the better post players in our league,” Senderoff said. “Then there's a really big-and-physical freshman post player [6-foot-9, 225-pound Adjehi Baru], who is a rebounding machine.

“But they've also got a kid [freshman guard Anthony Stitt], who's injured and it's hurt their depth. When Charleston had everybody healthy, they beat Clemson [72-69 on Nov. 19] and Tennessee [71-65 on Dec. 14]. But they haven't done quite as well in league play, and I think that's due to missing one of their main guys who'd averaged 10 points a game.”

Stitt injured his left hand on Jan. 12 and was expected to be out six weeks.

“I don't know if he's going to be back for our game or back next week, but I do know he's supposed to be back at some point,” Senderoff said. “But even without him, they're a good team that's going to be a challenge for us in a lot of areas.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State goes for elite club in presence of Elite alumni (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State goes for its 20th win of the season in a battle with College of Charleston and celebrates the 10th anniversary of its Elite Eight run on what should make for a rousing BracketBuster Saturday tonight at the M.A.C. Center.

A victory would notch the Golden Flashes' 13th 20-win season in 14 years. Only Kansas, Duke, Syracuse, Kentucky, Florida, Gonzaga and Creighton can claim the same accomplishment, and only Texas with three more wins this season, Xavier with four more wins and Utah State with seven have a chance to join that crowd.

Fittingly, several members of the most memorable KSU team from this stretch of success will be in the house to celebrate the memory of their 30-win season in 2001-02.

The big name in that bunch is San Diego Chargers tight end and former KSU All-American Antonio Gates.

New additions to the list of honorees in attendance include 2002 Defensive Player of the Year Demetric Shaw, who is playing professionally for Barreteros De Zacatecas in Mexico, but confirmed just yesterday that he had cleared his schedule to return to Kent for tonight's celebration. Former Flashes wing Anthony Wilkins is also rumored to be a possible late addition.

KSU fans can meet Gates and the rest of the Flashes' former stars at a pregame autograph session scheduled for 4 p.m. Tipoff is set for 6 p.m.

Ironically, Gates' last game in a Kent State uniform was in 2003 during an NIT battle with the College of Charleston at the M.A.C. Center. The Flashes lost that game 71-66.

This year's Cougars have recovered a bit since head coach Bobby Cremins stepped aside for the remainder of the season in late January because of health reasons. Under the leadership of associate head coach Mark Byington, the Cougars (16-11, 8-8 Southern Conference) had won three in a row prior to a 78-63 loss at UNC Greensboro on Wednesday.

The capper to their three-game streak was a homecoming win over SoCon South Division leading Davidson on Feb. 11. The Cougars also have several other marquee wins this season.

“They are a dangerous team,” said KSU head coach Rob Senderoff. “I've never been on a team that had to have its coach step down for medical reasons, but I'm sure that can't be an easy thing. You look at what they've done this year, and they've beaten Tennessee, Clemson and UMass. Those are all impressive wins.”

The Cougars also lost a narrow 69-62 decision at No. 4 Louisville in late December.

“They have good size, including a post player named Trent Wiedman, who is averaging a double-double in conference,” said Senderoff. “He is big and he is pretty athletic.”

The 6-foot-8 Wiedman is averaging 12.9 points and 10.1 rebounds per game in SoCon play, and 11.7 points and 8.8 rebounds overall in his sophomore season. The Cougars' scoring leader is 6-7 senior forward Antwaine Wiggins at 16.3 per game.

Kent State is riding a seven-game winning streak prior to today's brief step outside of Mid-American Conference play. Senior center Justin Greene continues to lead the Flashes in both scoring (13.7) and rebounding (6.4). The Flashes' balanced offense includes two other players averaging double figures in guards Randal Holt (12.8) and Carlton Guyton (10.1), while point guard Michael Porrini and sixth-man Chris Evans add 9.1 and 9.9 points per game, respectively.

KSU has enjoyed some success in the BracketBuster event, going 6-3. Its six BracketBuster wins trail only Illinois Chicago, Bradley and Drake, all with seven.

Return to Top



News Headline: The School of Art Continues Season with 65th Student Annual | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Student Annual celebrates 65 years and will be open to the public from Feb. 23 to March 14, with a reception on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 5 p.m. The event will be held in the School of Art Gallery located on the second floor of the Art Building at Kent State University and will feature work by Kent State art students. For more information, visit http://galleries.kent.edu.

Cost: Free

Contact: Effie Tsengas, 330-672-8398, etsengas@kent.edu

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State spares landmark May Prentice house (Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is relocating and preserving the May Prentice house on Willow Street, rather than demolish it to make way for the KSU Esplanade extension.

The university will move the 110-year old house, which was owned by KSU's first woman faculty member, from its present location at 128 S. Willow St. to a site across the street at 212 S. Willow St.

The move is set to take place at 1 p.m. Monday.

"We made the decision to save the May Prentice house because of its historical connection to Kent State," said Tom Euclide, KSU associate vice president for facilities planning and operations. "This structure is not only significant to Kent State's history, but is also representative of the evolution of both our campus and city."

In preparation of the house move, work was done the is week to slide the May Prentice house over from its location above the old foundation to the north so that wheels could be placed underneath.

KSU officials said the house is in better shape than most houses its age located around the University Esplanade extension because of its owner occupancy. It was not recently used as a rooming or boarding house.

Kent State University's Board of Trustees approved the University Esplanade extension project in 2011 to create a pedestrian path that will connect the university campus to the city of Kent.

The project is a key component of the economic revitalization of downtown Kent. Several homes located on West Erie Street and Willow Street have been demolished or are slated for demolition for the Esplanade.

Prentice was one of the first four faculty members hired by Kent State Normal School in 1912. She was hired as the first director of the Kent State Normal Training School and also taught English, education and school management. She remained on the faculty until she retired1930. She lived in the house on Willow Street until her death in 1935.

The Prentice Gate, located at Main and Lincoln streets in front of Rockwell Hall, is named in her honor. It was dedicated shortly before she died.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent House With a History is Ready to Roll (Euclide, Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State will move century home once owned by first female faculty member on Monday.

This 110-year-old house at 128 S. Willow St. is ready to roll a few lots southward on Monday afternoon. Kent State University is preserving the structure because it was the longtime home of May H. Prentice (1857-1935), Kent State's first female faculty member

Kent State University will preserve one of the oldest houses along the new University Esplanade extension by literally moving it several lots south of its current location at 128 S. Willow St., at the corner of Erie Street.

University officials decided to not demolish the 110-year-old house as it was the longtime home of May H. Prentice (1857-1935), Kent State's first female faculty member.

Starting at 1 p.m. Monday, Stein House Movers Inc. will be relocating the structure from its present location to the 214/220 S. Willow St. lots where the university demolished two homes on Jan. 31. The Prentice house will sit primarily on the lot at 214 S. Willow.

Tom Euclide, Kent State's associate vice president for Facilities Planning and Operations, said officials decided to save the Prentice house because of its historical connection to the university.

“This structure is not only significant to Kent State's history, but is also representative of the evolution of both our campus and city,” Euclide said.

Officials said the Prentice house is in better shape than most houses its age located around the University Esplanade extension because of its owner occupancy. It was not recently used as a rooming or boarding house, as many other homes in the area have been.

On Wednesday, employees from Stein House Movers lifted the Prentice house off its foundation and moved it northward so that wheels could be placed underneath. Workers were at the site Friday making further preparations for the move.

Prentice – who lived in the South Willow house until her death at age 79 in 1935 – was on the faculty of Kent State from 1912 to 1930. She taught English, history of education and school management. One website reports she was the director of teacher training.

The university's oldest gateway, located at the intersection of East Main and Lincoln streets, is officially named the May H. Prentice Memorial Gate.

According to the university, it was built with funds donated by the 1928 through 1934 graduating classes and was dedicated on Jan. 5, 1935. Prentice was reportedly too ill to attend the ceremony and died three weeks later.

Prentice Hall, a three-story coeducational residence hall located at 250 Midway Drive on campus, was dedicated in her honor in 1959.

Emily Vincent, director of media relations, said Kent State will announce plans for the use of the Prentice house once they are finalized.

The Kent State Board of Trustees bought the 1,950-square-foot Prentice house from Andrej M. Petryna for its appraised value of $225,000 during a Sept. 15, 2010, meeting.

The trustees approved the University Esplanade extension project in 2011 to create a pedestrian path that will connect the university campus to the city of Kent. The project is a key component of the economic revitalization of downtown Kent.

Return to Top



News Headline: Schools: Stanton Students Excel at Hudson STEM Project Fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Projects by 25 Kent students garner awards, promotions to district and regional events

Numerous Stanton Middle School students received placement awards and/or had their projects promoted to district and regional science fairs during the recent Hudson STEM Project Fair at Kent State University.

Chip Hawks, gifted intervention specialist at Stanton, said 54 students in the school's Gifted and Talented Program participated in the fair with either individual and team projects. It was the first time Stanton has been represented at the annual event.

Hawks said the fair drew participation from more than 400 Ohio middle and high school students who showcased over 250 projects at the fair, held Feb. 11 at the Kent Student Center Ballroom.

The projects of numerous Stanton students will be advancing to the following district and regional events:

•The 63rd Annual Western Reserve District 5 Science Day, which will be hosted by The University of Akron's Department of Polymer Science on March 17. It is one of the 15 district science fairs held in Ohio each spring under the Ohio Junior Academy of Science.
• The 2012 edition of the Northeastern Ohio Science and Engineering Fair (NEOSEF), which will be held March 12-15 at Cleveland State University.
The following Stanton students won Hudson STEM Project Fair “placement awards” in the middle school category:

•1st Place Physics – Steve Mileski and Carter Hale, grade seven.
•2nd Place Physics – Isaac Stokes, grade six. His project also was promoted to both the District 5 science day and the NEOSEF.
•1st place Mathematics and special “Best of Show” award – Sam Pease, eighth grade. His project also was promoted to both the District 5 science day and the NEOSEF.
•1st Place Engineering and special “Most Original Idea” award – Harrison Fisher, Edward Matyja and Sonny Kim. Their project also was promoted to the District 5 science day.
•2nd Place Engineering – Matt Youngblood, eighth grade. His project also was promoted to both the District 5 science day and the NEOSEF.
•3rd Place Engineering – Katie Quinn and Collin Barack, eighth grade. Their also was promoted to the District 5 science day.
The following Stanton students had their projects promoted to the District 5 science day:

•Brianna Leclerc (project also promoted to NEOSEF)
•Cordelia Wheatley
•Anna Larison, Meredith Hartsook and Savanna Wills
•Barbara Hickin, Anna Susel and Kayla Fischer
•Julia Mattingly and Kylee Thompson
•Dasha Nesterenko (project also promoted to NEOSEF)
•James Martin, Emma Holm and Coulter Pfeiffer
•Payne Hartman, Nathan Jones and Sam Smith

The Hudson STEM Project Fair was sponsored by Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences and organized by the Hudson STEM Alliance and the Six District Educational Compact.

Return to Top



News Headline: Probe of Vars death still ongoing in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Police Department continues to investigate the January crash that killed Dr. Gordon F. Vars.

Kent police Lt. Paul Canfield said as of Thursday night, the department is still trying to determine if a crime took place when a car struck and killed the 88-year-old retired Kent State University professor.

Police said Vars was crossing Fairchild Avenue at about 10 p.m. Jan. 31 when a car hit him. Kent Fire Department paramedics transported Vars to Akron City Hospital, where he died from his injuries.

Vars, who taught at KSU from 1966 to 1993, was an expert on middle school education. He also was heavily involved in the Unitarian Universalist Church in Kent as well as community environmental groups.

Return to Top



News Headline: Pig Iron workshop set | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Pig Iron Literary & Art Works will have its writing workshop from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday at Pig Iron Press, 26 N. Phelps St., downtown. Jim Villani is the facilitator. Call 330-747-6932.

Local author writes sequel, ‘Holy Revenge'

YOUNGSTOWN

Author Jessica A. Robinson of Youngstown comes out with her third novel, a sequel, “Holy Revenge.”

She will premiere the book from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Hot Topix book club at Barnes & Noble, in the Shops at Boardman Park, Boardman.

Her first mark in the writing world was made in 2009 with her first novel, “Holy Seduction.” The success of the first book inspired her to write the second, “Pretty Skeletons.” Fans wanted the sequel to “Holy Seduction,” but she made them wait. The sequel is “Holy Revenge,” and fans can buy a hard copy at Barnes & Noble as well as meet her.

The author recently became a registered nurse and floats between three hospitals while finishing her bachelor's degree in nursing at Kent State University.

Return to Top



News Headline: Sarah Lefton speaks Monday at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sarah Lefton, a successful businesswoman who turned her creativity into a career, will be at Kent State University on Monday to speak about her start-up business dedicated to raising worldwide Jewish literacy.

Lefton will talk about her company at 7 p.m. in Room 137 in Bowman Hall. She will speak on the topic of "Animating Torah: Why Bible Literacy Matters and How YouTube Videos Can Make an Impact."

The free lecture is open to the public.

The lecture is sponsored by the university's Jewish Studies Program and Hillel at Kent State, in partnership with the university's Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation.

Return to Top



News Headline: Free Flick and Fashion Talk | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scene - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When: Mon., Feb. 20

You can get your fashion fix tonight at Case Western Reserve's Baker-Nord Center, with a 6 p.m. screening of Bill Cunningham New York, followed by a discussion with two fashion historians. The film focuses on Cunningham, a New York Times photog who has been documenting street fashions since the late 1970s. As our reviewer said this spring, the eccentric Cunningham appears to spend every waking moment in the streets, in the Times offices obsessively organizing his page, and running around to events at night. [Yet] in scene after scene, he looks like he's still having more fun than anybody else in the room. Afterward, stick around for stylish conversation with Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, and William Perrine of KSU's Fashion School. It's free and open to the public, although registration is suggested via the website.

Baker-Nord Center

11130 Bellflower Rd. , Cleveland Downtown/Flats/Warehouse District OH 44113

41.50870 ; -81.60917

216-368-8961

Return to Top



News Headline: The fracking boom (Wells) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The fracking boom

2011 marked the year hydraulic fracturing became big business in Northeast Ohio

When reporter/producer Tim Rudell began his continuing coverage of fracking, he set out to bring listeners facts, clear explanations of the technology and economics involved in this complex story.

In 2011, as drilling rigs sprang up throughout eastern Ohio and a full-scale gas and oil boom gained momentum, Rudell put together 10 stories on fracking and related subjects. His fact and information gathering ranged from contacting geothermal energy experts in Switzerland to following frackwater tankers on township roads in Carroll County (hunkering under a little old bridge there) to record the effects of the massive trucks on the rural infrastructure.

As the year wound down, Rudell presented a feature on new concerns about earthquakes that might be associated with disposal wells recently drilled near Youngstown. Only a few days later, on Dec. 24, there were new quakes around Youngstown. And on New Year's Eve, an earthquake that hit 4.0 on the Richter scale rocked area residents.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Shale gas could fuel economic revitalization

Hundred of millions of dollars are being invested in drilling equipment in the region

The old sheet and tube plant was once the biggest of its kind in the world. Then the steel industry all but died out in the Youngstown area and it was idled. Now, major parts of the facility are being rebuilt to make tubing for the new gas drilling technologies

In The Region:

There is a gas exploration boom in eastern Ohio. Drilling a mile or two down hits ancient layers of shale, the remains of lake beds and sea shores where the Appalachians now rise. Fossil fuel is trapped there and an aggressive recovery technology can bring it up. In part two of our series on "fracking, " Tim Rudell of members station WKSU looks at some of the claims about what that could do for, and to, Ohio economically.

The neighbors are together on Sally Lytle's wide porch, a lush summer afternoon is becoming evening in the valley below. It is a year ago, nearly to the day, and "fracking" and "the shale gas play" are in the news and in the lives of these rural Stark County landowners. They're being pressed by gas exploration companies to sign leases...and let the drilling begin. Molly Greco says she knows the gas is needed, for a lot of reasons, but wonders about claims she's hearing for how much is down there:

"They're saying this will give us fifty years of freedom from foreign oil, or something like that I read?..."

Kent State Geologist Neil Wells is a shale expert:

"You'll read estimates of 500-trillion cubic feet of gas...which sounds like a lot, and is. But maybe only 10% of that is recoverable. The U.S. uses, typically, 23-trillion cubic feet a year, ... which is also a lot. So, if it's 50-trillion cubic feet total, that's two years' worth of gas."

But, Wells points out, technology changes, and more of the gas may be recoverable a few years from now. That could make the shale layers under Ohio--the Marcellus and Utica_a factor in not only a national but a world energy supply problem.

Economic plusses

Looking back at the local and regional level, shale drilling already has had economic benefits. A massive old industrial site, Youngstown Sheet & Tube--once the world's largest manufacturing complex of its kind--was effectively abandoned for decades. Now V&M Star, part of a French corporation, is rebuilding much of it; spending two-thirds of a billion dollars and employing some 350 people. Roger Lindgren retired as chief executive of V&M Star shortly after the announcement of the new plant and says the whole investment was in large part because of the demand for tubing for drilling.

"Of course, the United States wants to become to some degree energy independent. And this shale drilling offers that opportunity. Because of the technology that's employed it's going to use a large consumption of pipe. So we are building that mill to serve that expanding market in the United States."

Tom Tomastik is a geologist for the Ohio division of gas and oil. He says a direct link between gas drilling and industrial development goes back a long way in Ohio, first with the development of Standard Oil and the oil industry in the 19thcentury, and then again with manufacturing expansions in the 1960s and 1970s....

"They drilled wells for the GE facilities. They drilled well for the Lordstown plant. And Ford up at Akron. And Firestone had a number of wells drilled on their property. And Stone Container actually had Stone Energy, which was theirown energy division."

The economic costs

The first of the shales to become a regular part of Ohio's drilling vocabulary was Marcellus shale. Under it is a layer called Utica. Kent State's Neil Wells says it is pricey to get to either one with the process known as fracking, drilling horizontally and then bursting open pools of gas with five million or so gallons of high-pressure water:

"Drilling a standard vertical well to get down to the Marcellus in the middle of Pennsylvania, you'd spend less than a million dollars. To drill a typical horizontal well into the Marcellus, they figure that's more like thirty-five million. It's not something a small company does on a small budget; and it doesn't matter if they miss on the first couple of wells and don't get much money out of it. You've got to have heavy funding for this."

So, the potential payoff of shale drilling must be big. But, Tom Tomastik says, it's not necessarily from natural gas, though that's what drillers are talking about the most when approaching land owners for leases:

"The big thing to the Utica shale for a lot of the gas companies that we're seeing now with an interest in Ohio is what they call the liquids production-crude oil production. And obviously, with the price of crude oil hovering around the low 90 dollars a barrel, that makes that very much more attractive than the natural gas right now ... which is depressed down around about $4-dollars to four-fifty per a thousand cubic feet."

Beware what you sign

Can wells be drilled for both gas and the other "wet" products down there? Yes, and says Alan Wenger--the Youngstown attorney who specializes in gas leases--that's why local landowners have to protect themselves with the deals they sign...and be wary of signing away too much, and be especially wary of a pitch he's heard about recently.

"It appears that there is an active market developing where companies that I believe are affiliated with the deep drilling companies, are coming around and making attractive offers to people to buy all of their mineral rights. And the landowner basically gets up front any consideration that they'll ever get again from their minerals. And folks see the dollar signs and they tend to think ‘I'm going to cash in, because no one knows the future, and they may be giving away rights for pennies on the dollar."

Cost left to the public to cover?

On the front porch in Paris Township there is also concern about the public cost of this private industry's work.

"What about out nice new roads?" asks Molly Greco.

Water weighs a lot. So do the massive pieces of machinery being trucked to remote drilling sites throughout eastern Ohio. Both can overwhelm small local roads. In some cases drillers are putting up bonds to fix crushed pavement and broken culverts and bridges. But, lawyer Alan Wenger says that far from covers it all for the tax payers:

"In some local government in Ohio they're helpless in this situation. Townships, for example, do not benefit from any permitting or tax type fees charged to this activity. They get nothing. And often these tiny township roads are roughed up. These are major industrial style locations with hundreds if not thousands of tanker trucks going in an out and rigs that weigh unbelievable weights."

The greatest burden on the roads comes from the tremendous amount of water needed for fracking operations. Geologist Neil Wells:

"Typically five million gallons of water are needed for a horizontal well, per well. Basically, we're talking about seven to eight Olympic size swimming pools. So, it's not like Lake Erie...for most of the streams around here that a minute or so of flow. But, it's not inconsequential. You can't just go up to a neighbor and say ‘mind if I plug into your tap?" And if you pump it out of the stream all in one go, ... a lot of people are going to be very unhappy. And if you pump it out at a rate they don't notice, it's going to take you forever. So they have to make arrangements."

Those arrangements include trucking water in from out of state, where drilling companies like Chesapeake Energy-the biggest of the players in gas exploration in our area-have agreements with commercial water providers. But, the water can come too from deals made with local municipal water agencies, from Lake Erie, and from rivers and streams all over Ohio. In fact, state lawmakers recently approved raising the limits on how much water can be taken from such sources.

In part three of our "fracking" series we'll look at that and other environmental issues.

Environmental issues make gas drilling boom controversial

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Prof's Research To Help Those With Parkinson's (Ridgel; Glickman; Gunstad) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Angela Ridgel is leading two projects involving exercise therapy.

Dr. Angela Ridgel, an assistant professor of exercise science/physiology at Kent State University, is leading two new research projects to help individuals with Parkinson's disease improve cognitive and motor function.

Ridgel has been studying Parkinson's disease for five years, and the two new research projects are bringing her closer to developing exercise therapy that can delay the progression of Parkinson's and lower Parkinson's medications dosages.

“Parkinson's is a progressive disease, and over time, individuals are required to take more and more medication – sometimes with negative side effects – in order to manage symptoms such as decreased motor and cognitive function,” Ridgel said. “The goal is to develop widely applicable exercise therapy to delay the progression of symptoms and reduce the need for medication.

“Nearly 1.5 million Americans have Parkinson's disease, and the longer people live, the more likely they are to develop progressive neurological disorders. I believe, and my research is proving, that we can use exercise therapy to promote improvements in the way the nervous system works and improve the lives of these individuals,” she said.

Click this link to watch a video of Ridgel talking about her research.

Research Study #1: The Parkinson's Disease Cognitive Intervention

Ridgel, with support from Kent State's Dr. John Gunstad, associate professor of psychology, and Dr. Ellen Glickman, professor of exercise physiology, is currently studying the impact of upper- and lower-extremity exercise on cognition, motor function and cerebral blood flow, as well as cardiovascular fitness and muscle strength in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

The goal is to add additional exercise therapy besides cycling for Parkinson's patients. Ridgel's past research has proven cycling improves motor and cognitive function.

Initial findings presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in November 2011 reveal that individuals with Parkinson's experience improvements in cognitive function, mobility and oxygen saturation in the brain after participating in the program's comprehensive exercise intervention. This exercise protocol developed by Kent State researchers can improve fitness, motor and cognitive function in a short, eight-week period.

Additionally, through extensive psychological evaluations measuring memory, attention, problem-solving and language, the researchers are examining which underlying brain responses and neurological functions are associated with cognitive improvements. These findings may lead to additional methods for Parkinson's rehabilitation, according to Gunstad.

“With a greater understanding of how exercise impacts neurological function, we can gauge which areas of the brain are key to repairing cognitive function,” Gunstad said. “This could eventually lead us to look for methods of brain stimulation that may produce the same cognitive benefits for Parkinson's.”

Ridgel will present the results of the study at the American College of Sports Medicine conference in May.

Research Study #2: Smart Bike

“While the work we are doing with exercise therapy has been successful, there is quite a bit of variability in the data,” Ridgel said. “Individuals with Parkinson's each have different symptoms and capabilities, making it challenging to develop a single, applicable rehabilitation program ideal for all patients.

“Our goal is to build a ‘smart bike' that would allow us to create a database of symptoms and responses. Using this database, we could then design a cycling program tailored to an individual's unique capabilities and challenges.”

On Jan. 7, Ridgel received a two-year, $390,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop the smart bike in collaboration with Dr. Kenneth Loparo of Case Western Reserve University and Dr. Fred Discenzo of Rockwell Automation.

Starting in June, Ridgel will use the “smart bike” to assess individual effort, performance, skill level and therapeutic value. The ultimate goal is to devise a computer-driven system that alters resistance, speed and time to benefit each individual. Using an established baseline, the bike will output a customized exercise program to benefit individuals with Parkinson's.

If successful, the team can apply for a second grant to develop a solution for widespread use in therapist and doctor's offices.

Ridgel received her undergraduate degree in biology from the College of William and Mary in Virginia, a master's degree in biology at Villanova University in Pennsylvania and her doctoral degree in biomedical sciences from Marshall University in West Virginia. Ridgel completed her postdoctoral training at Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic. Her early work used animal models to examine the neurobiology of movement and the effects of aging on movement. Most recently, she has been interested in how aging and neurological disorders limit exercise and movement in humans.

For more information on Kent State's exercise physiology program, visit http://www.kent.edu/ehhs/exph.

Return to Top



News Headline: EDITORIAL: Product of collaboration | Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Feb. 17--Collaboration often is easier to talk about than to achieve. Challenged by John Kasich, Ohio's public colleges and universities have shown they are up to it. In the process, they have done much to advance the idea of the institutions as a functioning system of higher education.

The governor gave the 37 schools a tight time frame to submit a single capital-funding request that captured their priorities within the reality of the state's strained resources. On Wednesday, the Higher Education Capital Funding Collaborative, led by Ohio State President E. Gordon Gee, delivered a unified funding proposal, stressing its system wide, strategic approach.

Until now, universities and colleges have engaged in an each-for-itself fight for state funds, the chances of funding determined by formulas and by lobbying clout at the Statehouse.

The $350 million request submitted this week represents a radical shift, featuring a more prominent place for the interests of the state as a whole. Together, the schools have clarified principles and guidelines for funding, while addressing key structural and workforce priorities without short-changing individual institutions.

For instance, mindful of immediate workforce needs as the shale-gas industry grows, the panel recommends Stark State College receive $10 million for an Energy Industry Training Center. Among the many line items, the University of Akron is up for $16 million to renovate Zook Hall, a recognition of the need for long-term maintenance to protect the huge investment in facilities. In the category "engineering meets science," Kent State is in line for the same amount to repair Cunningham, Smith and Williams halls and for multidisciplinary research labs.

The governor has applauded the proposal as unprecedented -- and for good reason. Faced with a tight budget, he has provided the essential leadership, pounding home the message of "cultural change" in how state operations are conducted.

Copyright © 2012 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: University System's next chapter | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stark State gets $10 million for downtown Canton project

The issue: Master plan for higher-ed construction

Our view: Strickland's achievement pays new dividends under Kasich

Combining the state's 14 public universities and 23 community colleges into the University System of Ohio was former Gov. Ted Strickland's smartest, longest-lasting achievement.

Certainly it laid the foundation for the $350 million capital improvements list that university presidents turned in to Gov. John Kasich this week.

Late last year, Kasich asked the university leaders to work together on choosing construction priorities for their campuses in the state's next two-year capital budget. Kasich's approach was a good one - light-years better than having the universities compete for project money as they always have.

The plan they came up with includes $10 million for an Energy Industry Training Center for Stark State College in downtown Canton. Such a center would build on Stark State's growing presence downtown and would better position this region to benefit from the gas and oil drilling boom.

If state legislators approve the plan, it also will mean:

• $685,000 for renovations to the fine arts building at the Kent State University Stark Campus

• $615,000 in renovations to the Kent Stark library

• $930,000 for classroom renovations at Kent Tuscarawas

This kind of master plan never would have happened, especially within a matter of weeks, without creation of the University System of Ohio in 2007. Strickland, former Chancellor Eric Fingerhut and the universities and community colleges worked together to create a 10-year strategic plan that included specific targets for increases in enrollment and graduation rates. The strategic plan also reduced duplication in course offerings and enabled each school to expand on its strengths.

It would be hard to overestimate the importance of this accomplishment, given the traditional turf-protecting mindset that had to be overcome first.  

"We're at the beginning of creating a university system," Gov. Kasich told The Columbus Dispatch this week. The new capital improvements plan is an important chapter in the evolution of a university system. It's not the beginning; Kasich's predecessor deserves the credit for that.

The issue: Master plan for higher-ed construction

Our view: Strickland's achievement pays new dividends under Kasich

Combining the state's 14 public universities and 23 community colleges into the University System of Ohio was former Gov. Ted Strickland's smartest, longest-lasting achievement.

Certainly it laid the foundation for the $350 million capital improvements list that university presidents turned in to Gov. John Kasich this week.

Late last year, Kasich asked the university leaders to work together on choosing construction priorities for their campuses in the state's next two-year capital budget. Kasich's approach was a good one - light-years better than having the universities compete for project money as they always have.

The plan they came up with includes $10 million for an Energy Industry Training Center for Stark State College in downtown Canton. Such a center would build on Stark State's growing presence downtown and would better position this region to benefit from the gas and oil drilling boom.

If state legislators approve the plan, it also will mean:

• $685,000 for renovations to the fine arts building at the Kent State University Stark Campus

• $615,000 in renovations to the Kent Stark library

• $930,000 for classroom renovations at Kent Tuscarawas

This kind of master plan never would have happened, especially within a matter of weeks, without creation of the University System of Ohio in 2007. Strickland, former Chancellor Eric Fingerhut and the universities and community colleges worked together to create a 10-year strategic plan that included specific targets for increases in enrollment and graduation rates. The strategic plan also reduced duplication in course offerings and enabled each school to expand on its strengths.

It would be hard to overestimate the importance of this accomplishment, given the traditional turf-protecting mindset that had to be overcome first.  

"We're at the beginning of creating a university system," Gov. Kasich told The Columbus Dispatch this week. The new capital improvements plan is an important chapter in the evolution of a university system. It's not the beginning; Kasich's predecessor deserves the credit for that.

Loading commenting interface...

Thank you for the abuse report. We will review the report and take appropriate action.

Return to Top



News Headline: Use of former school buildings very gratifying | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Here at the Salem News, we can look right out our front window to see a great example of progressive thinking. Kent State bought and fully utilizes the former Salem Junior High School building. The Kent State University City Center offers everything from student instruction to community concerts in a building that in most like instances would have become sheer blight. Many aging buildings follow the route of deterioration and neglect. They become eyesores and possible hazards. But not the former the former junior high building thanks to Kent State Salem.

Another example is nearby. The former South Range middle and high schools are being used instead of sitting abandoned or even being torn since that district opened its spanking new complex on Columbiana-Canfield Road in Beaver Township.

The buildings are now business incubators, helping to hatch, if you will, new enterprises. A local company, Greenford Bobcats LLC, is owned by Green Township residents John Monroe and former township trustee Ed Schaefer. The partners purchased the district's old buildings with a hope of encouraging business growth. That would include, of course, jobs creation. It seems to be working.

The former South Range Middle School building on route 165 is now called - what a cool name too - the Greenford Bobcats Space Center. The company also owns and operates the North Lima Business Complex in the former South Range High School and Elementary buildings.

The Greenford Bobcats Space Center, with 36 rooms in the 67,000-square foot facility, houses a convenience store, a restaurant called The Smokehouse at Greenford, a day care center, a media group, general offices and an insurance company.

The North Lima Business Complex is located at 11836 South Avenue in the former high school building near the intersection of routes 164 and 165.

It has 46 rooms in approximately 100,000 square feet and houses varied enterprises such as crafting and antique stores, an Ebay consignment shop, a media group, a flea market on weekends and catering out of the commercially licensed kitchen. It will also serve as permanent offices for the Tadmor Circus, which will hold its events in the gymnasium.

As we detailed in a page 1A story yesterday, a grand opening is scheduled today at the North Lima Business Complex from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. with 15 businesses being jointly featured.

Both facilities offer hourly rentals and open gyms, as well as provide practice space for area sports teams. The business owners stress strength in numbers and provide support for each other. Rent in the building is very affordable. High rent often prohibits a business from even getting off the ground.

It is gratifying to see good use being made of former school buildings located in Salem, Greenford and North Lima. That used to be called thinking out of the box. We'd like to call if a common sense business approach - using existing properties that in most instances would have ended up on the wrong end of a wrecking ball. Both Kent State and Greenford Bobcats LLC deserve a public salute. The new business enterprisers deserve a hearty good luck as they launch their respective endeavors. We've seen enough buildings and businesses fall to the wayside around here. This is good to see.

Return to Top



News Headline: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Business calendar

American Chemical Society, Akron Section: Careers in Chemistry: A Panel Discussion and Workshop - 2-5 p.m., Kent State University Stark, Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Featured speakers: Tama Drenski, Dominic Frisina, Elizabeth A. Jaszczak, Dr. Suguna Rachakonda, Dr. Kenneth W. Street, and Marc Wolbert. Moderator and workshop presenter is Fran Kravitz. Free. Reservations: 330-972-5343.

Return to Top



News Headline: Plain resident revolutionizes fishing-knots problem | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Karl Beitzel is so allergic to fish that he can't even join friends for dinner at the Red Lobster.

Still, he developed a fishing hook that earned him a $50,000 entrepreneurial business grant from the city of Canton. Designing equipment for anglers was never his intention.

A trained artist, Beitzel, 45, was working for a Hudson firm designing surgical devices. His project involved a new piece of eye surgery equipment.

"They couldn't figure this one out, this high-tech device had to be turned into a wind-up device. So I used fishing line for some knots because I knew they were the same fibers as medical fibers, and you could put tension under it. Once I put that into my device, my company said we can't use fishing line," recalled Beitzel, married and the father of three.

Despite the customer's approval, the company told Beitzel the project was going to be sacked.

SOMETHING FISHY

Determined, he spent hours researching alternatives to the knots deemed unacceptable. He salvaged the project when he developed a knotless tie still using the fishing line. It currently is undergoing FDA testing for surgical use on presbyopia and glaucoma patients.

At home, it occurred to him that the same method could be used to attach fishing line to a hook without a knot.

Jack Hooks became the name of his business. Its motto: "If you are still tying knots, you don't know Jack."

Next weekend, he travels to Shreveport, La.'s Bassmaster Classic, the largest bass show in the world.

The 45-year-old Canton native has hooked up - no pun intended - with fishing pros who anxiously await his arrival.

Beitzel is working feverishly to make enough of his products for the trade-show end of the Classic. A package of six sells for $15.95 on his website, jackhooks.com.

"I wasn't really expecting this, so it's a mad dash to get these done," said Beitzel, who works out of his Johnnycake Ridge NE home. "I've put this into high speed. I was up last night until 4."

BUSINESS BOOST

Jack Hooks is the first recipient of the city's new program - the Canton Entrepreneur Launch - which is run in conjunction with ystark!, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce.

The launch program is aimed at encouraging area business owners who plan to locate new ventures in the city.

Beitzel is working with the city on finding a permanent location in Canton, said Derek Gordon, assistant safety and service director.

Karl Beitzel is so allergic to fish that he can't even join friends for dinner at the Red Lobster.

Still, he developed a fishing hook that earned him a $50,000 entrepreneurial business grant from the city of Canton. Designing equipment for anglers was never his intention.

A trained artist, Beitzel, 45, was working for a Hudson firm designing surgical devices. His project involved a new piece of eye surgery equipment.

"They couldn't figure this one out, this high-tech device had to be turned into a wind-up device. So I used fishing line for some knots because I knew they were the same fibers as medical fibers, and you could put tension under it. Once I put that into my device, my company said we can't use fishing line," recalled Beitzel, married and the father of three.

Despite the customer's approval, the company told Beitzel the project was going to be sacked.

SOMETHING FISHY

Determined, he spent hours researching alternatives to the knots deemed unacceptable. He salvaged the project when he developed a knotless tie still using the fishing line. It currently is undergoing FDA testing for surgical use on presbyopia and glaucoma patients.

At home, it occurred to him that the same method could be used to attach fishing line to a hook without a knot.

Jack Hooks became the name of his business. Its motto: "If you are still tying knots, you don't know Jack."

Next weekend, he travels to Shreveport, La.'s Bassmaster Classic, the largest bass show in the world.

The 45-year-old Canton native has hooked up - no pun intended - with fishing pros who anxiously await his arrival.

Beitzel is working feverishly to make enough of his products for the trade-show end of the Classic. A package of six sells for $15.95 on his website, jackhooks.com.

"I wasn't really expecting this, so it's a mad dash to get these done," said Beitzel, who works out of his Johnnycake Ridge NE home. "I've put this into high speed. I was up last night until 4."

BUSINESS BOOST

Jack Hooks is the first recipient of the city's new program - the Canton Entrepreneur Launch - which is run in conjunction with ystark!, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce.

The launch program is aimed at encouraging area business owners who plan to locate new ventures in the city.

Beitzel is working with the city on finding a permanent location in Canton, said Derek Gordon, assistant safety and service director.

More than 60 applications came in for the program's inaugural funding cycle. The Entrepreneur Launch commission worked with business start-up specialist JumpStart Inc. and the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University Stark campus on the process. Four finalists were invited to a formal presentation, with Jack Hooks emerging as the winner.

The money comes from Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), which is funneled to the city through state and federal funds. None of the money comes from the city's general fund.

"We were thrilled to receive so much interest and to see such a healthy entrepreneurial spark in our region," Mayor William J. Healy II said.

"This year we wanted to make a significant investment that could take a business to the next level. We believe that Jack Hooks can use this money to make great progress in their venture."

 

Loading commenting interface...

Return to Top



News Headline: Happy FRIDAY!!!! Take in a silent film. | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: • "Evil Dead the Musical"; viewer discretion strongly advised due to gratuitous profanity, gore and adult subject matter; 8 to 10 p.m. today and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday; Kent State University Stark Campus, theater in Fine Arts building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; adults, $14; students younger than 17 and senior citizens, $10; KSU students with current I.D., free; box office, 330-244-3348; www.stark.kent.edu .

Return to Top



News Headline: Photos: 'Evil Dead: The Musical' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photo Gallery

Photos: 'Evil Dead: The Musical'

Things are getting bloody at Kent State Stark as students are putting on 'Evil Dead: The Musical.' The show runs Feb. 17, 18, 23, 24 and 25 at 8 p.m. A pair of 2:30 p.m. shows will be held Feb. 19 (ASL interpreted) and 26. Tickets are $14. Current KSU students are free. Photos by Ryan Haidet, WKYC-TV.

Return to Top



News Headline: VIDEO: A look inside 'Evil Dead: The Musical' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A look inside 'Evil Dead: The Musical'

Kent State Stark is hosting a bloody live show -- 'Evil Dead: The Musical' -- which is based on a 1981 horror movie.

http://www.wkyc.com/video/1458618553001/1/A-look-inside-Evil-Dead-The-Musical

http://bcdownload.gannett.edgesuite.net/wkyc/34306114001/34306114001_1458714295001_th-1458672501001.jpg?pubId=34306114001

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Evil Dead: The Musical' screams to life at KSU Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Ryan Haidet
News OCR Text: The latest musical to land at Kent State Stark is creating a lot of buzz -- chain-saw buzz.

Opening this weekend, "Evil Dead: The Musical" features elements you would never anticipate for a live production: Buckets of blood, intestinal jump-roping, a beheading, demons and a hero with a chain-saw for a hand.

"This show is all about having fun," says Seth Hunter who plays Ash, the lead role. "We're taking an awful B horror movie and turning it into something entertaining and fun and loving and everything you could possibly imagine with something this crazy."

The musical is based on the 1981 cult horror flick "The Evil Dead" in which five college students spend a weekend at a cabin in the woods. The movie, directed by Sam Raimi, takes wild and deadly turns after the college pals find a creepy book.

One element that makes "Evil Dead: The Musical" so unique is the special bloodzone. If you're sitting in the first three central rows you will be covered in stage blood throughout the performance.

"You will be splattered, there's no ifs ands or buts," Hunter warns. "I can guarantee you that it probably won't come out of your clothes. So I really suggest you wear all white: White T-shirt, white sweat pants, white anything so that way you can definitely advertise that you've been in the bloodzone."

At least five gallons of blood will be splattered into the audience each performance.

While the musical contains horror themes, its tone is more comedic.

"Evil Dead: The Musical" screams on the stage Feb. 17, 18, 23, 24 and 25 at 8 p.m. A pair of 2:30 p.m. shows will be held Feb. 19 (ASL interpreted) and 26. Tickets are $14, but current KSU students can get in for free.

Due to the graphic language and nature of the musical, it is not intended for children.

Return to Top



News Headline: YSU to get $9.4M for capital projects if Kasich approves state panel's report | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Youngstown State University would receive about $9.4 million for capital projects if recommendations from a state higher-education commission are approved by the governor.

The largest project, $2.5 million, is for renovations to Melnick Hall.

Ron Cole , YSU spokesman, said the university is pleased with the process used to develop the proposal that was submitted to the governor and is hopeful that the requests will be funded.

“We worked hard to make sure our requests were in line with the commission's guiding principles for the use of capital funds for higher education,” he said in an email. “In particular, we focused much of our request — including elevator, building [exterior renovations] and roof repairs — on projects that deal with maintaining current buildings rather than building new.”

The recommendations were made by a seven-member funding commission appointed by Gordon Gee, president of The Ohio State University.

Members are university and community-college presidents and leaders of the state's higher-education associations.

Gov. John Kasich appointed Gee to lead the effort. Kasich asked higher-education leaders to think differently about the task of allocating the state's limited resources.

Kasich must decide what's included in the capital budget.

Previously, higher-education institutions received funding based on a formula that included the age of the institution's facilities, enrollment and the amount of infrastructure it maintains.

“The old formula ensured that there was a fair and predictable distribution of funds, but it was also viewed as being less responsive to the needs of the state,” the report said. “The new collaborative process is equally fair and respectful.”

But it's also more flexible, accommodating and “presented a more strategic vision for the state of Ohio's investment,” it says.

The new formula focuses on public-private partnerships, work-force development, interdisciplinary approaches and long-term maintenance.

All of the recommendation allocations for YSU fall into the long-term maintenance category, and that comprises the majority of recommended funding in the report at about $208 million.

“Specifically, the commission recommends maintenance projects that are focused on either modernizing student learning environments or reducing the ongoing operations costs of our campuses,” it says.

In its capital plan, YSU said that Melnick Hall's renovation “is a key first step to free space elsewhere on campus that will allow YSU to better serve and expand its growing Health and Human Services and Medical Science programs.”

It says that the demand for medical professionals grows through the state and country. “Additional space is needed to serve the increased enrollments and, in particular, to create simulation and other medical-science laboratories for new programs in the growing fields of respiratory care, nurse practitioner, dental hygiene and others,” YSU's plan says.

To free space, the university proposes moving WYSU, now in Cushwa Hall where the Bitonte College of Health and Human Services is located.

“YSU proposes moving the radio station to Melnick Hall, a building on campus that is significantly under-utilized at this time,” the plan says. “This will free significant space in Cushwa Hall and allow for the expansions in Health and Human Services/Medical Science programs. ...”

The renovations are needed to relocate WYSU to Melnick.

Besides Melnick, other recommendations for YSU include $2 million for roof renovations and $1.5 million for exterior building repairs.

Other recommendations include $950,000 for roof replacements for Eastern Gateway Community College; $855,000 for heating, ventilation and air-conditioner replacements at Kent State University's Trumbull campus; and $485,000 for science-lab expansion at Kent's Salem campus.

Northeast Ohio Medical University also was recommended for funding.

Ann Koon, EGCC spokeswoman, said the recommendation is in line with what the college thought it would receive. The roof to be replaced is on the Jefferson County Campus on a structure built in 1968.

Return to Top



News Headline: Award-winning play 'Proof' on stage at Kent State Tuscarawas | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-Winning play “Proof” will be performed at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Everyone has parents and everyone aspires to be like them in some way. But what happens when there's a distinct possibility that we may inherit their talent — and their madness? Written by David Auburn and performed by Walnut Street Theatre, “Proof” is a remarkable and luminous play about fathers and daughters, genius and insanity, legacy and truth.

Winner of both the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and the Tony Award for Best Play, “Proof” tells the story of Catherine, a young woman who has sacrificed college so that she could take care of her brilliant, yet mentally ill father. One of his former students, Hal, comes to visit in search of more proof of his math professor's genius.  He finds romance with the remote and introspective Catherine and, when her father dies, an astonishing mathematical proof is discovered. Is the proof real? Who is the author? Will Catherine find her way in life, or will she continue to be haunted by her father's past and by the shadow of her own future? This graceful, clever and often funny play is a delightful romance, a drama of finely splintered family dynamics and a mystery about the true nature of genius.

“Proof” is supported by the Performing Arts Fund, a program of Arts Midwest, funded by the national endowment for the Arts, with additional contributions from the Ohio Arts Council, General Mills Foundation and Land O'Lakes Foundation.

Return to Top



News Headline: Worship News - Feb. 19 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: GLBTQ Support Group meets March 5

The First Congregation Church of Hudson's GLBTQ Support Group will meet in the Friends Room on March 5 at 7 p.m. The guest will be Dr. Molly Merryman, associate professor in the department of sociology and co-coordinator of Kent State University LGBT Studies. All friends, family members, allies and interested persons in the community are invited to attend this meeting at the church, 47 Aurora St.

Return to Top



News Headline: Virtual Ed. Seen as Understudied (Ferdig) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Education Week - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published Online: February 8, 2012

Published in Print: February 8, 2012, as A Thirst for Research

Features

Virtual Education Seen as Understudied

Experts say virtual education is largely understudied, and that is a significant problem given the increasing popularity of this form of education

By Michelle R. Davis

A flurry of reports and high-profile news articles over the past year has cast doubt on the effectiveness of online education, and raised concerns about the rapid growth of virtual education across the country. This increased attention comes as such education moves further into the mainstream of K-12 education and opens itself up to greater scrutiny.

At this point in the maturation of virtual education, the importance of high-quality, objective research is greater than ever. Education leaders need it to make informed decisions about how to use virtual education programs. But therein lies the problem: Very little high-quality, objective research on the subject is available.

Some policymakers, e-learning experts, and researchers say that K-12 virtual education is understudied, and that studies which can definitively say online learning works, or that it can surpass face-to-face education, or that in certain circumstances it provides the best opportunities for students, remains lacking even as interest in virtual education rises. Others say that research exists, but that it is often ignored because it looks at individual classes or small groups of students.

Variations of online learning have expanded to all 50 states, school districts are developing their own virtual programs, private providers are staking out an increasingly influential role in the marketplace, and many students can now choose between courses that are fully virtual or a mixture of online and face-to-face interaction. To date, however, only a few studies—often small-scale or dealing with isolated examples—have looked at those issues. The few existing large-scale studies on such issues primarily examine higher education.

"The research is definitely lagging behind," says Barbara Means, the director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, a nonprofit research institute in Menlo Park, Calif. "We're way behind on research when you consider how many schools and individuals are embracing online learning. It's understudied."

'Does It Work?'

In the recently released "Keeping Pace With K-12 Online Learning" report, produced by the Evergreen Education Group, a Durango, Colo.-based research and consulting firm, the section on research cites the study that is most often referred to when people ask: Does online learning work?

Related Research

A Study of the Effectiveness of the Louisiana Algebra 1 Online Courses

by Laura M. O'Dwyer, Rebecca Carey, and Glenn Kleiman, Spring 2007, Journal of Research on Technology in Education

... The data also showed that students in the treatment (online) classrooms tended to do better than students in the comparison classrooms on the group of items that required them to create an algebraic expression from a real-world example.

... Bearing in mind that the content standards covered in both courses were the same, the differential effect of the online distance-learning initiative on particular types of algebra skills should be explored further.



... It may be that the students in the treatment classrooms acquired better conceptual

understanding of some aspects of the content due to the nature of the technology-enhanced learning tools employed.

Final Report: A Comprehensive Report of Florida Virtual School

Florida TaxWatch, 2007

... FLVS students outperformed their statewide counterparts on two independent assessments, both the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test and Advanced Placement examinations.

... They earned higher grades in parallel courses. And this was accomplished with less money than was typically spent for instruction in traditional schools.

Charter School Performance in Pennsylvania

Center for Research on Education Outcomes, Stanford University, April 2011

... Cyber charter students have significantly smaller gains in reading and math than those of their traditional public school peers.

In 2009, the U.S. Department of Education released a meta-analysis

evaluating evidence-based practices in online learning. The analysis sifted through more than a thousand studies of online learning and screened them to see if they compared such learning with a face-to-face learning environment, if they measured student learning outcomes, and if they used a rigorous research design. The researchers, who included Means, found 50 studies that could be included in the meta-analysis. But they noted that only a small portion of them related to K-12 students; most focused on higher education.

The meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning environments performed "modestly better than those receiving face-to-face instruction."

Other studies, on a smaller scale, also compare online learning and face-to-face instruction, such as the 2007 "Study of the Effectiveness of the Louisiana Algebra I Online Course," published in the Journal of Research on Technology in Education. The study found mixed results when comparing students who took the face-to-face version of the algebra course and the online version, noting that those who took the online course felt less confident in their algebra skills, though they outscored those in traditional courses on 18 of 25 items on a test at the end of the course.

In addition, several studies of virtual programs have found positive results, the "Keeping Pace" report notes. In a 2008 review of the state-sponsored, 97,000-student Florida Virtual School, Florida TaxWatch used student achievement, demographics, Advanced Placement test scores, and enrollment information to give the online school a positive rating. The Maynard, Mass.-based Virtual High School Global Consortium has reported that 63 percent of students who take one of its AP courses get a score of 3 or above on AP tests, compared with a national average of 58 percent.

Cathy Cavanaugh, an associate professor of educational technology at the University of Florida, in Gainesville, who has published more than 50 articles, studies and papers on online learning and the role of technology in education, its impact on K-12 student outcomes, and on successful tactics for using virtual education, says research has already shown that online education can be successful.

But she adds that because the K-12 research has been limited compared with studies on higher education students, "we are always having to answer the same few questions: Does it work? How can students possibly develop socially? How can teachers and students form relationships? We do have some data, … but it's just a smattering of research, so it's not persuasive."

Thirst for Data

But not everyone believes lack of research is a problem.

Mathew J. Wicks, the vice president of strategy and organizational development for the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, or iNACOL, based in Vienna, Va., says the question of whether online learning works has been asked and answered.

"Research shows it can work, but you can find examples of programs or schools not working" in both the traditional and virtual school sphere, he says.

John Watson, the founder of the Evergreen Education Group, which conducts research on K-12 online learning, says it's time to look deeper into virtual education, but he says that not everyone is ready to take that intellectual dive.

"Researchers and practitioners have moved past the question of 'we need more research into whether this works,' but I'm not sure the policymakers and legislators and the general media have," he says.

What now needs answering, Watson says, are questions on how best to implement online learning and to determine which factors contribute to success. But that type of investigation can pose problems. With so many variations on how online learning is implemented—in hybrid forms, full-time virtual schools, supplemental online courses, courses with online instructors and without, and varying degrees of face-to-face support—it's hard to do comparisons, Watson says.

"When you talk about research, people have an idea that you have a group of students with an online class, a control group, a random sample. …You really can't do that" with online learning, he says. "There are far too many permutations, implementations, and instructional models."

In addition, timing is an issue. Methods and strategies surrounding K-12 online learning are changing quickly, as educators constantly adapt to student needs and emerging technologies.

"What you'd get is a paper that comes out three years after the fact that looked at what happened in one class, and it's not replicable," Watson says.

He believes what would be more valuable right now is to do additional data mining with the information often already being collected by states about how students are doing in e-learning. States that have a unique identifier for each student could dig into their existing data to determine how students who experience full-time online education do, for example, even if they leave the virtual school to return to more traditional settings.

Some recent reports have questioned the success of online learning. But from Wicks' perspective, studies in Colorado and Minnesota, for instance, that suggested full-time online students are struggling to match the achievement levels of their peers in traditional schools, get more at an issue of accountability rather than whether online learning can work under the right circumstances.

"No one would disagree with the need for more accountability," Wicks says. "But it's hard to draw conclusions, and it's complicated."

In part, because of reports like the ones out of Colorado and Minnesota—and a recent story in The New York Times questioning the success of models provided by for-profit companies, specifically K12 Inc., an online education company based in Herndon, Va.—there's renewed interest in having strong research on online programs, Wicks says.

He believes research now needs to focus on the common factors that successful programs using online education have. Though there's a thirst for that type of data, he says, the big question is whether it will get funded.

Research Questions

There are some upcoming opportunities for new research to bubble up, including the U.S. Department of Education's new Center on Online Learning and Students With Disabilities, which is expected to generate hard information about what online strategies work best with such students.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is also set to award a third wave of competitive grants in the Next Generation Learning Challenge to applicants who design new blended-learning models. The latest round of grants will include a requirement that applicants gather data on student outcomes. (A grant from the Gates Foundation also helps support Education Week's coverage of the education industry and educational innovation.)

But some of the existing research on K-12 online learning should not be ignored or overlooked, says Cavanaugh. "Just like a lot of parents and students still don't know there are online options, the research is equally invisible," she says. "A lot of people don't know about it."

That includes doctoral students seeking to identify areas of research, she says. "It's not seen as a serious form of education that's here to stay, or there's a lack of understanding of the research base that's there," she says. And that's also connected to funding.

"The bulk of reviewers at foundations or government agencies that have funding," says Cavanaugh, "are not familiar with the practice or the research, so they see it as too risky to fund."

The issue is complicated by the fact that a significant portion of online learning is being pushed forward by for-profit companies that run virtual schools or sell virtual curricula. Those companies are doing their own research—some made public and some kept for internal use—but often the studies'conclusions are immediately discounted because of the connection to for-profit endeavors.

Richard E. Ferdig, a professor of research and information technology at Kent State University, in Ohio, who is the founder of the Virtual School Clearinghouse, a collaborative research project designed to collect data on the field, and has researched the impact of various strategies for success in virtual schools, says it's important not to dismiss research related to for-profit programs out of hand. Rather, he recommends reviewing it with a careful eye.

"I don't think we ought to sweep them away and generalize and say it's all horrible, but we have to be cautious and look at the motivation … to see whether it's true to research standards, rather than true to the product," he says of studies on commercial products.

Jeff Kwitowski, a spokesman for K12 Inc., says his company has participated in a number of reports and evaluations and does its own internal studies.

A recent performance-trends analysis, for example, showed that the longer students were enrolled in a K12-managed school, the better they did on state testing. For example, 39 percent of students enrolled one year or less scored proficient on state math tests, while 60 percent of those enrolled five years or more scored proficient.

Kwitowski believes it would be shortsighted to not consider research that involves for-profit or private organizations, since many of those companies are doing innovative work. But he says some companies and programs are reluctant to share a significant amount of data because the results can be manipulated.

Ferdig agrees, saying some virtual schools hesitate to share their information becausethey may feel it may be used in what can be a politically charged debate over online education.

"A lot of these schools have been guarded about their data and outcomes due to the scrutiny they've been under," he says. "They're being asked to instantly show success and growth."

Some schools, like the Michigan Virtual School, regularly share their data. The state-supported online program, which provides supplemental classes to Michigan school districts, is required to publish its achievement data annually, says Jamey Fitzpatrick, the president and chief executive officer of the Lansing-based Michigan Virtual University, which oversees the virtual school.

The most recent report, on the 2010-11 school year, showed that students had an average course-completion rate of 86 percent, but it did not make comparisons to student achievement in traditional classrooms. However, Fitzpatrick says the school has tried to make some comparisons, for example with AP scores. The school found no difference on AP test pass rates of students taking MVS AP courses and traditional versions of the courses, though Fitzpatrick cautions that this may not provide a wholly accurate picture since students taking AP exams often list their home school (not MVS) on their exam information.

Because the state of Michigan requires students to take at least one online course before graduating, Fitzpatrick says politicians, parents, and educators have generally moved past the question of whether online learning works and on to how best to implement it. But he says more data on that implementation would be helpful.

"It's just a less mature field," he says.

Vol. 05, Issue 02, Pages 24-28

Return to Top



News Headline: Albrecht Inc.'s business park in Stow adds ChemImage Corp. unit as tenant | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Albrecht Inc., an Akron-based real estate company, said it has added ChemImage Imaging Technologies to its Hudson Drive Business Campus in Stow.

The subsidiary of ChemImage Corp. of Pittsburgh received a $1 million grant from the Ohio Third Frontier Advanced Materials Program to help create a manufacturing operation for the company's liquid crystal-based technology. Albrecht said ChemImage is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute to produce the technology, and will become the second tenant of the business park to work with Kent State. It will join California-based CoAdna Photonics, which opened a research-and-development operation in the Hudson Drive flex complex in 2007.

“By bringing in a company like ChemImage, we've added yet another layer of technology and sophistication to our Hudson Drive Business Campus,” said Jack Juron, vice president of Albrecht. “Their collaboration with Kent State and the impact of job creation in the next five years is a victory for the area and is a blueprint for future economic development on our campus.”

Albrecht created the Hudson Drive Business Campus after acquiring the former Goodyear mold plant in 2005. The 106-acre property includes the original 130,000-square-foot plant, which has been remodeled, and a pair of flex buildings that are now at 98% occupancy.

In addition to using approximately 11,500 square feet in the second flex structure, ChemImage also is building a clean room to aid in its research.

ChemImage Corp. provides instrumentation, software, contract services and consulting to government, industrial and academic organizations.

Return to Top



News Headline: Pittsburgh company locating unit in Stow | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Pittsburgh company that specializes in imaging technology used in forensics, defense and security is opening a facility in Stow.

ChemImage Imaging Technologies is the newest company to move into the former Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. mold plant on Hudson Drive.

Akron commercial real estate company Albrecht Inc. bought the plant in 2005, dubbing it the Hudson Drive Business Campus.

ChemImage is using 11,500 square feet in the Stow facility.

ChemImage was lured to Ohio in part by a $1 million grant from Ohio's Third Frontier Advanced Material Program. It was not immediately clear how many jobs ChemImage is creating locally.

The imaging company is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute on imaging technology.

Albrecht Inc. said Friday that ChemImage is the second tenant in the former mold plant working with the Liquid Crystal Institute.

Albrecht Inc. is the real estate development unit for the F.W. Albrecht Grocery Co., operator of Acme Fresh Markets.

Return to Top



News Headline: BRIEF: Pittsburgh company locating unit in Stow | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Pittsburgh company that specializes in imaging technology used in forensics, defense and security is opening a facility in Stow.

ChemImage Imaging Technologies is the newest company to move into the former Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. mold plant on Hudson Drive.

Akron commercial real estate company Albrecht Inc. bought the plant in 2005, dubbing it the Hudson Drive Business Campus.

ChemImage is using 11,500 square feet in the Stow facility.

ChemImage was lured to Ohio in part by a $1 million grant from Ohio's Third Frontier Advanced Material Program. It was not immediately clear how many jobs ChemImage is creating locally.

The imaging company is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute on imaging technology.

Albrecht Inc. said Friday that ChemImage is the second tenant in the former mold plant working with the Liquid Crystal Institute.

Albrecht Inc. is the real estate development unit for the F.W. Albrecht Grocery Co., operator of Acme Fresh Markets.

Copyright (C) 2012, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: BRIEF: Pittsburgh company locating unit in Stow | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: PredictWallStreet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Pittsburgh company that specializes in imaging technology used in forensics, defense and security is opening a facility in Stow.

ChemImage Imaging Technologies is the newest company to move into the former Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. mold plant on Hudson Drive.

Akron commercial real estate company Albrecht Inc. bought the plant in 2005, dubbing it the Hudson Drive Business Campus.

ChemImage is using 11,500 square feet in the Stow facility.

ChemImage was lured to Ohio in part by a $1 million grant from Ohio's Third Frontier Advanced Material Program. It was not immediately clear how many jobs ChemImage is creating locally.

The imaging company is working with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute on imaging technology.

Albrecht Inc. said Friday that ChemImage is the second tenant in the former mold plant working with the Liquid Crystal Institute.

Albrecht Inc. is the real estate development unit for the F.W. Albrecht Grocery Co., operator of Acme Fresh Markets.

Copyright (C) 2012, The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: Mardi Gras celebration Sunday at Kent United Church of Christ | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent United Church of Christ is inviting the community to get “jazzed up” at a musical Mardi Gras celebration Sunday.

The KSU Jazz Ensemble, directed by Chas Baker, will join the church's chancel choir, led by Kerry Glann, for a mostly musical worship service, with prelude beginning 10:25 a.m.

The jazz ensemble will perform selections from Paul Ferguson's Jazz Vespers. The choir will sing a “jazzy” setting of “When the Saints Go Marching In.”

Mardi Gras treats will be served in VanMeter Hall after the service. The church is located at 1400 E. Main St.

Commenting on plans for the occasion, the Rev. David Pattee, senior pastor of the church since 2008, said that “Jazz is a terrific medium for Christian worship and exploration of Christian faith. It expresses the life of tradition in creative relationship with the source of our inspiration.”

This special program exemplifies the use of art to teach and inspire that is a hallmark of ministries at Kent UCC, a congregation of the 1.2 million member United Church of Christ denomination, emphasizing unity in Christ and respectful dialogue with other traditions, extravagant hospitality, and Christian witness through advocacy and service for social justice.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State University to Sponsor Youth Honors Band Series on Campus | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University to Sponsor Youth Honors Band Series on Campus

Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music will continue to sponsor the Fab Friday series in cooperation with the Division of Bands and the Department of Music Education at Kent State. Each event is scheduled from 9 a.m. until noon and includes an ensemble warm-up and introduction by the group's conductor, a session led by music education students, program rehearsals and one-on-one instruction with applied music faculty. The series will continue on Friday, Feb. 24 with the South Euclid Lyndhurst Memorial Middle School Honors Band.

Cost: Free

Contact: Marcus Neiman, 330-672-4802, mneiman@kent.edu

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (Van Baars) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975.

Directed by Eric van Baars, the show will run through Feb. 26 in E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Building. This concert version follows the original story with the addition of a scaled down orchestra.

"'Ragtime' is an epic tale of three families struggling to protect the ones they love. The music packs an emotional punch," said van Baars. "Bring tissues- it will be the best cry you'll ever have!"

"Ragtime" is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time -- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos -- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

"Just as in Doctorow's compelling novel, the historical figures ground the characters in the reality of the times," said van Baars. "More importantly, the historical figures provide inspiration and spiritual guidance for the characters."

Shows are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon - 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu . Tickets are $8 students, $12 Seniors (60 and older), $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, and $16 Adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

By Posting to this site, you agree to our Terms of Service Be polite.

Inappropriate posts may be removed.

Fallsnewspress.com doesn't necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post.

Login above or Register to comment.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975.

Directed by Eric van Baars, the show will run through Feb. 26 in E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Building. This concert version follows the original story with the addition of a scaled down orchestra.

"'Ragtime' is an epic tale of three families struggling to protect the ones they love. The music packs an emotional punch," said van Baars. "Bring tissues- it will be the best cry you'll ever have!"

"Ragtime" is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time -- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos -- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

"Just as in Doctorow's compelling novel, the historical figures ground the characters in the reality of the times," said van Baars. "More importantly, the historical figures provide inspiration and spiritual guidance for the characters."

Shows are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon - 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu. Tickets are $8 students, $12 Seniors (60 and older), $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, and $16 Adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ragtime | E. Turner Stump Theatre | Theatrical Events | Cleveland Scene | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scene - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Phone: 330-672-2497

Price: $8 to $16

www.theatre.kent.edu

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011/2012 production season with Ragtime, based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow and directed by Eric van Baars. Ragtime is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

E. Turner Stump Theatre

1325 Theatre Drive, in the Music & Speech Bldg. , Kent, Portage County OH 44242


330-672-2497

Return to Top



News Headline: USPTO ISSUES TRADEMARK: FOLK ALLEY | Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ALEXANDRIA, Va., Feb.17 -- The trademark FOLK ALLEY (Reg.No.4098551) was issued on Feb.14 by the USPTO.

Owner: Kent State University state university OHIO Office of General Counsel P.O.Box 5190 Kent OHIO 44242.

The trademark application serial number 85342171 was filed on June 9, 2011 and was registered on Feb.14.

Goods and Services: Entertainment services, namely, providing nondownloadable prerecorded music, information in the field of music, and commentary and articles about music, all on-line via a global computer network; Providing on-line newsletters in the field of folk music.FIRST USE: 20040908.FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20040908

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: BLACK HISTORY MONTH Scheduled events | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: TRUMBULL COUNTY

Thursday: “The African Odyssey in Pre-Columbian America” lecture with Dr. George Garrison, 6 to 7 p.m. Kent State University, Classroom/Administration building, Room 202. Garrison is a tenured professor at Kent State University. His works are published nationally and internationally. Before his time at KSU, Garrison served in the Vietnam War and also taught at a boarding school in the Navajo Nation. He will be discussing how over the last half-century or more, evidence has been discovered that clearly has established an African presence in the Americas centuries before the voyages of Columbus to this part of the world. This lecture will seek to summarize the evidence that is the foundation for the claim that Africans have been present in this land from the Pre-Christian Era to the period of the arrival of Europeans in this hemisphere; and to explain how these ancient African visitors traveled throughout this continent given the impenetrable forests, swamps, mountains and deserts that were natural barriers to traveling in this land.

Return to Top



News Headline: Professor to discuss odyssey | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PROFESSOR TO DISCUSS AFRICAN ODYSSEY: Dr. George Garrison, a professor at Kent State University, will speak at 6 p.m. Thursday at Kent State Trumbull on ''The African Odyssey in Pre-Columbian America." Garrison will be discussing how over the last half century or more, evidence has been discovered that has established an African presence in the Americas centuries before the voyages of Columbus to this part of the world. The lecture will take place in Room 202 of the Classroom / Administration Building.

Return to Top



News Headline: Extraterrestrial life is planetarium topic | Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HAPPENING

The Kent State University Planetarium will present the series, "The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence," at 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Feb. 24 in Room 108 at Smith Hall. The hour long show is free. Call 330-672-2246 to make reservations. For more details, visit http://planetarium.kent.edu.

Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by News Bank with Permission.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Planetarium Opens 2012 Series of Free Public Shows (Ellman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 'The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence' debuts tonight on campus.

The Kent State University Planetarium is presenting the first in a series of free public shows for 2012 at 8 tonight, Saturday and again on Feb. 24.

The hour-long presentation, "The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence," showcases humanity's search for intelligent life in other worlds, said Brett Ellman, associate professor and planetarium director.

“After a tour of the lovely Ohio night sky, we will explore celestial objects that may harbor life millions to trillion miles away,” Ellman said. “We will then describe ongoing attempts to communicate with whomever may be listening and the huge, difficult, worldwide effort to find the needle of an intelligent message within the haystack of cosmic radio noise."

The Department of Physics' planetarium is located in Room 108 at Smith Hall.

Call 330-672-2246 to make reservations for the presentation. Any individuals needing special accommodations are encouraged to contact the Department of Physics prior to the desired show date to make arrangements.

For more information, visit the planetarium's website: http://planetarium.kent.edu

Return to Top



News Headline: Downtown Kent entertainment district weighed | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New liquor licenses could be coming to downtown Kent's new developments with the proposed creation of a community entertainment district.

The entertainment district was proposed by Fairmount Properties developer Randy Ruttenberg in a letter to Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala.

Dan Smith, Kent economic development director, said creating the entertainment district would create four new liquor licenses to encourage new restaurants to locate in downtown Kent. He said the city is currently "maxed out" on liquor licenses and an entertainment district is the best way to bring more in.

The boundaries of the proposed entertainment district would be within the $100 million downtown redevelopment, Smith said, which includes the Fairmount Properties block, Acorn Alley II, Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center and PARTA's Kent Central Gateway transit center.

A D-5j liquor permit can be issued within a community entertainment district under Ohio Revised Code if there is $50 million or more invested in development.

"Without question, the state was trying to incentivize people spending money on creating a district," Smith said.

A new liquor license purchased through the state for a business in an entertainment district costs $2,340.

A few owners of established businesses in Kent say they're all for the development, but would like a compromise on liquor sales to protect their businesses.

Mike Beder, owner of the Water Street Tavern, points out that local business owners who have purchased a liquor license at market value in recent years paid about $35,000 for the license. He suggested that businesses obtaining the new liquor licenses stop selling alcohol at 1 a.m., so that local bars won't be impacted as much.

"I think that would be the fairest," Beder said. "I definitely don't think we should get in the way of any progress for downtown. The more places there are downtown, the more people come downtown."

Beder said capping sales to 1 a.m. would also keep a restaurant atmosphere to the district.

Kent Stage owner Tom Simpson, who recently purchased a liquor license for his business, agrees.

"It's great for Kent to see all these things happening," he said. "In order to financially stay afloat, the sale of alcohol definitely comes into the equation. (A liquor license) is a substantial investment and it has value."

Simpson declined to disclose the price of The Kent Stage's license, but said it was in "the tens of thousands."

Simpson said he'd like to see established business owners, city administration and incoming business owners come to the table for a discussion about what could satisfy all parties.

"I think it's a great idea that we all come together and talk about it," he said.

With new development, there is another license for new businesses opening in the area. The D-5i is required for new businesses with $750,000 of investment, at least 140 seats, 4,000 square feet and where liquor and beer sales do not exceed 25 percent of the gross sales, according to the Ohio Revised Code.

"This is specifically for high dollar reinvestment, the entertainment district is, to enable a high-end restaurant or pub to come into town," said Smith, adding Laziza's currently has the D-5i.

Smith said the next step is presenting the entertainment district to Ken City Council, which will most likely be April 4. If council approves, then the state will take additional steps to ensure the licenses are being used correctly.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU Preserves Historic House | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Larry States
News OCR Text: Written by Larry States

Rate this item

Kent State University moving to save a piece of its history as it develops the Esplanade to connect the University with downtown Kent.

Kent State will preserve one of the oldest houses along the Esplanade extension. The 110-year-old May Prentice house on S. Willow St., previously owned by and named after Kent State's first female faculty member, will not be demolished during ongoing expansion of the Esplanade. Instead, the university will move the house across the street from its present location on Monday.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Beggars of Life' With Louise Brooks Screens in New York | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/17/2012
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name: Thomas Gladysz
News OCR Text: Beggars of Life is a film whose reputation is picking up steam.

Directed by William Wellman the year after he made Wings (the first film to win an Academy Award), Beggars of Life (1928) is a gripping drama about a girl (Louise Brooks) dressed as a boy who flees the law after killing her abusive stepfather. On the run, she rides the rails through a male dominated hobo underworld in which danger is always close at hand. Picture Play magazine described the film as "Sordid, grim and unpleasant," though added "it is nevertheless interesting and is certainly a departure from the usual movie."

Beggars of Life will be screened on February 20th as part of Film Forum's Wellman Festival. It is a great opportunity to see a rarely screened film not readily available on DVD.

Beggars of Life is based on the 1925 novelistic memoir of the same name by Jim Tully, a once celebrated "hobo author" whose own reputation is also on the rise. Kent State University Press in Kent, Ohio (Tully's one-time hometown) has launched an ambitious program of reissuing the author's books, including Beggars of Life -- his best remembered work. They have also recently published an excellent biography of the author called Jim Tully: American Writer, Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler. The book includes a forward by documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, who calls it "hugely important." Coincidentally, Tully biographers Paul J. Bauer and Mark Dawidziak are speaking about the author at New York University's Ireland House on February 23 at 7 pm. More info here.

Though shot as a silent, Beggars of Life has the distinction of being considered Paramount's first sound film: a synchronized musical score, sound effects, and a song were added at the time of its release. Early advertisements for the 1928 film even boasted "Come hear Wallace Beery sing!" The gravel-voiced character actor and future Oscar winner plays Oklahoma Red, a tough hobo with a soft heart. Richard Arlen, who the year before had starred in Wings, plays Brooks' romantic interest.

Beggars of Life is a film about the desperate and the downtrodden. And in some ways, it anticipates films made during the Depression, which was just a few years off. Among them is Wellman's own Wild Boys of the Road, from 1933. It too is included in the Wellman Festival.

Richard Arlen and Louise Brooks in Beggars of Life. Photo courtesy of Film Forum.

In 1928, Beggars of Life was named one of the six best films for October by the Chicago Tribune, and, it made the honor roll for best films of the year in an annual poll conducted by The Film Daily. Nevertheless, it is little known today and its grim story set among disheveled tramps drew mixed reviews upon release. One Baltimore newspaper said it would have limited appeal, quipping, "Tully tale not a flapper fetcher for the daytime trade."

Louella Parsons, writing in the Los Angeles Examiner, echoed the sentiment when she stated, "I was a little disappointed in Louise Brooks. She is so much more the modern flapper type, the Ziegfeld Follies girl, who wears clothes and is always gay and flippant. This girl is somber, worried to distraction and in no comedy mood. Miss Brooks is infinitely better when she has her lighter moments." Her cross-town colleague, Harrison Carroll, added to the drumbeat of disdain when he wrote in the Los Angeles Evening Herald, "Considered from a moral standpoint, Beggars of Life is questionable, for it throws the glamour of adventure over tramp life and is occupied with building sympathy for an escaping murderess. As entertainment, however, it has tenseness and rugged earthy humor."

Critics in New York were also divided on the merits of Beggars of Life, so many of them instead focused on Brooks' unconventional, cross-dressing role. Brooks, it should be noted, was something of a local celebrity in the 1920s. The actress had lived in New York in the mid-twenties while appearing with the George White Scandals and Ziegfeld Follies. And, more often than not related to some outrageous behavior or a scandal, she also managed to get her name or picture in the paper on more than a few occasions.

Mordaunt Hall, in the New York Times, noted, "Louise Brooks figures as Nancy. She is seen for the greater part of this subject in male attire, having decided to wear these clothes to avoid being apprehended. Miss Brooks really acts well, better than she has in most of her other pictures."

The New York Morning Telegraph penned, "Louise Brooks, in a complete departure from the pert flapper that it has been her wont to portray, here definitely places herself on the map as a fine actress. Her characterizations, drawn with the utmost simplicity, is genuinely affecting." While Quinn Martin of the New York World wrote, "Here we have Louise Brooks, that handsome brunette, playing the part of a fugitive from justice, and playing as if she meant it, and with a certain impressive authority and manner. This is the best acting this remarkable young woman has done."

Indeed, it was Brooks' best acting and her best silent film prior to her heading off to Germany to star in Pandora's Box and Diary of a Lost Girl (both 1929). It is on those two films, each directed by G.W. Pabst, that Brooks' reputation rests.

Girls dressed as boys, pastoral life gone wrong, the mingling of the races, desperation depicted among the glitz and glamour of the twenties -- there is a lot of friction and a lot going on in Beggars of Life. It's a more than worthwhile film and one well worth watching. And, until a few years ago when the George Eastman House blew-up its sole surviving 16mm print to 35mm, Beggars of Life had been little seen.

Wellman was one of the great directors -- and he made a lot of great movies; among them are Wings (1927), The Public Enemy (1931), A Star is Born (1937), Beau Geste (1939), Roxie Hart (1942), The Ox Bow Incident (1943), and Battleground (1949). Actor and author William Wellman Jr., who has recently completed a biography of his father and is introducing some of the movies at the Wellman Festival, stated via email, "Beggars of Life was one of my Father's favorite silent films. He loved it. He talked about it a great deal with appreciation and GUSTO."

Beggars of Life will be screened on February 20th as part of Film Forum's William Wellman Festival. Start time is 8:35 pm. Musical accompaniment will be provided by Steve Sterner. Film Forum is located at 209 West Houston St., west of 6th Ave.

Thomas Gladysz is an arts journalist and silent film buff. He is also the founding director of the Louise Brooks Society, an online archive and international fan club devoted to the silent film star. Gladysz has organized exhibits, contributed to books, appeared on television, and introduced the actress's films around the world.

The Diary of a Lost Girl (Louise Brooks edition)

by Thomas Gladysz, Margarete Bohme

Follow Thomas Gladysz on Twitter: www.twitter.com/thomas_gladysz

Return to Top



News Headline: Louise Brooks in Beggars of Life in New York | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/18/2012
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Thomas Gladysz
News OCR Text: Beggars of Life is a film whose reputation is picking up steam.

Directed by William Wellman the year after he made Wings (the first film to win an Academy Award), Beggars of Life (1928) is a gripping drama about a girl (Louise Brooks) dressed as a boy who flees the law after killing her abusive stepfather. On the run, she rides the rails through a male dominated hobo underworld in which danger is always close at hand. Picture Play magazine described the film as "Sordid, grim and unpleasant," though added "it is nevertheless interesting and is certainly a departure from the usual movie."

Beggars of Life will be screened on February 20th as part of Film Forum's Wellman Festival. It is a great opportunity to see a rarely screened film not readily available on DVD.

Beggars of Life is based on the 1925 novelistic memoir of the same name by Jim Tully, a once celebrated "hobo author" whose own reputation is also on the rise. Kent State University Press in Kent, Ohio (Tully's one-time hometown) has launched an ambitious program of reissuing the author's books, including Beggars of Life -- his best remembered work. They have also recently published an excellent biography of the author called Jim Tully: American Writer, Irish Rover, Hollywood Brawler. The book includes a forward by documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, who calls it "hugely important."

Coincidentally, Tully biographers Paul J. Bauer and Mark Dawidziak are speaking about the author at New York University's Ireland House on February 23 at 7 pm. More info here.

Though shot as a silent, Beggars of Life has the distinction of being considered Paramount's first sound film: a synchronized musical score, sound effects, and a song were added at the time of its release. Early advertisements for the 1928 film even boasted "Come hear Wallace Beery sing!" The gravel-voiced character actor and future Oscar winner plays Oklahoma Red, a tough hobo with a soft heart. Richard Arlen, who the year before had starred in Wings, plays Brooks' romantic interest.

Beggars of Life is a film about the desperate and the downtrodden. And in some ways, it anticipates films made during the Depression, which was just a few years off. Among them is Wellman's own Wild Boys of the Road, from 1933. It too is included in the Wellman Festival.

In 1928, Beggars of Life was named one of the six best films for October by the Chicago Tribune, and, it made the honor roll for best films of the year in an annual poll conducted by The Film Daily. Nevertheless, it is little known today and its grim story set among disheveled tramps drew mixed reviews upon release. One Baltimore newspaper said it would have limited appeal, quipping, "Tully tale not a flapper fetcher for the daytime trade."

Louella Parsons, writing in the Los Angeles Examiner, echoed the sentiment when she stated, "I was a little disappointed in Louise Brooks. She is so much more the modern flapper type, the Ziegfeld Follies girl, who wears clothes and is always gay and flippant. This girl is somber, worried to distraction and in no comedy mood. Miss Brooks is infinitely better when she has her lighter moments." Her cross-town colleague, Harrison Carroll, added to the drumbeat of disdain when he wrote in the Los Angeles Evening Herald, "Considered from a moral standpoint, Beggars of Life is questionable, for it throws the glamour of adventure over tramp life and is occupied with building sympathy for an escaping murderess. As entertainment, however, it has tenseness and rugged earthy humor."

Critics in New York were also divided on the merits of Beggars of Life, so many of them instead focused on Brooks' unconventional, cross-dressing role. Brooks, it should be noted, was something of a local celebrity in the 1920s. The actress had lived in New York in the mid-twenties while appearing with the George White Scandals and Ziegfeld Follies. And, more often than not related to some outrageous behavior or a scandal, she also managed to get her name or picture in the paper on more than a few occasions.

Mordaunt Hall, in the New York Times, noted, "Louise Brooks figures as Nancy. She is seen for the greater part of this subject in male attire, having decided to wear these clothes to avoid being apprehended. Miss Brooks really acts well, better than she has in most of her other pictures."

The New York Morning Telegraph penned, "Louise Brooks, in a complete departure from the pert flapper that it has been her wont to portray, here definitely places herself on the map as a fine actress. Her characterizations, drawn with the utmost simplicity, is genuinely affecting." While Quinn Martin of the New York World wrote, "Here we have Louise Brooks, that handsome brunette, playing the part of a fugitive from justice, and playing as if she meant it, and with a certain impressive authority and manner. This is the best acting this remarkable young woman has done."

Indeed, it was Brooks' best acting and her best silent film prior to heading off to Germany to star in Pandora's Box and Diary of a Lost Girl (both 1929). It is on those two films, each directed by G.W. Pabst, that Brooks' reputation rests.

Girls dressed as boys, pastoral life gone wrong, the mingling of the races, desperation depicted among the glitz and glamour of the twenties -- there is a lot of friction and a lot going on in Beggars of Life. It's a more than worthwhile film and one well worth watching. And, until a few years ago when the George Eastman House blew-up its sole surviving 16mm print to 35mm, Beggars of Life had been little seen.

Wellman was one of the great directors -- and he made a lot of great movies; among them are Wings (1927), The Public Enemy (1931), A Star is Born (1937), Beau Geste (1939), Roxie Hart (1942), The Ox Bow Incident (1943), and Battleground (1949). Actor and author William Wellman Jr., who has recently completed a biography of his father and is introducing some of the movies at the Wellman Festival, stated via email, "Beggars of Life was one of my Father's favorite silent films. He loved it. He talked about it a great deal with appreciation and GUSTO."

Beggars of Life will be screened on February 20th as part of Film Forum's William Wellman Festival. Start time is 8:35 pm. Musical accompaniment will be provided by Steve Sterner. Film Forum is located at 209 West Houston St., west of 6th Ave.

Thomas Gladysz is an arts journalist and silent film buff. He is also the founding director of the Louise Brooks Society, an online archive and international fan club devoted to the silent film star. Gladysz has organized exhibits, contributed to books, appeared on television, and introduced the actress's films around the world.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus