Report Overview:
Total Clips (33)
Admissions (1)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Alumni; KSU at Stark; WKSU (1)
Alumni; University Press (1)
Alumni; WKSU (1)
Art, School of; Students (1)
Biological Sciences; Procurement (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Communication and Information (CCI); Students (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
College of Technology (1)
College of Undergraduate Studies; Office of the Provost (1)
Communication Studies (1)
Exercise Physiology (2)
Geography (2)
Health Sciences (1)
KSU at Trumbull; Students (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (1)
Political Science (1)
Students (2)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
The Out-of-State Solution to College Budgets (Garcia) 03/05/2012 Bloomberg Businessweek - Online Text Attachment Email

...UC-Berkeley to boost nonresident enrollment, others must work harder to attract the interest and ultimately, the tuition dollars, of out-of-state residents. Kent State University in Ohio, where state budget cuts will total from $11 million to $15 million this year, has mounted an aggressive campaign to...


Alumni (1)
Rear Admiral Jon G. Matheson 03/03/2012 Navy Newstand Text Attachment Email

...U.S. Fleet Forces Command Rear Adm. Matheson is a second-generation naval aviator and his two brothers are also naval aviators. He is a graduate of Kent State University earning a Bachelor of Science degree and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant, United States Marine Corps (USMC) in 1984. At...


Alumni; Athletics (1)
Jon Teitel's "Forgotten Legends": Kent State's Trevor Huffman 03/05/2012 Collegehoops.net Text Attachment Email


Alumni; KSU at Stark; WKSU (1)
Chamber hosts two from NPR 03/04/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...of National Public Radio during the North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce's awards dinner. The program is March 14 at the University Center on the Kent State University Stark campus. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., with dinner at 6:15 and the program at 7. Nuzum, who grew up in Canton and is a Kent...


Alumni; University Press (1)
Collection highlights Funky Winkerbean's 40th anniversary (Underwood) 03/04/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The nationally syndicated "Funky Winkerbean" comic turns 40 this month, and the Kent State University Press is marking the occasion with the release the first of many "Funky Winkerbean" collection volumes. Tom Batiuk, Funky...


Alumni; WKSU (1)
Local news briefs -- March 3 - NPR leader to visit 03/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Art, School of; Students (1)
Young patients draw strength from art 03/03/2012 South Bend Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...them, just to break the days up." The Gallery of Strength is the culmination of a yearlong, $16,000 grant from the Livestrong Foundation that allowed Kent State University doctoral student Emily Dennis, 27, of Akron, Ohio, to serve as the hospital's artist-in-residence. During the past year,...


Biological Sciences; Procurement (1)
Falls family takes trip to 'Wonderland' 03/04/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...said. Even outside of a busy rehearsal and performing schedule at ANTIC, the McWilliams family is active in the community, Larry said. He works at Kent State University; Helen is a physical therapist at Altercare in the Falls and is teaching a class at KSU; Regina is Student Council Secretary,...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
KSU collaborative wins national award 03/03/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email

HONORED Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative was recently honored with the National Sustainability Award from the American Planning...


College of Communication and Information (CCI); Students (1)
Firms honored at Akron ADDY Awards 03/03/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...one. --Three Bears Design, one. --JTate Design, one. Student Gold ADDY Awards: --Chris Leson, Youngstown State. --Kimberly Smolkowicz, Kent State. --Joseph Ickes, University of Akron. --Zac Bettendorf, University of Akron. --James Patterson II, University of...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Local news briefs -- March 3 - Designer to appear 03/05/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Studies from Kent State University Add New Findings in the Area of Cardiology 03/05/2012 Cardiovascular Week Text Email

...transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient CR for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events," wrote M.A. Dolansky and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted." Dolansky and...


College of Technology (1)
Galaxy Systems: Interactive Online Intellectual Property Education Is Fun and Informative 03/04/2012 Web Newswire Text Attachment Email

Students at Kent State Universitys College of Technology mixed traditional learning with the use of Galaxy Systems BizWiz interactive online intellectual...


College of Undergraduate Studies; Office of the Provost (1)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? 03/03/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University: Said Sewell was named dean of undergraduate studies, and Todd Diacon was named senior vice president for academic affairs and...


Communication Studies (1)
Media Linking Crimes to Alcohol Increase Support of Liquor Laws 03/03/2012 PsychCentral.com Text Attachment Email

...support the idea of enforcing alcohol laws after reading a newspaper article linking alcohol to a violent crime or accident, according to a new study by Ohio State University. For the study, participants read real news reports that featured violent crimes and various accidental injuries; half of...


Exercise Physiology (2)
KSU professor leading two research projects to aid Parkinson's patients (Ridgel) 03/05/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU professor leading two research projects to aid Parkinson's patients (Ridgel) 03/05/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Email


Geography (2)
Mark Arum: Gridlock Guy 03/04/2012 Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online Text Attachment Email

...tornado-strewn debris. I did, however, find one scientific study that might change the way people view this situation in the future. Conducted in 2002 by Kent State University, Wichita State University and Boyce Thompson Institute, the research was used to determine the “safety and stability of stationary...

Follow advice as weather turns bad 03/05/2012 Atlanta Journal-Constitution Text Email

...often become traps for debris. I did, however, find one scientific study that might change the way people view this situation. Conducted in 2002 by Kent State University, Wichita State University and Boyce Thompson Institute, the research was used to determine the "safety and stability of stationary...


Health Sciences (1)
Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkley) 03/04/2012 Telegraph - Online, The Text Attachment Email

AKRON, Ohio – The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise. A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically...


KSU at Trumbull; Students (1)
STUDENTS TO FIGHT HUNGER 03/04/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Trumbull's SIFE (Students In Free Enterprise) organization is challenging all other Kent State regional campuses to...


KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Blues Brothers Revue 03/04/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Brothers Revue, starring Wayne Catania, Kieron Lefferty and a seven-piece band, will appear in concert Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. This Blues Brothers tribute show will include clowning, dancing and such lively trademark songs as "Soul...

On the Beat: Jake and Elwood Blues taking their act to New Philly 03/02/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Brothers Revue, starring Catania and Kieron Lefferty - as Elwood Blues, his partner in crime and music - will roll into the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. "We've got a great band, just wonderful, talented people," Catania says about the...

Students earn honors for bridge building 03/05/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University at Tuscarawas Engineering Technology Department held the Regional Bridge Building Contest for area high school students during...

'Blues Brothers Revue' at KSU Tusc on Tuesday 03/03/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Official Blues Brothers Revue, featuring Wayne Cantania and Kieron Lafferty as Jake and  Elwood, will perform at the Performing Arts Center of Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. The performance is co-sponsored by Mix 94.1 Radio. “The Blues Brothers” are what can...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
KSU Library school is re-accredited by ALA (Wearden) 03/04/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Library and Information Science has received continued accreditation from the American Library Association, the...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Third Frontier (1)
Albrecht announces addition of technology company to business campus (Yokoyama) 03/04/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...Materials Program to help create a manufacturing facility for the company's liquid crystal-based technology. They are working in close cooperation with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute to produce the technology, and will become the second tenant to work with Kent State, joining...


Political Science (1)
GOP candidates blanket Ohio ahead of Super Tuesday (Yantek) 03/03/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...a challenge: how to discern facts from fantasy. "It's very difficult," said John Green, director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron. "A lot of information is coming out through a wide variety of means, and a lot of it is contradictory." In coming days candidates...


Students (2)
Twinsburg couple uses Facebook to stay close during Guardsman's deployment to Afghanistan 03/05/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent: Students celebrate free birth control 03/05/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State students celebrated President Obama's decision to have employers cover the cost of birth control.


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Teaching fluency through song (Rasinski) 03/03/2012 Mount Airy News - Online Text Attachment Email

Timothy Rasinski, a professor of literacy education at Kent State University, put an emphasis on inflection and its importance in reading comprehension when speaking to more than 265 teachers in the Surry...


Town-Gown (1)
Changes in store for Kent parking 03/04/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...overnight parking. The deck is expected to have 365 spaces. Bowling said officials tried to price the parking deck's spots in a way that would discourage Kent State University students from using the deck everyday instead of buying an on-campus parking pass. Free on-street parking, with a restriction...


University Press (1)
Book talk: Early 'Funky Winkerbean' 03/03/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

With 40 years worth of daily and Sunday strips, the Kent State University Press says they can release an installment in The Complete Funky Winkerbean every year for the next 13 years. Volume 1, which...


News Headline: The Out-of-State Solution to College Budgets (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bloomberg Businessweek - Online
Contact Name: Alison Damast
News OCR Text: That is the case now at the University of Washington which has been grappling with a painful budgetary quandary. After the state slashed higher education funding by more than $500 million in 2011, UW was forced to reduce this year's slots for resident students by 150, while adding 300 slots for nonresidents to help make up some of the lost revenue, says UW Admissions Director Philip Ballinger.

At UW, “Almost Abhorrent” Cuts

The school had no problem finding out-of-state students for those seats: Of 25,000 applications for this year's freshman class, 14,100 came from out of state. This fall, nonresidents will make up 33 percent of the freshman class, up from 25 percent three years ago, Ballinger says. Making the decision to admit more students from outside Washington's borders wasn't easy. “University of Washington, relatively speaking for a public flagship institution, is public to the bone,” he says. “The thought that we would be in a place where, to maintain quality and access, we had to reduce resident enrollment and increase nonresident enrollment was almost abhorrent.”

Until now, the state has set tuition rates for UW. Next fall the school will be able to set its own rates for the first time, and Ballinger hopes this will allow UW to restore the 150 freshman slots for residents that were removed this year.

While it may be easy for such schools as the University of Washington and UC-Berkeley to boost nonresident enrollment, others must work harder to attract the interest and ultimately, the tuition dollars, of out-of-state residents.

Kent State University in Ohio, where state budget cuts will total from $11 million to $15 million this year, has mounted an aggressive campaign to attract out-of-state students to its freshman class.

Scholarships and Legacy Solicitations

In the last three years, Kent State has hired five admissions counselors to target students in states such as Illinois, Maryland, and Virginia, introduced scholarship programs that reduce the out-of-state surcharge for highly qualified students, and launched a program aimed at attracting the children of out-of-state Kent alums. Non-Ohio residents now make up 6 percent of the incoming freshman class, up from about 2 percent three years ago. “Even increasing out-of-state enrollment by two or three percent helps us with the budget cuts,” says T. David Garcia, the school's associate vice-president for enrollment management.

Garcia says that funding is not the sole motivation behind the school's interest in nonresidents. The number of Ohio high school graduates expected to go on to college in the next decade is sliding. “As an institution we need to look at other avenues in which we can make up some of that difference,” he says.

Declining high school enrollment is also a concern for Ann Korschgen, vice-president for enrollment management at the University of Missouri. By 2014, there will be 9,000 fewer Missouri high school graduates than in 2010. This is part of the reason why the school has ramped up recruiting outside the state, she says. The school is currently tapping markets such as Chicago and Dallas and will soon send a recruiter to Minneapolis and Denver. This fall, the freshman class has 1,720 out-of-state students, up from 791 in fall 2002, Korschgen says.

Korschgen confirms that nonresident tuition revenue has helped the school address the shortfall in state support. However, she says the school is primarily recruiting out-of-state students to bring greater geographic diversity to the campus, as well as to counter the state's worrisome demographic trends.

Not all education experts are comfortable with that rationale. Penn State's Heller says he is skeptical of schools that say they are increasing out-of-state enrollment for mainly demographic purposes. “It may be a convenient excuse to say ‘Gee, there just aren't enough students,' but I think the reality is that they are going after out-of-state students for money,” Heller says. “In many—if not all—cases, if they wanted to make the effort to attract students from within the state, they could probably find them.”

Join the discussion on the Bloomberg Businessweek Business School Forum and follow @BWbschools on Twitter.

Damast is a reporter for Businessweek.com.

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News Headline: Rear Admiral Jon G. Matheson | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Navy Newstand
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Reserve Deputy Commander for Fleet Management, U.S. Fleet Forces Command

Reserve Chief of Staff, U.S. Fleet Forces Command

Rear Adm. Matheson is a second-generation naval aviator and his two brothers are also naval aviators. He is a graduate of Kent State University earning a Bachelor of Science degree and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant, United States Marine Corps (USMC) in 1984. At the end of The Basic School (TBS), he was offered a Navy flight school quota due to USMC squadron over-manning and after receiving a service transfer, he earned his wings in 1986.

After completing training in the F-14 Tomcat he reported to the Diamondbacks of Fighter Squadron (VF) 102 and deployed aboard italic">USS America (CV 66) to the North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, and Indian Ocean. He then received orders to the Challengers of VF 43 as an adversary instructor pilot. As an "AMBUSH" bogey driver he flew the A-4 Skyhawk, F-5 Tiger, and F-16N Viper, and attended the Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN).

Matheson transitioned to the Reserve Component in 1992 with the Omars of Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12. He served in a variety of billets before assuming command of the squadron in November 2001. During his tenure as executive officer and commanding officer, VFC-12 was awarded a Noel Davis Trophy "Battle E'", a CNO Aviation Safety Award "Safety S", and a Golden Anchor Award.

Subsequent Navy Reserve (NR) commanding officer assignments include: NR Tactical Air Control Squadron 2286, NR Carrier Strike Group Eight, and NR Navy Warfare Development Command 101. He has also been assigned to NR Joint Forces Air Component Commander 0186 and NR Joint Forces Command 206.

Significant extended periods of active duty providing support to the fleet include: U.S. 2nd Fleet air operations officer implementing Naval Command & Control of Air Operations, chief of staff to the Executive Director for Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command; director - Navy Maritime Operations Center Training Team and chief of staff - Navy Don't Ask/Don't Tell Repeal Implementation Task Force.

Promoted in October 2011, he is currently serving as the reserve deputy commander for Fleet Management & Reserve Chief of Staff at U.S. Fleet Forces Command.

Matheson has the privilege of being designated as an honorary chief petty officer and has proudly served with shipmates who have earned four "Battle E" Awards for Excellence. He has accumulated more than 3,500 flight hours in tactical aircraft and logged nearly 300 carrier landings. His awards include the Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal (6 awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (2 awards), and various unit and service awards.

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News Headline: Jon Teitel's "Forgotten Legends": Kent State's Trevor Huffman | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Collegehoops.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State great Trevor Huffman

© Getty Images/Doug Pensinger

In the latest installment in his "Forgotten Legends" interview series CHN writer Jon Teitel caught up with Kent State great Trevor Huffman, who is still the school's all-time leading scorer. Huffman scored 1,820 points in his four seasons at Kent State, helping to lead the Golden Flashes to three NCAA tournament appearances and an Elite 8 in 2002. Huffman has since played professionally in five different countries as well as the CBA.

Jon Teitel: What are your memories of the 1999 NCAA tournament (Huffman went scoreless in seven minutes in a seven-point loss to Temple)?

Trevor Huffman: How big everything seemed and how the fans at the Fleet Center just kept going up and up and up. I remember feeling so grateful for being there, just to experience it.

JT: In 2000 you were named Second Team All-MAC, and in 2001 and 2002 you were a First Team All-MAC selection. How were you able to continue to dominate throughout your college career?

TH: I think it was just a matter of working hard and having great coaches and teammates that always pushed me. Obviously there were more athletic players than me, but it takes a mental aspect, a physical aspect, and a spiritual aspect for me: to keep breaking down new barriers as a player and getting to new heights by always pushing myself in those areas.

2000 Postseason NIT

JT: You scored 18 points in a win over Rutgers (the first-ever postseason win in Kent State history) and had 13 points and five assists in a win over Villanova. Did you start to feel that you were a team of destiny, and what did you learn from the 1999 NCAA tournament that helped you succeed in 2000?

TH: Our early success definitely helped in making winning part of our mental psyche. We believed that we should have been winning every game we played. Our coaches instilled that in us, and all the players bought into it: Coach Gary Waters was a mastermind in that sense.

JT: You scored two points and fouled out in a seven-point loss to Penn State. Did you consider your run in the tournament to be a success (due to making it so far) or a failure (due to not winning it all)?

TH: Of course we wanted to go farther, but the NIT is not played on neutral floors and Penn State had a very good team. It was one of those games as a young player where you put too much pressure on yourself to perform and the opposite happens, rather than just playing the game.

2001 NCAA Tournament

JT: You scored a school tournament-record 24 points in a four-point win over Indiana (the first-ever NCAA win in school history). How big a deal was it to win that game, and what was the feeling like in your locker room afterwards?

TH: That was a breakthrough for me personally and for our team as a whole. We had achieved so much in the past but had never moved past the first round. Once we did that it was like, "What else can we do?!" Winning that first round game on such a big stage led to total euphoria in the locker room. I know I did not want to leave the gym. Plus I got to talk to Leslie Visser and Bill Walton, which I could not believe!

JT: You scored seven points (2-11 FG) in a loss to Cincinnati. Was your team still on a high after beating Indiana, or did you just run into a better team in Cincinnati?

TH: They were just a better team, more athletic and used to playing at a higher level with more physicality and brute force. It was not something we were used to seeing that much.

2002 NCAA Tournament

JT: You played with transfer Antonio Gates, who has since become one of the best tight ends in NFL history. What did you think of his skills on the basketball court, and were you surprised that he turned into such an outstanding football player?

TH: Gates is an amazing basketball player: he just moves so fluidly for a man of his size. To this day he is the only big man that could honestly beat me in a suicide if he wanted to (note: IF he wanted to!). I am not surprised at all by his NFL success.

JT: You scored 18 points in a win over Oklahoma State. What did your team learn from the 2001 tournament that helped you succeed in the 2002 tournament?

TH: My junior year helped prepare me for my senior year. Our goal in the tournament was not just to win a first round game but to win a championship. We had fared well against some very tough teams earlier that year after a slow start, so it was about winning championships that year.

JT: You had 20 points and five assists in a win over Alabama (Mo Williams had 12 points after scoring 33 in the first round), the 20th straight win for Kent State that season. Were you at a point in the season where you just expected to win every time you stepped onto the court, and how far did you think your team was going to go in the tournament?

TH: Breaking all the MAC records and then winning 21 games in a row (the longest streak in the nation at the time) was just what we expected to do at that point. We wanted a championship so it did not matter who we played. We honestly thought that we could beat anyone. Coach Stan Heath's system and coaching style fit us so well: we were really playing at a high level and it was a credit to him and his staff. Coach Jim Christian is now at TCU and Coach Heath is now at USF.

JT: You scored 17 points in a five-point overtime win over Pitt, including the go-ahead lay-up with one minute left in overtime (Pitt's Julius Page scored 18 points but missed a three-pointer at the end of regulation). What was the team feeling like as the game went into overtime, and how were you able to maintain your composure and win the game?

TH: We felt cheated with 25 seconds left in regulation (Gates made a shot to give Kent State the lead but the officials called a jump ball instead), but it worked out okay for us. Pitt was a tough defensive team so we just needed a few shots to fall. Those games are about who is able to execute in the final moments and our experience helped us there.

JT: Kent State became the first MAC school to get to the Elite 8 since the tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985. What kind of praise did you get from other MAC schools, and did you still feel like a "Cinderella" after getting that far?

TH: We did not feel like a "Cinderella" at all. Coach Heath had us in complete tunnel-vision mode focused on winning a championship. We knew the mid-majors out there were rooting for us, and I still root for the small guys every year.

JT: You scored eight points (2-7 FG) in a loss to Indiana, who had one of the best long-range shooting displays in tourney history (15-19 3PT). Did you feel that Indiana was out for revenge because you had beat them the previous year, and was it just one of those scenarios where every shot they put up seemed to go in because they were "in the zone"?

TH: Ironically Indiana was probably the last team we wanted to see, as they had extra motivation. They had a good feel for our players and personnel and were amazing in that game. Most players cannot stand by themselves in an empty gym and make 15 of 19 three-pointers but they seemed to do it with ease. They were a well-balanced team that year and Jared Jeffries was a defensive X-factor who slowed us a down a lot.

JT: You finished your career as the all-time leading scorer in school history. Did you realize at the time how prolific a player you were?

TH: Prolific? No. But good? Yes. I had come a long way from Petoskey High when no wanted me (Kent State did not offer Huffman a scholarship until the summer after he graduated from high school), so I knew how far I had come. I just wish I had more guidance coming into the pros and trying to make the NBA, which at that point was my next step. The game of basketball has shown me the world and I get paid money to play ball, which was always the dream in the 1st place.

JT: From 2003-2006 you played in Germany, Poland and Portugal, as well as for Great Lakes in the CBA. What did you learn from these experiences, and how did they compare to college basketball?

TH: European basketball is nothing like American college basketball due to the culture shock and language barriers. Success has less to do with your skills and more with your ability to make the transition into European life. I want to write a book on it and help kids learn what it means to play over here! I learned to adapt my game, my mind, and my life to a new way of living. Mostly I had to wipe the slate clean of what I thought I should be doing or where I should be playing and just try to do the best I could in the place I was.

Huffman is also on Jon's list of best fantasy players in MAC history.

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News Headline: Chamber hosts two from NPR | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -

Ohio's role in the 2012 presidential election will be reviewed by Eric Nuzum and Karen Kasler of National Public Radio during the North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce's awards dinner.

The program is March 14 at the University Center on the Kent State University Stark campus. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., with dinner at 6:15 and the program at 7.

Nuzum, who grew up in Canton and is a Kent State graduate, works as NPR's vice president of programming. He has been with NPR since 2004, and served six years as program director at WKSU. In 2002, he received the Edward R. Murrow Award from RTDNA (Radio Television Digital News Association.)

Kasler works as NPR's State House bureau chief. She reports for NPR and Marketplace, and has been on PBS's "Newshour."

Before Nuzum and Kasler discuss politics, North Canton's Chamber will present awards for Business of the Year, economic development, community service, chamber appreciation, community leadership and Volunteer of the Year.

The dinner is open to the public and cost is $45. Reservations can be made by calling the North Canton Chamber at 330-499-5100.

Ohio's role in the 2012 presidential election will be reviewed by Eric Nuzum and Karen Kasler of National Public Radio during the North Canton Area Chamber of Commerce's awards dinner.

The program is March 14 at the University Center on the Kent State University Stark campus. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., with dinner at 6:15 and the program at 7.

Nuzum, who grew up in Canton and is a Kent State graduate, works as NPR's vice president of programming. He has been with NPR since 2004, and served six years as program director at WKSU. In 2002, he received the Edward R. Murrow Award from RTDNA (Radio Television Digital News Association.)

Kasler works as NPR's State House bureau chief. She reports for NPR and Marketplace, and has been on PBS's "Newshour."

Before Nuzum and Kasler discuss politics, North Canton's Chamber will present awards for Business of the Year, economic development, community service, chamber appreciation, community leadership and Volunteer of the Year.

The dinner is open to the public and cost is $45. Reservations can be made by calling the North Canton Chamber at 330-499-5100.

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News Headline: Collection highlights Funky Winkerbean's 40th anniversary (Underwood) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The nationally syndicated "Funky Winkerbean" comic turns 40 this month, and the Kent State University Press is marking the occasion with the release the first of many "Funky Winkerbean" collection volumes.

Tom Batiuk, Funky Winkerbean's creator, said it's incredible that he's still at his drawing board, 40 years later.

"It's like you're in some kind of strange ‘Twilight Zone' episode where you look up at the clock from your desk and 40 years go by," he said, adding that the time has allowed him to grow his characters and create a continuing story. "It's got a history that you can play off of now. When you start, you don't have any of that."

Batiuk, a KSU graduate, said he's incorporated many influences from his life into "Funky Winkerbean," including a few elements from Kent's past.

Although Montoni's Pizza in the comic strip is mainly modeled after Luigi's Pizza in Akron, it's named after the pizza place that once used the space that is now the Zephyr Pub on West Main Street in downtown Kent.

The now-demolished Robin Hood that stood at East Main and Lincoln streets in "Funky Winkerbean" and Stopher Hall, Batiuk's former dormitory made it into strips. He also included a piece related to the May 4 shootings in "Crankshaft," which he works on with Chuck Ayers.

"The school I was teaching in became Westview," he said. "I find that having a place I understand makes a stage for the characters."

The "Funky Winkerbean" series started as a joke-a-day strip about high school life, while Batiuk was teaching a junior high school art class. But, later in the series, Batiuk began using the strip to also touch on real-life issues that affect every day people including alcoholism, teen pregnancy, suicide, disease and more.

Batiuk was honored by the Pulitzer Board in 2008 for "Lisa's Story," a series on breast cancer, which has also been published by the Kent State University Press.

"The Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1" will include the first three years of the comic strip, and will be released on March 29 to coincide with the date the first "Funky Winkerbean" strip was published.

Will Underwood, director of Kent State University Press, said there are enough "Funky Winkerbean" comic strips to publish a new volume every year for the next 13 years.

"We really like working with Tom and we're grateful that we wants to publish with us," Underwood said.

Batiuk said the timing is right to publish and revisit the old "Funky Winkerbean" comics bundled together. He said he even noticed a few continuity breaks with old characters and is reworking the current story lines to include some old faces.

"It has been a long while since I revisited and I found some surprises," he said. " ‘Funky' has become a large repertory company of players. There's a lot of things that weave in and out."

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- March 3 - NPR leader to visit | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON: Eric Nuzum, a Kent State University graduate and vice president for programming at National Public Radio, will speak to the Akron Roundtable on March 15.

The luncheon, open to the public, begins at noon and will be at Quaker Station, behind Quaker Square Inn on South Broadway in downtown Akron.

Nuzum's talk, titled Dare to Listen, will include information on how NPR is handling coverage of this year's elections.

Before being hired by NPR in 2004, Nuzum was program director for six years at WKSU-FM public radio.

Nuzum, raised in Canton, is the author of The Dead Travel Fast: Stalking Vampires from Nosferatu to Count Chocula. His memoir, Giving Up the Ghost, will be published by Random House this summer.

The luncheon is sponsored by Kent State University. Tickets are $20.

For information, go to www.akronroundtable.org.

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News Headline: Young patients draw strength from art | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: South Bend Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Young patients draw strength from art

AKRON, Ohio -- The courageous lion has nothing on Ethan Puhalsky.

The 7-year-old from Norton, Ohio, bravely endures countless tests, treatments and lengthy hospital stays as he battles leukemia .

So when he had the chance to work with an artist during one of his many stays at Akron Children's Hospital, it's only fitting that he decided to paint a portrait of his favorite stuffed lion.

Ethan's piece is one of 34 works of art that went on display in the Gallery of Strength art show at Akron Children's Hospital's Emily Cooper Welty Expressive Therapy Center.

Each painting, drawing and digital artwork in the one-day art show was made by a patient at Children's.

For Ethan, painting allows him to be a normal kid, not a cancer patient who's often trapped in a hospital room.

"Maybe next time I'm in the hospital we can do a puppy or panda," Ethan said enthusiastically.

"He has no problems coming to the hospital because of things like this," added his father, Brian Puhalsky. "It's really a great program for them, just to break the days up."

The Gallery of Strength is the culmination of a yearlong, $16,000 grant from the Livestrong Foundation that allowed Kent State University doctoral student Emily Dennis, 27, of Akron, Ohio, to serve as the hospital's artist-in-residence.

During the past year, Dennis spent nine hours a week helping patients express themselves by drawing, painting and creating artwork on iPads.

"The goal was to bring the arts to health care and introduce the arts," she said.

Dennis became interested in art therapy nine years ago when her father was battling cancer.

"I was coping with that by drawing," she said. "That's how I expressed myself. It was an outlet for me. It was taking all that anxiety and putting it into a visual form and getting it out of my head."

Her personal experience encouraged her to earn a master's degree in art therapy. She's now pursuing a doctoral degree in counseling.

Although the goal of the yearlong art program at Children's wasn't necessarily therapeutic, "it's hard to deny there's therapy going on," she said.

At first glance, for instance, the whimsical creatures with toothy grins in one of the paintings displayed in the Gallery of Strength appear lighthearted and fun.

But for the artist who created the piece, Dennis said, the colorful beasts represent personal monsters: serious, frightening medical problems.

"These were her monsters and these were what she was dealing with," Dennis said. "The artwork was her way of externalizing these internal fears."

Copyright 2012, South Bend Tribune

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News Headline: Falls family takes trip to 'Wonderland' | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Alice in Wonderland" at ANTIC Inc. has been a family affair for the McWilliams family of Cuyahoga Falls.

Yes, the entire family has a role in the theater's show, which can be seen March 9 through 18.

"We auditioned for this show because we love our ANTIC 'family,'" said Larry McWilliams, who plays Tweedledum. "We have so much fun performing all together. Theater is one of the only activities we know of that we can share together, adults and children, all different ages."

The other members of the family include wife Helen McWilliams, who plays the Duchess; daughters Regina and Laura, who play the Gryphon and Fish Footman respectively, and son George, who plays the Dormouse at the Mad Hatter's Tea Party.

The familiar story follows the adventures of Alice (Maria Macaluso) as she chases a rabbit (Danielle Clarke / Molly Ann) down a rabbit hole. Alice wakes up Chessy the Chesire Cat (Allison Thomas) in a magical land called Wonderland.

Alice is amazed to be in Wonderland and asks her new friend Chessy for help in returning home. Chessy warns Alice to watch out for the Queen of Hearts (Kristen Smith), and promises to help Alice find her way home.

Along the way, Alice meets the Caterpillar (Christopher Poore), Humpty Dumpty (Nick Ferda), and flowers that sing and talk (Morgan Isabella, Maddie Gallagher, Ellie Polyak, Mackenzie Schneider, Maura Schneider, Clara Coughlin and Fiona Coughlin).

Alice encounters the Duchess, the Cook (Linda Knight) and attends a tea party with the Mad Hatter (Patrick Wulff), the Dormouse, and the March Hare (Hannah Siebenhaar / Valerie Nauman).

Alice spends a few minutes with Tweedledum and Tweedledee (Mark Brown) and dances with the Turtle (Karen Sauerbrey) and Gryphon (Regina McWilliams) before continuing her journey.

Alice finally meets the Queen of Hearts, the King of Hearts (Tom Babb), the Prince (Ben Ferda) and Princess of Hearts (Kristian Williams), and the Queen's entourage, including ladies (Alissa Thompson, Molly Ann, Regan O' Neill), footmen (Jenna Kull, Laura McWiliams), the courtier (Devin Thompson) the knave (Sam McCombs) and the soldiers (Nate West, Connor Cook, and Matt Knight).

The Queen summons the Executioner (Christopher Poore) to get rid of Chessy once and for all. Alice hopes to save Chessy and find the way home, but it looks hopeless.

The production is directed by Liz Hickman and Kristen Smith.

Larry McWilliams said that each of them have been in past shows at ANTIC, but "this is the first Antic production that all five of us have performed together at the same time." Regina, now 12, has been in "Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," "Aladdin," Cinderella," "Beauty and the Beast" and "Snow White." Laura, 11, has been in "Aladdin," Beauty and the Beast" and Show White." George, 8, has been in "Snow White" and "Christmas Story." Lawrence has been in "Beauty and the Beast" and Helen was in "Christmas Story."

"It was interesting to become familiar with the play whose characters and story is more true to [Lewis] Carroll's original tale, versus the more well known Disney version," Larry said.

Even outside of a busy rehearsal and performing schedule at ANTIC, the McWilliams family is active in the community, Larry said. He works at Kent State University; Helen is a physical therapist at Altercare in the Falls and is teaching a class at KSU; Regina is Student Council Secretary, Girl Scout, and on swim team; Laura is on swim team and an altar server; and George is a Boy Scout and takes hip-hop lessons. All three children attend Immaculate Heart of Mary School in Cuyahoga Falls.

"We are always juggling schedules," he said "The calendar is consulted at the beginning of each day. At least when performing together we all have to be at the same place at the same time."

Larry said that "appreciation and support of the arts and community involvement at all levels is very important to our family."

"Helen is the vice president of the Cuyahoga Falls Library Board of Directors and the entire family has participated in the Adopt-A-Spot program for 5 years," he said. "We are very grateful to the large number of friends that continually attend our performances at ANTIC, and are especially proud of the times that our involvement has led to a person experiencing live theater for the first time."

TICKET AND SHOW INFORMATION

Performance dates and times are March 9,10,16 and 17 at 8 p.m., with two Sunday matinees March 11 and 18 at 3 p.m.

The home of ANTIC is the Newell Theatre, on the third Floor of the Quirk Cultural Center, 1201 Grant Ave. in Cuyahoga Falls.

Tickets are available at the door for all shows. There are no pre-show ticket sales.

Ticket prices are $10 adults, $8 students, and $6 seniors and children under 12. For show information, call 330-971-5665

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News Headline: KSU collaborative wins national award | Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HONORED

Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative was recently honored with the National Sustainability Award from the American Planning Association for its initiative titled "Re-imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland." The association recognized the project in part because of its potential to affect national policies on smart growth and climate change.

Copyright © 2012 The Plain Dealer.

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News Headline: Firms honored at Akron ADDY Awards | Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Lin-Fisher, Betty
News OCR Text: March 03--427 Design was awarded Best of Show in the 2012 ADDY Awards ceremony Friday night.

The annual awards are the first of the three-tiered national competition by the American Advertising Federation.

Awards are given in 15 categories, including sales promotion, collateral, direct marketing, interactive and broadcast.

The event by the Akron Chapter of the American Advertising Federation was held at the Akron Urban League. The Canton ADDYs were awarded last week.

427 Design won Best of Show for Best Use of Printing for University Park Arts Fair and Food Fest poster for the University Park Alliance.

Judge's Awards were presented to:

--  TRIAD/Next Level for its Open House event materials.

--  427 Design for its Open House V.

--  design x nine for 1,764 Buttons.

Here are other top honors.

ADDY Gold Awards (Professional):

--427 Design, five awards.

--TRIAD/Next Level, eight.

--WhiteSpace Creative, one.

--Kleidon & Associates, one.

--Knox Marketing, one.

--design x nine, one.

--Hitchcock Fleming & Associates, three.

--Todd Biss Photography, two.

--Glyphix, one.

--Three Bears Design, one.

--JTate Design, one.

Student Gold ADDY Awards:

--Chris Leson, Youngstown State.

--Kimberly Smolkowicz, Kent State.

--Joseph Ickes, University of Akron.

--Zac Bettendorf, University of Akron.

--James Patterson II, University of Akron (won Student Best of Show).

--Kareem Taftaf, University of Akron.

--Michael Talese, University of Akron.

Copyright © 2012 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- March 3 - Designer to appear | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Fashion designer Donna Karan will be the keynote speaker at 12:45 p.m. Monday for the College of Nursing's annual conference at Kent State.

The conference explores ways to incorporate self-care and mindfulness in a balanced personal and professional life. Karan's Urban Zen Foundation has collaborated with the nursing college for two years to promote self-care of nurses.

The KSU-Urban Zen collaboration is the first of its kind in the country.

The designer's presentation will be streamed online at https://ksutube.kent.edu/watchlive.php?playthis=2143.

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News Headline: Studies from Kent State University Add New Findings in the Area of Cardiology | Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cardiovascular Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to the authors of a study from Kent, Ohio, "The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self-Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity walking and education in self-management skills to facilitate recovery following a cardiac event."

"Using a randomized two-group design, exercise self-efficacy, steps walked, and participation in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program were compared in a sample of 38 older adults (17 Cardiac TRUST, 21 usual care). At discharge from postacute care, the intervention group trended toward higher levels of self-efficacy for exercise outcomes than the usual care group. During the 6 weeks following discharge, the intervention group had greater attendance in outpatient CR and a trend toward more steps walked during the first week. The feasibility of the intervention was better for the home health care participants than for those in the skilled nursing facility. The provision of CR during postacute care has the potential to bridge the gap in transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient CR for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events," wrote M.A. Dolansky and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted."

Dolansky and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Gerontological Nursing (Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 2011;37(12):36-44).

For more information, contact M.A. Dolansky, Kent State University, Dept. of Public Hlth, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Gerontological Nursing is: Slack Inc, 6900 Grove Rd, Thorofare, NJ 08086, USA.

Copyright © 2012 Cardiovascular Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Galaxy Systems: Interactive Online Intellectual Property Education Is Fun and Informative | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Web Newswire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students at Kent State Universitys College of Technology mixed

traditional learning with the use of Galaxy Systems BizWiz interactive

online intellectual property (IP) awareness game. During the summer

intersession, one class included the online intellectual property

component to become more aware of the role intellectual property plays

in business. This game was fun. Its a juggling and balancing act of

finances, invention, legal patents and copyrights, customers, income,

employees and real world attacks, one student explained. Another

student commented that, All in all, the BizWiz game served to be an

innovative teaching tool on how important IP is to a company as well as

marketing and R&D. There is no doubt that from what I learned from this

game that I will apply to my real life research and business.

“This game was fun. Its a juggling and balancing act of

finances, invention, legal patents and copyrights, customers, income,

employees and real world attacks”

Galaxy Systems president, Tim Trainer stated that, This reaction from

students in an educational setting supports our view that intellectual

property rights awareness and education has a real place in the

classroom. Although I have often used the tool with domestic and foreign

government officials, including customs officials, police officers,

prosecutors and judges, the tool has broad application because it links

creativity and innovation to the need for securing intellectual property

rights in new and creative products that may become the target of

counterfeiters and pirates.

At a time when we need to create jobs, it is important to demonstrate

to students through educational institutions and to businessmen and

women the importance of protecting creativity and innovation with the

proper forms of IP, which become assets to help grow businesses and

create jobs, Trainer commented. We are very happy with the experience

of the students and will continue our outreach to educational

institutions as well as businesses and governments to try and deliver

the message about the benefits of IP. While patent, trademark and

copyright enforcement is critically important, we need to underscore the

business and economic benefits of IP for new enterprises and for smaller

businesses so that IP can be used to grow the business and, hopefully,

generate jobs, he added.

The Obama Administrations recent release of the Joint Strategic Plan on

Intellectual Property Enforcement focuses on enforcement of IP rights

here and abroad. Galaxy Systems online tool, while having enforcement

elements in it, focuses on demonstrating the benefits of IP and IPs

potential to contribute to business growth and economic development. The

tool seeks to challenge individuals, interact with intellectual property

concepts, think about it and learn while playing.

Mr. Trainer established Galaxy Systems, Inc., in 2007. Two versions of

the tool are now available and accessible on the internet. Galaxy

Systems aims to provide a creative and broad-based learning approach

that focuses less on the legal and technical aspects of intellectual

property and promotes the general application of intellectual property

to grow businesses. Mr. Trainers intellectual property experience

includes positions as past president of the International

AntiCounterfeiting Coalition, an attorney at the U.S. Customs Service

and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and work in private practice.

He is an adjunct professor at American Universitys Washington College

of Law.

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News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Said Sewell was named dean of undergraduate studies, and Todd Diacon was named senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

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News Headline: Media Linking Crimes to Alcohol Increase Support of Liquor Laws | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: PsychCentral.com
Contact Name: Traci Pedersen Associate News Editor
News OCR Text: People better support the idea of enforcing alcohol laws after reading a newspaper article linking alcohol to a violent crime or accident, according to a new study by Ohio State University.

For the study, participants read real news reports that featured violent crimes and various accidental injuries; half of these were edited to mention the role of alcohol and half were edited to leave out the role of alcohol.

Volunteers who read the articles that included alcohol became more supportive of enforcing laws regarding serving intoxicated people, sales to underage youth and open containers, compared to people who had read the non-alcohol articles.

Previous research from this group revealed that fewer than one-fourth of newspaper reports and only one-tenth of TV news reports on alcohol-related crimes and non-car-related fatal injuries actually mention the involvement of alcohol.

“The underreporting of alcohol's role in crime and accidents may be having a real impact on public health,” said Michael Slater, co-author of the study and professor of communication at Ohio State University.

“If people were more aware of how prevalent alcohol use was in crimes and all forms of accidents, there may be more of a public demand for tougher law enforcement.”

Slater conducted the study with Andrew Hayes, associate professor, and David Edwoldsen, professor, both in the School of Communication at Ohio State; and Catherine Goodall of Kent State University.

For the study, 789 adults, randomly chosen from across the country, were asked to read one of 60 representative local newspaper articles featuring a violent crime, car crash, or other injury.

Half of the articles mentioned that alcohol played a causative role in the crime or accident, and half did not.

Volunteers were told that the purpose of the study was to evaluate news articles for factors such as clarity and were then given a series of questions to answer.

Participants were also asked to rate their level of support for current liquor laws—on a scale of 1 to 10—such as how they felt about selling alcohol to underage youth.  Participants were told these questions would help researchers understand their evaluation of the article.

Individuals who read the articles mentioning alcohol showed more support for alcohol enforcement than did those who read articles that had no such mention.  Results were similar whether they read articles about crimes or injuries.

Participants were also asked if they would support new alcohol control laws, including restricting the number of bars and liquor stores in an area, restricting advertising, and making servers legally liable if they give alcohol to intoxicated customers.

Interestingly, volunteers who read the stories mentioning alcohol were no more likely to support these proposed new laws than those who read the other articles.

“In retrospect, it is not too surprising that there wasn't more support for these new laws, given the current political environment against more government control over economic activities,” Slater said.

He notes, however, that the findings reveal that people may support tougher enforcement of current laws – at least if the news media accurately reported the scope of the problem.

Public health estimates suggest that over 30 percent of fatalities due to violent crimes, car crashes and other accidental injuries are in part attributable to alcohol use.

A 2006 study by Slater and his research team, however, showed that media reports of alcohol's role in crime and accidents are much lower.  Specifically, newspapers mention the role of alcohol in only 7.3 percent of their articles about violent crimes and 4.8 percent of accidental injuries.  Television news reported alcohol's role even less.

In this study, Slater noted, support for alcohol law enforcement increased after reading just one article.

“The effect of reading one article may not last long, but people will be constantly reminded if alcohol's role is mentioned regularly in accident and crime stories,” he said.  “These stories are ubiquitous in local news.”

He believes that local governments have a role to play in increasing media coverage of alcohol's role in crime and accidents.

“It would help if policies mandated that local law enforcement include information on alcohol use, when appropriate, in their reports on crimes and accidents,” Slater said.  “If reporters see alcohol information in police reports, they will be more likely to include that information in their stories.”

The study appears in the March 2012 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Source: Ohio State University

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News Headline: KSU professor leading two research projects to aid Parkinson's patients (Ridgel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Angela
Ridgel,
an assistant
professor of
exercise science/
physiology
at Kent
State University,
is leading
two new
research projects to help individuals
with Parkinson's disease
improve cognitive and
motor function. Ridgel has
been studying Parkinson's
disease for five years, and
the two new research projects
are bringing her closer
to developing exercise therapy
that can delay the progression
of Parkinson's and
lower Parkinson's medications
dosages.
“Parkinson's is a progressive
disease, and over time,
individuals are required to
take more and more medication
— sometimes with negative
side effects — in order
to manage symptoms such
as decreased motor and cognitive
function,” Ridgel said.
“The goal is to develop widely
applicable exercise therapy
to delay the progression
of symptoms and reduce the
need for medication.
STUDY NO. 1: THE PARKINSON'S
DISEASE COGNITIVE
INTERVENTION
Ridgel, with support from
KSU's Dr. John Gunstad, associate
professor of psychology,
and Dr. Ellen Glickman,
professor of exercise physiology,
is currently studying
the impact of upper- and
lower-extremity exercise on
cognition, motor function
and cerebral blood flow, as
well as cardiovascular fitness
and muscle strength in
individuals with Parkinson's
disease. The goal is to add
additional exercise therapy
besides cycling for Parkinson's
patients. Ridgel's past
research has proven cycling
improves motor and cognitive
function.
Initial findings presented
at the Society for Neuroscience
Meeting in November
2011 reveal that individuals
with Parkinson's experience
improvements in cognitive
function, mobility and oxygen
saturation in the brain
after participating in the program's
comprehensive exercise
intervention. This exercise
protocol developed by
Kent State researchers can
improve fitness, motor and
cognitive function in a short,
eight-week period.
Additionally, through extensive
psychological evaluations
measuring memory, attention,
problem-solving and
language, the researchers are
examining which underlying
brain responses and neurological
functions are associated
with cognitive improvements.
These findings may
lead to additional methods
for Parkinson's rehabilitation,
according to Gunstad.
“With a greater understanding
of how exercise impacts
neurological function,
we can gauge which areas of
the brain are key to repairing
cognitive function,” Gunstad
said. “This could eventually
lead us to look for methods
of brain stimulation that may
produce the same cognitive
benefits for Parkinson's.”
Ridgel will present the
results of the study at the
American College of Sports
Medicine conference in May
2012.
STUDY NO. 2: SMART BIKE
“While the work we are
doing with exercise therapy
has been successful, there
is quite a bit of variability in
the data,” Ridgel said. “Individuals
with Parkinson's
each have different symptoms
and capabilities, making
it challenging to develop
a single, applicable rehabilitation
program ideal for all
patients.
“Our goal is to build a
‘smart bike' that would allow
us to create a database
of symptoms and responses.
Using this database, we
could then design a cycling
program tailored to an individual's
unique capabilities
and challenges.”
Earlier this year, Ridgel received
a two-year, $390,000
grant from the National Institutes
of Health to develop
the smart bike in collaboration
with Dr. Kenneth Loparo
of Case Western Reserve University
and Dr. Fred Discenzo
of Rockwell Automation.
Starting in June 2012, she
will use the “smart bike” to
assess individual effort, performance,
skill level and therapeutic
value. The ultimate
goal is to devise a computerdriven
system that alters resistance,
speed and time to
benefit each individual. Using
an established baseline,
the bike will output a customized
exercise program to
benefit individuals with Parkinson's.
If successful, the
team can apply for a second
grant to develop a solution
for widespread use in therapist
and doctor's offices.
Ridgel received her undergraduate
degree in biology
from the College of William
and Mary in Virginia, a master's
degree in biology at Villanova
University in Pennsylvania
and her doctoral degree
in biomedical sciences from
Marshall University in West
Virginia. Ridgel completed
her postdoctoral training at
Case Western Reserve University
and Cleveland Clinic.
Her early work used animal
models to examine the neurobiology
of movement and
the effects of aging on movement.
Most recently, she has
been interested in how aging
and neurological disorders
limit exercise and movement
in humans.
For more information on
Kent State's exercise physiology
program, visit www.
kent.edu/ehhs/exph.

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News Headline: KSU professor leading two research projects to aid Parkinson's patients (Ridgel) | Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Angela
Ridgel,
an assistant
professor of
exercise science/
physiology
at Kent
State University,
is leading
two new
research projects to help individuals
with Parkinson's disease
improve cognitive and
motor function. Ridgel has
been studying Parkinson's
disease for five years, and
the two new research projects
are bringing her closer
to developing exercise therapy
that can delay the progression
of Parkinson's and
lower Parkinson's medications
dosages.
“Parkinson's is a progressive
disease, and over time,
individuals are required to
take more and more medication
— sometimes with negative
side effects — in order
to manage symptoms such
as decreased motor and cognitive
function,” Ridgel said.
“The goal is to develop widely
applicable exercise therapy
to delay the progression
of symptoms and reduce the
need for medication.
STUDY NO. 1: THE PARKINSON'S
DISEASE COGNITIVE
INTERVENTION
Ridgel, with support from
KSU's Dr. John Gunstad, associate
professor of psychology,
and Dr. Ellen Glickman,
professor of exercise physiology,
is currently studying
the impact of upper- and
lower-extremity exercise on
cognition, motor function
and cerebral blood flow, as
well as cardiovascular fitness
and muscle strength in
individuals with Parkinson's
disease. The goal is to add
additional exercise therapy
besides cycling for Parkinson's
patients. Ridgel's past
research has proven cycling
improves motor and cognitive
function.
Initial findings presented
at the Society for Neuroscience
Meeting in November
2011 reveal that individuals
with Parkinson's experience
improvements in cognitive
function, mobility and oxygen
saturation in the brain
after participating in the program's
comprehensive exercise
intervention. This exercise
protocol developed by
Kent State researchers can
improve fitness, motor and
cognitive function in a short,
eight-week period.
Additionally, through extensive
psychological evaluations
measuring memory, attention,
problem-solving and
language, the researchers are
examining which underlying
brain responses and neurological
functions are associated
with cognitive improvements.
These findings may
lead to additional methods
for Parkinson's rehabilitation,
according to Gunstad.
“With a greater understanding
of how exercise impacts
neurological function,
we can gauge which areas of
the brain are key to repairing
cognitive function,” Gunstad
said. “This could eventually
lead us to look for methods
of brain stimulation that may
produce the same cognitive
benefits for Parkinson's.”
Ridgel will present the
results of the study at the
American College of Sports
Medicine conference in May
2012.
STUDY NO. 2: SMART BIKE
“While the work we are
doing with exercise therapy
has been successful, there
is quite a bit of variability in
the data,” Ridgel said. “Individuals
with Parkinson's
each have different symptoms
and capabilities, making
it challenging to develop
a single, applicable rehabilitation
program ideal for all
patients.
“Our goal is to build a
‘smart bike' that would allow
us to create a database
of symptoms and responses.
Using this database, we
could then design a cycling
program tailored to an individual's
unique capabilities
and challenges.”
Earlier this year, Ridgel received
a two-year, $390,000
grant from the National Institutes
of Health to develop
the smart bike in collaboration
with Dr. Kenneth Loparo
of Case Western Reserve University
and Dr. Fred Discenzo
of Rockwell Automation.
Starting in June 2012, she
will use the “smart bike” to
assess individual effort, performance,
skill level and therapeutic
value. The ultimate
goal is to devise a computer driven
system that alters resistance,
speed and time to
benefit each individual. Using
an established baseline,
the bike will output a customized
exercise program to
benefit individuals with Parkinson's.
If successful, the
team can apply for a second
grant to develop a solution
for widespread use in therapist
and doctor's offices.
Ridgel received her undergraduate
degree in biology
from the College of William
and Mary in Virginia, a master's
degree in biology at Villanova
University in Pennsylvania
and her doctoral degree
in biomedical sciences from
Marshall University in West
Virginia. Ridgel completed
her postdoctoral training at
Case Western Reserve University
and Cleveland Clinic.
Her early work used animal
models to examine the neurobiology
of movement and
the effects of aging on movement.
Most recently, she has
been interested in how aging
and neurological disorders
limit exercise and movement
in humans.
For more information on
Kent State's exercise physiology
program, visit www.
kent.edu/ehhs/exph.

Return to Top



News Headline: Mark Arum: Gridlock Guy | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As you are probably well aware, severe weather returned to the metro area Friday night into Saturday morning. March tornadoes in North Georgia. Amazing.

I was on the air Friday night taking calls from people trying to hold on during the storms. A number of callers were out driving in the bad weather wondering what they should do. I figured now was a good time to review what the experts say on tornado safety while driving.

I have always been told to get out of my car during a tornado, that being in a car in such a violent storm is a huge mistake. I'm not going to lie to you; if caught in a tornado, I would have second thoughts about fleeing my car unless there was a stable building nearby. I decided to do some research on the subject.

Most sources still recommend getting out of your vehicle if a tornado approaches. The best advice seems to be to find a low spot on the ground away from trees and to lie face down with your hands covering your head to protect yourself from flying debris. Hiding under bridges and overpasses is not suggested, with those structures often becoming traps for tornado-strewn debris.

I did, however, find one scientific study that might change the way people view this situation in the future. Conducted in 2002 by Kent State University, Wichita State University and Boyce Thompson Institute, the research was used to determine the “safety and stability of stationary motor vehicles exposed to severe winds.”

Data was used from 291 vehicles exposed to tornadoes, two “storm-chasing” vehicles and a wind tunnel used to see how high wind speeds effected both sedans and mini-vans. The findings were quite interesting.

Cars exposed to F-1 or F-2 (73-157 mph winds) tornadoes were not moved by the high winds 72 percent of the time. Ninety-six percent of the cars exposed to F-1 and F-2 winds did not tip over. That means in an F-1 or F-2 tornado there is a 4-percent chance that your car could tip over.

The higher the wind speeds, the greater chance of car movement. Cars exposed during F-3 and F-4 ( 155-260 mph winds) tornadoes were “moved” 50 percent of the time and tipped over 18 percent of the time.

The study concluded that: “Although an underground shelter or sturdy building offer the best protection from severe winds, it is found that a vehicle may be a relatively stable place and may be safer than a mobile home or the outdoors. These findings may warrant changes to public recommendations made during tornado warnings and other severe storm situations.”

Now, I'm not saying that you should definitely stay in your car when a tornado is approaching, but it may be your best bet if you can't find a permanent structure of low-lying area to take cover.

The Red Cross might have put it best on its website. If you are caught outdoors, seek shelter in a basement, shelter or sturdy building. If you cannot quickly walk to a shelter:

Immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter.

If flying debris occurs while you are driving, pull over and park. Now you have the following options as a last resort:

Stay in the car with the seat belt on. Put your head down below the windows, covering with your hands and a blanket if possible.

If you can safely get lower than the level of the roadway, exit your car and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.

Your choice should be driven by your specific circumstances.

Hopefully, none of us will ever have to make this decision during a tornado.

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News Headline: Follow advice as weather turns bad | Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Contact Name: Arum, Mark
News OCR Text: Severe weather returned to metro Atlanta on Friday night, and I was on the air taking calls from people who were driving in the bad weather and wondering what to do.

I have always been told to get out of my car during a tornado. I'm not going to lie to you; if caught in a tornado, I would have second thoughts about fleeing my car unless there were a stable building nearby. I decided to do some research on the subject.

Most sources still recommend getting out of your vehicle if a tornado approaches. The best advice is to find a low spot on the ground away from trees and to lie face down with your hands covering your head to protect yourself from flying debris. Hiding under bridges or overpasses is not suggested; those structures often become traps for debris.

I did, however, find one scientific study that might change the way people view this situation. Conducted in 2002 by Kent State University, Wichita State University and Boyce Thompson Institute, the research was used to determine the "safety and stability of stationary motor vehicles exposed to severe winds."

Data was from 291 vehicles exposed to tornadoes, two "storm-chasing" vehicles and a wind tunnel used to see how high wind speeds affected both sedans and mini-vans.

Cars exposed to F1 or F2 tornadoes (73-157 mph winds) were not moved by the high winds 72 percent of the time. Ninety-six percent of the cars did not tip over.

Cars exposed to F3 and F4 tornadoes ( 155-260 mph winds) were moved 50 percent of the time and tipped over 18 percent of the time.

The study concluded that "although an underground shelter or sturdy building offer the best protection from severe winds, it is found that a vehicle may be a relatively stable place and may be safer than a mobile home or the outdoors. These findings may warrant changes to public recommendations made during tornado warnings and other severe storm situations."

The Red Cross might have put it best on its website. If you are caught outdoors, seek shelter in a basement or sturdy building. If you cannot quickly walk to a shelter, then get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter. If flying debris occurs while you are driving, pull over and park.

Now you have the following options as a last resort:

Stay in the car with the seat belt on. Put your head down below the windows, covering with your hands and a blanket if possible.

If you can safely get lower than the level of the roadway, exit your car and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.

Gridlock updates

Mark Arum's column appears Mondays. Listen to his traffic reports daily on AM 750 and now 95.5FM News/Talk WSB, and see him each morning on Channel 2 Action News. Connect with Mark by email at mark.arum@coxradio.com; Twitter @markarum; or Facebook: markarumWSB.

Copyright © 2012 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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News Headline: Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Telegraph - Online, The
Contact Name: CHERYL POWELL
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio – The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise.

A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically active.

These findings, published recently in the American Academy of Pediatrics' professional journal Pediatrics, could help shed light on contributing factors and potential solutions for the nation's childhood obesity epidemic.

“Ostracism appears to cause a reduction in physical activity,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State. “It could create a scenario where if you're an overweight or obese child, that ostracism could reduce your physical activity.

“As you get more ostracized, you get heavier, you get more ostracized because you got heavier and things get worse and worse.”

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of children and adolescents are overweight.

Barkley got the idea for the study while watching his three sons, ages 3-7, playing in their backyard.

“I noticed when friends came over, the intensity of their activity increased dramatically,” he said. “After seeing that, I went and looked at the literature in terms of peer influence and physical activity behavior.”

Barkley found other studies showing a link between ostracism or bullying and a decline in physical activity. But previous research didn't show a clear cause and effect.

For example, one study determined that children who felt teased verbally or physically were less likely to be active and more likely to be overweight, Barkley said.

“But does this peer victimization cause them to be less active, or (does) the fact that they're less active cause victimization?” he said.

In his study, Barkley and his colleagues observed 19 boys and girls ages 8-12 who completed two experimental sessions at Kent State.

During one session, children playing a ball-toss computer game received the ball one-third of the time. During the other, the computer was programmed to exclude the children from receiving the ball most of the time.

After playing the computer games, the participants were taken to a gym, where they were allowed to choose sedentary or physical activities.

When they were excluded by the computer game, the study participants spent 41 percent more time with sedentary activities, such as reading books, coloring or playing matching games, the study found.

When the children were included in the computer game, their physical activity level in the gym was 22 percent higher.

“I think it's really important that children have positive peer interaction in their life,” Barkley said.

Barkley is conducting follow-up research exploring whether positive peer interaction encourages physical activity.

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News Headline: STUDENTS TO FIGHT HUNGER | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Trumbull's SIFE (Students In Free Enterprise) organization is challenging all other Kent State regional campuses to compete for the title of "Best Food Can Sculpture" via the Let's Can Hunger Challenge, sponsored nationally by Campbell's. The challenge is a comprehensive hunger challenge including raising awareness, translating awareness to action in the form of urgent hunger relief and empowering those in need to defeat the cycle of hunger The challenge is to construct a food can sculpture with a minimum of 30 cans and post photos of the sculpture to the SIPE Facebook page by noon Wednesday. Photos that get the most "likes" will win the People's Choice Award. Voting will be March 8 to 14, with winners being announced on the KSU Trumbull SIFE Facebook page on March 15. Prizes will be awarded. For information, call Susan at 330-675-8997.

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News Headline: Dan Kane's entertainment spotlight: Blues Brothers Revue | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Official Blues Brothers Revue, starring Wayne Catania, Kieron Lefferty and a seven-piece band, will appear in concert Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. This Blues Brothers tribute show will include clowning, dancing and such lively trademark songs as "Soul Man," "Hey Bartender" and "Rubber Biscuit." Tickets, $24, $27 and $37, may be ordered at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac and 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: On the Beat: Jake and Elwood Blues taking their act to New Philly | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Asked how he began portraying Jake Blues for a living, Wayne Catania chuckles and says, "I was kinda forced into it."

As a touring drummer with various recording artists, Catania had heard for years how much he resembled Belushi's Blues Brothers persona, Jake.

"Everywhere I went, people were taking pictures of me and telling me I should do a Blues Brothers act. It was crazy," he says. "I heard about it for so long and so often that I decided to actually pick up a copy of (the Blues Brothers album) �Briefcase Full of Blues.' As soon as I spun that, I loved it, I visualized it and I never looked back."

The Official Blues Brothers Revue, starring Catania and Kieron Lefferty - as Elwood Blues, his partner in crime and music - will roll into the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

"We've got a great band, just wonderful, talented people," Catania says about the revue's combo of guitar, bass, drums, sax, trumpet, keyboards and backing vocalist. "They represent the music wonderfully, which was always the first intention - even with Dan (Aykroyd) and John. The comedy is built-in."

The Blues Brothers' concert will include clowning, dancing and such lively trademark songs as "Soul Man," "Gimme Some Lovin'," "Hey Bartender," "Rubber Biscuit," "Respect," "Shout," "Shake Your Tail Feather" and "Sweet Home Chicago."

"We try to make the audience a part of everything. There is a great energy that Blues Brothers fans, which makes it a lot more fun for us." Catania says.

"It's a bit of a phenomena. We get people in their teens who weren't even born when the (�Blues Brothers') movie came out, to fans well into their 80s."

Both native Canadians, Catania and Lefferty first appeared together as Jake and Elwood in a "Legends in Concert" production in Toronto. Through an A&E docudrama about the duo titled "Lost in Las Vegas," John Belushi's widow Judy learned of them and invited the guys to audition for a stage musical titled "The Official Blues Brothers Revival" in Chicago in 2004.

"We learned that day how hard it is to do what John and Dan did," said Belushi, quoted on the Blues Brothers Revue's website. "Some looked the part but nobody had the whole package until Kieron and Wayne arrived."

Through the Chicago production, "We were able to meet Dan (Aykroyd) and we kept working together. He's a sweetheart," Catania says. "We know Jim Belushi and the family and whatnot - all wonderful, wonderful people." For years, he and Lefferty have worked with Aykroyd and Judy Belushi "scripting out a TV show based on Jake and Elwood," he says. "We really understand the characters internally."

Asked how he began portraying Jake Blues for a living, Wayne Catania chuckles and says, "I was kinda forced into it."

As a touring drummer with various recording artists, Catania had heard for years how much he resembled Belushi's Blues Brothers persona, Jake.

"Everywhere I went, people were taking pictures of me and telling me I should do a Blues Brothers act. It was crazy," he says. "I heard about it for so long and so often that I decided to actually pick up a copy of (the Blues Brothers album) �Briefcase Full of Blues.' As soon as I spun that, I loved it, I visualized it and I never looked back."

The Official Blues Brothers Revue, starring Catania and Kieron Lefferty - as Elwood Blues, his partner in crime and music - will roll into the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

"We've got a great band, just wonderful, talented people," Catania says about the revue's combo of guitar, bass, drums, sax, trumpet, keyboards and backing vocalist. "They represent the music wonderfully, which was always the first intention - even with Dan (Aykroyd) and John. The comedy is built-in."

The Blues Brothers' concert will include clowning, dancing and such lively trademark songs as "Soul Man," "Gimme Some Lovin'," "Hey Bartender," "Rubber Biscuit," "Respect," "Shout," "Shake Your Tail Feather" and "Sweet Home Chicago."

"We try to make the audience a part of everything. There is a great energy that Blues Brothers fans, which makes it a lot more fun for us." Catania says.

"It's a bit of a phenomena. We get people in their teens who weren't even born when the (�Blues Brothers') movie came out, to fans well into their 80s."

Both native Canadians, Catania and Lefferty first appeared together as Jake and Elwood in a "Legends in Concert" production in Toronto. Through an A&E docudrama about the duo titled "Lost in Las Vegas," John Belushi's widow Judy learned of them and invited the guys to audition for a stage musical titled "The Official Blues Brothers Revival" in Chicago in 2004.

"We learned that day how hard it is to do what John and Dan did," said Belushi, quoted on the Blues Brothers Revue's website. "Some looked the part but nobody had the whole package until Kieron and Wayne arrived."

Through the Chicago production, "We were able to meet Dan (Aykroyd) and we kept working together. He's a sweetheart," Catania says. "We know Jim Belushi and the family and whatnot - all wonderful, wonderful people." For years, he and Lefferty have worked with Aykroyd and Judy Belushi "scripting out a TV show based on Jake and Elwood," he says. "We really understand the characters internally."

To date, the Blues Brothers Revue has toured across the United States, Canada and Australia, with talk of a U.K. tour. "The schedule is pretty hectic sometimes," Catania says. "It's important to rest up and recharge the batteries. I really want to deliver for the audience."

Tickets, $24, $27 and $37, may be ordered at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac and 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Students earn honors for bridge building | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Gay Rights Group
News OCR Text: The Kent State University at Tuscarawas Engineering Technology Department held the Regional Bridge Building Contest for area high school students during the annual Engineering Technology Opportunity Expo on Feb. 23.

Julian Levengood won first place and Nick Gauding won second place. Both are students at Tuscarawas Valley High School.

Students had the opportunity to participate individually or in groups. Thirty-four bridges were submitted by 38 students from the Cyber Clubs at Claymont, New Philadelphia and Tuscarawas Valley high schools.

The submitted entries were judged by members of the Tuscarawas Valley Society of Professional Engineers. All participants were awarded a participation certificate. In addition, the first- and second-place winners will be given the opportunity to compete in the international contest in Las Vegas.

The Kent State University at Tuscarawas Engineering Technology Department held the Regional Bridge Building Contest for area high school students during the annual Engineering Technology Opportunity Expo on Feb. 23.

Julian Levengood won first place and Nick Gauding won second place. Both are students at Tuscarawas Valley High School.

Students had the opportunity to participate individually or in groups. Thirty-four bridges were submitted by 38 students from the Cyber Clubs at Claymont, New Philadelphia and Tuscarawas Valley high schools.

The submitted entries were judged by members of the Tuscarawas Valley Society of Professional Engineers. All participants were awarded a participation certificate. In addition, the first- and second-place winners will be given the opportunity to compete in the international contest in Las Vegas.

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News Headline: 'Blues Brothers Revue' at KSU Tusc on Tuesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Official Blues Brothers Revue, featuring Wayne Cantania and Kieron Lafferty as Jake and  Elwood, will perform at the Performing Arts Center of Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

The performance is co-sponsored by Mix 94.1 Radio.

“The Blues Brothers” are what can only be described as a musical, comedic and cinematic legend. They have become part of our culture, and the irreverent characters of Jake and Elwood resonate with everyday people all over the world.

In true Blues Brothers spirit, The Official Blues Brothers Revue is a live concert that combines the comedy and hit songs from the original 1980 hit film, as well as the five popular albums put out by John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd.

Sanctioned by Dan Aykroyd and the John Belushi Estate, the Official Blues Brothers Revue and its 10-piece intercontinental rhythm and blues revue band pay homage to the humor, music and mayhem of the Blues Brothers, as well as the rich history of blues, gospel and soul music.

Tickets are $24 to $37 and are available at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at  www.tusc.kent.edu/pac  or by calling 330-308-6400.

The box office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Dr. NE, New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: KSU Library school is re-accredited by ALA (Wearden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Library and Information Science has received continued accreditation from the American Library Association, the oldest and largest library association in the world. The announcement came from the ALA's Committee on Accreditation after the organization's midwinter meeting in Dallas.

The ALA COA has evaluated educational programs to prepare librarians since 1924. The Council for Higher Education Accreditation recognizes ALA COA as the authority for assessing the quality of education offered by graduate programs in the field of library and information studies.

Currently there are 63 ALA-accredited master's programs across the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico and three programs seeking initial accreditation. Most employers in libraries and other information professions require an ALA-accredited master's degree for professional-level positions, and some states require an ALA-accredited degree to work as a professional librarian in public or school libraries.

Stanley Wearden, Ph.D., dean of the College of Communication and Information of which SLIS is a part, said, "I am very pleased that SLIS has been reaccredited. This is a tribute to the excellent faculty in the school. I want to acknowledge the hard work of Athena Salaba, Ph.D., associate professor, who chaired the self-study committee, and Don Wicks, Ph.D., interim director of the school. Without their leadership, this could not have happened. Finally, it's important that we express our gratitude to the ALA Committee on Accreditation, a dedicated group that invests many hours in the accreditation process. Their guidance is invaluable in our pursuit of excellence."

SLIS at Kent State began offering graduate courses for a Master of Arts in library science in 1949, and then received its first ALA accreditation in 1961-62. With that, it became the 33rd school in the nation and the second in Ohio (after Case Western Reserve University) to offer an accredited graduate degree in library science. In 2000, SLIS received university approval to change the name of the master's degree from Master of Library Science to Master of Library and Information Science, reflecting the increasing influence of technology and information science on the profession.

Today, SLIS at Kent State has the only ALA-accredited MLIS program in Ohio. (CWRU closed its library school program in 1986.) Courses are offered in Kent; at the State Library of Ohio in Columbus, Ohio; and in a fully online MLIS option. With more than 650 graduate students, SLIS has one of the largest programs in the country. The school ranks among the top 20 library schools in the nation, according to U.S. News and World Report, and its children's librarianship program ranks 13th. For more information about the school, visit www.kent.edu/slis .

ALA accreditation indicates that the program has undergone a self-evaluation process, has been externally reviewed and meets the Standards for Accreditation of Master's Programs in Library and Information Studies, established by the ALA's Committee on Accreditation and adopted by ALA Council. COA evaluates each program for conformity to the Standards, which address mission, goals and objectives; curriculum; faculty; students; administration and financial support; and physical resources and facilities. The Standards can be found at http://bit.ly/ALA-standards .

The accreditation process occurs every seven years, unless evidence persuades COA that the review should be conducted at an earlier or later date. The COA requires accredited schools to submit annual statistical reports and biennial narrative reports.

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News Headline: Albrecht announces addition of technology company to business campus (Yokoyama) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Albrecht Inc., a Northeast Ohio-based retail and industrial real estate company, recently announced the addition of ChemImage Imaging Technologies to its Hudson Drive Business Campus in Stow. ChemImage Imaging Technologies is a newly created subsidiary of ChemImage Corp.

Headquartered in Pittsburgh, ChemImage received a $1 million grant from the Ohio Third Frontier Advanced Materials Program to help create a manufacturing facility for the company's liquid crystal-based technology. They are working in close cooperation with Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute to produce the technology, and will become the second tenant to work with Kent State, joining California-based CoAdna Photonics, which opened a research and development facility in Albrecht's Hudson Drive flex complex in 2007.

"By bringing in a company like ChemImage, we've added yet another layer of technology and sophistication to our Hudson Drive Business Campus," said Jack Juron, vice president of Albrecht Inc. "Their collaboration with Kent State and the impact of job creation in the next five years is a victory for the area and is a blueprint for future economic development on our campus."

Albrecht created the Hudson Drive Business Campus after acquiring the former Goodyear mold plant in 2005. The 106-acre property includes the original 130,000 square foot plant, which has been remodeled, and a pair of flex buildings that are now at 98 percent occupancy at the time of this announcement. In addition to using approximately 11,500 square feet in the second flex structure, ChemImage is also building one of the highest-rated "clean rooms" in the region to aid in its research.

"The addition of ChemImage to the Hudson Drive Business Campus is a testament to the strength of the location," said Jim Nilsen, president and treasurer of Albrecht Inc. "We're proud to be a part of the continued growth of the Route 8 corridor, and the blossoming of the Steels Corners interchange in particular."

ChemImage Corp., a leader in hyperspectral imaging technology (i.e., molecular chemical imaging), provides instrumentation, software, contract services and expert consulting to government, industrial and academic organizations. The company's proprietary, state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging technology has many applications, including defense, security, pharmaceuticals, forensics and biomedical diagnostic research, which can reveal critical chemical and biological information from a variety of material systems.

"As part of our business strategy, ChemImage has committed to the regional expertise that exists in Northeast Ohio for liquid crystal technology and Albrecht, Incorporated plays an important role as we partner for the future," said John Belechak, ChemImage chief operating officer. "Albrecht provides a Hudson Drive Business Campus location that emphasizes a high-tech culture and brings us within close proximity to the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State University and a cluster of companies that provide regional stability and future economic growth. The professionalism and flexibility of Albrecht made our decision easy."

The Glenn H. Brown Liquid Crystal Institute (LCI) was founded in 1965 by Glenn H. Brown, a chemistry professor at Kent State University. The birthplace of liquid crystal displays, the LCI is the world first research center focused on the basic and applied science of liquid crystals. Research at the LCI addresses the entire range of multidisciplinary topics associated with the science and technology of liquid crystals and related self-organized materials and devices. The LCI is the place where the future of the liquid crystals is relentlessly pursued, fostering cross-disciplinary and academia-industry collaborations.

"In Albrecht, we're fortunate to have a relationship with a company that is as interested as we are in growing and building technology in Northeast Ohio," said Dr. Hiroshi Yokoyama, director of Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute. "The addition of a second liquid crystal-based company to the Hudson Drive complex is an exciting announcement for everyone involved."

Albrecht Inc. is a privately held, locally owned real estate company with more than four million square feet of retail, grocery and industrial real estate under its ownership and management. Its grocery-anchored shopping centers are located at some of the highest traffic areas in Summit, Cuyahoga, Stark, Medina and Portage counties. Albrecht Inc. leases space to national retailers, Fortune 500 companies, local family-owned businesses and Acme Fresh Markets.

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News Headline: GOP candidates blanket Ohio ahead of Super Tuesday (Yantek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With the Republican presidential face-off in Ohio too close to call, the leading candidates are blanketing the state.

Rick Santorum will hold a rally at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Falls River Square pavilion in Cuyahoga Falls, just 12 hours before voting begins on Super Tuesday. Mitt Romney is scheduled to appear throughout the state this weekend.

"We're the center of the political universe," Ohio GOP spokesman Christopher Maloney said.

But as Santorum and Romney, and to a lesser extent Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul, campaign across the state with personal appearances and media buys, voters are left with a challenge: how to discern facts from fantasy.

"It's very difficult," said John Green, director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron. "A lot of information is coming out through a wide variety of means, and a lot of it is contradictory."

In coming days candidates will go "wall to wall" with commercials "and increasingly go more and more negative," said Thom Yantek, an associate professor of political science at Kent State who specializes in politics and public policy.

That is on top of a primary season that has been more surly and contentious than the norm because of the rise of the tea party; the new super PACs that raise unlimited money for candidates; and the candidates themselves, Yantek said.

"When things go negative, the truth can get stretched," Yantek said. "Anybody who isn't skeptical of what they hear is asking for trouble."

He advises voters to check "truth" websites that examine comments by candidates and officeholders alike.

For instance, at www. politifact.com , public officials who make wildly incorrect statements get the "pants on fire" setting on the Truth-O-Meter gauge of accuracy.

"It does take some effort" to figure out what's true, UA's Green said.

Hard to predict

As the days go on, the messages increasingly will be filtered to those who haven't voted early, he said.

Campaigns can go to the boards of election and check who has voted - not how they voted - and tailor their messages to those who are expected to show up at the voting booths.

How many that will be is anybody's guess. In other primaries, turnout has been anywhere from 19 percent to 48 percent, with the high being in 2008.

The secretary of state's office isn't hazarding any guesses this year, and even UA's Green backs away from predictions.

"There is a lot of volatility," he said. "A lot of Republicans haven't been able to decide who their standard bearer is."

Jason Johnson, a political science and communications professor at Hiram College who specializes in campaign strategies and communication, said Republicans are clear on two things:

"One, they don't like Mitt Romney and two, they want to beat Obama in November. Number 2 is more important than Number 1."

If you want to dip your toe into the fun, each candidate welcomes your money.

Gingrich's website asks voters for $2.50 to help him win and keep his pledge to trim gas prices to that level.

For just 50 cents more, Romney supporters can win a chance to be with the candidate as the Super Tuesday vote rolls in. Fine print on the candidate's website clarifies that supporters can enter and win without paying a dime.

"This is a spectator sport," Yantek said. "The whole Republican primary has been a fascinating circus."

Of the 10 states weighing in on Tuesday, Ohio offers the hottest contest.

Top priority

Despite the vast territory in play across the country, from Alaska and Idaho to Vermont, Virginia and Georgia, Romney will sleep in Ohio every night until Tuesday. It's that important to him.

Romney has much of Ohio's Republican establishment behind him after years of courting the party's county chairmen and donors.

"When a party chairman gets a call early on from someone perceived as the front- runner and they ask you to sign on as a county chairman, it's easy to say yes and it's hard to say no," said Mark Munroe, the Mahoning County GOP chief who is leading Romney's efforts in the Northeast Ohio county. "We've seen the Romney campaign in action since late last year. He was able to start early and that makes such a huge difference."

Romney's camp insists he does not need to win Ohio to get the presidential nomination or even to keep alive the expectation that he eventually will.

However, losing here would drive persistent doubts about the strength of Romney's candidacy. His campaign's schedule - along with TV advertising commitments - shows Ohio is his priority on a day when Republicans in other big states also make their choice.

Spending on TV

Figures provided to the Associated Press show Romney's campaign is spending more than $1.5 million in television ads this week in Ohio and his allies are on the air with almost $1.5 million.

In total, Romney and his supporters plan to spend more than $3.8 million on cable and broadcast television ads.

Santorum and his allies are spending only $796,000 on Ohio. Yet a Quinnipiac University poll released Friday found Santorum at 35 percent support and Romney at 31 percent support - essentially a tie.

Gingrich is short on cash and has been camped out in Georgia trying to prevent an embarrassing home state loss on Tuesday. But he's still a player of sorts in Ohio, where he plans one day of campaigning as well as a 30-minute, policy-thick cable television commercial about energy, an ad costing him $2,750 to run five times through Monday.

The poll that found Romney and Santorum vying for the Ohio lead put Gingrich at 17 percent.

Paul, the favorite of the libertarian wing of his party, had 12 percent support in the poll. He plans no television ads or serious campaigning yet is sure to draw his fervent supporters to the polls for a campaign that has yet to win a state.

Gingrich plans to visit Ohio today to appear in a forum with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and to give remarks to a National Rifle Association event in Findlay and a GOP dinner in Bowling Green.

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News Headline: Twinsburg couple uses Facebook to stay close during Guardsman's deployment to Afghanistan | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Shortly before dawn on Nov. 17, 2011, Ohio Army National Guardsman Tim Sheaffer of Twinsburg rushed into an Afghan coffee shop after the Internet went down at his barracks.

There, accompanied by the beat of the caf 's European techno music, he used Skype to connect with his wife, Amanda, at Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna, to watch the birth of their daughter, Brooklyn.

"It was great being able to talk to my wife during the labor," he wrote in a recent e-mail. "The only thing better would have been to be there, letting her squeeze my hand till my fingers turned purple."

His wife remembered how the laughing, the joking and even the Internet caf background music helped her through labor.

This sort of long-distance relationship is nothing new to this couple, both 22, who have relied on social media ever since they first met nearly two years ago via Facebook.

Now, they say that electronic connection has become more important than ever since his deployment last June.

"We talk about things any couple would: how our respective days went, plans for the weekend, how Brooklyn is doing," Tim Sheaffer wrote. "It helps to have a normal conversation that doesn't revolve around the military."

Amanda Sheaffer said communicating through Facebook and Skype "really helps keeps me going, and he definitely says the same."

The hardest part, she noted, is the lack of physical contact -- "him not being here, not seeing Brooklyn grow, having to do everything on my own. Just a hug. I definitely don't take things like that for granted now."

But she added that the best part (and there really is one) of being apart is that it "brings out our deepest emotions, and how we really feel about each other, as opposed to that in-love high of the honeymoon stage."

Her husband said he is writing a letter each day to his daughter that he plans to put in a book "to give her when she's older, that will hopefully help her understand this place better."

He also noted that two of the biggest life lessons he has learned from deployment are respect for human beings all over the world, and patience.

He hopes to be back home in May, continue his studies at Kent State University and perhaps be a history teacher someday.

For now, though 7,000 miles apart, Tim and Amanda Sheaffer still have each other -- even if only electronically.

"It's bittersweet," as she noted.

But it works.

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News Headline: Kent: Students celebrate free birth control | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/05/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
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News OCR Text: Kent State students celebrated President Obama's decision to have employers cover the cost of birth control.

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News Headline: Teaching fluency through song (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Mount Airy News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Timothy Rasinski, a professor of literacy education at Kent State University, put an emphasis on inflection and its importance in reading comprehension when speaking to more than 265 teachers in the Surry County school system Wednesday afternoon.

Rasinski is essentially a rock star in the teaching world as he has published a number of books. Through a grant and federal funding, the school system was able to bring him in to help kick off changes in the K-2 assessment for literacy and mathematics in North Carolina. He held two sessions, one for K-2 teachers, principals and support staff and one for 3-12 teachers, principals and support staff.

“He's opened up whole new ways for us to think about reading,” said Pat Widdowson, assistant superintendent.

Rasinkski kicked off the sessions by asking teachers to sing a number of patriotic songs with him. He projected the words for each song onto a screen at Dobson First Baptist Church.

“We just read more words than struggling readers do in a whole day,” he told them when they had finished. “There's a place for singing in your life.”

He spoke to teachers about how they can use singing to teach students. They can use songs and poetry to teach history by looking at artifacts from particular time periods.

“Our culture is imbedded in songs and poetry and I think we need to share that with our kids,” he said.

Singing is also a type of oral reading that puts a meter to the words and allows students to commit them to muscle memory.

“We need to find a balance between oral and silent reading,” he told those gathered in the audience.

By having students say or sing the words in a rhythm, they become more fluent in reading. They build their vocabularies and therefore become comfortable with more words. In order to become more fluent, they need to be able to recognize words without thinking about them.

“It's not reading fast, it's reading with comprehension. The goal of phonics is to get kids not to use phonics,” he said.

The workshop will help students with the new assessment because it places an emphasis on phonemic awareness, word development and fluency components to improve reading instruction.

Copyright 2012 Mount Airy News.

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News Headline: Changes in store for Kent parking | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/04/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
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News OCR Text: The $100 million in downtown redevelopment has presented Kent's administration with the challenge of finding places for all of the new customers, visitors and workers to park.

After years of planning with parking consultants, businesses and other players in the downtown redevelopment, City Engineer Jim Bowling said the city's administration likely will take new parking guidelines to Kent City Council for approval in the summer or fall.

One major difference in the city administration's recommended plan would be the implementation of fees to park at 262 downtown parking spaces.

Under the plan, drivers would use some form of pay station to park at spots located on:

* Water Street between Haymaker Parkway and Columbus Street

* Main Street between DePeyster Street and Gougler Avenue

* DePeyster Street between Main Street and Haymaker Parkway

* Erie Street between Franklin Avenue and Haymaker Parkway

* Franklin Avenue between Main Street and College Avenue

The spaces would cost 25 cents per hour between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., with a limit of two hours. After 6 p.m. and on Sundays, the spots would be free to users.

"It's meant not to make money," Bowling said. "It's meant to be practical (and) efficient." He said currently, there is no lack of downtown parking.

Bowling said the overall parking proposal, created through years of research and discussion, is fair to office and retail users, as well as visitors to the city, without adding to Kent's annual operating cost.

Bowling said the pay stations would keep new customers flowing in and out of the downtown by preventing vehicles from taking up central spots for long periods of time and making parking enforcement easier.

Sue Nelson, owner of Sue Nelson Designs on South Water Street, said she believed the city helped area businesses when it removed parking meters in the early 1980s. She said she hoped the city would not implement a paid parking system again.

"I remember when we had (parking meters) before," Nelson said. "It scared business away. People gravitated to the malls."

Nelson said she thought metered parking could especially hurt new and incoming fine dining restaurants. She also said she believed stepping up enforcement of the current two-hour parking limits on many downtown spaces would work better for visitors and businesses than bringing in pay stations.

Gwen Rosenberg, owner of the gourmet popcorn store Popped!, located in the Acorn Alley II retail development, had a different take.

"Anything that encourages turnover and additional people parking, that's a (good thing)," Rosenberg said.

The other paid option will be the parking deck at the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway transit center on the corner of East Erie and DePeyster streets. Rates would likely be 50 cents per hour, $4 for between four and 10 hours and $7 for overnight parking. The deck is expected to have 365 spaces.

Bowling said officials tried to price the parking deck's spots in a way that would discourage Kent State University students from using the deck everyday instead of buying an on-campus parking pass.

Free on-street parking, with a restriction on overnight parking, would be located:

* Water Street from Columbus Street to Brady Street

* DePeyster Street from Main Street to Columbus Street

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News Headline: Book talk: Early 'Funky Winkerbean' | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/03/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With 40 years worth of daily and Sunday strips, the Kent State University Press says they can release an installment in The Complete Funky Winkerbean every year for the next 13 years. Volume 1, which publishes this month, covers 1972 to 1974, introducing Funky, Les, Harry L. Dinkle, "Crazy" Harry and the rest of the gang at Westview High. The book costs $45.

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