Report Overview:
Total Clips (18)
Art, School of (1)
Art, School of; Pan-African Studies; Physics; Political Science; Theatre and Dance (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
College of Podiatric Medicine (1)
Communication Studies (2)
Fashion Design (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Music (1)
Pan-African Studies (5)
Public Safety (1)
Theatre and Dance (2)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of (1)
On View This Week 02/22/2012 Scene - Online Text Attachment Email

Zygote Press: Fellow Travelers: Works of J. Noel Reifel and his Students. Reifel has taught printmaking at Kent State's School of Art since 1976. This exhibit presents his work as both a teacher and a printmaker, by way of works by former students and his...


Art, School of; Pan-African Studies; Physics; Political Science; Theatre and Dance (1)
THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts 02/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Gym Rats Turned Partiers? (Glass) 02/22/2012 Women's Health - Online Text Attachment Email

...primary neurotransmitter in your brain's reward center. It makes us feel good," says brain chemistry researcher J. David Glass, Ph.D., a professor at Kent State University. Alcohol has a similar effect-hence, the buzz you get soothes your worries (if only temporarily). RELATED: How Alcohol Affects...


College of Podiatric Medicine (1)
KSU, podiatric school merger to be final in summer (Lefton) 02/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Communication Studies (2)
News articles linking alcohol to crimes or accidents increase support for liquor law enforcement 02/22/2012 EurekAlert! Text Attachment Email

...role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health," said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University. "If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a...

News Articles Linking Alcohol to Crimes or Accidents Increase Support for Liquor Law Enforcement 02/22/2012 Newswise Text Attachment Email

...role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health,” said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University. “If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a...


Fashion Design (1)
Project MOCA: A Monumental Fashion Competition 02/23/2012 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Library and Information Professionals Careers Nights Scheduled in Kent and Columbus 02/22/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Library and Information Professionals Careers Nights Scheduled in Kent and Columbus Kent State University's School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) will host its annual Library and Information Professionals Careers Night...


Music (1)
Philadelphia Chamber Music Society: Master Classes For Talented Students 02/22/2012 Hollywood Industry Text Attachment Email

...Hall at Temple University. Miami Quartet: The Miami Quartet is one of the most prominent string quartets in America and the Quartet in Residence at Kent State University in Ohio. This master class will be held Saturday, February 11 at 4 pm in Room 222 at Temple University Center City. Eric...


Pan-African Studies (5)
Festival speakers 02/23/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

... WARREN Francis Dorsey, director and co-founder of the African Community Theater and former chairman of the Department of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, will be featured speaker at the third annual Black History Month Festival on Saturday. The festival will be noon to 4 p.m....

Showing of 'Black List' video canceled at KSU Stark 02/22/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TWP. - The showing of the "Black List Volume III" video scheduled for 12:30 p.m. today, Feb. 22, at Kent State University at Stark has been canceled. The event, which was sponsored by the campus' Black History Month Committee, will not be rescheduled....

On With The Show 02/22/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

THEATRICAL EVENTS Now-Feb. 26 -- "Ragtime," 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, E. Turner Stump Theater at Kent State University campus.

Showing of 'Black List' video canceled at KSU Stark 02/22/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TWP. - The showing of the "Black List Volume III" video scheduled for 12:30 p.m. today, Feb. 22, at Kent State University at Stark has been canceled. The event, which was sponsored by the campus' Black History Month Committee, will not be rescheduled....

Showing of 'Black List' video canceled at KSU Stark 02/22/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TWP. - The showing of the "Black List Volume III" video scheduled for 12:30 p.m. today, Feb. 22, at Kent State University at Stark has been canceled. The event, which was sponsored by the campus' Black History Month Committee, will not be rescheduled....


Public Safety (1)
Portage police agencies looking at combing dispatch services (Vincent) 02/22/2012 Aurora Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...a way to share resources and save money. City Council initially considered Feb. 13 legislation that, if passed, would allow the city to group with Kent State University, Portage County Sheriff's Department and the cities of Streetsboro, Ravenna and Kent and apply for a grant that would pay for...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (Van Baars) 02/22/2012 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975....

Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (Van Baars) 02/22/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975....


University Press (1)
Writing the Alzheimer's Experience: A Workshop for Caregivers 02/22/2012 seattlepi.com Text Attachment Email

...problems here, but you won't feel alone either. Class reader: "Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose about Alzheimer's Disease," edited by Holly J. Hughes, Kent State University Press, 2009 For information, call: Northwest Center for Creative Aging: 206-382-3789 Or register by e-mail: Info@nwcreativeaging.org...


News Headline: On View This Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scene - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Zygote Press: Fellow Travelers: Works of J. Noel Reifel and his Students. Reifel has taught printmaking at Kent State's School of Art since 1976. This exhibit presents his work as both a teacher and a printmaker, by way of works by former students and his own current prints. An opening reception happens Feb. 24 from 6 to 9 p.m. The exhibit continues through March 30 at 1410 East 30th St. Call 216-621-2900 or go to zygotepress.com.

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News Headline: THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ■ The Kent State University School of
Art continues season with 65th Student
Annual from Feb. 23 to March
14 in the School of Art Gallery. A reception
will be held at 5 p.m. Feb.
23. Location: School of Art Gallery,
Room 211, Art Building, Kent State
University.

Kent State University's School
of Theatre and Dance will present
the B.F.A. Senior Dance Concert:
At(ten)tion to Detail. The concert
will run at 8 p.m. March 1 through
4 in the Louis O. Erdmann and William
H. Zucchero (EZ) Black Box Theatre.
Tickets are $8 students, $12 seniors,
$14 faculty/staff/KSU alumni
and $16 adults. for more information,
call 330-672-2497 or online
at www.dance.kent.edu. Location:
Music and Speech Building, 1325
Theatre Drive, Kent.

■ The Kent State University Planetarium
will present The Search for
Extraterrestrial Intelligence at 8
p.m. Feb. 24, at 8 p.m. The presentation
will showcase humanity's search
for intelligent life on other planets. To
make reservations, call 330-672-
2246. Location: Kent State University
Planetarium, Room 108, Smith
Hall, Summit Street, Kent.

Author and attorney Kip Petroff will
hold a book discussion and signing of
“Battling Goliath: Inside a $22 Billion
Legal Scandal” from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m
April 19. Location: Kent State Univesity

■ The Kent State University School of
Theatre and Dance will present “Ragtime”
through Feb. 26. The shows run
at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday
and at 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets
are $16 for adults, $14 for faculty,
staff and Alumni Association members,
$12 for seniors 60 and older
and $8 for students. For more information,
call 330-672-2497. Location:
E. Turner Stump Theatre, Music
and Speech Building, East Main
Street, Kent.
Kiva, Summit Street, Kent.

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News Headline: Gym Rats Turned Partiers? (Glass) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Women's Health - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EXERCISE AND ALCOHOL

Exercise and Alcohol: Running on Empty Bottles

Women's Health investigates the surprising reasons why the most dedicated exercisers are also some of the biggest drinkers

By Selene Yeager

TWO RUNNERS WALK INTO A BAR...

No, this isn't the beginning of a tired joke, it's an increasingly common real-life occurrence. And research shows that, once inside, those avid runners-and other frequent exercisers-tend to accrue bigger tabs than the average bar patron. Picture the Cheers gang clad in head-to-toe sweat-wicking spandex.

A 2009 study from the University of Miami found that the more people exercise, the more they drink-with the most active women consuming the highest amounts every month. It's a peculiar phenomenon that has had scientists scratching their heads since 1990, when research first pinpointed the alcohol-exercise connection. But they expected that, at some point, the script would be flipped-that the biggest boozers would exercise less. Never happened.

Instead, this landmark 2009 analysis of more than 230,000 men and women revealed that, on average, drinkers of both genders and all ages (not just wild twentysomethings) were 10 percent more likely to engage in vigorous exercise like running. Heavy drinkers exercised 10 minutes more each week than moderate drinkers and 20 minutes more than abstainers. An extra bender actually increased the number of minutes of total and vigorous exercise the men and women did that week.

"There's this misconception that heavy drinkers are exercise-averse couch potatoes," explains study author Michael T. French, Ph.D., a professor of health economics at the University of Miami. "That may be true in some cases, but that's certainly not what we've found."

This trend seems particularly pronounced in women-especially active, educated women, who, according to recent research from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, are drinking more than ever. In part, progress may be the root of this evil: With growing numbers of women in the workplace and other male-dominated arenas, it has become increasingly socially acceptable for women to go out and belly up to the bar alongside their male counterparts-and to overdo it.

Working Out to Work It Off

One simple theory scientists have to support the drinking-exercise connection is the morning-after phenomenon. In this case, the party girl who downs a few appletinis (and maybe some mozzarella sticks) feels the need to repent for those calories by banging out five or six miles the next morning.

"Women who consume alcohol could simply be exercising more to burn it off and avoid weight gain," says French. "Likewise, they may drink more simply because they can, as they know they're burning calories, so they're less worried about the weight gain."

But exercising to atone for the sins of the night before doesn't explain why someone would chase a spin class with a round of drinks, which also happens with staggering frequency. This, researchers say, could be the product of a "work hard, play hard" personality type. "There are people who are sensation seekers," says Ana M. Abrantes, Ph.D., an assistant professor at Brown University's Alpert Medical School. "They engage in activities that produce intense sensations and can be quickly bored by things that don't produce those feelings."

For others, it might be a matter of blowing off stress. Which may be why some women offset their tension with a boot-camp class, or by getting loaded, or both. "Exercising stimulates the release of serotonin, which is your natural antidepressant, as well as dopamine, which is the primary neurotransmitter in your brain's reward center. It makes us feel good," says brain chemistry researcher J. David Glass, Ph.D., a professor at Kent State University. Alcohol has a similar effect-hence, the buzz you get soothes your worries (if only temporarily).

RELATED: How Alcohol Affects Your Body

Last updated: February 17, 2012

Issue date: March 2012

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2012 Rodale Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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News Headline: KSU, podiatric school merger to be final in summer (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine plan to come together into one single, academic entity, as early as this summer.

The podiatric school in Independence, established in 1916, is one of the largest podiatric medical education institutions in the country and the only accredited podiatry school in Ohio.

The move to join KSU is part of the strategic plan of the podiatric school to expand the college's teaching and research. The podiatric college also will offer strategic research and teaching collaborations with the university's health and science departments.

“We are moving pretty quickly with this acquisition, which is as a result of due diligence on our part and the commitment of all involved,” KSU President Lester Lefton said in a statement. “Our partnership will have a huge impact on the future and quality of podiatric medicine. The opportunities for a well-rounded education for our podiatric medicine students are enormous, and I am excited to officially welcome the college and its students to the Kent State family this summer.”

The partnership will offer expanded academic options for podiatric students, including the ability to obtain a dual degree, such as a master's degree of business administration or public health, or a Ph.D. in a variety of science programs.

The boards of trustees of both institutions will have separate meetings in March where progress made in the acquisition will be discussed.

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News Headline: News articles linking alcohol to crimes or accidents increase support for liquor law enforcement | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: EurekAlert!
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio – Reading a newspaper article about the role alcohol played in an injury accident or violent crime makes people more supportive of enforcing alcohol laws, a new study suggests.

Researchers had participants read actual news reports, randomly selected from newspapers across the United States, about violent crimes and various accidental injuries – half of which were edited to mention the role of alcohol and half of which were edited not to make such mention.

Those who read the articles mentioning alcohol's role later showed more support for enforcing laws regarding serving intoxicated people, sales to underage youth and open containers, compared to those who had read the other articles.

The results are important because prior work from this research group has indicated that fewer than one-fourth of newspaper reports and one-tenth of TV news reports on alcohol-related crimes and non-car-related fatal injuries actually mention that alcohol was involved.

"The underreporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health," said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University.

"If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a public demand for tougher law enforcement."

Slater conducted the study with Andrew Hayes, associate professor, and David Edwoldsen, professor, both in the School of Communication at Ohio State; and Catherine Goodall of Kent State University.

Their study appears in the March 2012 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

The study involved a random sample of 789 adults who were recruited for the study from across the country.

Participants read online one of 60 representative articles taken from U.S. local newspapers. They were evenly split between articles about violent crimes, car crashes, and other injuries.

Half the articles mentioned that alcohol played a causative role in the crime or accident, and half did not.

Participants were told that the purpose of the study was to evaluate the news articles, such as how clear they were, and they were asked several questions about their thoughts on what they read.

They were also asked several questions asking them to indicate their level of support for current liquor laws, such as those regulating sales to underage youth, on a scale of 1 to 10. Participants were told these questions would help researchers understand their evaluation of the article.

Those who read articles mentioning alcohol use rated their support for alcohol enforcement higher than did those who read articles that had no such mention. Findings were similar whether they read articles about crimes or injuries.

Participants were also asked whether they would support new alcohol control laws, including restricting the number of bars and liquor stores in an area, restricting advertising, and making servers legally liable if they give alcohol to intoxicated customers.

The findings showed that participants who read the stories mentioning alcohol were no more likely to support these proposed new laws than those who read the other articles.

"In retrospect, it is not too surprising that there wasn't more support for these new laws, given the current political environment against more government control over economic activities," Slater said.

But the results do show that people may support tougher enforcement of current laws – at least if the news media accurately reported the scope of the problem, he said.

Public health estimates indicate that more than 30 percent of fatalities due to violent crimes, car crashes and other accidental injuries are in part attributable to alcohol use.

But a 2006 study by Slater and his colleagues showed that the media reporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents is much lower. Newspapers mention alcohol's role in only 7.3 percent of their articles about violent crimes and 4.8 percent of accidental injuries. Television news was even less likely to mention the role of alcohol.

Slater noted that, in this study, support for alcohol law enforcement increased after reading only one article.

"The effect of reading one article may not last long, but people will be constantly reminded if alcohol's role is mentioned regularly in accident and crime stories," he said.

"These stories are ubiquitous in local news."

Local governments have a role to play in increasing media coverage of alcohol's role in crime and accidents, he said.

"It would help if policies mandated that local law enforcement include information on alcohol use, when appropriate, in their reports on crimes and accidents," Slater said.

"If reporters see alcohol information in police reports, they will be more likely to include that information in their stories."

The study was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

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News Headline: News Articles Linking Alcohol to Crimes or Accidents Increase Support for Liquor Law Enforcement | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Newswise
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Newswise — COLUMBUS, Ohio – Reading a newspaper article about the role alcohol played in an injury accident or violent crime makes people more supportive of enforcing alcohol laws, a new study suggests.

Researchers had participants read actual news reports, randomly selected from newspapers across the United States, about violent crimes and various accidental injuries – half of which were edited to mention the role of alcohol and half of which were edited not to make such mention.

Those who read the articles mentioning alcohol's role later showed more support for enforcing laws regarding serving intoxicated people, sales to underage youth and open containers, compared to those who had read the other articles.

The results are important because prior work from this research group has indicated that fewer than one-fourth of newspaper reports and one-tenth of TV news reports on alcohol-related crimes and non-car-related fatal injuries actually mention that alcohol was involved.

“The underreporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health,” said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University.

“If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a public demand for tougher law enforcement.”

Slater conducted the study with Andrew Hayes, associate professor, and David Edwoldsen, professor, both in the School of Communication at Ohio State; and Catherine Goodall of Kent State University.

Their study appears in the March 2012 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

The study involved a random sample of 789 adults who were recruited for the study from across the country.

Participants read online one of 60 representative articles taken from U.S. local newspapers. They were evenly split between articles about violent crimes, car crashes, and other injuries.

Half the articles mentioned that alcohol played a causative role in the crime or accident, and half did not.

Participants were told that the purpose of the study was to evaluate the news articles, such as how clear they were, and they were asked several questions about their thoughts on what they read.

They were also asked several questions asking them to indicate their level of support for current liquor laws, such as those regulating sales to underage youth, on a scale of 1 to 10. Participants were told these questions would help researchers understand their evaluation of the article.

Those who read articles mentioning alcohol use rated their support for alcohol enforcement higher than did those who read articles that had no such mention. Findings were similar whether they read articles about crimes or injuries.

Participants were also asked whether they would support new alcohol control laws, including restricting the number of bars and liquor stores in an area, restricting advertising, and making servers legally liable if they give alcohol to intoxicated customers.

The findings showed that participants who read the stories mentioning alcohol were no more likely to support these proposed new laws than those who read the other articles.

“In retrospect, it is not too surprising that there wasn't more support for these new laws, given the current political environment against more government control over economic activities,” Slater said.

But the results do show that people may support tougher enforcement of current laws – at least if the news media accurately reported the scope of the problem, he said.

Public health estimates indicate that more than 30 percent of fatalities due to violent crimes, car crashes and other accidental injuries are in part attributable to alcohol use.

But a 2006 study by Slater and his colleagues showed that the media reporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents is much lower. Newspapers mention alcohol's role in only 7.3 percent of their articles about violent crimes and 4.8 percent of accidental injuries. Television news was even less likely to mention the role of alcohol.

Slater noted that, in this study, support for alcohol law enforcement increased after reading only one article.

“The effect of reading one article may not last long, but people will be constantly reminded if alcohol's role is mentioned regularly in accident and crime stories,” he said.

“These stories are ubiquitous in local news.”

Local governments have a role to play in increasing media coverage of alcohol's role in crime and accidents, he said.

“It would help if policies mandated that local law enforcement include information on alcohol use, when appropriate, in their reports on crimes and accidents,” Slater said.

“If reporters see alcohol information in police reports, they will be more likely to include that information in their stories.”

The study was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

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News Headline: Project MOCA: A Monumental Fashion Competition | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sat 2/25 @ 7 – 10PM

Get ready for a couture throw-down at MOCA. Based on Project Runway, Project MOCA is a (friendly) runway competition featuring fashion students from Cleveland Institute of Art, Kent State University, and Virginia Marti School of Art and Design. These students will design original fashions addressing “monumentality” a la Ursula von Rydingsvard's current sculpture exhibition. Their fashions will be judged by Yellowcake's Valerie Mayen, Dredger's Union's Sean Bilovecky and Dana Sobota, Valerie Welebir, and wardrobe stylist Conor O'Malley.

http://MOCAcleveland.org

MOCA Cleveland8501 Carnegie Ave
Cleveland, OH 44103
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News Headline: Library and Information Professionals Careers Nights Scheduled in Kent and Columbus | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Library and Information Professionals Careers Nights Scheduled in Kent and Columbus

Kent State University's School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) will host its annual Library and Information Professionals Careers Night in Kent on Tuesday, Feb. 28, and in Columbus on Thursday, March 8. The event in Kent will take place in the Kent Student Center Ballroom from 5 - 8 p.m. on Feb. 28. Refreshments will be served, and the program is free and open to anyone interested in a career in libraries or other information agencies, including museums and other cultural institutions, government offices, corporations and numerous other organizations. For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=D3AB2A55-E86B-7C1D-5931AAA5B56FC7C3.

Cost: Free

Contact: Flo Cunningham, 330-672-0003, fcunning@kent.edu

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News Headline: Philadelphia Chamber Music Society: Master Classes For Talented Students | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hollywood Industry
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society (PCMS) is pleased to announce Philadelphias most promising musical students will have an opportunity to learn from some of the worlds greatest professional musicians during master classes. Working one-on-one, students will gain new perspectives and a deeper understanding of important chamber music. The classes are generously funded by the Lois and Julian Brodsky Education Program Reserve Fund in partnership with the Curtis Institute and Temple University.

Leading musicians involved in the Philadelphia chamber music Master Classes include:

Robert Levin: Known for his performances and compositions, Robert Levin has dedicated his life to musical studies and currently holds the chair of Dwight P. Robinson, Jr. Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. This master class will be held Saturday, February 11 at 11:30 am in Rock Hall at Temple University.

Miami Quartet: The Miami Quartet is one of the most prominent string quartets in America and the Quartet in Residence at Kent State University in Ohio. This master class will be held Saturday, February 11 at 4 pm in Room 222 at Temple University Center City.

Eric Owens: American bass-baritone Eric Owens has carved a unique place in contemporary opera as an esteemed interpreter of classic works and champion of new music. He currently serves on the Board of Trustees of The National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts and Astral Artistic Services. This master class will be held Wednesday, February 29 at 1 pm in Field Hall at the Curtis Institute.

Johannes Quartet: The quartet includes Peter Stumpf, principal cello of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Choong-Jin (C.J.) Chang, principal viola of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Soovin Kim, the first American to win the Paganini Violin Competition in 24 years, and Jessica Lee, a Concert Artist Guild International Competition Winner. This master class will be held on Saturday, March 3 at 4 pm in Room 222 at Temple University Center City.

Artemis Quartet: The Berlin-based Artemis Quartet was founded at the Lübeck Musikhochschule in 1989. In addition to touring, members hold a joint professorship in chamber music at Berlins Universität der Künste. This master class will be held Tuesday, May 1 at 10 am in Field Hall at the Curtis Institute.

PCMS is proud to support the next generation of chamber musicians.

ABOUT PCMS

The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society (PCMS) aims to serve and enrich audiences with a compelling variety of chamber music and recital programs performed by exceptional international and Philadelphia-based artists. PCMS also promotes new music and music education, collaborating with regional cultural and educational institutions. Visit http://www.pcmsconcerts.org

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News Headline: Festival speakers | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Festival speakers

WARREN

Francis Dorsey, director and co-founder of the African Community Theater and former chairman of the Department of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, will be featured speaker at the third annual Black History Month Festival on Saturday.

The festival will be noon to 4 p.m. at the TCAP building, 1230 Palmyra Road SW. Admission is free.

Also speaking will be Warren Mayor Doug Franklin; Atty. Gilbert Rucker; Orneil Heller, assistant Warren fire chief; Joan Sullivan; and Walter Allen, minister.

Habitat ceremony

YOUNGSTOWN

Habitat for Humanity of Mahoning County is having a groundbreaking ceremony for a home for its newest partner family, Abby Walsh and Shaun Dunmire, at 10 a.m. Saturday at 4 Maranatha Drive on the city's East Side.

Panel appointments

YOUNGSTOWN

Judges Joseph J. Vukovich of the 7th District Court of Appeals and John M. Durkin of Mahoning County Common Pleas Court are among 28 people from around Ohio who have been appointed to the Task Force on the Funding of Ohio Courts.

Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor of the Ohio Supreme Court named the task-force members recently.

With its first meeting set for March 23, the panel will examine long-term solutions to strengthen the finances of Ohio courts.

The task force meets throughout this year and will issue a report by early next year with specific recommendations for cost savings and efficiencies.

Grant announced

Girard

U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan of Niles, D-17th, announced a $853,000 grant for the city's fire department. Fire Chief Kenneth Bornemiss said the grant would pay for a new firetruck.

“This is the largest grant our fire department has ever received ... and it is extremely significant for our small community,” Bornemiss said in a statement Wednesday. “Our current ladder truck is 40 years old this year, and without this money, we can't buy one.”

The money is part of the Assistance to Firefighter Grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.

Trial to be closed

PITTSBURGH (AP)

Pennsylvania Superior Court says the juvenile court trial for a boy who was just 11 when he reportedly killed his father's pregnant fianc e and unborn son will remain closed to the public, despite appeals by three western Pennsylvania newspapers.

The court heard arguments last month about whether to open the trial of Jordan Brown of Wampum, who is now 14.

State law required Brown to be charged as an adult in the February 2009 killings — which caused the details of the case and Brown's name to be widely reported — before his attorneys convinced a Lawrence County judge to move the case to juvenile court. Another county judge then closed the upcoming trial to the public. The trial was delayed by the appeals by the New Castle News, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

© 2012 Vindy.com.

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News Headline: Showing of 'Black List' video canceled at KSU Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -

The showing of the "Black List Volume III" video scheduled for 12:30 p.m. today, Feb. 22, at Kent State University at Stark has been canceled. The event, which was sponsored by the campus' Black History Month Committee, will not be rescheduled.

Find other area Black History Month events here .

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News Headline: On With The Show | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THEATRICAL EVENTS

Now-Feb. 26 -- "Ragtime," 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, E. Turner Stump Theater at Kent State University campus.

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News Headline: Showing of 'Black List' video canceled at KSU Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -

The showing of the "Black List Volume III" video scheduled for 12:30 p.m. today, Feb. 22, at Kent State University at Stark has been canceled. The event, which was sponsored by the campus' Black History Month Committee, will not be rescheduled.

Find other area Black History Month events here .

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News Headline: Showing of 'Black List' video canceled at KSU Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -

The showing of the "Black List Volume III" video scheduled for 12:30 p.m. today, Feb. 22, at Kent State University at Stark has been canceled. The event, which was sponsored by the campus' Black History Month Committee, will not be rescheduled.

Find other area Black History Month events here .

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News Headline: Portage police agencies looking at combing dispatch services (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Aurora -- The city is pondering whether to merge with five dispatch centers in Portage County as a way to share resources and save money.

City Council initially considered Feb. 13 legislation that, if passed, would allow the city to group with Kent State University, Portage County Sheriff's Department and the cities of Streetsboro, Ravenna and Kent and apply for a grant that would pay for a feasibility study to explore combining the agencies into one dispatch center.

The agencies are calling the proposed merger the Portage Coordinated Public Safety Communications Initiative.

The Ohio Department of Development's Local Government Innovation Fund is offering $9 million in grant money for projects that encourage efficiency and shared services among local governments, according to Police Chief Seth Riewaldt.

"Of the many services provided to residents by local governments, studies indicate public safety communications is one that can most easily be shared," he wrote in a letter to Mayor Lynn McGill.

Ward 1 Councilman Jim Vaca said he opposes the idea. "We need to use our own dispatch center. We shouldn't rely on Portage County for anything. We've got a good thing going," he said.

Councilman Dennis Kovach agreed, saying a merger of dispatching services could mean layoffs and more of a financial burden for the city once grant money is no longer available to help run the operation.

"In theory it might be a good idea, but in practicality, it's not a good idea," Kovach said.

COUNCIL IS expected to address the resolution again at its Feb. 27 meeting at 7 p.m. in Town Hall. The grant application deadline is March 1.

Kent and Ravenna pass-ed legislation this month, and the county commissioners are expected to address the matter Feb. 21.

According to KSU Director of Media Relations Emily Vincent, the university is considering the matter but has yet to take official action, and Streetsboro has not addressed the matter.

According to Riewaldt, the study should help the interested agencies determine the possible cost savings and improvements to service the merger could provide.

"For several years, there have been discussions about merging operations since each nearly duplicates the activity of the others," Riewaldt said. "All agree that cost savings and improvement of services could be realized if the number of PSAPs was reduced; however, no action was ever taken on this idea."

The roles of each of the agencies and how the grant money would be used would be part of the application, according to the resolution.

The group must get estimates from several consultants to determine how much the feasibility study would cost. Riewaldt said initially the group thought such a study could cost $30,000.

If awarded the grant, the consortium would be required to contribute a 10 percent match. Assuming the grant covers the entire cost of a $30,000 study, each city's share would be $500.

If the agencies decide to move forward with the consolidation, Riewaldt said the cost would be "considerable," but Ohio is offering a 10-year, no-interest loan.

THE GRANT money is scheduled to be distributed starting July 1.

Although Riewaldt said the Aurora Police Department doesn't expect to hire or lay off employees as a result of the possible consolidation, it's unknown whether the staffing of the other agencies would be affected.

He said no one knows how long the feasibility study would take and what the timeline for the actual merger would be.

Other questions still looming would be where the combined dispatch center would be located and the fate of the dispatch area at the Aurora police station.

Aurora's 2012 budget includes $90,000 for renovations to the dispatch area. A community grant, which accounts for $80,000 of that amount, was carried over from 2011 since the work wasn't completed.

"Although the police department has a budget to renovate its communications center, I feel it is prudent to apply for this grant," Riewaldt said.

"Results from a study may indicate that Aurora residents are better served by merging with another department, making the renovation unnecessary. Conversely, the study may suggest Aurora take on additional call-handling responsibility, expanding the scope of our current plans.

"I feel that some type of consolidation will be in the future for Portage County public safety communications," Riewaldt added.

"The cost of 'next-generation' 911 equipment alone will cause some communities to question whether they can maintain the status quo. The study hopefully will give us a better picture of what the future might look like."

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News Headline: Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (Van Baars) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975.

Directed by Eric van Baars, the show will run through Feb. 26 in E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Building. This concert version follows the original story with the addition of a scaled down orchestra.

"'Ragtime' is an epic tale of three families struggling to protect the ones they love. The music packs an emotional punch," said van Baars. "Bring tissues- it will be the best cry you'll ever have!"

"Ragtime" is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time -- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos -- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

"Just as in Doctorow's compelling novel, the historical figures ground the characters in the reality of the times," said van Baars. "More importantly, the historical figures provide inspiration and spiritual guidance for the characters."

Shows are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon - 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu. Tickets are $8 students, $12 Seniors (60 and older), $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, and $16 Adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

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News Headline: Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (Van Baars) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975.

Directed by Eric van Baars, the show will run through Feb. 26 in E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Building. This concert version follows the original story with the addition of a scaled down orchestra.

"'Ragtime' is an epic tale of three families struggling to protect the ones they love. The music packs an emotional punch," said van Baars. "Bring tissues- it will be the best cry you'll ever have!"

"Ragtime" is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time -- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos -- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

"Just as in Doctorow's compelling novel, the historical figures ground the characters in the reality of the times," said van Baars. "More importantly, the historical figures provide inspiration and spiritual guidance for the characters."

Shows are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon - 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu. Tickets are $8 students, $12 Seniors (60 and older), $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, and $16 Adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

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News Headline: Writing the Alzheimer's Experience: A Workshop for Caregivers | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: seattlepi.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: � Alzheimer's Cafe Special Valentine's Day Gathering, 3:30-5:00 pm, at Mae's


Writing was the one component missing for me when attending caregiver support groups (while Abe was alive) and grief groups (after his death), so I've been developing a writing class for caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. Now I'm pleased to announce that it's come to fruition at the Northwest Center for Creative Aging . In addition to the NWCCA, the class is sponsored by the Adult Day Center, Elderwise and with the support of the Alzheimer's Association .

For those who need to write or who want to document the caregiving experience as it touches your life, join us on six Mondays, March 19 – April 23, at the Northwest Center for Creative Aging.

Belonging to a writing community can:

- Help focus and refine thoughts relative to caregiving and self-care

- Provide greater understanding of what caregivers and their Loved Ones experience daily

- Counter isolation and loneliness

- Act as a pressure release

- Increase acceptance of self and others connected with Alzheimer's Disease

- Help erase stigma associated with brain disease

Prior writing experience isn't necessary. We'll write in any form – memoir, poem, fragments, essays, lists. We won't solve our problems here, but you won't feel alone either.

Class reader: "Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose about Alzheimer's Disease," edited by Holly J. Hughes, Kent State University Press, 2009

For information, call: Northwest Center for Creative Aging: 206-382-3789

Or register by e-mail: Info@nwcreativeaging.org

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