Report Overview:
Total Clips (24)
Alumni; Music; Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
College of Business (COB); Global Education; Payroll Office; Students; Treasury, Tax and Investments (1)
Communication Studies (2)
Geology (1)
Health Sciences (2)
Health Sciences; Research (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum; Physics (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
Public Safety (1)
Scholarships; Students (1)
Theatre and Dance (3)
Town-Gown; University Communications and Marketing (1)
University Communications and Marketing; University Relations (1)
Upward Bound (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Music; Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (0 comments) 02/23/2012 Bedford Times Register - Online Text Attachment Email

Autos Jobs Classifieds Legals MarketplaceOhio Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975....


College of Business (COB); Global Education; Payroll Office; Students; Treasury, Tax and Investments (1)
Free tax help at UA, Kent State for students, community 02/24/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Ohio.com > Business > Free tax help at UA, Kent State for students, community By Betty Lin-Fisher Beacon Journal business writer Published: February 23, 2012 - 11:02 PM Free tax...


Communication Studies (2)
Underreporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents decreases public support for liquor laws 02/23/2012 News-Medical.Net Text Attachment Email

...role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health," said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University. "If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a...

News Articles Linking Alcohol to Crimes Or Accidents Increase Support for Liquor Law Enforcement 02/24/2012 Netnews Publisher Text Attachment Email

...role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health," said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University. "If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a...


Geology (1)
New Paleontology Study Results from Kent State University Described (Schweitzer) 02/24/2012 Science Letter Text Email

...the early Cretaceous and survived into the Paleogene. New taxa include Steorrosia new genus. Bretonia new genus," wrote C.E. Schweitzer and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "Faksecarcinus new genus, and sixteen new combinations." Schweitzer and colleagues published...


Health Sciences (2)
5 healthiest cheeses Caine-Bish 02/24/2012 Daily Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...component of Greek cuisine, feta is lower in fat and calories than most cheeses, says Natalie Caine-Bish, an associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Kent State University. A one-ounce serving – enough to make a Greek salad lover happy – has four grammes of protein and only 74 calories. Caine-Bish...

Ostracism a factor of obesity in young (Barkley) 02/23/2012 Scranton Times-Tribune - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...mcclatchy newspapers Ryan Barkley, 7, participates in a research study conducted by his father, Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, Feb. 3. The research is studying the effects of the presence or absence of a single friend or a group of friends...


Health Sciences; Research (1)
Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkley) 02/23/2012 Victorville Daily Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...AKRON, OHIO • The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise. A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically...


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Dr. Seuss' Birthday Celebration slated for March 10 at Ashtabula Towne Square 02/23/2012 Star-Beacon - Online Text Attachment Email

...Center, Ashtabula County Head Start, Ashtabula Towne Square, Conneaut Public Library, Gazette News-papers, Harbor-Topky Library, Henderson Public Library, Kent State Uni-versity-Ashtabula, Kings-ville Public Library, Media One, and the Star Beacon Newspapers in Education Program. For more information,...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (1)
Village chamber continues to grow McFadden) 02/24/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...reservations call (330) 532-5540. Guest speaker for the luncheon was Tim McFadden, CPA, academic program director for applied business technologies at Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses. McFadden spoke about the various business courses and degree program offerings locally. He...


KSU at Stark (2)
'Evil Dead: The Musical' at Kent Stark is silly fun - Canton, OH - CantonRep.com 02/23/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...‘Evil Dead: The musical' at Kent Stark JACKSON TWP. -   There's little that's really evil in "Evil Dead: The Musical," running through Sunday at Kent State University Stark Campus. Based on a trio of gory, low-budget, cult-favorite horror flicks, this student stage production is not for...

Looking for an "alternative" THURSDAY activity? Look here. 02/23/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...featuring the Wallace Coleman Band; Coleman was 10-year veteran of Grammy Award-winning Robert Lockwood Jr. Band and started own band in 1996; 6 p.m.; Kent State University Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; free; 330-499-9600, www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity . • Alternative...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Concert to feature pianist Maria Liliestedt 02/24/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Franz Liszt's "Piano Concerto No. 1 in E-flat" at 7 p.m. Saturday when the Tuscarawas Philharmonic appears in concert in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. Tickets range from $9 to $32, depending on location and whether it is a student, senior, or adult ticket....


KSU Museum; Physics (1)
2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Feb. 24-March 1, 2012 02/23/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...airport hours. Research center and gift shop with original documents, photos and books. Center and gift shop: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Free. Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Data on Analytical Science Published by Researchers at Kent State University (Culbreath) 02/24/2012 Science Letter Text Email

...2 mm x 2 mm area with a resolution of 2.2 mu m. A confocal autofocus system insures accurate and repeatable focus," wrote C. Culbreath and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "Microscopic orientational surface patterns have been demonstrated to exhibit a variety...


Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
Review: KSU delivers with 'Ragtime' 02/24/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Public Safety (1)
Auroraadvocate.com (Vincent) 02/23/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

...a way to share resources and save money. City Council initially considered Feb. 13 legislation that, if passed, would allow the city to group with Kent State University, Portage County Sheriff's Department and the cities of Streetsboro, Ravenna and Kent and apply for a grant that would pay for...


Scholarships; Students (1)
Cochlear Americas Announces Scholarship Winners, Adds New Program 02/23/2012 Advance for Audiologists - Online Text Attachment Email

...Scholarship are Spencer Parker, a freshman at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute studying mechanical engineering, art and design; Andrea McGhee, a freshman at Kent State University studying art education; and Carly Swanson, a junior at Illinois Institute of Technology studying information technology and...


Theatre and Dance (3)
Kent State Dancers Premiere Original Works in Two Concerts: B.F.A. Senior Dance Concert and the Student Dance Festival 02/24/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Dancers Premiere Original Works in Two Concerts: B.F.A. Senior Dance Concert and the Student Dance Festival Kent State University's...

Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage 02/23/2012 Twinsburg Bulletin - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975....

Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage 02/23/2012 MapleHeightsPress Text Attachment Email

Autos Jobs Classifieds Legals MarketplaceOhio Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975....


Town-Gown; University Communications and Marketing (1)
Kent State Video Showcases Downtown Revitalization (Vincent) 02/24/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


University Communications and Marketing; University Relations (1)
Factchecking Kent State's "We're #1″ Billboards (Vincent, Harvey) 02/24/2012 NPR - Online Text Attachment Email


Upward Bound (1)
Annual Black History Program at Ravenna church 02/24/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage (0 comments) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bedford Times Register - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Autos

Jobs

Classifieds

Legals

MarketplaceOhio

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975.

Directed by Eric van Baars, the show will run through Feb. 26 in E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Building. This concert version follows the original story with the addition of a scaled down orchestra.

"'Ragtime' is an epic tale of three families struggling to protect the ones they love. The music packs an emotional punch," said van Baars. "Bring tissues- it will be the best cry you'll ever have!"

"Ragtime" is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time -- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos -- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

"Just as in Doctorow's compelling novel, the historical figures ground the characters in the reality of the times," said van Baars. "More importantly, the historical figures provide inspiration and spiritual guidance for the characters."

Shows are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon - 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu . Tickets are $8 students, $12 Seniors (60 and older), $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, and $16 Adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

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News Headline: Free tax help at UA, Kent State for students, community | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio.com > Business >

Free tax help at UA, Kent State for students, community

By Betty Lin-Fisher

Beacon Journal business writer

Published: February 23, 2012 - 11:02 PM

Free tax help at UA, Kent State for students, community February 24,2012 04:02 AM GMT

Betty Lin-Fisher

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

University of Akron and Kent State University volunteers are reaching out to the community by providing a free tax service for low- to moderate-income taxpayers.

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program, also known as VITA, is IRS-sponsored, and volunteers adhere to strict qualifications. The VITA Program offers free tax help to people who make $50,000 or less and need assistance in preparing their own tax returns.

At the University of Akron, it is the third year that the George W. Daverio School of Accountancy is a VITA site, but only the second year it is open to the public, said Kristina Melomed, an adjunct instructor at the school and VITA site coordinator.

The UA volunteers are students and staff. Volunteers must complete at least a three-credit college course in Federal Taxation as well as six IRS certifications.

The UA site prepares 1040s and 1040NRs, as well as 8843s (forms required for international students and teachers to remain in compliance with their visas), 4868s (forms used to file for an extension), and 1040Xs (amended returns). Volunteers can prepare 2010 as well as 2011 returns. This year, the site is also offering self-service kiosks for those people who want to file their own returns, but would like a knowledgeable person nearby if they have any questions.

The UA site is located in the College of Business Administration Building, 259 South Broadway St., Room 105.

Appointments are accepted online only at www.uakron.edu/cba/vita. However, this Saturday is "Super Saturday" and walk-ins will be accepted. Hours are Saturdays only from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a one-hour break for lunch from noon to 1 p.m. The site will be open every Saturday through April 14, 2012, except for March 10 and 17.

Kent State's VITA is offering the service for qualifying individuals this tax-filing season on the Kent Campus.

Paula DiVencenzo, business and finance tax manager at Kent State, said this is the second year Kent State is participating in the IRS-sponsored VITA program. Volunteers include members from Beta Alpha Psi, the Accounting Association, the university's payroll department and the Office of Global Education, as well as five interns completing the master's program in the College of Business Administration.

DiVencenzo said some volunteers are involved to gain experience, but most are community-minded students who want to help people.

Kent State student Tianjun Shen, a VITA volunteer, said he got involved while interning for Kent State's International Student and Scholar Services.

"I offered to help and found it quite rewarding to be able to help international students, scholars and their family members," Shen said. "Also as an international student myself, I was confused about how to file my taxes, and I just wanted to offer my helping hand."

International students use the services more than any group, but it is open to all students and community members, said DiVencenzo.

To qualify for free preparation and e-file services, taxpayers' gross income must total $50,000 or less for individual and joint filing. The service is available to students, university employees and the public. Certified volunteers prepare U.S. 1040 forms for residents and 1040NR forms for nonresidents.

The VITA tax preparation site is located in Rooms A224 and A226 in the Business Administration Building located at 475 Terrace Drive in Kent. Weekday sessions are available by appointment. The VITA site is open for walk-ins on the following Saturdays: March 10 and April 7 from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., and March 31 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Although Saturday walk-ins are welcome, appointments are encouraged.

All appointments can be scheduled by contacting DiVencenzo at 330-672-8622 or via email at tax@kent.edu.

Taxpayers must provide proof of identification and specific documentation. Visit www.kent.edu/tax/kent-state-vita.cfm for a list of required items and for more information.

Betty Lin-Fisher can be reached at 330-996-3724 or blinfisher@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter at www.twitter.com/blinfisher and see all her stories at www.ohio.com/betty

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News Headline: Underreporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents decreases public support for liquor laws | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: News-Medical.Net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEWS ARTICLES LINKING ALCOHOL TO CRIMES OR ACCIDENTS INCREASE SUPPORT FOR LIQUOR LAW ENFORCEMENT

Reading a newspaper article about the role alcohol played in an injury accident or violent crime makes people more supportive of enforcing alcohol laws, a new study suggests.

Researchers had participants read actual news reports, randomly selected from newspapers across the United States, about violent crimes and various accidental injuries - half of which were edited to mention the role of alcohol and half of which were edited not to make such mention.

Those who read the articles mentioning alcohol's role later showed more support for enforcing laws regarding serving intoxicated people, sales to underage youth and open containers, compared to those who had read the other articles.

The results are important because prior work from this research group has indicated that fewer than one-fourth of newspaper reports and one-tenth of TV news reports on alcohol-related crimes and non-car-related fatal injuries actually mention that alcohol was involved.

"The underreporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health," said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University.

"If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a public demand for tougher law enforcement."

Slater conducted the study with Andrew Hayes, associate professor, and David Edwoldsen, professor, both in the School of Communication at Ohio State; and Catherine Goodall of Kent State University.

Their study appears in the March 2012 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

The study involved a random sample of 789 adults who were recruited for the study from across the country.

Participants read online one of 60 representative articles taken from U.S. local newspapers. They were evenly split between articles about violent crimes, car crashes, and other injuries.

Half the articles mentioned that alcohol played a causative role in the crime or accident, and half did not.

Participants were told that the purpose of the study was to evaluate the news articles, such as how clear they were, and they were asked several questions about their thoughts on what they read.

They were also asked several questions asking them to indicate their level of support for current liquor laws, such as those regulating sales to underage youth, on a scale of 1 to 10. Participants were told these questions would help researchers understand their evaluation of the article.

Those who read articles mentioning alcohol use rated their support for alcohol enforcement higher than did those who read articles that had no such mention. Findings were similar whether they read articles about crimes or injuries.

Participants were also asked whether they would support new alcohol control laws, including restricting the number of bars and liquor stores in an area, restricting advertising, and making servers legally liable if they give alcohol to intoxicated customers.

The findings showed that participants who read the stories mentioning alcohol were no more likely to support these proposed new laws than those who read the other articles.

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News Headline: News Articles Linking Alcohol to Crimes Or Accidents Increase Support for Liquor Law Enforcement | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Netnews Publisher
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You Are Here: Home >> Science Briefs >> News Articles Linking Alcohol to Crimes Or Accidents Increase Support for Liquor Law Enforcement

News Articles Linking Alcohol to Crimes Or Accidents Increase Support for Liquor Law Enforcement

Posted on admin on February 23, 2012 // Leave Your Comment

Reading a newspaper article about the role alcohol played in an injury accident or violent crime makes people more supportive of enforcing alcohol laws, a new study suggests.

Researchers had participants read actual news reports, randomly selected from newspapers across the United States, about violent crimes and various accidental injuries – half of which were edited to mention the role of alcohol and half of which were edited not to make such mention.

Those who read the articles mentioning alcohol's role later showed more support for enforcing laws regarding serving intoxicated people, sales to underage youth and open containers, compared to those who had read the other articles.

The results are important because prior work from this research group has indicated that fewer than one-fourth of newspaper reports and one-tenth of TV news reports on alcohol-related crimes and non-car-related fatal injuries actually mention that alcohol was involved.

"The underreporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health," said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University.

"If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a public demand for tougher law enforcement."

Slater conducted the study with Andrew Hayes, associate professor, and David Edwoldsen, professor, both in the School of Communication at Ohio State; and Catherine Goodall of Kent State University.

Their study appears in the March 2012 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

The study involved a random sample of 789 adults who were recruited for the study from across the country.

Science Brief thanks to EurekAlert.

News articles linking alcohol to crimes or accidents increase support for liquor law enforcement

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News Headline: New Paleontology Study Results from Kent State University Described (Schweitzer) | Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Members of the Etyidae and Feldmanniidae new family have unique arrangements of the spermatheca and gonopores that permit placement of each in different families and that differentiate each from all other brachyurans. Spermathecal openings are not always positioned along the sternal suture between sternites 7 and 8, suggesting that reproductive architecture within the Brachyura and what was formerly regarded as the Podotremata is considerably more diverse and disparate than previously thought," scientists writing in the Journal of Paleontology report (see also ).

"Etyidae and Feldmanniidae radiated in the early Cretaceous and survived into the Paleogene. New taxa include Steorrosia new genus. Bretonia new genus," wrote C.E. Schweitzer and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "Faksecarcinus new genus, and sixteen new combinations."

Schweitzer and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Paleontology (Revision Of Etyidae Guinot And Tavares, 2001 (crustacea: Brachyura). Journal of Paleontology, 2012;86(1):129-155).

Additional information can be obtained by contacting C.E. Schweitzer, Kent State University, Dept. of Geol, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

The publisher of the Journal of Paleontology can be contacted at: Paleontological Soc Inc, 810 East 10TH St, Lawrence, KS 66044, USA.

Copyright © 2012 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: 5 healthiest cheeses Caine-Bish | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Friday, February 24, 2012

5 healthiest cheeses

Cheese gets a lot of bad press for clogging arteries and packing on the pounds. But just because you shouldn’t eat an entire platter of Paula Deen’s cheese balls doesn’t mean you have to avoid cheese altogether, health.yahoo.net reports.

Cheese can be both delicious and a great source of lean protein, calcium, phosphorus, and other health benefits – if you choose the right varieties. Here are five cheeses that belong on any shopping list.

1. Feta

A key component of Greek cuisine, feta is lower in fat and calories than most cheeses, says Natalie Caine-Bish, an associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Kent State University. A one-ounce serving – enough to make a Greek salad lover happy – has four grammes of protein and only 74 calories. Caine-Bish says feta’s characteristic strong flavour means you can get away with using less cheese without feeling cheated. Feta’s salty flavour makes it a good choice to crumble on salads and soups. It also pairs well with sweeter produce, like watermelon or sweet potatoes. Tip: Although domestic feta is often made with cow’s milk, Greek feta is made from sheep or goat’s milk, which makes it a good choice for someone with problems digesting bovine dairy products. Keep in mind, though, that unpasteurised feta and other soft cheeses have a higher risk of containing the Listeria bacteria than other cheeses – so be sure to buy pasteurised feta if you’ll be serving it to a pregnant woman or someone with a compromised immune system.

2. String cheese

Seriously. String cheese, that favourite kid snack, is a great choice for adults too. For starters, if you choose string cheese made of part-skim mozzarella, it’s low in calories and high in protein (a one-ounce serving has 71 calories and 7 grammes of protein). What’s more, string cheese isn’t actually a processed cheese – mozzarella naturally behaves in that stringy way, so it counts as a whole food. (Just make sure to buy string cheese that’s 100 percent mozzarella.) Tip: String cheese is “quick and easy – grab and go, and already portioned out for you”, says Silvia Veri, the nutrition supervisor at Beaumont Health System’s Weight Control Centre in Royal Oak, Michigan. The fact that it’s prepackaged makes it handy for healthy snacks at work, between errands, or at home.

3. Parmesan

Like feta, Parmesan is a great choice because just a little packs a potent, nutty punch. Parmigiano-Reggiano comes from the Parma area of Italy, and its strong flavour has inspired a lot of buzz throughout history: Samuel Pepys famously buried his Parmesan cheese to keep it safe during the Great Fire of London, and Boccacio, in The Decameron, imagines a mountain of Parmesan inhabited by macaroni and ravioli makers. Parmesan is relatively low in calories (110 in a one-ounce serving), but it’s high in sodium (449 milligrammes for the same serving size), so be sure to use it in moderation. Tip: Try shaving pieces onto a salad or eating small slices with ripe apples or pears, in addition to grating it over pasta and pizza.

4. Swiss

Swiss is another strong cheese that’s good for you. What we call Swiss cheese is often Swiss Emmentaler (or Emmental), though other cheeses with a similar taste and hole-studded texture are sometimes lumped in as well. Swiss is a popular cheese, and Caine-Bish likes it specifically for that reason. Since it comes in a number of varieties, including low-sodium or low-fat, it’s easy to find a version that fits your dietary needs. As a hard cheese, Swiss is also richer in phosphorus than nearly all soft cheeses. According to Caine-Bish, “Calcium and phosphorus are key to bone formation and to maintaining bone density” – important for women of any age. Tip: Try adding a slice to your sandwich or grating a few ounces into scrambled or baked eggs. Small slices or cubes make a great snack, especially with fruit instead of crackers.

5. Cottage cheese

There’s a reason dieters love cottage cheese: It’s high in protein, low in fat (if you buy a low-fat variety), and versatile enough to add to most any meal or snack. “You can eat it with almost anything,” says Veri. “You can eat it with veggies and make it savoury, or add fruit and cinnamon and make it sweet.” A one-ounce serving of low-fat cottage cheese has three grammes of protein and only 20 calories. Like all cheeses, it’s also high in calcium. Indian paneer, Mexican queso fresco, and other types of farmer’s cheese are simply pressed versions of cottage cheese. If you’re the DIY-type, this cheese and its firmer derivatives are some of the easiest cheeses to make at home. Tip: Cottage cheese can have a lot of sodium, especially when it’s low-fat or nonfat. Be sure to check the nutrition label on the container before buying it. Some companies, such as Lucerne and Friendship Dairy, make no-salt-added versions. daily times monitor

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News Headline: Ostracism a factor of obesity in young (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scranton Times-Tribune - Online, The
Contact Name: Cheryl Powell
News OCR Text: By Cheryl Powell (McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS)

Karen Schiely / mcclatchy newspapers Ryan Barkley, 7, participates in a research study conducted by his father, Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, Feb. 3. The research is studying the effects of the presence or absence of a single friend or a group of friends on an individual child.

AKRON, Ohio - The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise.

A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically active.

These findings - published recently in the American Academy of Pediatrics' professional journal Pediatrics - could help shed light on contributing factors and potential solutions for the nation's childhood obesity epidemic.

"Ostracism appears to cause a reduction in physical activity," said study co-author Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., an assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State. "It could create a scenario where if you're an overweight or obese child, that ostracism could reduce your physical activity. As you get more ostracized, you get heavier; you get more ostracized because you got heavier, and things get worse and worse."

Dr. Barkley found other studies showing a link between ostracism or bullying and a decline in activity. But previous research didn't show a clear cause and effect.

For example, one study determined that children who felt teased verbally or physically were less likely to be active and more likely to be overweight, Dr. Barkley said.

In his study, Dr. Barkley and his colleagues observed 19 boys and girls ages 8 to 12 who completed two experimental sessions at Kent State.

During one session, children playing a ball-toss computer game received the ball one-third of the time. During the other, the computer was programmed to exclude the children from receiving the ball most of the time.

After playing the computer games, the participants were taken to a gym, where they were allowed to choose sedentary or physical activities.

When excluded by the computer game, the participants spent 41 percent more time with sedentary activities, the study found. When the children were included in the computer game, their physical activity level in the gym was 22 percent higher.

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News Headline: Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Victorville Daily Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity

February 23, 2012 9:49 AM

AKRON BEACON JOURNAL

AKRON, OHIO • The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise.

A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically active.

These findings - published recently in the American Academy of Pediatrics' professional journal Pediatrics - could help shed light on contributing factors and potential solutions for the nation's childhood obesity epidemic.

"Ostracism appears to cause a reduction in physical activity," said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State. "It could create a scenario where if you're an overweight or obese child, that ostracism could reduce your physical activity. As you get more ostracized, you get heavier, you get more ostracized because you got heavier and things get worse and worse."

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of children and adolescents are overweight.

Barkley got the idea for the study while watching his three sons, ages 3 to 7, playing in their backyard.

"I noticed when friends came over, the intensity of their activity increased dramatically," he said. "After seeing that, I went and looked at the literature in terms of peer influence and physical activity behavior."

Barkley found other studies showing a link between ostracism or bullying and a decline in physical activity. But previous research didn't show a clear cause and effect.

For example, one study determined that children who felt teased verbally or physically were less likely to be active and more likely to be overweight, Barkley said. "But does this peer victimization cause them to be less active, or (does) the fact that they're less active cause victimization?"

In his study, Barkley and his colleagues observed 19 boys and girls ages 8 to 12 who completed two experimental sessions at Kent State.

During one session, children playing a ball-toss computer game received the ball one-third of the time. During the other, the computer was programmed to exclude the children from receiving the ball most of the time.

After playing the computer games, the participants were taken to a gym, where they were allowed to choose sedentary or physical activities.

When they were excluded by the computer game, the study participants spent 41 percent more time with sedentary activities, such as reading books, coloring or playing matching games, the study found. When the children were included in the computer game, their physical activity level in the gym was 22 percent higher.

"I think it's really important that children have positive peer interaction in their life," Barkley said.

Barkley is conducting follow-up research exploring whether positive peer interaction encourages physical activity.

See archived 'Features' stories >>

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News Headline: Dr. Seuss' Birthday Celebration slated for March 10 at Ashtabula Towne Square | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Local News

February 22, 2012

Dr. Seuss' Birthday Celebration slated for March 10 at Ashtabula Towne Square

ASHTABULA TOWNSHIP -

 Ashtabula Towne Square will once again become the place to celebrate all things Seuss when the Ashtabula County Literacy Coalition hosts its annual Dr. Seuss' Birthday Celebration.

The public celebration of reading, hosted in conjunction with Read Across America Day, is held each year near the birthday of beloved book author Dr. Seuss.

This year's event is expected to be the biggest yet, with volunteer readers, puppet shows, free books and activities with a special Dr. Seuss character.

The event will begin at noon March 10 in the Center Court of the mall. Parents are encouraged to bring their cameras. Children in pre-kindergarten through fourth-grade are welcome. One book per child will be distributed until supplies run out.

Ashtabula County Literacy Coalition members are the Ashtabula County Technical and Career Center, Adult Basic and Literacy Education/ABLE Program, After School Discovery, Andover Public Library, Ashtabula Area City Schools/ESOL Program, Ashtabula County District Library, Ashtabula County Educational Service Center, Ashtabula County Head Start, Ashtabula Towne Square, Conneaut Public Library, Gazette News-papers, Harbor-Topky Library, Henderson Public Library, Kent State Uni-versity-Ashtabula, Kings-ville Public Library, Media One, and the Star Beacon Newspapers in Education Program.

For more information, call 440-576-5599.



Copyright

2012

The Star Beacon; Ashtabula, Ohio. All rights

reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,

rewritten or redistributed.

Local News

Area congregations mark start of Lent

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News Headline: Village chamber continues to grow McFadden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: / News / Local News /

Village chamber continues to grow

February 24, 2012

By NANCY TULLIS - Wellsville Reporter ( ntullis@reviewonline.com )

The Review

WELLSVILLE - "The Chamber is continuing to grow by leaps and bounds," Randy Allmon, president of the Wellsville Area Chamber of Commerce told members Thursday.

The group had its monthly meeting at the Riverside Roadhouse, with Chris Arnott of Nationwide Insurance honored as business of the month. Allmon said Arnott came from PNC Bank to purchase Nationwide Insurance in June of 2011, and also has an office in Lisbon.

Allmon welcomed John Morrow and Yvonne Twyford as new members and Debbie Koffel as a new board member Thursday. He said the board is currently reviewing applications for four more new memberships.

Mary Beth Morse of Potter Players gave Chamber members information about the community theater group's current production, "Harmony Romances" by Ron Hill. Morse is directing the production which is set for tonight, Saturday and March 3 at 7:30 p.m., and 2 p.m. March 4 at the playhouse at 417 15th Street.

Cost is $8 for adults and $7 for students and seniors. For reservations call (330) 532-5540.

Guest speaker for the luncheon was Tim McFadden, CPA, academic program director for applied business technologies at Kent State University East Liverpool and Salem campuses. McFadden spoke about the various business courses and degree program offerings locally. He said students can pursue three associate degrees in business - accounting, business management, and computer technology - locally, as well as a bachelor's degree in business management.

McFadden also said some new programs are in the works, but are currently under review by the Ohio Board of Regents.

Chamber members also discussed upcoming events, including a business breakfast at 7:30 a.m. March 9 at the East Liverpool Motor Lodge. The event is free for Chamber members.

The next luncheon is at noon March 29 at Riverside Roadhouse.

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News Headline: 'Evil Dead: The Musical' at Kent Stark is silly fun - Canton, OH - CantonRep.com | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CantonRep.com staff writer

Posted Feb 23, 2012 @ 09:00 AM

Related Stories

Video: ‘Evil Dead: The musical' at Kent Stark

JACKSON TWP. -

  There's little that's really evil in "Evil Dead: The Musical," running through Sunday at Kent State University Stark Campus.

Based on a trio of gory, low-budget, cult-favorite horror flicks, this student stage production is not for a moment frightening, and the blood-and-guts quotient is less than expected. Instead, "Evil Dead" is silly fun. The show operates on the level of an extended "Saturday Night Live" skit, sprinkled with profanity and frequent rude jokes. I laughed often.

The storyline is minimal: A bunch of college kids head to a remote cabin in the woods for Spring Break, where they quickly and unwittingly unleash a demonic force that leads to death, mayhem, lost limbs, tree demons, comedy and show tunes.

Seth Hunter gives a memorable, energetic and consistently entertaining performance as Ash, the irreverent hero who shifts from a nice guy (who sells housewares at S-Mart) into a vengeful survivalist. There's a terrific slapstick sequence in which one of his hands becomes possessed and starts beating him up.

Steven Grisez generates plenty of laughter as Jake, a cunning yet stupid backwoods kinda-guy who becomes enmeshed in the demon-cabin events. His big musical number, "Good Old Reliable Jake," is a dead-ringer for a dramatic Meatloaf ballad.

As the hapless Annie, Elizabeth Casper does well with her '50s-style ballad, "All the Men in My Life Keep Getting Killed by Candarian Demons." John Walker amuses as Ash's best pal Scotty, whose cocky, profane personality reminded me of Stifler in "American Pie." Samantha Rickard is a lively presence as Ash's sister Cheryl, whose demonic alter-ego pops out of the basement with regularity to deliver teasing wisecracks.   

The first two rows of the theater are designated as a splatter zone, whose occupants are occasionally squirted with fake blood by a trio of demons in leotards.

Remaining performances of "Evil Dead: The Musical" are at 8 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday in the Kent State Stark Theatre in the Fine Arts Building on the campus at 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Tickets are $14 for adults, and $10 for students 17 and younger, and senior citizens. To order, call 330-244-3348 weekdays from 1 to 5 p.m.

 

  There's little that's really evil in "Evil Dead: The Musical," running through Sunday at Kent State University Stark Campus.

Based on a trio of gory, low-budget, cult-favorite horror flicks, this student stage production is not for a moment frightening, and the blood-and-guts quotient is less than expected. Instead, "Evil Dead" is silly fun. The show operates on the level of an extended "Saturday Night Live" skit, sprinkled with profanity and frequent rude jokes. I laughed often.

The storyline is minimal: A bunch of college kids head to a remote cabin in the woods for Spring Break, where they quickly and unwittingly unleash a demonic force that leads to death, mayhem, lost limbs, tree demons, comedy and show tunes.

Seth Hunter gives a memorable, energetic and consistently entertaining performance as Ash, the irreverent hero who shifts from a nice guy (who sells housewares at S-Mart) into a vengeful survivalist. There's a terrific slapstick sequence in which one of his hands becomes possessed and starts beating him up.

Steven Grisez generates plenty of laughter as Jake, a cunning yet stupid backwoods kinda-guy who becomes enmeshed in the demon-cabin events. His big musical number, "Good Old Reliable Jake," is a dead-ringer for a dramatic Meatloaf ballad.

As the hapless Annie, Elizabeth Casper does well with her '50s-style ballad, "All the Men in My Life Keep Getting Killed by Candarian Demons." John Walker amuses as Ash's best pal Scotty, whose cocky, profane personality reminded me of Stifler in "American Pie." Samantha Rickard is a lively presence as Ash's sister Cheryl, whose demonic alter-ego pops out of the basement with regularity to deliver teasing wisecracks.   

The first two rows of the theater are designated as a splatter zone, whose occupants are occasionally squirted with fake blood by a trio of demons in leotards.

Remaining performances of "Evil Dead: The Musical" are at 8 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday in the Kent State Stark Theatre in the Fine Arts Building on the campus at 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Tickets are $14 for adults, and $10 for students 17 and younger, and senior citizens. To order, call 330-244-3348 weekdays from 1 to 5 p.m.

 

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News Headline: Looking for an "alternative" THURSDAY activity? Look here. | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: More in: AP Top 25 site

Looking for an "alternative" THURSDAY activity? Look here.

By Anonymous

CantonRep.com staff report

Posted Feb 23, 2012 @ 08:30 AM

                                 YOUR DAILY CALENDAR

• Electric Blues, featuring the Wallace Coleman Band; Coleman was 10-year veteran of Grammy Award-winning Robert Lockwood Jr. Band and started own band in 1996; 6 p.m.; Kent State University Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; free; 330-499-9600, www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity .

• Alternative Photography: Cyanotype Prints; for teens; learn to create cyanotypes, photographic prints using special light-sensitive paper; taught by artist Emily Vigil from Massillon Museum; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Stark County District Library Jackson Township Branch, 7487 Fulton Drive NW; free; registration requested, 330-833-1010, www.starklibrary.org .

• "Listening In - American History 1809-2010" historical play; performed by Rainbow Repertory Company; 7 to 9 p.m.; Cable Recital Hall, Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Ave. N, Canton; adults, $5; students, $2; 330-284-3421; www.rainbowrepertory.com .

Find more events, or post your own, at CalendarofOhio.com .

 

                                 YOUR DAILY CALENDAR

• Electric Blues, featuring the Wallace Coleman Band; Coleman was 10-year veteran of Grammy Award-winning Robert Lockwood Jr. Band and started own band in 1996; 6 p.m.; Kent State University Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; free; 330-499-9600, www.stark.kent.edu/about/diversity .

• Alternative Photography: Cyanotype Prints; for teens; learn to create cyanotypes, photographic prints using special light-sensitive paper; taught by artist Emily Vigil from Massillon Museum; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Stark County District Library Jackson Township Branch, 7487 Fulton Drive NW; free; registration requested, 330-833-1010, www.starklibrary.org .

• "Listening In - American History 1809-2010" historical play; performed by Rainbow Repertory Company; 7 to 9 p.m.; Cable Recital Hall, Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Ave. N, Canton; adults, $5; students, $2; 330-284-3421; www.rainbowrepertory.com .

Find more events, or post your own, at CalendarofOhio.com .

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News Headline: Concert to feature pianist Maria Liliestedt | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hot Links

Concert to feature pianist Maria Liliestedt

By Anonymous

Posted Feb 23, 2012 @ 07:20 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

Pianist Maira Liliestedt will perform Franz Liszt's "Piano Concerto No. 1 in E-flat" at 7 p.m. Saturday when the Tuscarawas Philharmonic appears in concert in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

Tickets range from $9 to $32, depending on location and whether it is a student, senior, or adult ticket. In addition, a $3 facility fee is added to each ticket by the Performing Arts Center. All  seats are reserved.

Tickets can be reserved at the orchestra's website ww.TuscarawasPhilharmonic.org,  where concert-goers can see what seats are available at what prices and can reserve their choices by clicking on those exact seats on the diagram and paying by credit card.

Tickets also can be reserved at the PAC box office or by calling 330-308-6400. Philharmonic tickets are not available through the PAC's website.

Concert guarantor is Barbour Publishing and the concert sponsors are ProVia Door and an anonymous donor.

Pianist Maira Liliestedt will perform Franz Liszt's "Piano Concerto No. 1 in E-flat" at 7 p.m. Saturday when the Tuscarawas Philharmonic appears in concert in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

Tickets range from $9 to $32, depending on location and whether it is a student, senior, or adult ticket. In addition, a $3 facility fee is added to each ticket by the Performing Arts Center. All  seats are reserved.

Tickets can be reserved at the orchestra's website ww.TuscarawasPhilharmonic.org,  where concert-goers can see what seats are available at what prices and can reserve their choices by clicking on those exact seats on the diagram and paying by credit card.

Tickets also can be reserved at the PAC box office or by calling 330-308-6400. Philharmonic tickets are not available through the PAC's website.

Concert guarantor is Barbour Publishing and the concert sponsors are ProVia Door and an anonymous donor.

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News Headline: 2Do: Museums, parks, family events and more for Feb. 24-March 1, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Cleveland Institute of Art. Ohio Bell Auditorium, Ohio Bell Auditorium, 11141 East Blvd. 216-421-7000 or cia.edu. "A Rich Tapestry: CIA’s Diverse African-American Alumni." Historian Mark Bassett, scholar in residence in CIA’s Liberal Arts Environment, presents an illustrated lecture based on his research into the accomplishments of some of CIA’s most noted African-American alumni including portrait artist and interior decorator Charles Sallée and painter Hughie Lee-Smith (both class of 1938). 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Free.

Lorain County Metro Parks. French Creek Reservation's Burrell Homestead, 4792 E. River Road, Sheffield. 19th Century Lorain County and African-Americans. Learn about life in 19th century Lorain County for African-Americans during a Burrell House tour. 11 a.m. Saturday. Free.

FAMILY ACTIVITIES

Zoos

Akron Zoological Park. 500 Edgewood Ave. 330-375-2550 or akronzoo.org. Winter hours through April 30: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Closed major holidays. $6, nonmembers; free, zoo members ($2 parking for nonmembers).

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. 3900 Wildlife Way. 216-661-6500 or clemetzoo.com. Winter zoo hours and RainForest: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Australian Adventure closed for the season. Admission: $8; $5, ages 2-11; free, ages under 2 and zoo members. Mondays free for residents of Cuyahoga County and Hinckley Township.

Greater Cleveland Aquarium. 2000 Sycamore St. 216-862-8803 or greaterclevelandaquarium.com. Features more than 40 tanks, including a walk-through shark tank. Strollers and wagons are temporarily not permitted in the aquarium until it is fully wheelchair accessible. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. $21.95; $15.95, ages 2-12. Annual pass: $50, adults; $90, couple; $130, family (two adults and two children) with each additional child $25.

PANCAKE BREAKFASTS

Lorain County Metro Parks. Carlisle Reservation, Visitor Center, 12882 Diagonal Road, LaGrange. 440-458-5121 or loraincountymetroparks.com. Pancake Breakfast. This event organized by Friends of Metro Parks in Lorain County. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $6.50, adults; $4, children 2-10; free, ages under 2.

Nature Center at Shaker Lakes. 2600 South Park Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-321-5935 or shakerlakes.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Trails open dawn to dusk. Pancake Breakfast With the Birds. Exhibitions, activities and guided nature hikes for the family. Preregistration recommended. 8 a.m.-noon Saturday. $8, adults; $5, children 4-10; free, ages 3 and under. Co-presented with the Rotary Club of Shaker Heights.

PARTICIPATORY ACTIVITIES

Cleveland Metroparks. Brecksville Reservation, Nature Center, Chippewa Creek Drive, off Ohio 82, Brecksville. 440-526-1012 or clevelandmetroparks.com. Hand-feed a Chickadee. Visitors can experience feeding a bird from their hand. Sunflower seeds and instructions provided. 10 a.m.-noon Saturday-Sunday.

Cleveland Metroparks Rocky River Reservation. Maple Grove Picnic Area, off Valley Parkway, between Cedar Point and Spafford roads, Brook Park. 440-734-6660. History of Maple Sugaring. Learn how and when maple trees are tapped to enjoy the sweet maple syrup taste. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through March. 11. Free.

Cleveland Metroparks South Chagrin Reservation. Miles and Chagrin River roads, east of SOM Center Road (Ohio 91), Bentleyville. 440-247-7075. Snowshoe With IGO. Try a pair of snowshoes and hike along a course set up for the day. Institute of the Great Outdoors staff will rent snowshoes when snow is 4 inches or deeper. No special boots are required for snowshoeing, but waterproof footwear is suggested. Last rental is at 2 p.m. Call IGO at 216-341-1704 for more information. Ages 8 and older with participating adult. Registration suggested. 11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday. $10. Weather permitting.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Ira Trailhead, Riverview Road, north of Ira Road, Peninsula. Winter Marshlands Hike. Explore what is happening at the Beaver Marsh in winter by joining a park ranger for a 1.5-mile walk along the Towpath Trail. 2-3:30 p.m. Sunday. Cuyahoga Valley National Park Headquarters, Riverview and Vaughn roads, Brecksville. 1-800-468-4070 or nps.gov/cuva. Winter Warm-up Hike. Warm up with a trek of seven miles on the difficult Buckeye and Valley trails. 9-11:30 a.m. Sunday. Ledges Shelter, Truxell Road (two miles east of Akron-Peninsula Road), Peninsula. Winter Sunset Hike. After hiking 1.5 miles among sandstone cliffs, watch darkness fall from the Ledges Overlook. Wear sturdy shoes or boots, and bring a camera or sketch pad to capture the beauty of a Cuyahoga Valley sunset. 5-7 p.m. Saturday.

Geauga Park District. West Woods Nature Center, 9465 Kinsman Road, Russell Township. 440-286-9516 or geaugaparkdistrict.org. Afternoon Hike. See the sights of the season with a naturalist. 4 p.m. Sunday.

Lorain County Metro Parks. Carlisle Reservation, Visitor Center, 12882 Diagonal Road, LaGrange. 440-458-5121 or loraincountymetroparks.com. Winterscapes at Carlisle. Search the Meadow Loop Trail for unique scenic views. Cameras recommended. Moderate hiking level. 9 a.m. Saturday. Columbia Reservation, 25145 Royalton Road (Ohio 82), Columbia Station. Power Hike. Come out for a brisk hike on the trails of Columbia. Difficult hiking level. 2:30 p.m. Tuesday. Kopf Family Reservation, 32649 Electric Blvd., Avon Lake. Woodland Walk. A guided walk through the woodlands of the Kopf Family Reservation. Moderate hike. 9 a.m. Wednesday.

Sandy Ridge Reservation's Johnson Wetland Center, 6195 Otten Road, North Ridgeville. Winter Hike and Campfire. A brisk hike around the park, followed by a campfire. Strenuous hiking level. 1:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Summit County Metro Parks. Firestone Metro Parks Tuscarawas Meadows Area, 2620 Harrington Road, Akron. Lantern Scavenger Hunt. Join a naturalist for this scavenger hunt about the stars, with American Indian stories around the campfire. Marshmallows provided. 6 p.m. Saturday. Liberty Park's Recreation Area, 9385 Liberty Road, Twinsburg. Top of the South Ledges. Hike with a naturalist to look for winter animals by sight, tracks and scat, in an undeveloped area of Liberty Park where orchards once grew. 2 p.m. Saturday.

PARKS/OUTDOORS

Cleveland Metroparks. South Chagrin Reservation's Look About Lodge, 37374 Miles Road, Bentleyville. 440-247-7075 or clevelandmetroparks.com. Eye on the Environment Film Series: "FRESH." "FRESH" celebrates a new way of thinking about food production in America. Farmers, business people and others share their insights and successes. For ages 14 and over. 7 p.m. today. Nature's Chisels. Watch for woodpeckers at the lodge's feeders, learn about their habits and how to tell them apart, and make a feeder to take home. Registration is required and space is limited. 1 p.m. Sunday. Mill Stream Run Reservation's Chalet Recreation Area, Valley Parkway between U.S. 42 and Ohio 82, Strongsville. 440-572-9990 or clevelandmetroparks.com. Chalet Toboggan Chutes. All riders must wear gloves or mittens. Children must be at least 42 inches tall to ride, and must be accompanied by an adult. Personal toboggans are not allowed at the facility. 6-10 p.m. Thursdays (through February); 6-10:30 p.m. Fridays, noon-10:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon-5 p.m. Sundays (through March 11). $8, adults; $6, children 11 and under. Fee includes unlimited rides and use of toboggans for the day. $3 one-time ride tickets are also available. $35 for adults, $25 for children, ages 11 and under for season pass. $100 for a family season pass (up to four people). North Chagrin Reservation, Nature Center, Sunset Lane off SOM Center Road, Mayfield. 440-473-3370 or clemetparks.com. Family Friday Night: Wintering in Mexico. View a video about migrating monarch butterflies, then create a butterfly craft to take home as a reminder that winter is more than half over. 7 p.m. today. Saturday Night Special: "Upper Michigan: Rare Plants, Rugged Scenery" with Tom Sampliner. Rugged escarpments, beach dunes and swales, boreal forest and rare plants along with lots of birds and critters attract naturalists to the Upper Peninsula. Tom Sampliner will share the natural beauty of the region. Space limited. 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

Geauga Park District. Big Creek Park, Donald W. Meyer Center, 9160 Robinson Road, Chardon Township. 440-286-9516 or geaugaparkdistrict.org. Travelogue: Up Close & Personal in Kenya. Join Bill and Sue Berger as they share their visit to Lewa, a private rhino sanctuary in Kenya. Days there were filled with game drives, a dog tracking exhibition, a water project and visits to a boma (traditional Masai village), a community school and an elephant orphanage. 1-2 p.m. Sunday.

Lake Metroparks. Farmpark, 8800 Chardon Road (U.S. 6), Kirtland. 440-256-2122 or lakemetroparks.com. Farmpark is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas, New Year's Day, Vintage Ohio and on Mondays through March. Open Martin Luther King Jr. Day and Presidents Day. Exhibit: "The 21st annual Quilts Show." During Farmpark hours. Through Wednesday, March 21.

Lorain County Metro Parks. Carlisle Reservation, Visitor Center, 12882 Diagonal Road, LaGrange. 440-458-5121 or loraincountymetroparks.com. Art Show: Erie Shore Art League. Artwork from the members of the Erie Shore Art League is on display. 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. today-Sunday. Maple Surgaring. Learn about the history and science of maple sugaring process through lecture, hiking and visiting the sugar shack. Noon-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Free. Schoepfle Garden and Visitor Center, 11106 Market St., Birmingham. 440-965-7237 or loraincountymetroparks.com. Winter Wonderland Craft Day. Get out of the house to make fun winter crafts. Registration required. 10 a.m. Saturday. $1.

Summit County Metro Parks. F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm/Visitors Center, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. 330-865-8065 or summitmetroparks.org. Amphibian Mania. Join a naturalist for an evening filled with amphibians. Learn about salamander and toad migrations and where to see them. A short presentation, live animals and a craft are included. 7 p.m. today. Wildlife & Wood Workshop. Discover the types of squirrels you can attract to your backyard, and then build a squirrel-in-the-jar feeder. Registration required. Participation is required to purchase a kit. Space limited. 11 a.m. Saturday. $20 per kit. Limit one kit per family. Leap Ahead: Butterflies & Moths. Leap ahead to warmer days by discovering with a naturalist some of the beautiful butterflies and moths that you can attract to your backyard this spring and summer. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Firestone Metro Park's Coventry Oaks Pavilion, 40 Axline Road, Akron. 330-865-8065 or summitmetroparks.org. Bogs and Fens: What's the Difference? Learn from naturalist Dave Brumfield about these wetlands found throughout Northeast Ohio, including how they are formed, their plant and animal life and why these fragile habitats are important. 1 p.m. Saturday.

MUSEUMS

Children's Museum of Cleveland. 10730 Euclid Ave. 216-791-7114 or clevelandchildrensmuseum.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Daily. $7, adults and children; free for 11 months and younger. Exhibit: Galapagos Sands: Exploring the Centuries. Children can uncover tortoise eggs, sail in a pirate ship and search in the sand for artifacts from the past. Composed of over 70 tons of sand, the exhibit will allow you and your children to explore the unique and amazing environment of the Galapagos Islands. Through Sunday, April 15. Free with admission. Pirate Family Adventure: Voyage to Galapagos. Your family will work together to search for clues and find the hidden treasure on the island. No need to barter for grub -- finger food and light refreshments provided for all of the swashbucklers. There will be activity stations throughout the museum, including map and telescope making, flag design, explorer gear, and ship building and testing. Feel free to dress like captains or pirates. Registration required. 5:30-8 p.m. Saturday. $10, members; $15, nonmembers; free, children 2 and under.

Cleveland Botanical Garden. 11030 East Blvd. 216-721-1600 or cbgarden.org. Winter hours: Nov. 1 through March 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday; closed Mondays. Hershey Children's Garden closed for the winter. All other gardens remain open. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day. Hours subject to change.Closed Mondays. $8.50, adults; $3, children 3-12; free, members and children under 3. Events, exhibits and programs free with garden admission. Orchid Mania: This Side of Paradise. Hundreds of orchids will be on display. Opens Saturday. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and noon- 5 p.m. Sundays through March 25. Closed Mondays. $9.50; $3, ages 3-12; free, members and ages 3 and under.

Cleveland Hungarian Heritage Society. Galleria at Erieview, 1301 East Ninth St. 216-523-3900 or jcu.edu/language/hunghemu. On the second floor of the Galleria. The museum's mission is preserving Hungarian culture and the experiences of Hungarians in Northeast Ohio. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. By appointment only Monday and Saturday. Free.

Cleveland Museum of Natural History. 1 Wade Oval Drive. 216-231-4600 or cmnh.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday (until 10 p.m. Wednesday); noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Closed holidays. $10; $8, ages 7-18, college students with ID, seniors 60 and up; $7, kids ages 3-6; free, 2 and younger. Family Health Fair. Come to the museum for health screenings, demonstrations about exercise and good nutrition, and make-and-take activities for the whole family. Free. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Sponsored by MetroHealth, Medical Mutual of Ohio, and Target.

Croatian Heritage Museum and Library. 34900 Lake Shore Blvd., Eastlake. 440-946-2044 or croatianmuseum.com. Museum and library hours: 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays; 3-8 p.m. Fridays; and 1-5 p.m. Saturdays. Group tours can be arranged.

Dennison Railroad Depot Museum. 400 Center St. 740-922-6776 or dennisondepot.org. Museum and Whistle Stop Gift Shop, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. today; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday.

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Learning Center and Money Museum. 1455 East Sixth St. 216-579-3188 or clevelandfed.org. Learn what gives money value while exploring more than 30 interactive exhibits in the main lobby. Free admission. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Closed holidays.

Great Lakes Science Center. 601 Erieside Ave., Cleveland. 216-694-2000 or greatscience.com. Great Lakes Science Center Open Daily (closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day) 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Steamship William G. Mather 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Open May, September, October (weekends only) Open June, July, August (Tuesday – Sunday). Girls Go! Science Workshop. Led by women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Explore different careers, meet female student-scientists from local universities and engage in fun learning and group projects. Open to girls in grades 6-12. Includes admission to Great Lakes Science Center and NASA Glenn Visitor Center. Registration required. Saturday. 216-694-2000 or greatscience.com. $27 members; $32, nonmembers.

International Women's Air and Space Museum. Burke Lakefront Airport terminal lobby, 1501 N. Marginal Road, Cleveland. 216-623-1111 or iwasm.org. Self-guided tours during airport hours. Research center and gift shop with original documents, photos and books. Center and gift shop: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Free.

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $3-$5. Exhibit: A Day at the Beach. A selection of garments worn near and at the beach between the 1860s and 1910s. Through Sunday, Oct. 7. Exhibit: On the Home Front: Civil War Fashions and Domestic Life. An exhibit about the material circumstances and domestic life during the Civil War and in the years that followed. Display of women's and children's costumes, which is supplemented with related photographs, decorative arts and women's magazines. In observance of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Through Sunday, Aug. 26.

Kent State University Planetarium. Smith Hall, Room 108, East Summit Street. 330-672-2246. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. Free. Not recommended for children under 6. Registration required. 8 p.m. today.

Lake View Cemetery. 12316 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-421-2665 or lakeviewcemetery.com. Cemetery hours: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. daily. The Garfield Monument and Wade Memorial Chapel are both closed for the season. To register for programs, call Mary Krohmer, director of community relations, at 216-421-2687.

Lorain County Historical Society. Hickories Museum and Hickories Memorial Library, 509 Washington Ave., Elyria. 440-322-3341 or lchs.org. 1-4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturday. $5, adults; $3, children 13-18; $2, children under 6; free, members. Exhibit: Girl Scouts USA -- 100 Years Celebration. The Lorain County Girl Scouts, with the assistance of Dot MacIntyre, will display many historical Girl Scouts items, including clothing and accessories, books, dolls, ceramics, tins, posters and newspaper articles. If you are a former or current Girl Scout and would like to share memories of your experience with this organization, contact the museum. Exhibit runs through Nov. 2. Free with admission.

Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. 2929 Richmond Road, Beachwood. 216-593-0575 or maltzmuseum.org. Features a rich selection from the Temple Museum of Religious Art's collection of art and artifacts that includes ritual objects, sacred books and scrolls and fine art from around the world. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday); noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Closed all holiday Mondays unless noted on the website. $12; $10, seniors 60 and older, and students 12 and up; $5, children 5-11. Free for Maltz Museum members and children under 5. Family Fun Day. Spend the afternoon playing games, making art, and visiting the special exhibition, "Project Mah Jongg." Enjoy Chinese checkers, card games, Scrabble and an introduction to the game of mah jongg. 1-4 p.m. Sunday. Free with admission.

Mill Creek Falls History Center. 8404 Webb Terrace, Cleveland. 216-271-9300 or slavicvillagehistory.org. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Monday through Friday by appointment. Learn about the history of the Slavic Village and Mill Creek neighborhoods.

National Cleveland-Style Polka Hall of Fame. 605 East 222nd St., Euclid. 216-261-3263 or clevelandstyle.com. Polka history and memorabilia. Free. Noon-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday, Monday and holidays.

National First Ladies Library Education and Research Center. Education and Research Center, 205 S. Market Ave., Canton. 330-452-0876 or firstladies.org. Guided tours: 9:30 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. $7; $6, seniors; $5, children under 18; $2 off regular admission with National Park Passes. Admission also includes the Saxton McKinley House located one block south at 331 S. Market Ave. "Rising to the Occasion." Exhibit examines the role of first ladies during disaster, war and other crises. Through Friday, May 4.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. 1100 Rock and Roll Blvd., Cleveland. 216-781-7625, 1-800-493-7655 or rockhall.com. Music memorabilia (exhibits, sounds and experiences of artists, songwriters and producers from every era). 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. daily. $13-$22 (two-day passes for consecutive days available). $18 for residents of Northeast Ohio with ZIP codes beginning with 440, 441, 442 or 443 with an ID. Permanent Exhibits: "Hall of Fame Inductee Gallery," "The Roots of Rock and Roll: Blues, Gospel, Country/Folk/Bluegrass and R&B," "Cleveland Rocks," "Cities and Sounds," "Films at the Rock Hall," "Treasures From the Vault." Today-Thursday. Traveling Exhibit: "Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power." Museum's Floors 5 and 6: The important roles women have played in rock and roll from its inception through today. Closes Sunday.

Shaker Historical Society. 16740 South Park Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-921-1201 or shakerhistory.com. Hours: 2-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday. Closed holidays. $4, nonmembers; $2, children 6-18; free, members and children under 6. Exhibit: The Selling of Peaceful Shaker Village: Shaker Heights 1905 -1930. This exhibit tells the story of the Van Sweringen brothers’ purchase of land options, their extraordinary vision for Shaker Heights, and the beginning of the development of a planned community that made the nation take notice. Through Friday, March 30. Exhibit: The Van Sweringen Legacy: Shaker Heights, The Rapid and Terminal Tower. The exhibit tells the life story of Oris Paxton and Mantis James Van Sweringen, born in Wooster, Ohio, in 1879 and 1881, respectively. Industrious and enterprising, they rose to fame and power in the early 1900s in Cleveland. The exhibit explores their humble beginnings and the iconic Cleveland landmarks that resulted from their visionary leadership. Permanent exhibit.

Western Reserve Historical Society. 10825 East Blvd., Cleveland. 216-721-5722 or wrhs.org. Includes the Hay-McKinney Mansion. The Crawford Auto Aviation collection galleries are temporarily closed for renovations. All other areas of the WRHS History center will remain open during construction. Museum: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Hay-McKinney Mansion tours are noon, 1:30 and 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 12:30, 2 and 3:30 p.m. Sunday. Private tours by appointment only. Library/archives and Genealogy Center: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. $8.50; $7.50, seniors; $5, students; free, members and children under 2. Exhibit: Through the Lens of Allen E. Cole. Showcasing the work of the renowned Cleveland African-American photographer. Highlights include a Cole self-portrait and images of businesses, churches and social organizations in the Cedar-Central neighborhood during the 1930s and 1940s. The exhibit runs through May 25. Exhibit: "Domare: The art and history of Italian stone carving in Northeast Ohio" by sculptor Giancarlo Calicchia. The installation explores the past and present of Italian stone carving in the region, drawing connections between area landmarks, such as monuments in Lake View Cemetery, carvings on the Hope Memorial Bridge and the great sandstone formations of Berea, with current work from Calicchia's Cleveland studios. Exhibit run through Sept. 8. Free with admission. Hale Farm & Village, 2686 Oak Hill Road, Bath. 330-666-3711 or halefarm.org. Late fall, winter and spring (November through May): Open for special programs. The 13th annual "A Fugitive’s Path -- Escape on the Underground Railroad." The 90-minute interactive, role-playing program involves visitors in the story of the Underground Railroad. Evening tours depart every 20 minutes. Reservations required. 6 to 9 p.m. Feb. 21-24, 28-29, March 1-2, 5-9, 12-15, 27-31, April 3-7, 10-14. $20, nonmembers; $15, members; $12, students. Call for more details.

Just for fun

Lakewood Public Library. 15425 Detroit Ave. 216-226-8275 or lkwdpl.org. Family Music & More: Jungle Terry. Learn all about the animals Jungle Terry cares for and more. 7 p.m. Saturday. Free.

Middlefield Market Complex. 15848 Nauvoo Road. 440-632-3196. Middlefield Market's annual Chili Cook-Off. A chili sampler pack containing 8 cups, a spoon and a People%u2019s Choice ballot for $3. Patrons select samples from a wide spectrum of chilies including shredded beef, chicken, hot, mild, spicy and vegetarian. The Farmers Grill will be open with full menu options. 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.

Theater

Beck Center for the Arts Teen Theater. Studio Theater, 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. 216-521-2540 or beckcenter.org. Craig Lucas' "Reckless." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $12, adults; $10, students 18 and under. Through Sunday, March 4.

Fairmount Temple. 23737 Fairmount Blvd., Beachwood. (216) 464-1430. Cinderella's Royal Ball presented by Mandel JCC Playmakers Youth Theatre. A special event just for families with children eight and under. During this magical afternoon, little princes and princesses will enjoy a dance with Cinderella on stage and a backstage “tour†of her castle. Punch and pastry will be served and all royal guests are encouraged to come in costume. For reservation, call 216-831-0700, ext. 1230. 12:30 p.m. Sunday. $5 per person.

Fine Arts Association's Yarnell Youth Theatre Company. Corning Auditorium, 38660 Mentor Ave. , Willoughby. 440-951-7500 or fineartsassociation.org. "Alice in Wonderland." 7:30 p.m. today; 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $17; $15, senior citizens and students 11 and up; $10, children 10 and under. Sign-interpreted performance: Sunday.

Firestone Theatre. Firestone High School, 333 Rampart Ave., Akron. 330-873-3408 or firestonetheatre.com. "Legally Blonde, the Musical." 7 p.m. Wednesday; 7:30 p.m. Thursday. $8, Wednesday. All other performances through Saturday, March 3: $8-$10. Reserved, VIP seats: $13.

Hawken Upper School. Kennedy Auditorium, 12465 County Line Road, Gates Mills. 440-423-4446, ext. 430 or hawken.edu. "Godspell." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $12, patron; $5 general seating.

Lake Ridge Academy School of Fine Arts. 37501 Center Ridge Road, North Ridgeville. 440-327-1175 or lakeridgeacademy.org. "The Wedding Singer, the Musical." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Donations accepted. Through Saturday, March 3.

Magnificat High School. 20770 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River. 440-331-1572 or magnificaths.org. "The seventh annual Magnificat Talent Show." 7:30 p.m. today. $5. Proceeds benefit H2O for Life.

Mandel JCC Playmakers Youth Theatre. Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple, 23737 Fairmount Blvd., Beachwood. 216-831-0700, ext. 1230 or mandeljcc.org/playmakers. Rodgers & Hammerstein's "Cinderella." Prior to Sunday matinees, 12:30-1:15 p.m. Feb. 26 and March 4, there's a Cinderella’s Royal Ball for children 8 and under. Children will dance with Cinderella on stage, take a backstage “tour†of her castle and have punch and pastry. Children are encouraged to come in costume. Tickets for the ball are an additional $5 per person. Call 216-831-0700, ext. 1230. 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Thursday. $10-$12; $8-$10, Jewish Community Center members, seniors and students. Through Sunday, March 4.

ETC.

Bay Village Community House. 303 Cahoon Road. 440.871.6755 or bayrec.org. Green Homes Presented by Chuck Miller, Doty Miller Architects and Planners. A free program offering tips to make your current home "greener" and a discussion about future trends in sustainable housing. Registration required. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Penn-Ohio Wooden Money Collector's Club. Middlefield Library, 16167 E. High St., Middlefield. 440-632-1961 or powmc.org. Monthly meeting. A numismatic club specializing in collecting wooden money. This organization has released several series of wooden nickels featuring lighthouses of the Great Lakes. 1-3 p.m. Saturday.

PlayhouseSquare. State Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave. , Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or playhousesquare.org. 21st annual Jump Back Ball. This year's ball's theme is "Through the Looking Glass." Travel through the looking glass and enter the whimsical world of "Alice in Wonderland." Reservations required. 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Saturday. $120-$200. 21 and over only. Proceeds benefit PlayhouseSquare's not-for-profit mission. Presented by PlayhouseSquare Partners.

Walker Building. 129 W. Pioneer Trail, Aurora. 330-995-9152. Shaker-box Making. Learn the age-old craft of Shaker-box making with professional woodworking instructor Kurt Klimko and master Shaker-box builder Carl Huth. Students will construct three different boxes. Registration deadline is today. Class is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Fee is $89; lunch and materials are included.

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News Headline: Data on Analytical Science Published by Researchers at Kent State University (Culbreath) | Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Science Letter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to the authors of a study from Kent, Ohio, "We present a fully automated maskless exposure system for the fabrication of microscopic orientational surface alignment patterns."

"The maskless system allows us to fabricate arbitrary surface patterns over a 2 mm x 2 mm area with a resolution of 2.2 mu m. A confocal autofocus system insures accurate and repeatable focus," wrote C. Culbreath and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "Microscopic orientational surface patterns have been demonstrated to exhibit a variety of novel functionalities, such as surface alignment multi-stability."

Culbreath and colleagues published the results of their research in Review of Scientific Instruments (Note: Automated maskless micro-multidomain photoalignment. Review of Scientific Instruments, 2011;82(12):529-531).

For additional information, contact C. Culbreath, Kent State University, Inst Liquid Crystal, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

The publisher of the journal Review of Scientific Instruments can be contacted at: Amer Inst Physics, Circulation & Fulfillment Div, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Ste 1 N O 1, Melville, NY 11747-4501, USA.

Copyright © 2012 Science Letter via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Review: KSU delivers with 'Ragtime' | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Chad Murphy
By Conner Howard | Staff Writer

Following a revival on Broadway in 2009, Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens' musical "Ragtime" has come to Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance, and students are owning the musical as if they wrote it themselves.

Based on the book by Terrence McNally, "Ragtime" is set against the backdrop of early 20th century America, and explores themes of desperation, determination and the American dream. The story follows both historical figures such as Henry Ford, Emma Goldman, Booker T. Washington and Harry Houdini as well as fictional characters hailing from aristocratic, immigrant and working poor backgrounds. Conflicts between races, sexes and classes abound throughout the musical.

Under the guidance of Director Eric van Baars, the cast and ensemble carry the audience through a gripping tale of perseverance and hope, all seen through the lens of political and social history.

The lead actors, on the whole, simply cannot be credited enough for their stunning performances. The cast portrayed genuine passion and every lead's voice rang clear and vibrant. Musical numbers were at times powerful and emotionally stirring, at others hearty and uplifting, but impressive across the board. The mood in the theater was apt to swing from cheery and jovial to tearfully solemn within seconds.

Though every actor discharged his or her role admirably, the character of the hopeful and hardworking Latvian immigrant Tateh (played by Tim Welsh), stood out in particular as a grand personality on the stage. Welsh's representation of Tateh evoked both grins and grimaces as his character fought to feed his young daughter in his strange and often hostile new home. Additionally, Welsh's ability to emphatically deliver his lines and songs with an Eastern European accent is a credit to the production.

Perceptible flaws were few and far between during Wednesday's presentation of "Ragtime," as the music and acting came together in commendable harmony. The dance routines, however, though lively and largely graceful, occasionally lacked precision in their execution.

"Ragtime" runs through Sunday at the E. Turner Stump Theatre, Music and Speech Building, Theater Drive, Kent. For more information, call 330-672-2497.

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News Headline: Auroraadvocate.com (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: HOLLY SCHOENSTEIN
News OCR Text: Portage police agencies looking at combing dispatch services

Aurora -- The city is pondering whether to merge with five dispatch centers in Portage County as a way to share resources and save money.

City Council initially considered Feb. 13 legislation that, if passed, would allow the city to group with Kent State University, Portage County Sheriff's Department and the cities of Streetsboro, Ravenna and Kent and apply for a grant that would pay for a feasibility study to explore combining the agencies into one dispatch center.

The agencies are calling the proposed merger the Portage Coordinated Public Safety Communications Initiative.

The Ohio Department of Development's Local Government Innovation Fund is offering $9 million in grant money for projects that encourage efficiency and shared services among local governments, according to Police Chief Seth Riewaldt.

"Of the many services provided to residents by local governments, studies indicate public safety communications is one that can most easily be shared," he wrote in a letter to Mayor Lynn McGill.

Ward 1 Councilman Jim Vaca said he opposes the idea. "We need to use our own dispatch center. We shouldn't rely on Portage County for anything. We've got a good thing going," he said.

Councilman Dennis Kovach agreed, saying a merger of dispatching services could mean layoffs and more of a financial burden for the city once grant money is no longer available to help run the operation.

"In theory it might be a good idea, but in practicality, it's not a good idea," Kovach said.

COUNCIL IS expected to address the resolution again at its Feb. 27 meeting at 7 p.m. in Town Hall. The grant application deadline is March 1.

Kent and Ravenna pass-ed legislation this month, and the county commissioners are expected to address the matter Feb. 21.

According to KSU Director of Media Relations Emily Vincent, the university is considering the matter but has yet to take official action, and Streetsboro has not addressed the matter.

According to Riewaldt, the study should help the interested agencies determine the possible cost savings and improvements to service the merger could provide.

"For several years, there have been discussions about merging operations since each nearly duplicates the activity of the others," Riewaldt said. "All agree that cost savings and improvement of services could be realized if the number of PSAPs was reduced; however, no action was ever taken on this idea."

The roles of each of the agencies and how the grant money would be used would be part of the application, according to the resolution.

The group must get estimates from several consultants to determine how much the feasibility study would cost. Riewaldt said initially the group thought such a study could cost $30,000.

If awarded the grant, the consortium would be required to contribute a 10 percent match. Assuming the grant covers the entire cost of a $30,000 study, each city's share would be $500.

If the agencies decide to move forward with the consolidation, Riewaldt said the cost would be "considerable," but Ohio is offering a 10-year, no-interest loan.

THE GRANT money is scheduled to be distributed starting July 1.

Although Riewaldt said the Aurora Police Department doesn't expect to hire or lay off employees as a result of the possible consolidation, it's unknown whether the staffing of the other agencies would be affected.

He said no one knows how long the feasibility study would take and what the timeline for the actual merger would be.

Other questions still looming would be where the combined dispatch center would be located and the fate of the dispatch area at the Aurora police station.

Aurora's 2012 budget includes $90,000 for renovations to the dispatch area. A community grant, which accounts for $80,000 of that amount, was carried over from 2011 since the work wasn't completed.

"Although the police department has a budget to renovate its communications center, I feel it is prudent to apply for this grant," Riewaldt said.

"Results from a study may indicate that Aurora residents are better served by merging with another department, making the renovation unnecessary. Conversely, the study may suggest Aurora take on additional call-handling responsibility, expanding the scope of our current plans.

"I feel that some type of consolidation will be in the future for Portage County public safety communications," Riewaldt added.

"The cost of 'next-generation' 911 equipment alone will cause some communities to question whether they can maintain the status quo. The study hopefully will give us a better picture of what the future might look like."

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3152

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News Headline: Cochlear Americas Announces Scholarship Winners, Adds New Program | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Advance for Audiologists - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For the 10th year in a row, Cochlear™ Americas, which offers implantable hearing solutions, has announced winners of its prestigious Cochlear Graeme Clark Scholarship Award, as well as the winners of a new award, the Anders Tjellstrom Baha® Scholarship. Since 2002, Cochlear Americas has awarded more than $320,000 in scholarships to 50 college students, including the $80,000 awarded this year.

Five students were presented the Graeme Clark Scholarship, which provides $8,000 in college financial assistance to Nucleus® cochlear implant recipients around the world. The scholarship, named after the inventor and pioneer of the cochlear implant, honors implant recipients who are academically gifted and committed to leadership and humanity. Each student will receive $2,000 per year for up to four years at an accredited college or university.

Cochlear Americas also made its first awards of the Anders Tjellstrom Baha Scholarship, which is open to recipients of Baha implants. Three students were awarded the $8,000 scholarships, named after Anders Tjellstrom, MD, PhD, DSc, a research physician in the Department of Otolaryngology at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden. In 1972 he collaborated with Per-Ingvar Branemark, a pioneer in the field, to treat the first patient with a Baha device. Forty years later, Dr. Tjellstrom continues his groundbreaking work to restore hearing to people around the world. The scholarship recognizes students who have proven academic achievement and a commitment to the Cochlear ideals of leadership and humanity.

"It is our great honor to support these inspirational students who have overcome challenges and shown hard work and determination while benefiting from the use of Nucleus cochlear implant and Baha technology," said Chris Smith, president of Cochlear Americas, based in Centennial, CO. "This year's addition of the Anders Tjellstrom Baha Scholarship allows us to assist even more students as they pursue their academic goals and dreams."

The recipients of the Graeme Clark Scholarship are Sarah Ovresat, a freshman at the University of Michigan whose interests include nanotechnology, computer science and art; Christen Nelson, a freshman at Quinnipiac University who plans to become a pediatric occupational therapist; Anna Davies, a freshman at Dartmouth College who has a strong interest in international relations, government, history and environmental studies; and Peter Campbell, a freshman at Rutgers University who is pursuing a degree in labor studies and employment relations and hopes to attend law school.

The recipients of the Anders Tjellstrom Baha Scholarship are Spencer Parker, a freshman at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute studying mechanical engineering, art and design; Andrea McGhee, a freshman at Kent State University studying art education; and Carly Swanson, a junior at Illinois Institute of Technology studying information technology and management.

More than 140 applications were received and reviewed by the panel of judges.

The judges for the Graeme Clark Scholarship were Brian Perry, MD, of Ear Medical Group; Rene Gifford, PhD, of Vanderbilt University; Diego Preciado, MD, PhD, of George Washington University School of Medicine; and Melissa Sweeney, MS, CCC-SLP, of the University of Texas, Callier Center.

Judges for the Anders Tjellstrom Baha Scholarship were Dr. Tjellstrom; Stephen Cass, MD, MPH, of University of Colorado Hospital, in Denver; and Colleen Ryan-Bane, MS, CCC-A, of Johns Hopkins.

For more information about the scholarships, visit www.cochlearamericas.com/scholarship.

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News Headline: Kent State Dancers Premiere Original Works in Two Concerts: B.F.A. Senior Dance Concert and the Student Dance Festival | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Dancers Premiere Original Works in Two Concerts: B.F.A. Senior Dance Concert and the Student Dance Festival

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its 2011- 2012 production season with the B.F.A. Senior Dance Concert: At(ten)tion to Detail. The concert will run March 1 - 3 in the Louis O. Erdmann and William H. Zucchero (EZ) Black Box Theatre, located at 1325 Theatre Drive in the Music and Speech Center. Performances begin at 8 p.m. every evening.

Junior and senior dance performance and dance education majors will debut works in the EZ Theatre at the annual Student Dance Festival: 1 and itself, on Sunday, March 4, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

The Box Office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. Tickets can be purchased at the Box Office by calling 330-672-2497 or online at www.dance.kent.edu.

For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?customel_dataPageID_9299=2991033.

Cost: Tickets are $8 students, $12 seniors, $14 faculty/staff/KSU alumni and $16 adults. The Box Office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash.

Contact: Effie A. Tsengas, 330-672-8398, etsengas@kent.edu

Contact Information

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News Headline: Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975.

Directed by Eric van Baars, the show will run through Feb. 26 in E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Building. This concert version follows the original story with the addition of a scaled down orchestra.

"'Ragtime' is an epic tale of three families struggling to protect the ones they love. The music packs an emotional punch," said van Baars. "Bring tissues- it will be the best cry you'll ever have!"

"Ragtime" is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time -- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos -- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

"Just as in Doctorow's compelling novel, the historical figures ground the characters in the reality of the times," said van Baars. "More importantly, the historical figures provide inspiration and spiritual guidance for the characters."

Shows are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon - 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu. Tickets are $8 students, $12 Seniors (60 and older), $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, and $16 Adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

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News Headline: Kent State theater school brings 'Ragtime' to its stage | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: MapleHeightsPress
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Autos

Jobs

Classifieds

Legals

MarketplaceOhio

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will continue its season with "Ragtime," based on the novel written by E. L. Doctorow in 1975.

Directed by Eric van Baars, the show will run through Feb. 26 in E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, Music and Speech Building. This concert version follows the original story with the addition of a scaled down orchestra.

"'Ragtime' is an epic tale of three families struggling to protect the ones they love. The music packs an emotional punch," said van Baars. "Bring tissues- it will be the best cry you'll ever have!"

"Ragtime" is a story about life during Progressive-era America at the beginning of the 20th century. The show illustrates the issues of the time -- from immigration, racism and politics to industrialization and social chaos -- through the intermingling of characters and familiar historical figures. Harry Houdini, Booker T. Washington and Henry Ford connect with the story's characters in unpredictable settings to add an unusual literary component.

"Just as in Doctorow's compelling novel, the historical figures ground the characters in the reality of the times," said van Baars. "More importantly, the historical figures provide inspiration and spiritual guidance for the characters."

Shows are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. The box office is open weekdays from noon - 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance. For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497 or visit www.theatre.kent.edu . Tickets are $8 students, $12 Seniors (60 and older), $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, and $16 Adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

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News Headline: Kent State Video Showcases Downtown Revitalization (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University videographers create montage on Kent's '$100 Million Facelift.'

By Kasha Legeza
Email the author
February 23, 2012

Downtown Kent's "$100 Million Facelift" is showcased in a short video montage created by Kent State University's Communications and Marketing department.

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller liked the downtown revitalization progress video so much he was compelled to promote it in his Kent 360° blog.

Emily Vincent, director of media relations at Kent State, said the piece was created by the university's videographers.

"They create videos that we use on the www.kent.edu home page and our weekly employee newsletter. (The videos) change out each week," Vincent explained.

The video's promo reads, "With over $100 million in new construction, downtown Kent, Ohio, is currently undergoing a massive redevelopment. Projects in various stages of construction include the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, the Kent Central Gateway, the Kent State University Esplanade Extension, Acorn Alley II and three additional commercial buildings that will house restaurants, stores and offices."

Click this link to see some of the other featured videos created by the University Communications and Marketing videographers.

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News Headline: Factchecking Kent State's "We're #1″ Billboards (Vincent, Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: NPR - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has launched a new $100,000 advertising campaign featuring nearly 20 billboards proclaiming Kent State State “#1 in college graduates in Northeast Ohio.”

But what exactly does that mean? A commenter on Kent State's Facebook wall wrote:

“I saw it on I77 in Cleveland. I'm not exactly sure what it means, though. Does Kent have a higher percentage of graduates, or is it just bigger? One means something and one doesn't.”

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent it means that “Kent State produces the most graduates among universities in Northeast Ohio.”

That's true: Kent State awarded 5,223 bachelor's, doctor's and master's degrees and various certificates in the 2009-10 school year, the most recent federal data shows. That's nearly 900 more degrees than runner-up University of Akron. (State-wide, Kent State is actually #4 in the number of graduates produced, behind Ohio State University, the University of Cincinnati and Ohio University.)

But that's only one side of the story. What about Kent State's graduation rate?

In an interview with Kent State's student TV station, Vice President for University Relations Iris Harvey said that the billboards were intended to let families know that “great things happen every day at Kent State.” She said:

“One of the great things is our commitment to our students and student success. One of the best way of measuring that is graduation… You make a big investment in an university education. And so we wanted people to know, that coming here, you are more likely to finish.”

That's the part that isn't so true.

Kent State has one of the lowest graduation rates in Northeast Ohio. The most recent federal data (for full-time students who first entered college in 2003) shows that 49 percent of Kent State students aiming for bachelor's degrees graduated within six years.

Here are the total number of graduates and bachelor's degree graduation rates for some of Northeast Ohio's largest colleges and universities:

College Graduates: Northeast Ohio Institutions

Institution Name | # of Graduates | Graduation Rate | # of Graduates Rank | Graduation Rate Rank
Kent State University at Kent 5,223 | 49% | 1 | 10
University of Akron Main Campus 4,357 | 33% | 2 | 12
Cleveland State University 3,509 | 29% | 3 | 13
Case Western Reserve University 2,811 | 80% | 4 | 2
Cuyahoga Community College District 2,361 | n/a | 5 | 14
Youngstown State University 2,150 | 34% | 6 | 11
Ashland University 1,734 | 60% | 7 | 8
Lorain County Community College 1,364 | n/a | 8 | 15
Baldwin-Wallace College 1,019 | 68% | 9 | 5
John Carroll University 900 | 75% | 10 | 4
Oberlin College 663 | 86% | 1 | 1
Walsh University 649 | 60% | 12 | 9
Malone University 627 | 61% | 13 | 7
University of Mount Union 455 | 63% | 14 | 6
The College of Wooster 396 | 76% | 15 | 3

Source: Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System | Data Notes

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News Headline: Annual Black History Program at Ravenna church | Attachment Email

News Date: 02/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 16th annual Black History Program, hosted by the Chosen Ones, was held recently at The
United Church of Jesus Christ in Ravenna. The theme was “Obedience is the knowledge of the
road to success: Learn from your past.” Among those attending are, from left, Kayla Purkiss;
Llewésha Perry; Dr. Geraldine Nelson; guest speaker Bonnie Richardson of Kent State University
Upward Bound; Renée Jones, who was recognized for her work with children; Linda Sanders, president
of the Chosen Ones; and Stacee Purnell. Elder James E. Sanders is the church pastor.

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