Report Overview:
Total Clips (30)
Anthropology (8)
Art, School of (1)
Art, School of; Pan-African Studies; Theatre and Dance (1)
Athletics (4)
Biology; Chemistry and Biochemistry; Mathematics; Physics; Students; Technology (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (4)
College of Technology (1)
Communication Studies (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Fashion Design (2)
Geography (1)
Higher Education (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Regional Academic Center (1)
Students (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Anthropology (8)
Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/07/2012 RoadRunner Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....

Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/07/2012 Yahoo! News Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....

VIDEO: Gorilla Genome Decoded, Found Surprisingly Close To Man's (Lovejoy) 03/07/2012 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

...`our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....

Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/08/2012 ABC News - Online Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....

Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/07/2012 Boston.com Text Attachment Email

...`our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....

Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/07/2012 Houston Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....

Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/07/2012 NPR - Online Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....

Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/07/2012 U.S. News & World Report Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....


Art, School of (1)
On View This Week 03/07/2012 Scene - Online Text Attachment Email

Zygote Press: Fellow Travelers: Works of J. Noel Reifel and his Students. Reifel has taught printmaking at Kent State's School of Art since 1976. This exhibit presents his work as both a teacher and a printmaker, by way of works by former students and his...


Art, School of; Pan-African Studies; Theatre and Dance (1)
THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts 03/08/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Athletics (4)
Kent State Golden Flashes' Justin Greene named 1st-team all-MAC; Akron Zips' Zeke Marshall and Alex Abreu named 2nd-team 03/08/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Expectations high at Kent, just how its coach wants it (Senderoff) 03/08/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Golden Flashes regroup, turn attention toward MAC Tournament and ultimate prize (Senderoff) 03/08/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State track star to compete in NCAA Indoor Championships 03/08/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email


Biology; Chemistry and Biochemistry; Mathematics; Physics; Students; Technology (1)
School Notes: 3 writers head to state 03/07/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Ten Harmon School students participated Feb. 25 in the Power of the Pen regional tournament at Kent State University. McKenna Ritter took first among 80 eighth-graders, while Carly Reitz placed 14th and Lydia Holman 15th among seventh-graders....


College of Education, Health and Human Services (4)
Lack of cooking skills part of poverty cycle 03/07/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

..."I've not done a class that I don't have somebody tell me they drink a 2-liter every day," she said. At the Center of Hope in Ravenna, students from Kent State University's Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum hold classes for those wanting to prepare more healthful meals. They tackle topics like...

LEARNING TO COOK STRETCHES FOOD AID: SMART BUDGETING, SHOPPING CAN HELP BREAK POVERTY CYCLE 03/07/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

..."I've not done a class that I don't have somebody tell me they drink a 2-liter every day," she said. At the Center of Hope in Ravenna, students from Kent State University's Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum hold classes for those wanting to prepare more healthful meals. They tackle topics like...

Environmentalist Gordon Vars will be honored at Kent Bog 03/08/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Lack of cooking skills part of poverty cycle 03/07/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

..."I've not done a class that I don't have somebody tell me they drink a 2-liter every day," she said. At the Center of Hope in Ravenna, students from Kent State University's Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum hold classes for those wanting to prepare more healthful meals. They tackle topics like...


College of Technology (1)
Local news briefs -- March 7: Dean appointment 03/08/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Communication Studies (1)
Media coverage of alcohol in crime might sway public opinion, support of liquor laws 03/08/2012 Lantern - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...communication professor David Ewoldsen, associate communication and psychology professor Andrew Hayes and Catherine Goodall, assistant communication professor at Kent State University. Slater said these reports are read by advocacy and public health organizations that push for change, and they could have...


Entrepreneurship (1)
Launching Students into Entrepreneurship 03/07/2012 White House, The Text Attachment Email

...additional schools: Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Walsh College, Detroit, Michigan Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio Kent State University, Kent, Ohio Lorain Community College, Elyria, Ohio Baldwin Wallace University, Bera, Ohio We plan to open many more...


Fashion Design (2)
Another generation discovers the allure of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' style (Palomo-Lovinski) 03/08/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Fashion Societé Show (Young Kim) 03/08/2012 MyLiTv.com Text Attachment Email


Geography (1)
Overnight News Digest: Some tossed by twisters live to tell about it, but how? (Schmidlin) 03/08/2012 DAILY KOS Text Attachment Email

... "It is puzzling because one or two people in a place will be killed while others live, and it often seems to be luck," acknowledges Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who has studied tornado injuries. Luck does seem to have a lot to do with it, in that one or more factors have...


Higher Education (1)
Educators support bill that would offer property to universities 03/08/2012 Akron Legal News - Online Text Attachment Email

...backing a House bill that would require a school district to offer the right of first refusal for district property to state universities. Luis Proenza, University of Akron president, and David W. James, Akron Public Schools superintendent, recently testified before the House Education committee in...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU shares stories of Holocaust survivors 03/08/2012 Plain Dealer Text Email


KSU Museum (1)
'They wore THAT to the beach' 03/08/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Regional Academic Center (1)
Kent State-Twinsburg facility's construction right on schedule (Mohan) 03/07/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

Twinsburg -- With the exterior of the building almost complete, the new 45,000-square-foot Kent State Geauga Twinsburg campus should be open for classes when the fall 2012 semester begins Aug. 27. "By the end of this week, the building...


Students (1)
Huntington links OSU student ID cards with checking accounts 03/07/2012 Business First of Columbus - Online Text Attachment Email

Ohio State University students now can buy everything from books to booze with just their student identification card. Huntington Bancshares Inc....


News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: RoadRunner
Contact Name: ALICIA CHANG
News OCR Text: This undated image provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows a female western lowland gorilla named Kamilah, at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in San Diego, Calif. Scientists recently published a draft of her DNA and compared it to the genetic blueprints of humans and chimpanzees to better understand how humans evolved. (AP Photo/San Diego Zoo Global)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes — humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans — to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Return to Top



News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! News
Contact Name: ALICIA CHANG
News OCR Text: LOS ANGELES (AP) — Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes — humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans — to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Return to Top



News Headline: VIDEO: Gorilla Genome Decoded, Found Surprisingly Close To Man's (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LOS ANGELES -- Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as `our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes – humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans – to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Return to Top



News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: ABC News - Online
Contact Name: ALICIA CHANG AP Science Writer
News OCR Text: Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes — humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans — to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Return to Top



News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Boston.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This undated image provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows a female western lowland gorilla named Kamilah, at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in San Diego, Calif. Scientists recently published a draft of her DNA and compared it to the genetic blueprints of humans and chimpanzees to better understand how humans evolved.

(AP Photo/San Diego Zoo Global)

LOS ANGELES- Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as `our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes -- humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans -- to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Return to Top



News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Houston Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: ALICIA CHANG
News OCR Text: This undated file photo shows Clint, a chimpanzee, whose DNA was deciphered by scientists in 2005. A different team of researchers recently sequenced the genome of a gorilla and compared it to the genetic blueprints of humans and chimpanzees to better understand how humans evolved. Photo: Yerkes National Primate Research Center / AP

This undated image provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows a female western lowland gorilla named Kamilah, at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in San Diego, Calif. Scientists recently published a draft of her DNA and compared it to the genetic blueprints of humans and chimpanzees to better understand how humans evolved.   Photo: San Diego Zoo Global / AP

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes — humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans — to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Return to Top



News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: NPR - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LOS ANGELES (AP) — Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes — humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans — to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Return to Top



News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: U.S. News & World Report
Contact Name: ALICIA CHANG
News OCR Text: LOS ANGELES (AP) — Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes — humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans — to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: On View This Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scene - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Zygote Press: Fellow Travelers: Works of J. Noel Reifel and his Students. Reifel has taught printmaking at Kent State's School of Art since 1976. This exhibit presents his work as both a teacher and a printmaker, by way of works by former students and his own current prints. The exhibit continues through March 30 at 1410 East 30th St. Call 216-621-2900 or go to zygotepress.com.

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News Headline: THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ART
The Kent State University School of
Art continues season with 65th Student
Annual through March 14 in the
School of Art Gallery. Location: School
of Art Gallery, Room 211, Art Building,
Kent State University.

SPEAKERS
Author and attorney Kip Petroff
will hold a book discussion and
signing of “Battling Goliath: Inside
a $22 Billion Legal Scandal” from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m April 19. Location:
Kent State Univesity Kiva, Summit
Street, Kent

Kent State University's Department
of Pan-African Studies will
host College of Wooster History Professor
Ibra Sene for a reception and
lecture in the second-floor lecture
hall in Ritchie Hall. The reception will
be March 13 from 5:30 “ 6:30 p.m.
with the lecture to follow at 7 p.m.
Sene's lecture will focus on youth, religion
and cultural identity in the era
of globalization and Hizbut Tarqiyya,
a West African social youth movement
of Islamic intellectuals. Location:
Oscar Ritchie Hall, 225 Terrace
Drive, Kent.

The annual Thomas Schroth Visiting
Artist Series presents worldrenowned
architect, George H. Miller,
managing partner at Pei Cobb
Freed and Partners, on March 15,
at 7 p.m. in the Kent State University
Kiva Auditorium. The lecture is free
and open to the public. To ensure a
seat, please call 330-672-2760 or
email collegeofthearts@kent.edu.
Location: Kent Student Center, Kent
State University.

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News Headline: Kent State Golden Flashes' Justin Greene named 1st-team all-MAC; Akron Zips' Zeke Marshall and Alex Abreu named 2nd-team | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Kent State Golden Flashes forward Justin Greene has been named to the Mid-American Conference all-conference first-team for the second straight season.

Greene, a 6-8 senior forward and the MAC Player of the Year last season, was among the players to earn all-conference honors that were determined by league coaches' votes, and announced today.

The MAC regular season champion Akron Zips were represented on the second-team by sophomore guard Alex Abreu and junior center Zeke Marshall.

On Tuesday, it was announced that Akron players received two individual awards: Marshall earned MAC defensive Player of the Year honors for the second straight season; junior forward Quincy Diggs earned the Sixth Man of the Year award.

Akron senior forward Nikola Cvetinovic and Kent State senior guard Michael Porrini made third-team all-MAC.

Kent State guards Carlton Guyton, a senior, and Randal Holt, a junior, made honorable mention.

Other MAC honors announced previously this week include: Buffalo's Mitchell Watt, Player of the Year; Eastern Michigan's Rob Murphy, Coach of the Year; Toledo's Julius Brown, Freshman of the Year.

Kent State (20-10) plays a MAC Tournament quarterfinal game on Thursday at Quicken Loans Arena, against the winner of tonight's game between Western Michigan (13-19) and Northern Illinois (5-25).

Akron (21-10), as the regular season champion with a 13-3 league record, earned byes to play in a semifinal game on Friday.

All-MAC first-team

Mitchell Watt, Buffalo

Javon McCrea, Buffalo

Justin Greene, Kent State

Julian Mavunga, Miami

D.J. Cooper, Ohio

All-MAC second-team

Zeke Marshall, Akron

Alex Abreu, Akron

Jarrod Jones, Ball State

Austin Calhoun, Bowling Green

Rian Pearson, Toledo

All-MAC third-team

Nikola Cvetinovic, Akron

Scott Thomas, Bowling Green

Trey Zeigler, Central Michigan

Darrell Lampley, Eastern Michigan

Michael Porrini, Kent State

Honorable mention

Randal Holt, Kent State

Carlton Guyton, Kent State

Ivo Baltic, Ohio

Walter Offutt, Ohio

Curtis Dennis, Toledo

Flenard Whitfield, Western Michigan

All-freshman team

Aaron Adeoye, Ball State

Austin McBroom, Central Michigan

Brian Sullivan, Miami

Abdel Nader, Northern Illinois

Julius Brown, Toledo

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News Headline: Expectations high at Kent, just how its coach wants it (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- "I don't know nearly as much as I thought I did."

That's what Rob Senderoff has learned as he comes to the end of his first season as Kent State's men's basketball coach.

Senderoff had the ideal background for a KSU coach. He spent six years as an assistant at the school, under Jim Christian (2002-06) and Geno Ford (2008-11). When Ford departed for Bradley last spring, Senderoff was promoted.

"I knew there would be a difference between being an assistant and a head coach, and that's so true," Senderoff said. As an assistant, he was a big brother who listened to the other siblings complain about their parents. He'd give advice, help with problems and allow them to vent. When players went to an assistant, it was the head coach who was the target of their frustration.

"Now, that guy is me," Senderoff said. "I make the final call. For three years, some of these guys went to me to talk about Geno Ford when they were unhappy with their minutes, their shots ... stuff like that. The dynamic has changed."

Don't misunderstand, Senderoff has had a solid rookie season. KSU is 20-10 going into Thursday's 7 p.m. Mid-American Conference tournament quarterfinal against Western Michigan. Yes, the Golden Flashes were picked to win the league, and finished fourth. They lost twice to rival Akron, which eats away at Kent State fans. But 20 wins is 20 wins, and a 10-6 record in the MAC is still respectable.

"The bar here has been set so high," Senderoff said. "This is the 13th time in 14 years that we've won 20 games. We're one of only four teams [along with Kansas, Gonzaga and Creighton] to have won at least 10 conference games in each of the last 14 years. We've had so many terrific seasons, people take this for granted."

That's especially true as Senderoff is the fifth KSU basketball coach in the past 14 years.

"I think if someone says we had a bad year if we fail to win the MAC Tournament -- well, that person needs to have his head examined," he said. "Our goal is to win it. I think we can. I like our kids and their approach. But this season is about more than the tournament."

Northeast Ohio rivalries

His challenge may not be greater than what Gary Waters faced when he began this streak, coaching KSU to a 23-7 record and an NCAA Tournament appearance in 1999. At that time, Akron and Cleveland State were not cranking out 20-win seasons as they do now. The door was wide open for a dynamic coach like Waters to revive the local mid-major basketball scene.

But this season, Akron, CSU and Kent State have all won 20 games. Waters, now at Cleveland State, has done so four of the past five years. Keith Dambrot has turned Akron into a power with seven consecutive seasons of at least 20 victories.

Senderoff said one of his mistakes this season was his approach to the Cleveland State game, a 57-53 loss at home.

"I made it too big," he said. "It's an important game, but I notice how Gary talked about how it's not a conference game and it's just a good local rivalry. That's the right approach. I put too much pressure on the kids because they beat us last year. That game is on me."

Kent State went to the NCAA Tournament four times between 1999 and 2008. Since then, CSU went in 2009, as did Akron. The Zips did it again in 2011.

So it's a battle for Senderoff, who is a rookie head coach at 38 facing two veteran mid-major coaches in his backyard. The recruiting battles are tougher, the expectations higher.

Maintenance isn't easy

Senderoff realizes most fans think because one coach after another at KSU keeps the program winning, there are few stalls and sputters in the transition periods. But that's not true.

In 2002, Jim Christian took over a 30-6 team that went to the Elite Eight. He lost some key players, but still finished at 22-9 and went to the NIT.

"But some people were disappointed because we still had the MAC Player of the Year [Antonio Gates] and didn't win the MAC," said Senderoff, who joined Christian's staff in 2002.

Christian spent six years a KSU before going to Texas Christian in 2008. Gene Ford was promoted to head coach, and the Flashes were 19-15 in his first year.

"Even though Geno was on the staff, there still was a period of adjustment," Senderoff said.

The next two seasons, Ford was 24-10 and 25-12 with two NIT appearances.

Ever since Stan Heath left after the 2001-02 season for Arkansas, KSU has replaced the head coach with promoted assistants. With Senderoff, the school took a chance. He was sanctioned by the NCAA during his two seasons (2006-08) at Indiana, where head coach Kelvin Sampson was penalized for making too many calls to recruits. Some say Senderoff took part of the fall for Sampson; others say he was just as guilty.

Either way, former Kent Athletic Director Laing Kennedy believed in Senderoff and allowed him to return and help Ford. Then current AD Joel Nielsen promoted him. Now, he's sitting in Ford's seat, "and I'm really grateful for the chance."

He talked about being a mediocre high school player who was cut from his Division III Albany basketball team.

"Kent has become a very special place to play basketball," he said. "It's my job to keep it that way."

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News Headline: Golden Flashes regroup, turn attention toward MAC Tournament and ultimate prize (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State basketball coach Rob Senderoff delivered a subtle but powerful message to his team in the locker room after a second loss to the University of Akron last Friday night.

The rival Zips had just clinched the Mid-American Conference regular-season championship and had done it at the M.A.C. Center, where the Golden Flashes had been unbeaten in conference games.

The players were exhausted and angry.

Senderoff quickly made them realize that their quest for the ultimate prize, a berth in the NCAA Tournament, had not yet started.

Pointing to two trophies on the floor, Senderoff borrowed a line from Zips coach Keith Dambrot to help illustrate his point.

“This right here,” Senderoff said, pointing to the Flashes' MAC regular-season championship trophy from the previous season. “This is the little prize. That's what Akron just won.”

After pausing, Senderoff continued. “But this here,” he said, touching the Flashes' 2008 MAC Tournament trophy, “this is the big prize. We can still get the big prize.”

Those are the words the Flashes have clung to this week heading into their MAC Tournament game tonight in Cleveland.

The only thing that winning the MAC regular season guarantees is a trip to the National Invitation Tournament. To go to the NCAA Tournament, MAC teams have to win the postseason tournament.

Senderoff spent seven seasons as an assistant coach at KSU and knows first hand that the regular-season champ is no lock to win the tournament and the coveted prize that goes to the winner.

Senior forward Justin Greene knows it, too.

“The last two years we won the regular-season championship, and it got us nowhere,” Greene said. “We have to regroup and refocus and know that if we play hard for 40 minutes in [each game] in the tournament, we can beat anybody.”

For a veteran team, the Flashes were uncharacteristically inconsistent in a disappointing regular season.

So Senderoff launched a last-ditch effort to create the proper mindset.

Hoping to tap into the talent he knows is there, Senderoff set up an affirmative and player-friendly week of preparation designed to encourage his team to finally blossom.

Film and practice

After taking Saturday off to simply exhale, the Flashes gathered in the team's meeting room above the M.A.C. Center on a snowy Sunday. Sitting around a large oval table in high-backed chairs, they watched mistake after mistake during the second-half debacle against Akron.

Just like in the first game against the Zips, the Flashes used their defense to spark a big first half, only to let off the gas and allow a second-half lead to disappear in a disappointing loss.

“I wanted them to see how and why our lead dissipated,” Senderoff said. “How we went from up nine [points] to down 11. There were certainly some things Akron did, but a lot of things were self-inflicted — the turnovers, forcing shots, trying to do too much.”

After the horror flick was over and the lights were turned on, much effort was made to focus the next four days on the task at hand and to forget all about the regular season.

“My point to the team this week is we have to trust each other,” Senderoff said. “At this time of the year, there's nothing more important than that. If one person tries to do too much and goes outside of what we've done all year, then it'll mess everyone else up.”

White signs with black capital letters featuring positive words such as TRUST, TOUGHNESS, BELIEVE, TEAM and TOGETHER were randomly hung all over the dark blue room, and the pep in the players' steps began to return Monday afternoon.

Before practice, players and coaches again gathered in the meeting room to read and sign affidavits from the NCAA about refraining from gambling during the tournament.

Once the forms were turned in and notarized, attention turned to tonight's quarterfinal game against a then-unknown opponent.

The Flashes' opponent remained unknown until Wednesday night when Western Michigan defeated Northern Illinois 71-54 in a second-round game.

During Monday's short film session, the previous depressing mistakes were replaced by a five-minute uplifting clip put together by former player and first-year director of operations Mike McKee. Each clip demonstrated how KSU used its hustle and defense to lead to bursts of easy offense in transition.

“This is where we're at our best,” Senderoff said while providing play-by-play. “Look how we don't give up on the play, how a dive on the floor leads to an exciting dunk. … I just want to make sure we keep seeing ourselves playing the way we will play and win Thursday, Friday and Saturday.”

The team watched another McKee production Tuesday, this one another five-minute clip of a series of plays in which the Flashes executed their offense with precision.

“I think either Western [Michigan] or Northern [Illinois] will play zone against us because they can't guard us in man,” Senderoff said. “Not when we play like this.”

A victory would give the Flashes a third shot at Akron in a semifinal at 7 p.m. Friday night with the winner advancing to Saturday's championship game.

“Man, I want to win a championship!” senior guard Carlton Guyton said to no one in particular while making his way from the meeting room down to the gym floor for practice.

He didn't realize Senderoff was just a few feet behind him.

“We all do, Scootie,” Senderoff replied.

It was a light week of practice for the Flashes, with more of an emphasis on walking through plays on offense and defense than on live action.

“I'm not worried about effort,” Senderoff said. “I just want everyone as fresh and as healthy as can be and with a good mindset. There are teams that don't want to play anymore. There are teams that are ready to hang it up.”

Coaches' preparation

Tuesday afternoon, McKee was putting the finishing touches on the season highlight video the team would watch on the bus on the way to Cleveland on Wednesday.

As his graduate assistant was pre-ordering breakfast for the team from McDonald's, making sure to order two orange juices per player for the ride, McKee pointed to a pair of boxing gloves hanging on the wall near him.

“Every year we have a theme for the season and the video reflects that,” he said. “This year, the guys were a little feisty in practice early on, so we jokingly got a pair of boxing gloves and told the guys they'd have to wear them if they got too fired up.”

No one ever had to wear them, but the gloves became a visual reminder of the toughness the Flashes would need. A rule was soon adopted that whenever a guard got seven rebounds in a game or a big man got 10, they autographed the gloves with a silver Sharpie in recognition.

“The theme to the season's video this year is boxing,” McKee said. “I've been working on it for weeks. [Assistant coach] Bobby [Steinburg] and I collaborated on the music. We call it a Stein Kee production.”

A voice clip of boxing great Muhammad Ali, a song clip from the boxing movie Million Dollar Baby and the entire song One Shining Moment serve as the background for the nine-minute video.

“One Shining Moment is my favorite part,” said Eric Haut, a guard on the Flashes' 2002 Elite Eight team, as he popped out of his office to watch the video. “That's one of my favorite things about the NCAA Tournament. When it's over, they play highlights from all the teams to this song. I'll never forget it when we were on it.”

In a nearby office, another assistant and former Flashes guard, Jordan Mincy, works on editing a paper copy of his scouting report that he'll present to the team if Western Michigan wins Wednesday night. Steinburg has done the same in case Northern Illinois wins.

The reports goes along with a video presentation Mincy will put together with the help of a computer program called Synergy that the league uses so each team has access to every opponent's film.

“You can put together clips of things they do well or plays they run the most and have the players watch that,” Mincy said. “Last year I remember I had two scouts [scouting reports] back-to-back, so I was up till 3 a.m. putting it together. It was crazy.”

And it will all be worth it if the Flashes grab the ultimate prize and end up with a chance for their moment to shine

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News Headline: Kent State track star to compete in NCAA Indoor Championships | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Penina "Peni" Acayo, a graduate student and triple jumper on the Kent State women's track and field team, is headed to the 2012 NCAA Indoor Championships at the Jacksons Indoor Track in Nampa, Idaho, after all.

Acayo was not on the initial NCAA Meet Participants List, which was announced Monday, March 5.

Event fields for the NCAA Indoor Championships are determined by a descending order list. Including ties, fields can be anywhere from 14-20 participants; the initial list for the triple jump cut off at the top 16 competitors.

Acayo was the 17th competitor on the list by just one centimeter.

Acayo's best triple jump of the season came last weekend at Notre Dame's Alex Wilson Invitational, where she jumped 12.97 meters, or 42' 6.75". That mark is second-best in Kent State history.

It is unknown if another competitor who initially qualified then scratched because of injury or illness.

Acayo and the rest of the nation's elite triple jumpers will compete at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 10. She and Kent State assistant coach for jumps Phil Rickaby will depart for Idaho Thursday morning.

Acayo won the Mid-American Conference title in the triple jump Feb. 25. Of the seven meets she participated in during the indoor campaign,Acayo finished first in six. She placed third at the SPIRE Indoor Track Invitational Feb. 11, where she jumped a then personal-best of 41' 10.75".

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News Headline: School Notes: 3 writers head to state | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ten Harmon School students participated Feb. 25 in the Power of the Pen regional tournament at Kent State University.

McKenna Ritter took first among 80 eighth-graders, while Carly Reitz placed 14th and Lydia Holman 15th among seventh-graders. The three will move on to the state competition in May at the College of Wooster.

Harmon's seventh- and eighth-grade teams finished second combined.

Other local participants were eighth-graders Olivia Calder, Caroline Lukehart, Emma Pollock and Taryn Washburn and seventh-graders Brooke Kozar, Kathryn Slates and Hannah Wilk.

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News Headline: Lack of cooking skills part of poverty cycle | Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Abraham, Lisa
News OCR Text: March 07--Local food pantries and soup kitchens see the same scenario over and over again -- their numbers go up during the last 10 days of the month, when food assistance or money runs out.

Kathy Wilkins, the food pantry and kitchen director for Christ is the Answer Ministries at 379 E. South St. in Akron, said the number of folks at her church's free hot meals on Tuesdays and Thursdays changes all of the time. But one thing is certain: "It always increases at the end of the month."

"The first weeks, people get their check or their food stamps and maybe we feed 20 or so," Wilkins said. By the end of the month, the figure can double.

Michelle Hinton, director of marketing for the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank, said a study by the food bank shows that on average, public food assistance runs out for most households 2.8 weeks into the month. The 450 agencies that the food bank works with in an eight-county area report that their numbers begin to climb in the last two weeks of the month "because of food stamps running out."

Making a food budget last is not an easy task. The average family of four receiving money through the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (the aid commonly referred to as "food stamps") gets about $535 a month, according to federal statistics for Ohio.

Stretching those dollars can be a challenge to even the most frugal cook. But that may be the biggest part of the problem: Many who are receiving assistance simply aren't cooking.

Food assistance money often is used to buy more expensive prepared foods, not raw ingredients to cook from scratch. Microwaveable meals, frozen pizzas and soda pop can quickly eat up a monthly allotment while providing little nutritional value.

"I think there's a lot of different things that play into it. I think for the most part, a lot of the folks that I talk to and work with, they would love to do it better. They just don't necessarily have the tools to do that," said Ann Marie Mann, director of community outreach services for Family & Community Services in Portage County. The agency operates Kent Social Services and the Center of Hope in Ravenna, both of which provide hot meals and emergency grocery assistance.

Many folks think nothing of microwaving a frozen dinner each night, simply because that's what they grew up eating.

"The poverty circle is hard to break, especially if that's all you know," Mann said.

Lynette Brown, a program assistant for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Eduction Program at the OSU Extension in Summit County, deals with the problem every day and has spent years providing folks with the answer. She teaches food, nutrition, cooking, shopping and planning skills to those receiving public assistance.

"I can give somebody a zucchini and they will say, 'Thank you very much,' and it will rot in their refrigerator and they will throw it away," Brown said.

The program has been around for 42 years, paid for by a grant from the USDA, the same agency that gives out federal food assistance dollars. Brown said the knowledge vacuum is worst in generational poverty -- people who grew up in poverty and are still living there.

They have little experience managing a food budget, planning a meal and cooking, and often don't have the faintest idea of what a nutritious meal should include. "There is an absolute divide between people who live in different types of poverty. The folks who found themselves newly poor [due to the current economy] don't take the [assistance] card and buy soda at the gas station. But a lot of other people do," Brown said.

The curriculum includes eight lessons taught over four weeks on meal planning, shopping, budgeting, nutrition and food safety.

"I feel as though our program changes lives. But I am also of the belief that, 'Yeah, we can help people out of poverty.' But I think it will be one family, one person at a time," Brown said.

Right now, that one person may be Quiani Key, a 34-year-old Akron mother of three, ages 16, 12 and 11.

Key has been attending Brown's classes at Cascade Village homes on Akron's north side, and said that for the first time, she actually had money left over at the end of the month from her $600 budget.

Key put into practice what she has learned, making a list before she shops, only staying in a store for half an hour at a time to avoid impulse buying, planning meals and sticking to a budget.

She also is learning to try new foods and learning what they can offer her family nutritionally. At a recent meeting, Brown brought in quiche for the group to sample. Filled with spinach, milk, eggs and cheese, the dish is packed with calcium, and Key was anxious to taste. "I have always heard of it, but never tried it," Key said.

"I like it," she said, adding that she's a big spinach lover.

By making the right choices, it is entirely possible to survive for the month on food stamps and eat well, Brown said.

Alan Shannon, director of public affairs for the USDA's Food and Nutrition Service/Midwest Region, said SNAP money was never intended to be a family's entire food budget, but was designed to supplement other resources, including income. According to USDA fact sheets, only 12 percent of the households that receive food assistance also receive cash welfare benefits, and only 4 percent of those households are on general relief.

There are other assistance programs available. In Ohio, many who receive SNAP also qualify for the Women Infants and Children program, which provides foods such as milk, eggs, cereal, produce and peanut butter to pregnant, postpartum and nursing women and their children up to age 5. School-age children whose families qualify for SNAP are likely to qualify for free or reduced-price breakfasts or lunches at school.

Frances Ladd, assistant director of programs for the Summit County Department of Job and Family Services, said beyond the dollars, the problem of not cooking or not being able to manage food assistance is complex and often tied to the recipient's state of mind.

When people come in for help, particularly single mothers with children, they often are overwhelmed by their circumstances. Depression is not uncommon among the agency's clients, Ladd said, and putting a meal on the table can be an overwhelming task. "When women get depressed, what's the first thing that happens? We don't feel like cooking or cleaning," Ladd said. "When you don't plan anything, you don't plan a meal."

Not knowing how to cook is an underlying problem. "My grandmother and mother taught me how to cook," Ladd said, "But many of our clients, particularly single folks, never learned."

Most schools no longer offer home economics courses, where young people learn basic kitchen skills, and that has made the problem worse. "We can't afford it. But we can't afford to have overweight kids. We sacrifice one thing for another," Ladd said.

From a nutritional standpoint, Brown said, there is still much work to do. Fast-food chains offer 99-cent solutions that will fill up someone's belly, but offer little nutrition, she said. Packaged and frozen prepared foods are loaded with salt and fat. Obesity rates for those receiving public food assistance are among the highest, she said.

Brown said soda remains one of the biggest problems, because it is both empty calories and a money waster. "I've not done a class that I don't have somebody tell me they drink a 2-liter every day," she said.

At the Center of Hope in Ravenna, students from Kent State University's Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum hold classes for those wanting to prepare more healthful meals. They tackle topics like how to cut down on sodium, how to stretch food dollars and how to shop and use coupons.

Mann said the biggest problem she sees is people who simply were never educated on how to plan and cook meals, so they rely on processed foods instead. "They just can't seem to manage it. I think there's a lot of variables in there," she said.

Hinton said often the food bank will receive large supplies of certain vegetables, like squash or kale, only to find that those who end up taking it home don't know how to prepare it. The food bank has started sending recipes along with the items.

Brown's group also works with community gardens to help tackle food deserts. There are neighborhoods in Akron where there aren't even grocery stores, let alone access to fresh locally grown produce, she said.

Her group has built raised-bed gardens on top of cement parking lots to show that it is possible to grow food even without green space.

Hinton cautioned, however, that people should not be reluctant to ask for help if they run out of food, particularly when there is so much help available.

"There are hot meal sites and pantries to go to," she said, "to access food."

Copyright © 2012 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: LEARNING TO COOK STRETCHES FOOD AID: SMART BUDGETING, SHOPPING CAN HELP BREAK POVERTY CYCLE | Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Abraham, Lisa
News OCR Text: Local food pantries and soup kitchens see the same scenario over and over again - their numbers go up during the last 10 days of the month, when food assistance or money runs out.

Kathy Wilkins, the food pantry and kitchen director for Christ is the Answer Ministries at 379 E. South St. in Akron, said the number of folks at her church's free hot meals on Tuesdays and Thursdays changes all of the time. But one thing is certain: "It always increases at the end of the month."

"The first weeks, people get their check or their food stamps and maybe we feed 20 or so," Wilkins said. By the end of the month, the figure can double.

Michelle Hinton, director of marketing for the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank, said a study by the food bank shows that on average, public food assistance runs out for most households 2.8 weeks into the month. The 450 agencies that the food bank works with in an eight-county area report that their numbers begin to climb in the last two weeks of the month "because of food stamps running out."

Making a food budget last is not an easy task. The average family of four receiving money through the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (the aid commonly referred to as "food stamps") gets about $535 a month, according to federal statistics for Ohio.

Stretching those dollars can be a challenge to even the most frugal cook. But that may be the biggest part of the problem: Many who are receiving assistance simply aren't cooking.

Food assistance money often is used to buy more expensive prepared foods, not raw ingredients to cook from scratch. Microwaveable meals, frozen pizzas and soda pop can quickly eat up a monthly allotment while providing little nutritional value.

"I think there's a lot of different things that play into it. I think for the most part, a lot of the folks that I talk to and work with, they would love to do it better. They just don't necessarily have the tools to do that," said Ann Marie Mann, director of community outreach services for Family & Community Services in Portage County. The agency operates Kent Social Services and the Center of Hope in Ravenna, both of which provide hot meals and emergency grocery assistance.

Many folks think nothing of microwaving a frozen dinner each night, simply because that's what they grew up eating.

"The poverty circle is hard to break, especially if that's all you know," Mann said.

Lynette Brown, a program assistant for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Eduction Program at the OSU Extension in Summit County, deals with the problem every day and has spent years providing folks with the answer. She teaches food, nutrition, cooking, shopping and planning skills to those receiving public assistance.

"I can give somebody a zucchini and they will say, 'Thank you very much,' and it will rot in their refrigerator and they will throw it away," Brown said.

The program has been around for 42 years, paid for by a grant from the USDA, the same agency that gives out federal food assistance dollars. Brown said the knowledge vacuum is worst in generational poverty - people who grew up in poverty and are still living there.

They have little experience managing a food budget, planning a meal and cooking, and often don't have the faintest idea of what a nutritious meal should include. "There is an absolute divide between people who live in different types of poverty. The folks who found themselves newly poor [due to the current economy] don't take the [assistance] card and buy soda at the gas station. But a lot of other people do," Brown said.

The curriculum includes eight lessons taught over four weeks on meal planning, shopping, budgeting, nutrition and food safety.

"I feel as though our program changes lives. But I am also of the belief that, 'Yeah, we can help people out of poverty.' But I think it will be one family, one person at a time," Brown said.

Right now, that one person may be Quiani Key, a 34-year-old Akron mother of three, ages 16, 12 and 11.

Key has been attending Brown's classes at Cascade Village homes on Akron's north side, and said that for the first time, she actually had money left over at the end of the month from her $600 budget.

Key put into practice what she has learned, making a list before she shops, only staying in a store for half an hour at a time to avoid impulse buying, planning meals and sticking to a budget.

She also is learning to try new foods and learning what they can offer her family nutritionally. At a recent meeting, Brown brought in quiche for the group to sample. Filled with spinach, milk, eggs and cheese, the dish is packed with calcium, and Key was anxious to taste. "I have always heard of it, but never tried it," Key said.

"I like it," she said, adding that she's a big spinach lover.

By making the right choices, it is entirely possible to survive for the month on food stamps and eat well, Brown said.

Alan Shannon, director of public affairs for the USDA's Food and Nutrition Service/Midwest Region, said SNAP money was never intended to be a family's entire food budget, but was designed to supplement other resources, including income. According to USDA fact sheets, only 12 percent of the households that receive food assistance also receive cash welfare benefits, and only 4 percent of those households are on general relief.

There are other assistance programs available. In Ohio, many who receive SNAP also qualify for the Women Infants and Children program, which provides foods such as milk, eggs, cereal, produce and peanut butter to pregnant, postpartum and nursing women and their children up to age 5. School-age children whose families qualify for SNAP are likely to qualify for free or reduced-price breakfasts or lunches at school.

Frances Ladd, assistant director of programs for the Summit County Department of Job and Family Services, said beyond the dollars, the problem of not cooking or not being able to manage food assistance is complex and often tied to the recipient's state of mind.

When people come in for help, particularly single mothers with children, they often are overwhelmed by their circumstances. Depression is not uncommon among the agency's clients, Ladd said, and putting a meal on the table can be an overwhelming task. "When women get depressed, what's the first thing that happens? We don't feel like cooking or cleaning," Ladd said. "When you don't plan anything, you don't plan a meal."

Not knowing how to cook is an underlying problem. "My grandmother and mother taught me how to cook," Ladd said, "But many of our clients, particularly single folks, never learned."

Most schools no longer offer home economics courses, where young people learn basic kitchen skills, and that has made the problem worse. "We can't afford it. But we can't afford to have overweight kids. We sacrifice one thing for another," Ladd said.

From a nutritional standpoint, Brown said, there is still much work to do. Fast-food chains offer 99-cent solutions that will fill up someone's belly, but offer little nutrition, she said. Packaged and frozen prepared foods are loaded with salt and fat. Obesity rates for those receiving public food assistance are among the highest, she said.

Brown said soda remains one of the biggest problems, because it is both empty calories and a money waster. "I've not done a class that I don't have somebody tell me they drink a 2-liter every day," she said.

At the Center of Hope in Ravenna, students from Kent State University's Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum hold classes for those wanting to prepare more healthful meals. They tackle topics like how to cut down on sodium, how to stretch food dollars and how to shop and use coupons.

Mann said the biggest problem she sees is people who simply were never educated on how to plan and cook meals, so they rely on processed foods instead. "They just can't seem to manage it. I think there's a lot of variables in there," she said.

Hinton said often the food bank will receive large supplies of certain vegetables, like squash or kale, only to find that those who end up taking it home don't know how to prepare it. The food bank has started sending recipes along with the items.

Brown's group also works with community gardens to help tackle food deserts. There are neighborhoods in Akron where there aren't even grocery stores, let alone access to fresh locally grown produce, she said.

Her group has built raised-bed gardens on top of cement parking lots to show that it is possible to grow food even without green space.

Hinton cautioned, however, that people should not be reluctant to ask for help if they run out of food, particularly when there is so much help available.

"There are hot meal sites and pantries to go to," she said, "to access food."

Copyright © 2012 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Environmentalist Gordon Vars will be honored at Kent Bog | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of the Kent Bog's most passionate defenders soon will be memorialized at the site.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources recently announced plans to honor Dr. Gordon F. Vars by naming the bog's boardwalk in his honor.

Vars, a longtime professor at Kent State University, founded Friends of the Kent Bog to encourage preservation of the site and education about it. He died Jan. 31 after he was hit by a car near his Fairchild Avenue home. He was 88.

When Kent resident Sally Burnell heard about Vars' death, she began brainstorming ways to honor her friend. She wrote to ODNR, not expecting a reply, she said, asking if the boardwalk at the site could be named after Vars for his volunteer work.

ODNR officials wrote back days later telling her they approved of the idea.

“I think Dr. Vars recognized (the bog) is a very rare and fragile gift we've been given in Kent,” Burnell said.

The bog itself, located off of Meloy Road near the Kent-Brimfield border, is named in honor of a KSU professor emeritus — its official title is the Tom S. Cooperrider-Kent Bog State Nature Preserve, after the Kent botanist.

Adam Wohlever, preserve manager for the Kent Bog, said ODNR would be installing a kiosk with information about Vars' life as well as a space for the brochures on the bog Vars always made sure were available to visitors.

Wohlever said it was appropriate to give Vars recognition at the site he cared so strongly about.

“He dedicated countless hours to the preservation of the bog and the education of the public,” he said.

The preserve includes nearly 42 acres of land with 3,500 tamarack trees, deciduous conifers that are rare in Ohio. The bog formed thousands of years after a glacier melted on the site, forming a glacial lake that would gradually be replaced by a bog meadow after peat filled in the lake.

The state of Ohio purchased the land in 1985, installing the half mile of boardwalk constructed out of recycled plastic in 1993.

ODNR officials said a date for the naming ceremony has not been set.

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News Headline: Lack of cooking skills part of poverty cycle | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Local food pantries and soup kitchens see the same scenario over and over again -- their numbers go up during the last 10 days of the month, when food assistance or money runs out.

Kathy Wilkins, the food pantry and kitchen director for Christ is the Answer Ministries at 379 E. South St. in Akron, said the number of folks at her church's free hot meals on Tuesdays and Thursdays changes all of the time. But one thing is certain: "It always increases at the end of the month."

"The first weeks, people get their check or their food stamps and maybe we feed 20 or so," Wilkins said. By the end of the month, the figure can double.

Michelle Hinton, director of marketing for the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank, said a study by the food bank shows that on average, public food assistance runs out for most households 2.8 weeks into the month. The 450 agencies that the food bank works with in an eight-county area report that their numbers begin to climb in the last two weeks of the month "because of food stamps running out."

Making a food budget last is not an easy task. The average family of four receiving money through the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (the aid commonly referred to as "food stamps") gets about $535 a month, according to federal statistics for Ohio.

Stretching those dollars can be a challenge to even the most frugal cook. But that may be the biggest part of the problem: Many who are receiving assistance simply aren't cooking.

Food assistance money often is used to buy more expensive prepared foods, not raw ingredients to cook from scratch. Microwaveable meals, frozen pizzas and soda pop can quickly eat up a monthly allotment while providing little nutritional value.

"I think there's a lot of different things that play into it. I think for the most part, a lot of the folks that I talk to and work with, they would love to do it better. They just don't necessarily have the tools to do that," said Ann Marie Mann, director of community outreach services for Family & Community Services in Portage County. The agency operates Kent Social Services and the Center of Hope in Ravenna, both of which provide hot meals and emergency grocery assistance.

Many folks think nothing of microwaving a frozen dinner each night, simply because that's what they grew up eating.

"The poverty circle is hard to break, especially if that's all you know," Mann said.

Lynette Brown, a program assistant for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Eduction Program at the OSU Extension in Summit County, deals with the problem every day and has spent years providing folks with the answer. She teaches food, nutrition, cooking, shopping and planning skills to those receiving public assistance.

"I can give somebody a zucchini and they will say, 'Thank you very much,' and it will rot in their refrigerator and they will throw it away," Brown said.

The program has been around for 42 years, paid for by a grant from the USDA, the same agency that gives out federal food assistance dollars. Brown said the knowledge vacuum is worst in generational poverty -- people who grew up in poverty and are still living there.

They have little experience managing a food budget, planning a meal and cooking, and often don't have the faintest idea of what a nutritious meal should include. "There is an absolute divide between people who live in different types of poverty. The folks who found themselves newly poor [due to the current economy] don't take the [assistance] card and buy soda at the gas station. But a lot of other people do," Brown said.

The curriculum includes eight lessons taught over four weeks on meal planning, shopping, budgeting, nutrition and food safety.

"I feel as though our program changes lives. But I am also of the belief that, 'Yeah, we can help people out of poverty.' But I think it will be one family, one person at a time," Brown said.

Right now, that one person may be Quiani Key, a 34-year-old Akron mother of three, ages 16, 12 and 11.

Key has been attending Brown's classes at Cascade Village homes on Akron's north side, and said that for the first time, she actually had money left over at the end of the month from her $600 budget.

Key put into practice what she has learned, making a list before she shops, only staying in a store for half an hour at a time to avoid impulse buying, planning meals and sticking to a budget.

She also is learning to try new foods and learning what they can offer her family nutritionally. At a recent meeting, Brown brought in quiche for the group to sample. Filled with spinach, milk, eggs and cheese, the dish is packed with calcium, and Key was anxious to taste. "I have always heard of it, but never tried it," Key said.

"I like it," she said, adding that she's a big spinach lover.

By making the right choices, it is entirely possible to survive for the month on food stamps and eat well, Brown said.

Alan Shannon, director of public affairs for the USDA's Food and Nutrition Service/Midwest Region, said SNAP money was never intended to be a family's entire food budget, but was designed to supplement other resources, including income. According to USDA fact sheets, only 12 percent of the households that receive food assistance also receive cash welfare benefits, and only 4 percent of those households are on general relief.

There are other assistance programs available. In Ohio, many who receive SNAP also qualify for the Women Infants and Children program, which provides foods such as milk, eggs, cereal, produce and peanut butter to pregnant, postpartum and nursing women and their children up to age 5. School-age children whose families qualify for SNAP are likely to qualify for free or reduced-price breakfasts or lunches at school.

Frances Ladd, assistant director of programs for the Summit County Department of Job and Family Services, said beyond the dollars, the problem of not cooking or not being able to manage food assistance is complex and often tied to the recipient's state of mind.

When people come in for help, particularly single mothers with children, they often are overwhelmed by their circumstances. Depression is not uncommon among the agency's clients, Ladd said, and putting a meal on the table can be an overwhelming task. "When women get depressed, what's the first thing that happens? We don't feel like cooking or cleaning," Ladd said. "When you don't plan anything, you don't plan a meal."

Not knowing how to cook is an underlying problem. "My grandmother and mother taught me how to cook," Ladd said, "But many of our clients, particularly single folks, never learned."

Most schools no longer offer home economics courses, where young people learn basic kitchen skills, and that has made the problem worse. "We can't afford it. But we can't afford to have overweight kids. We sacrifice one thing for another," Ladd said.

From a nutritional standpoint, Brown said, there is still much work to do. Fast-food chains offer 99-cent solutions that will fill up someone's belly, but offer little nutrition, she said. Packaged and frozen prepared foods are loaded with salt and fat. Obesity rates for those receiving public food assistance are among the highest, she said.

Brown said soda remains one of the biggest problems, because it is both empty calories and a money waster. "I've not done a class that I don't have somebody tell me they drink a 2-liter every day," she said.

At the Center of Hope in Ravenna, students from Kent State University's Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum hold classes for those wanting to prepare more healthful meals. They tackle topics like how to cut down on sodium, how to stretch food dollars and how to shop and use coupons.

Mann said the biggest problem she sees is people who simply were never educated on how to plan and cook meals, so they rely on processed foods instead. "They just can't seem to manage it. I think there's a lot of variables in there," she said.

Hinton said often the food bank will receive large supplies of certain vegetables, like squash or kale, only to find that those who end up taking it home don't know how to prepare it. The food bank has started sending recipes along with the items.

Brown's group also works with community gardens to help tackle food deserts. There are neighborhoods in Akron where there aren't even grocery stores, let alone access to fresh locally grown produce, she said.

Her group has built raised-bed gardens on top of cement parking lots to show that it is possible to grow food even without green space.

Hinton cautioned, however, that people should not be reluctant to ask for help if they run out of food, particularly when there is so much help available.

"There are hot meal sites and pantries to go to," she said, "to access food."

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- March 7: Dean appointment | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State has named Shin-Min “Simon” Song as the new dean of the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

Song joins KSU on July 1, succeeding John Graham, who will be completing his one-year appointment as interim. The college will change its name from the College of Technology to the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology this summer.

His salary will be $210,000.

Song comes to Kent State from Northern Illinois University, where he is chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and coordinator of international programs. He also has taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Ohio State and was associate manager and project leader for Tatung Co. in Taipei, Taiwan, which develops and creates industry and electronic consumer products including machinery and power transformers.

He has a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Tatung Institute of Technology, a master's in mechanical engineering and a doctorate in mechanical engineering from Ohio State.

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News Headline: Media coverage of alcohol in crime might sway public opinion, support of liquor laws | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lantern - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An OSU study found that media outlets only reported a fraction of actual alcohol involvement in crimes and accidents.

When people read in a news article that alcohol was a factor in a crime or accident, they are more likely to support the enforcement of alcohol laws, according to new research conducted at Ohio State.

According to a press release about the study, previous OSU research shows that newspapers mention the involvement of alcohol fewer than one in four times, and TV news reports mention it one in 10 times, when there was alcohol involvement in a crime.

Communication professor Michael Slater, part of the team that conducted the study, said in an email to The Lantern that law enforcement and reporters should do a better job of communicating about the involvement of alcohol in crimes so that it can be accurately reported.

"From my conversations with people knowledgeable about media and police, it would be quite valuable if police procedurally made a practice of attempting to ascertain if alcohol was involved with a crime or non-motor vehicle injury and include that information in the police report," Slater said. "Conversely, if reporters make a practice of asking police about this, it is more likely that such information will start finding its way into police reports."

Participants in the study read news reports from the United States that involved violent crimes and various accidental injuries, half of which were edited to include the involvement of alcohol and half of which were edited to not include that information, according to the press release. Seven-hundred-and-eighty-nine adults across the country were surveyed.

Rachel Reineck, a third-year in nursing, said she thinks reporters on these types of issues should be more consistent.

"I don't know why it wouldn't be reported," she said. "I feel like it should be the same way every time."

She said when it comes to enforcing laws, people should be judged on a crime itself and not whether alcohol was involved. She feels that alcohol might make people think that someone should be given a harsher sentence, while others might favor leniency based on alcohol involvement, but that people should accept their actions are what they are regardless of substance use.

Reineck said alcohol involvement should be considered a fact, and without reporting that fact there is an omission to the story, which might skew people's perception of the crime.

"I think people need to do a better job of being objective … just looking at the facts," Reineck said.

Jenny Sulcebarger, a fourth-year in chemistry, said she agreed that news outlets should report involvement of alcohol to avoid creating a negative perception of law enforcement officers for doing their job.

"I know newspapers don't always report all the facts so it can skew things," Sulcebarger said. "So if (reporters) don't report involvement we are more likely to criticize law enforcement. Like maybe (perpetrators) weren't doing anything wrong."

She said she thinks the public might backlash after an arrest if they don't get the whole story.

"Many people get most information from what they read, so people could be better-informed," Sulcebarger said.

Three others were involved in the study – communication professor David Ewoldsen, associate communication and psychology professor Andrew Hayes and Catherine Goodall, assistant communication professor at Kent State University.

Slater said these reports are read by advocacy and public health organizations that push for change, and they could have a real impact on the way crimes are reported.

"An unusual aspect of the study is that it involves an online research panel that is reasonably representative of the U.S. population and a representative sample of news stories from local newspapers in the U.S.," Slater said in an email. "If we can identify what makes some stories more influential than others, this is information that can be used by people who work with the press in public health and advocacy contexts; reporters and editors too may be interested in what aspects of such stories impact people most."

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News Headline: Launching Students into Entrepreneurship | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: White House, The
Contact Name: Susan Amat
News OCR Text: Home • The Administration • Champions of Change

Dr. William Scott Green and I co-founded The Launch Pad at the University of Miami with two clear goals: 1. To expose students to the option of entrepreneurship as a viable career path, and 2. If a student were to start businesses we want them to do it in our community. The Launch Pad is the first program in higher education to successfully replicate its program at other institutions, we are considered a pioneer and among the best-in-class for entrepreneurship education. We don't offer classes or curriculum; we help start businesses.

University of Miami President Donna Shalala often says that The Launch Pad is the only place on campus where it is OK to fail. Our philosophy differs greatly from every other entrepreneurship center in that we focus on the development of the individual rather than the business. Based in the University's Toppel Career Center, The Launch Pad believes in slow success rather than the typical fast failure model.

“Paying it forward” by mentoring others is natural to me because of the incredible support I have received since starting my first business at 15. But as I attained the personal goals I set for myself in my teens and 20s, newer and loftier goals emerged: a desire to impact the lives of many more people than I can through individual mentoring; a recognition that the lessons and advice I can offer others can help many more people if, by “training the trainers,” they are recorded systematically, freely shared, and updated as the environment changes to ensure that the best practices are STILL the best practices. We created that system within The Launch Pad, which made it possible to replicate our model as a plug and play solution for other colleges and universities.

Generous grants from the Blackstone Charitable Foundation have expanded our reach to six additional schools:

Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan

Walsh College, Detroit, Michigan

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

Lorain Community College, Elyria, Ohio

Baldwin Wallace University, Bera, Ohio

We plan to open many more additional Launch Pad campus sites in the next few years, across the nation as well as in other countries. This expansion will allow college students at those schools access to the support and guidance we offer, and the ability to locate and interact with each other through The Launch Pad Network.

We are not content with teaching the next generations how to simply find a job; we teach them how to make their own, and potentially create jobs for many others as well. Over the next five to ten years, I envision that this effort will involve millions of students using our program to find service providers, customers, and even partners from other states and countries, working together to start businesses that, particularly in developing countries, will contribute to eradicating poverty, increasing self-reliance, and fostering a sense of accomplishment and dignity.

Dr. Susan Amat is the co-founder and Executive Director of The Launch Pad. Based in the University of Miami's Toppel Career Center.

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News Headline: Another generation discovers the allure of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' style (Palomo-Lovinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The American princess loomed over pop culture like so many of my icons.

I just had no idea. I was too young and too taken with Laura Ingalls and Cher Horowitz to notice Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis while she was living, or to grasp the import of her death in 1994.

It wasn't until the 21st century that I fell in love with Jackie -- and her style.

At 22, my senses piqued by a family trip to Cape Cod, I jumped headlong into the cult of Kennedy.

I devoured biographies while sneaking lunch in the stacks of the downtown library. I scrutinized black-and-white photos of President John F. Kennedy and his family, their handsome faces tan from sailing and playing football. I admired the clothes.

Soon I bought a swingy red coat from a vintage store, a brooch and even a velvet pillbox hat.

The clothes were so classic, so girly and yet so sophisticated, a way of ratcheting up my preppy, just-out-of-college self.

Over the next few years, I marveled at Jackie's dresses and size-10 pumps at the "Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years" exhibit at Chicago's Field Museum. I gleefully received Christmas presents of old Life magazines with Kennedys on the covers. I toured the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston and the John F. Kennedy Hyannis Museum on Cape Cod in Massachusetts.

At 26, I bought my first "Jackie cardigan," a three-quarter-sleeve J. Crew sweater in stretchy cotton with pearly buttons.

I now own six. I have a vintage Lilly Pulitzer sundress, too, splurged on last summer after years of longing. I own pearls, oversize tortoiseshell sunglasses and a pair of strappy Jack Rogers sandals, all incorporated into my preppy new-mom modern wardrobe.

Because the '60s flair Jackie made famous still works today.

"It is very timeless," said Noel Palomo-Lovinski, an associate professor at Kent State University's fashion school. "Jackie Kennedy really represents our version of royalty, someone everybody can look to as a style icon, who's uniquely American."

Apparently, I'm not the only one struck by the Kennedys, even a half-century later.

There are Jackie jewelry collections, including one set of reproductions hawked on QVC. There's an endless torrent of books, including a Stephen King novel last year fictionalizing JFK's assassination, and a stream of movies, including last year's Starz channel miniseries, with Katie Holmes as the former first lady.

Jackie O styles are among the biggest stock at The Cleveland Shop, a vintage store on Detroit Avenue.

"You can't go wrong with it," said shop owner Jane Joseph. "It's very clean lines and very flattering and very classy."

Classy. The word bubbles up over and over in conversations about the soft-spoken, one-time debutante.

Jacqueline Lee Bouvier was born into America's upper crust, educated at boarding school and Vassar College, before becoming the "Inquiring Camera Girl" for the Washington Times-Herald newspaper. She met Jack Kennedy in Washington, D.C., when he was a congressman, and married the then-senator in 1953.

In 1957, Jackie's daughter, Caroline, was born, and in 1960, Kennedy was elected president. She was only 31 when she moved into the White House with Caroline and a newborn John Jr.

Suddenly she was one of the most popular women in the world, said Myra Gutin, a communications professor at Rider University in New Jersey.

"She's an enduring fascination," Gutin said. "It's a combination of mystique and style and the times."

Jackie charmed the country, in sharp suits and dazzling evening gowns concocted by designer Oleg Cassini. She won an honorary Emmy for her 1962 televised tour of the White House, which she helped restore. She charmed world leaders, too.

Then, of course, the world couldn't stop watching in 1963 when her husband was killed, her pink Chanel suit splattered with blood.

Later, Jackie moved to New York and married shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. But the presidential world she dubbed Camelot is probably her greatest legacy.

"I think that Americans were very taken with that whole image," Gutin said. "Even today it sort of strikes people as the shining city on the hill, a different time, more carefree."

During the White House years, at the Kennedys' Hyannis Port enclave on Cape Cod or their home in Palm Beach, Fla., Jackie wore casual clothes with elegance, like the colorfully printed shifts made by her friend Lilly Pulitzer.

Pulitzer sewed her first dresses out of kitchen curtain material, according to the company, to disguise stains from spills at her juice stand.

That's American fashion, said Palomo-Lovinski. Inherently practical, like the jeans that designer Claire McCardell made ubiquitous.

"The reason you like the cardigan is because it looks good on you," Palomo-Lovinski said of my half-dozen Jackie cardigans. "It's something that works in your wardrobe."

Exactly. The cardigan is one of my spring-and-summer staples, paired with flowy blouses, jeans and sandals, including the Jack Rogers. I bought the sandals, in part, because Jackie sported the brand, which was founded in South Beach in 1960. More important, though, I think they're cute.

So it goes with all my Jackie-style pieces.

I admire Jackie because of her grace under pressure. I pore over the details of her family's history because of the fascinating soap-opera twists and turns. But I choose my clothes because I like them.

That's what separates the fashions of the 21st century from those of decades past, Palomo-Lovinski said. We wear what we like, what's functional, affordable and looks good on us.

"The '90s and 2000s, as of yet, are really about revisiting the past," she said. And Jackie "is just there in our collective culture."

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News Headline: VIDEO: Fashion Societé Show (Young Kim) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: MyLiTv.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Video Journalist Stephanie Stern

At the Fashion Societé Show, business executives get a competitive edge.

For more information visit: www.FashionSociete.com

Featured Interviews: Cathy Berger, Founder, Fashion Societé; Young Kim, Lecturer, The Fashion School at Kent State University; Debi Silber, The Mojo Coach; Katherine Leo, Wealth & Wellness Coach, Isagenix; Linda Sandberg, Attendee; Sherri Gillespie, Attendee; Tommy Ferentino, Attendee; Alissa Bickar, Attendee; Mark Hofmaier, Attendee

To View Video, Click Here: http://www.mylitv.com/articles/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1028:fashion-societe-show&catid=98:networking

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News Headline: Overnight News Digest: Some tossed by twisters live to tell about it, but how? (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: DAILY KOS
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jamal Stevens, 7, is among the few who can say they survived being picked up and tossed around by a twister -- last Friday he was sucked out of his bed and flung onto a grassy strip along an interstate behind his home. But how could Jamal or anyone survive such an extreme event?

"It is puzzling because one or two people in a place will be killed while others live, and it often seems to be luck," acknowledges Tom Schmidlin, a Kent State University professor who has studied tornado injuries.

Luck does seem to have a lot to do with it, in that one or more factors have to go your way to survive. It can happen, but chances are very, very remote.

"It's a lot like flipping a coin and have it land perfectly on its edge," says Jason Persoff, a University of Colorado doctor and -- on the side -- storm chaser.

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News Headline: Educators support bill that would offer property to universities | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Legal News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron educators are backing a House bill that would require a school district to offer the right of first refusal for district property to state universities.

Luis Proenza, University of Akron president, and David W. James, Akron Public Schools superintendent, recently testified before the House Education committee in support of House Bill 381.

Under the proposed legislation, if a school district board decides to dispose of property, the board would have to offer the right of first refusal for the purchase of the land to any of the 14 state universities with a main campus or branch campus within the school district's territory.

HB 381 is sponsored by Rep. Lynn Slaby, R-Copley.

James said the bill represents a plan to make effective use of decommissioned public school property.

"We believe that this unique opportunity, bridging the K-12 system and higher education together, will generate a synergy resulting in our graduates having a seamless transition to the post-secondary world."

James went on to reference the school district pairing with the University of Akron for two initiatives: the Akron Early College High School and the National Inventors Hall of Fame STEM Middle School.

"In my experience, I recognize that we need a well-educated workforce for our great state of Ohio to be a competitive player in our economy," he said.

"As we move to more rigorous college and career readiness standards, we must also remove the barriers that prevent our students from being successful."

Proenza said enacting HB 381 would open up new opportunities for collaboration between public schools and public universities.

"In this era of scarce resources, it is incumbent upon us to develop creative ways to make productive use of public property," he said, adding that he believes the bill is good public policy for the entire state.

"... This is a unique opportunity to bring K-12 and higher education together to generate better prepared college students and increase the number of Ohio's college graduates."

Proenza said each of the presidents at Ohio's public universities are in support of HB 381.

Under current Ohio law, school districts wanting to dispose of property worth more than $10,000 are required to first offer the land to start-up community schools located within the district's territory at a price that doesn't exceed the property's appraised fair market value.

If no community school is interested in buying the property, a board can then sell the land through a public auction. If a district tries to sell a piece of land at a public auction at least once without success, the property can then be sold privately.

In its aim to revamp state law to give the right of first refusal to public universities, HB 381 states the board could offer the property for a price no higher than the land's appraised fair market value or exchange the property, specifically in an "as is" condition, in return for agreed-upon, in-kind services, educational programs or other assistance provided by the university to the school district.

The proposal states that if a university does not accept either offer, or if an agreement is not reached between the district and university, within 60 days after the offer is made, the district would be mandated to offer the land to applicable community schools.

HB 381 would not apply to school districts that don't have a public university located within its territory.

The bill's provisions would apply to the University of Akron, Bowling Green State University, Central State University, the University of Cincinnati, Cleveland State University, Kent State University, Miami University, Ohio University, Ohio State University, Shawnee State University, the University of Toledo, Wright State University, Youngstown State University and the Northeast Ohio Medical University.

Slaby said HB 381 is designed to provide an "immediate opportunity and incentive" for Ohio's public schools and universities.

"It is imperative to find and support creative ways to help our public schools to properly prepare students for college," he said, noting that the legislature needs to help universities become active partners and players in that process.

"Passage of HB 381 will come at no cost to the state and will provide local schools with cost-effective solutions in the disposal of property."

HB 381 is co-sponsored by Reps. Courtney Combs, R-Fairfield, Robert Hackett, R-London, Tom Letson, D-Warren, Kristina Roegner, R-Hudson, and Louis Terhar, R-Cincinnati.

The bill has yet to be scheduled for a third hearing.

Copyright 2012 The Daily Reporter - All Rights Reserved

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News Headline: KSU shares stories of Holocaust survivors | Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University students will tell the stories of Holocaust survivors and their families during a program at 2 p.m. Sunday in the lobby of the FirstEnergy Auditorium at Franklin Hall.

The “Children of the Holocaust” event includes a reception and photo presentations. The event is free. Hillel at KSU will provide light refreshments, and parking is available in the lot by Franklin and Rockwell halls near East Main and South Lincoln streets. Call Dave LaBelle at 330-672-4290 for more information.

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News Headline: 'They wore THAT to the beach' | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/08/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM IS EXHIBITING
SWIMWEAR FROM THE 19TH CENTURY THROUGH OCT. 7

“They wore THAT to the
beach?”
That is a common reaction
from people who come
to see “A Day at the Beach:
Seaside Fashion, 1860-1915,”
at the Kent State University
Museum, said Sara Hume,
curator.
The exhibit takes a look
at beachware for women
and children, from an 1860s
dress to two 1915 bathing
suits.
Visitors expecting to see
actual bathing wear could
be in for a shock: “beachware”
usually were lightercolored
versions of the traditional
fashions was worn
on seaside vacations, made
with lighter materials such
as cotton. One example is a
white dress from the 1880s,
which is made of cotton and
eyelet.
“Most dresses from that
era were very heavy, made
with heavy materials such
as brocade,” she said.
The notion of a day at the
beach was different than today's
version of swimming
and sunbathing.
“They didn't go to the
beach so much to get a sun
tan, but for fresh air,” Hume
said. But women would
bring gloves and parasols
to keep from getting too
much sun.
“A Day at the Beach” can
be seen through Oct. 7.
The museum is at 515 Hilltop
Drive, at the corner of
East Main and South Lincoln
streets, in Kent. The
museum is open to the public
Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday from 10 a.m. to
4:45 p.m.; Thursday from 10
a.m. to 8:45 p.m.; and Sunday
from noon to 4:45 p.m.
Admission is $5 for adults,
$4 for seniors and $3 for children
under 18. The museum
is free with a Kent State ID,
free to the public on Sundays
and offers free parking.
For more information, call
330-672-3450 or visit www.
kent.edu/museum.

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News Headline: Kent State-Twinsburg facility's construction right on schedule (Mohan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name: EMILY CANNING
News OCR Text: Twinsburg -- With the exterior of the building almost complete, the new 45,000-square-foot Kent State Geauga Twinsburg campus should be open for classes when the fall 2012 semester begins Aug. 27.

"By the end of this week, the building should be fully enclosed with all of the glass work complete," Dr. David Mohan, dean of the Kent State University Geauga Campus said Feb. 24. "I am very confident we will be ready for the fall semester."

With the exterior wrapped up, the next step will be the installation of a heating system and dry wall. Mohan said an open house at the new Creekside Drive facility is scheduled for Aug. 11 from noon to 4 p.m.

"That will be the opportunity for everyone in the community to see our great new facility ... whether it be teens who would like to attend classes there in the future or parents and grandparents who want to see the new building," Mohan said.

"I really think everyone is going to be very impressed. By Aug. 13 we plan to be permanently moved into the new building and answering the telephone there."

The $24 million facility could eventually offer at least three master's degree programs and Mohan said he thinks the facility's nursing program will expand quickly, as many medical facilities are phasing out the position of licensed practical nurse.

"THERE ARE likely as many as 1,000 LPNs in a 30- to 45-mile radius who will need to become registered nurses," he said.

Mohan said the new campus can easily accommodate 1,500 students and added that KSU could eventually construct a second building on the Creekside Drive property if the student body continues to increase.

"We don't have any sort of formal timetable for a Phase II yet, but we definitely have the land to do it," Mohan said. "Of the 16.5 acres we own on Creekside, the new building and parking lot take up about 6 or 7 acres."

The Twinsburg campus is currently housed in a city-owned, 89-year-old, 29,000-square-foot building at Routes 91 and 82. Mohan said the campus had 200 students enrolled in 2004. Today that number totals 900.

Mayor Katherine Procop said that Twinsburg-based Pervanje architects have assessed the building and are completing a feasibility study to determine what the building could be used for once KSU moves out, and how much it would cost to make any needed renovations to the building.

Procop said options for the building include a Victorian baby carriage museum and offering low-rent space to startup businesses.

"Demolishing the building was not something we were considering, but if renovations are cost-prohibitive I think that option might have to go on the table," she said.

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News Headline: Huntington links OSU student ID cards with checking accounts | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/07/2012
Outlet Full Name: Business First of Columbus - Online
Contact Name: Rick Rouan
News OCR Text: Ohio State University students now can buy everything from books to booze with just their student identification card.

Huntington Bancshares Inc. will link OSU student ID cards with certain checking accounts at no additional charge. By linking the two, an OSU student can use the ID as a debit card to withdraw cash from ATMs and complete transactions using a pin number, Huntington Spokeswoman Maureen Brown said.

Transactions that require a signature — typically found when selecting “credit” instead of “debit” at the cash register — will not be possible with the student ID, she said.

Students will need to be enrolled in a Huntington checking account and have a new linkable BuckID card with a 16-digit account number and the Huntington logo on the back. Brown said the program, which begins this week, links to Huntington's Asterisk-Free and Plus checking accounts.

The new program is part of a $125 million deal between OSU and Columbus-based Huntington (NASDAQ:HBAN), which is now the university's official bank for individual consumer accounts. Huntington plans to double the 12 ATMs it has on campus during the next few months and add four branches.

“Huntington's ability to offer the campus card linkage at no charge and to do so quickly are the kind of services we are seeking for our students,” OSU Chief Financial Officer Geoff Chatas said in a release.

Huntington also links checking accounts to student ID cards at Kent State University and the University of Toledo, Brown said.

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