Report Overview:
Total Clips (37)
Anthropology (3)
Board of Trustees (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Computer Science (2)
Fashion Design (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
Geography (3)
Geology (1)
Health Sciences (1)
Higher Education (2)
Hillel; History (1)
Honors College; Office of the Provost (1)
Information Architecture and Knowledge Management (1)
Jewish Studies; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (4)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Political Science (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Anthropology (3)
Gorilla DNA aping humans (Lovejoy) 03/11/2012 Weekly Gleaner - Online Text Attachment Email

...closest living relative', and this is certainly true, based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from some smaller previous genetic studies. The...

Gorillas in our midst -- and in our DNA (Lovejoy) 03/11/2012 Waterbury Republican-American - Online Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) 03/10/2012 Ventura County Star - Online Text Attachment Email

...'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email. That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies....


Board of Trustees (1)
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING, MARCH 14 03/09/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

The Kent State University Board of Trustees will hold its next regular business meeting Wednesday, March 14.The Board will convene at 2 p.m.in the George...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
Banking on the future 03/11/2012 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...uses, Rush said. The city sold 400 parcels in 2010 and 2011, said Rush, who estimated that Cleveland has as many as 15,000 vacant and abandoned houses. Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative has worked with the city since 2008 to develop strategies to reuse the acres of vacant...

Banking on the future 03/11/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...uses, Rush said. The city sold 400 parcels in 2010 and 2011, said Rush, who estimated that Cleveland has as many as 15,000 vacant and abandoned houses. Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative has worked with the city since 2008 to develop strategies to reuse the acres of vacant...


College of Business (COB) (1)
KSU students hope to raise awareness of cerebral palsy 03/12/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


College of Public Health (COPH) (2)
Long road for panel on death penalty (Brewer) 03/09/2012 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...start to finish, according to a researcher. "More data are better. The more data you have, the more questions you are able to answer," Tom Brewer of Kent State University told the task force yesterday. Brewer is an assistant professor who studies juries' decisions on whether to impose the death...

Studies from Kent State University Add New Findings in the Area of Cardiology 03/10/2012 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient CR for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events," wrote M.A. Dolansky and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted." Dolansky and...


College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Thomas Schroth Visiting Artist Series Brings Architect George Miller to Kent State 03/09/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Visiting Artist Series presents world-renowned architect, George H. Miller, managing partner at Pei Cobb Freed and Partners, on March 15, at 7 p.m. in the Kent State University Kiva Auditorium. The lecture is free and open to the public. To ensure a seat, please call 330-672-2760 or email collegeofthearts@kent.edu....


Computer Science (2)
Anita Borg Announces Famous Women In Computer Science List 03/12/2012 EFY Times Text Attachment Email

...(Professor, Computer Science Department, University of California at Santa Barbara), Dr. Bob Walker (Professor and Chair, Computer Science Department, Kent State University). "Today and every day, we celebrate the impact that women have on the creation of technology and the positive impact that...

Famous women in computer science named by Anita Borg Institute 03/09/2012 TechJournal South - Online Text Attachment Email

...(Professor, Computer Science Department, University of California at Santa Barbara), Dr. Bob Walker (Professor and Chair, Computer Science Department, Kent State University).


Fashion Design (1)
COLLIDER SERIES EXPLORES INTERACTIVE NEW MEDIA MARCH 19-APRIL 14 AT UNIVERSITY OF AKRON 03/09/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

"Collider4: Spectacle," an array of events presented by The University of Akron's Myers School of Art, invites visitors to participate in, play with and ponder new media artworks.The events include exhibitions,...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Jo-Ann Stores, KSU fashion school pick inaugural scholarship winner 03/12/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
Wrangler has designs on KSU student's work (Greider) 03/11/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Shannon Gallagher, in her fifth year studying fashion merchandising at Kent State University, designed a workwear garment in her product development class that will be featured for purchase in Wrangler's Christmas 2012...


Geography (3)
Tornado activity on the rise in Hamilton County (Schmidlin) 03/11/2012 Chattanooga Times Free Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...minutes. There is no other reasonably safe option.” How much protection vehicles provide is still being debated. Several years ago, Tom Schmidlin of Kent State University published research that he said showed cars were often safer than mobile homes, particularly in tornadoes with a strength of...

As tornado approaches, flee mobile homes in favor of vehicles or ditches, experts say (Schmidlin) 03/10/2012 Lexington Herald-Leader - Online Text Attachment Email

...ride out a tornado in a mobile home, where flying debris from the disintegrating structure could be deadly. However, Thomas Schmidlin, a professor at Kent State University who has researched tornado safety among mobile-home residents, has argued that taking shelter in a car or truck would be safer...

As tornado approaches, flee mobile homes in favor of vehicles or ditches, experts say (Schmidlin) 03/11/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...ride out a tornado in a mobile home, where flying debris from the disintegrating structure could be deadly. However, Thomas Schmidlin, a professor at Kent State University who has researched tornado safety among mobile-home residents, has argued that taking shelter in a car or truck would be safer...


Geology (1)
KENT STATE RESEARCHER ANNOUNCES WORLD RECORD FIND: OLDEST EVIDENCE OF LOBSTERS LIVING TOGETHER DISCOVERED IN GAS SHALE 03/09/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

...fossils found in the Dotternhausen quarry south of Stuttgart, Germany, has now yielded a world record for fossil lobsters living together, according to Kent State University researcher Adiel Klompmaker. The news was published on March 7 in the multidisciplinary journal PLoS ONE.The article can...


Health Sciences (1)
Celebrations: Education 03/12/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email


Higher Education (2)
Tougher state ratings for schools make 'A' hard to get 03/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...under the age of 20 need help in math or English, according to the most recent statistics from the Ohio Board of Regents. The figure is 57 percent at Kent State University's main campus and 31 percent at the University of Akron. At the state's community colleges, 61 percent of students...

Tougher state ratings for schools make 'A' hard to get 03/10/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...under the age of 20 need help in math or English, according to the most recent statistics from the Ohio Board of Regents. The figure is 57 percent at Kent State University's main campus and 31 percent at the University of Akron. At the state's community colleges, 61 percent of students...


Hillel; History (1)
Seeking Kin: An Ohio man born in the Shoah's shadow searches for answers about his past (Factor) 03/09/2012 Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA) Text Attachment Email

...was born in 1946 near a displaced persons' camp in Germany, remains in the ether, evasive, ever tantalizing. Factor, who teaches Jewish history at Kent State University, near Cleveland, began poking at the holes 20 years ago in his biography. In 2007, he came close to locating the natural mother...


Honors College; Office of the Provost (1)
Author Sherman Alexie coming to KSU 03/12/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Information Architecture and Knowledge Management (1)
IA Summit 09 - Day 2 - Boxes And Arrows : The Design Behind the Design (Fast) 03/11/2012 Boxes and Arrows Text Attachment Email

...interacting with information are moving from the lab to our homes. Karl Fast , professor in the Information Architecture Knowledge Management program at Kent State University, argues that our conceptual tools for interaction design are more limited, and limiting, than we currently believe. The concept...


Jewish Studies; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Regional briefs – March 9 - Holocaust recalled 03/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Students from the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication will present a Children of the Holocaust exhibit and reception at 2 p.m. Sunday....


KSU at Geauga (1)
A balance is needed in college aid (Mohan) 03/11/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

President Obama's post-secondary education financial aid plan would help schools like Hiram College, which locks tuition beginning with each student's freshman year, and hurt schools like YSU, which has frequent tuition increases and...


KSU at Salem (1)
Women's Night Out is March 28 03/12/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association, the Ohio Bureau for Children with Medical Handicaps for Columbiana and Mahoning counties and an instructor at Youngstown State University. - "Top 10 Exercises and Stretches You Shouldn't Live Without" by Laurie Camp, who has been on staff at SCC since 2002...


KSU at Stark (4)
The artistic talent of KSU Stark students will shine at this year's Duct Tape Festival 03/12/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

YOUR DAILY CALENDAR 03/11/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...other families who love nature; 2 p.m.; The Wilderness Center, 9877 Alabama Ave. SW, Sugar Creek; free; 330-359-5235, www.wildernesscenter.org . • Kent State Stark Pops Concert; to benefit music and theater scholarships at Kent State University Stark Campus; 3 to 5 p.m.; Fine Arts Theatre,...

Stark's January jobless rate declines from 2011 (Engelhardt) 03/09/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...significantly lowers unemployment, and when it ends, the unemployment rate typically rises in January. The figures are not adjusted for seasonal factors. Kent State University Stark campus economics professor Lucas Engelhardt said, "The decrease in the unemployment rate in Stark County, it matches what...

Stark's January jobless rate declines from 2011 (Engelhardt) 03/09/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...significantly lowers unemployment, and when it ends, the unemployment rate typically rises in January. The figures are not adjusted for seasonal factors. Kent State University Stark campus economics professor Lucas Engelhardt said, "The decrease in the unemployment rate in Stark County, it matches what...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Dave Barry returning to speak at KSU Tusc in Phila (Patacca) 03/10/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Humor columnist and best-selling author Dave Barry will be the featured speaker at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on April 10. The presentation begins at 7 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center, with lobby doors opening at 6:30...


Political Science (1)
WKSU News: Former political boss Dimora loses his biggest gamble (Banks) 03/10/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...the nature of their crimes and the underlying behavior with deception and disregard for the law, we cannot decide they would NOT be a flight risk." Cleveland State University Provost Geoffery Mearns is a former federal prosecutor. He wasn't surprised by the verdict. "For any of us who were...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Hickey Karate Center (Hickey) 03/12/2012 Akron Legal News - Online Text Attachment Email

...the early 1970s after receiving his undergraduate degree from Thiel College in Pennsylvania. While studying for his master's degree in economics at The University of Akron, he took a karate class, he said, "for the exercise." That exercise regimen quickly became the centerpiece of Hickey's life,...


Town-Gown (2)
Patching holes in housing laws 03/12/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State, PARTA work together to save money 03/11/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Dump trucks began transporting tons of dirt between the sites of two downtown Kent redevelopment projects recently in a move that should save Kent, Kent State University and PARTA thousands of dollars. Lockhart Construction, the contractor in charge of site work at the Portage Area Regional...


News Headline: Gorilla DNA aping humans (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Weekly Gleaner - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizeable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative', and this is certainly true, based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement".

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes - humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans - to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about six million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a non-profit British genome research centre. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

Resemblance

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 per cent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 per cent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound (136-kilogram) western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

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News Headline: Gorillas in our midst -- and in our DNA (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Waterbury Republican-American - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

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News Headline: Genome study finds some gorilla DNA aping our own (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Ventura County Star - Online
Contact Name: The Associated Press
News OCR Text: Take a trip to the zoo and you can see gorillas are a lot like us. But a new DNA study says we're even more similar than scientists thought.

From the evolutionary family tree, you'd expect our DNA to be the most similar to chimps, our closest relatives. The new work found that's true for the most part, but it also found that a sizable portion of our genome is closer to a gorilla's than to a chimp's.

"The chimpanzee is often cited as 'our closest living relative' and this is certainly true based on total genome sequence, but the gorilla is nearly as close a relative," Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, who was not part of the project, said in an email.

That agrees with hints from with some smaller previous genetic studies. The latest work deciphered the entire genome of the gorilla, which Lovejoy called "a substantial achievement."

It reveals "a closer connection between our genome and that of the gorilla than was previously appreciated," Richard Gibbs and Jeffrey Rogers of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in an editorial accompanying the work published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

With the new research, scientists now have complete genetic blueprints of the living great apes - humans, chimps, gorillas and orangutans - to compare and gain fresh understanding of how humans evolved and developed key traits such as higher brain function and the ability to walk upright.

Humans and chimps evolved separately since splitting from a common ancestor about 6 million years ago.

The latest study was led by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, a nonprofit British genome research center. Researchers mapped the DNA of a female gorilla and compared it to the genomes of humans and chimps.

As expected, most of the human genome was closer to the chimp's than to the gorilla's. But in about 15 percent of the genome, human and gorilla resemble each other the most. In another 15 percent, chimp and gorilla DNA are closer to each other than chimp is to human. Both those situations clash with what you'd expect from the evolutionary tree, which says humans and chimps should always be the most similar, the researchers said.

The analysis also found gene variants in gorillas that are harmless to them but are linked to dementia and heart failure in people.

"If we could understand more about why those variants are so harmful in humans but not in gorillas, that would have important" medical implications, said one of the study's authors, Chris Tyler-Smith.

The gorilla genome was cracked using DNA from Kamilah, a 300-pound western lowland gorilla from the San Diego Zoo, which maintains a DNA library of endangered animals. Since the mapping of the human genome in 2001, there was a dash to similarly unravel the genetic codes of other animals, particularly primates. The first complete chimp genome was published in 2005 and the orangutan last year.

Like other great apes, gorilla populations in the forests of central Africa have been dwindling from hunting and disease. In decoding Kamilah's DNA, researchers said they hoped to do the same for the mountain gorilla, which is near extinction.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING, MARCH 14 | Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Board of Trustees will hold its next regular business meeting Wednesday, March 14.The Board will convene at 2 p.m.in the George Urban Board of Trustees Conference Room, which is located on the second floor of the Kent Campus Library.

Trustees will retire into executive session at 9 a.m.in the Urban Conference Room to consider specific topics as provided for under Ohio's "Sunshine Law."

Board committees will meet as follows:

* Academic Excellence and Student Success Committee - 10:30-11:30 a.m.in the Urban Conference Room.

* Audit/Finance and Administration Committee - 10:30-11:30 a.m.in Room 222.

* External Relations and Development Committee - 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.in the Urban Conference Room.

Kent State President Lester A.Lefton and Board Chair Jacqueline Woods will be available to answer media questions immediately after the business meeting.

The Board meeting agenda will be available via the Kent State University website at www.kent.edu/bot/meetings/index.cfm.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Banking on the future | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Elenora Moore of the Northeast Side has purchased two houses from the Columbus land bank in the past six months and has applied to buy a third one.

She owns more than a dozen rental properties near her house but said she started looking at land-bank properties in the area as well because she can pick them up for a pittance.

Moore bought her two land-bank houses for $5,000 apiece.

She spent money to fix them up, but still, she said, “I am able to rent them very cheap” — $650 a month.

Columbus has 928 properties in its land bank, the most it has ever had. John Turner, who manages the program for the city, said Columbus had fewer than 300 when he started with the land-redevelopment office in 2007.

The city acquires most of the properties through tax delinquencies.

The city has spent $1.75 million in federal neighborhood-stabilization money since 2010 to buy 123 foreclosed homes. In 2010 and 2011, it also acquired 297 houses and vacant lots through tax foreclosures. The city spent $54,000 on the properties in transfer fees.

Since Jan. 1, 2010, it has sold 229 properties for a total of $476,000, or an average of $2,078 per property. Seventy percent were sold to nonprofit corporations for redevelopment. An additional 35 lots were sold for side yards. The rest were sold to people who wanted to fix up the houses for themselves or to rent out.

Bill Duncan, who is a renter on Innis Avenue on the South Side, said he spotted a city car outside the boarded-up house across the street last year.

“I asked them how much they appraised it for and what do I have to do to get a look,” Duncan said.

Innis Avenue is at the heart of the city's war on blight. It's where Mayor Michael B. Coleman in February announced his plans to demolish 900 “worst of the worst” houses in Columbus.

The city gave Duncan, 61, a flashlight tour of the dark, empty house. He bought it for $5,738 and is installing a new furnace, duct work, wiring and plumbing.

“It looked like a possibility for me,” he said.

Duncan said his contract says he must live in the house for five years. The city gives buyers 60 days to fix exterior code violations and 180 days to finish renovations. New construction on empty lots must be completed in 18 months.

If the property owner doesn't follow through, ownership reverts to the city, Turner said. “They have to come to us with a specific end use.”

Buyers can receive tax abatements in designated neighborhoods.

Columbus' land bank was created in 1994 so the city could gain control of vacant lots and homes and return them to good use. But it has limited resources, so it can't acquire every vacant and abandoned property. And not every property is eligible: It must be tax delinquent and cannot be in bankruptcy or probate court or have any pending foreclosure actions.

Patricia Laquinte bought the lot next to her Whitethorne Avenue house in the Hilltop for $2,000 last fall after the city tore down the vacant house that sat on it. She expects her house to gain value because of the larger yard, she said. “These houses are so close together, we could use a little space.”

While Columbus has more than 900 properties in its land bank, other Ohio cities struggling with steep population losses carry even more. For example, Youngstown has 1,000 properties in its land bank.

In Cleveland, which has 9,974 properties in its land bank, most of the sales in recent years have been to homeowners who want an empty lot next to their houses, said Terry Robbins, that city's land-bank manager.

The vast majority of Cleveland's properties are vacant lots. In most cases, the city demolished the houses before its land bank acquired them, said Daryl Rush, Cleveland's community development director. The city leveled 5,152 buildings from 2006 to 2010.

Cleveland leases 185 lots for community gardens, pocket parks and other uses, Rush said. The city sold 400 parcels in 2010 and 2011, said Rush, who estimated that Cleveland has as many as 15,000 vacant and abandoned houses.

Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative has worked with the city since 2008 to develop strategies to reuse the acres of vacant land. Ideas include reserving land-bank lots near neighborhood centers and walkable areas for new development and emphasizing rehabilitation over demolition in these areas.

In Toledo, the Lucas County Land Reutilization Corp. charges only $100 for lots purchased by adjacent homeowners. Toledo has about 8,000 vacant and abandoned properties.

“What we're trying to do is stabilize property values and create viable neighborhoods,” said David Mann, the group's executive director.

mferenchik@dispatch.com

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News Headline: Banking on the future | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Elenora Moore of the Northeast Side has purchased two houses from the Columbus land bank in the past six months and has applied to buy a third one.

She owns more than a dozen rental properties near her house but said she started looking at land-bank properties in the area as well because she can pick them up for a pittance.

Moore bought her two land-bank houses for $5,000 apiece.

She spent money to fix them up, but still, she said, "I am able to rent them very cheap" -- $650 a month.

Columbus has 928 properties in its land bank, the most it has ever had. John Turner, who manages the program for the city, said Columbus had fewer than 300 when he started with the land-redevelopment office in 2007.

The city acquires most of the properties through tax delinquencies.

The city has spent $1.75 million in federal neighborhood-stabilization money since 2010 to buy 123 foreclosed homes. In 2010 and 2011, it also acquired 297 houses and vacant lots through tax foreclosures. The city spent $54,000 on the properties in transfer fees.

Since Jan. 1, 2010, it has sold 229 properties for a total of $476,000, or an average of $2,078 per property. Seventy percent were sold to nonprofit corporations for redevelopment. An additional 35 lots were sold for side yards. The rest were sold to people who wanted to fix up the houses for themselves or to rent out.

Bill Duncan, who is a renter on Innis Avenue on the South Side, said he spotted a city car outside the boarded-up house across the street last year.

"I asked them how much they appraised it for and what do I have to do to get a look," Duncan said.

Innis Avenue is at the heart of the city's war on blight. It's where Mayor Michael B. Coleman in February announced his plans to demolish 900 "worst of the worst" houses in Columbus.

The city gave Duncan, 61, a flashlight tour of the dark, empty house. He bought it for $5,738 and is installing a new furnace, duct work, wiring and plumbing.

"It looked like a possibility for me," he said.

Duncan said his contract says he must live in the house for five years. The city gives buyers 60 days to fix exterior code violations and 180 days to finish renovations. New construction on empty lots must be completed in 18 months.

If the property owner doesn't follow through, ownership reverts to the city, Turner said. "They have to come to us with a specific end use."

Buyers can receive tax abatements in designated neighborhoods.

Columbus' land bank was created in 1994 so the city could gain control of vacant lots and homes and return them to good use. But it has limited resources, so it can't acquire every vacant and abandoned property. And not every property is eligible: It must be tax delinquent and cannot be in bankruptcy or probate court or have any pending foreclosure actions.

Patricia Laquinte bought the lot next to her Whitethorne Avenue house in the Hilltop for $2,000 last fall after the city tore down the vacant house that sat on it. She expects her house to gain value because of the larger yard, she said. "These houses are so close together, we could use a little space."

While Columbus has more than 900 properties in its land bank, other Ohio cities struggling with steep population losses carry even more. For example, Youngstown has 1,000 properties in its land bank.

In Cleveland, which has 9,974 properties in its land bank, most of the sales in recent years have been to homeowners who want an empty lot next to their houses, said Terry Robbins, that city's land-bank manager.

The vast majority of Cleveland's properties are vacant lots. In most cases, the city demolished the houses before its land bank acquired them, said Daryl Rush, Cleveland's community development director. The city leveled 5,152 buildings from 2006 to 2010.

Cleveland leases 185 lots for community gardens, pocket parks and other uses, Rush said. The city sold 400 parcels in 2010 and 2011, said Rush, who estimated that Cleveland has as many as 15,000 vacant and abandoned houses.

Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative has worked with the city since 2008 to develop strategies to reuse the acres of vacant land. Ideas include reserving land-bank lots near neighborhood centers and walkable areas for new development and emphasizing rehabilitation over demolition in these areas.

In Toledo, the Lucas County Land Reutilization Corp. charges only $100 for lots purchased by adjacent homeowners. Toledo has about 8,000 vacant and abandoned properties.

"What we're trying to do is stabilize property values and create viable neighborhoods," said David Mann, the group's executive director.

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News Headline: KSU students hope to raise awareness of cerebral palsy | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Four Kent State University
students collaborated recently
to create awareness
of the cerebral palsy foundation
Pedal-with-Pete, an
organization established by
KSU College of Business Administration
alumnus Pete
Zeidner, who was born with
cerebral palsy.
The students used their
skills and experiences, ahead
of National Cerebral Palsy
Awareness Month in March,
to create a series of promotional
tactics to increase the
foundation's visibility and
further the organization's
goals.
Zeidner established the
Pedal-with-Pete Foundation
in 1993 to raise funds for cerebral
palsy research through
bike rides and walks. He has
helped raise more than half
a million dollars and has the
goal of reaching the $1 million
mark.
Zeidner, an avid bicyclist
who used to ride 60 to 80
miles a day, lost 80 percent
of his body function from an
accident that occurred in
1999. He has since been using
a wheelchair and has not
been able to cycle to support
his foundation.
When KSU College of Business
Administration entrepreneur-
in-residence Craig
Zamary first heard the story
behind the foundation,
he jumped at the opportunity
to help support its
mission. Zamary suggested
the project to his student,
Victor Newman, who needed
to complete his practicum
for the entrepreneurship
major.
Newman, whose goal is to
work for a nonprofit after college,
has experience managing
fundraisers for his fraternity,
Alpha Epsilon Pi. He put
his experience to work for
the Pedal-with-Pete Foundation.
To promote and create
more awareness for the foundation,
Newman pulled in
students from other disciplines
to help create a video
that captured who Zeidner
is and what his organization
stands for.
Together with fellow entrepreneurship
major Chris
Lintner, Newman worked
with journalism and mass
communications senior Simon
Husted to produce the
KSU students hope to raise awareness of cerebral palsy
C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012 Record-Courier WWW.RECORDPUB.COM
Pete Zeidner, seated, is surrounded by Kent State University students, from left, Diego Brito, Simon Husted, Victor Newman, Chris Lintner and
KSU College of Business entrepreneur-in-residence Craig Zamary. The team worked with Zeidner, a KSU alumnus, to promote his cerebral
palsy foundation, Pedal-with-Pete.
■ Rodney L. Gray II, 26, and Amy E.
Kovacs, 26
■ Lawrence A. Foulkes, 44, and
Christina A. Major, 46
■ James C. Hanson, 77, and
Margine M. Fryan, 75
■ Timothy L. Curran, 38, of Butler
County, Pa., and Gunay Rzayeva,
35, of Portage County
■ Zackary J. Zelenak, 18, and
Amanda J. Parkhill, 19
VITAL STATISTICS
■ Joshua P. Burwell, address
unknown, and Shila A. Drake, of
Ballinger, Texas
■ Karen M. Ladich Savage, of Kent,
and Paul A. Savage, of Akron
DIVORCES
MARRIAGE LICENSES
(The person filing for divorce
is listed first.)
video, and with visual communication
and design graduate
student from El Salvador
Diego Brito to create a
landing page and web page
design for the foundation.
Christopher Redmond, another
College of Business Administration
entrepreneurin-
residence who was pulled
into the project by Zamary,
also expressed satisfaction
with the high quality of the
students' work.
For more information
about the Pedal-with-Pete
Foundation, visit http://
pedal-with-pete.org.
For more information
about KSU's Center for Entrepreneurship
and Business
Innovation in the College of
Business Administration,
visit www.kent.edu/cebi.

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News Headline: Long road for panel on death penalty (Brewer) | Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Eggert, David
News OCR Text: It could be awhile before Ohio learns whether its death penalty is being administered fairly along racial, geographical and other lines.

Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor had wanted a 21-member panel to issue a report by the end of this year. She might not get it until late 2013.

"We aren't going to get this done in a year. I think we're probably looking at two years," task force chairman James Brogan told The Dispatch yesterday. Brogan, a retired appeals-court judge from Dayton, chairs the Joint Task Force to Study Administration of the Death Penalty.

A statistical analysis of capital punishment -- including all death-penalty-eligible cases in the state, not just those where prosecutors actually seek the death penalty -- could take two years from start to finish, according to a researcher.

"More data are better. The more data you have, the more questions you are able to answer," Tom Brewer of Kent State University told the task force yesterday. Brewer is an assistant professor who studies juries' decisions on whether to impose the death penalty.

The panel, which has been meeting for four months, is reviewing a 2007 American Bar Association report that found many problems with Ohio's death penalty.

The ABA criticized the Ohio Supreme Court for doing little to ensure capital punishment is imposed proportionately if defendants commit similar crimes. To better gauge the extent of the problem, task-force members are considering whether to examine homicides where the death penalty could have been pursued by prosecutors but was not.

Doing so could mean asking law students to fan out across the state in search of old case files in courthouse basements, death certificates and other records. Brewer said he did not know how much such a study could cost.

Panel member John Parker, a Cleveland defense lawyer, was eager to see hard data on potential disparities. He mentioned a defendant's race, the locale of the crime and financial advantages that the prosecution has over the defense.

"We need to somehow start getting data. I don't know how we're going to do that without funding," Parker said.

Some data already are available, so a lot will depend on what exactly the panel wants to collect independently. It came as no shock that the study will not be done this year.

O'Connor said in January that her initial timeline might have been too ambitious.

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News Headline: Studies from Kent State University Add New Findings in the Area of Cardiology | Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: According to the authors of a study from Kent, Ohio, "The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self-Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity walking and education in self-management skills to facilitate recovery following a cardiac event."

"Using a randomized two-group design, exercise self-efficacy, steps walked, and participation in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program were compared in a sample of 38 older adults (17 Cardiac TRUST, 21 usual care). At discharge from postacute care, the intervention group trended toward higher levels of self-efficacy for exercise outcomes than the usual care group. During the 6 weeks following discharge, the intervention group had greater attendance in outpatient CR and a trend toward more steps walked during the first week. The feasibility of the intervention was better for the home health care participants than for those in the skilled nursing facility. The provision of CR during postacute care has the potential to bridge the gap in transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient CR for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events," wrote M.A. Dolansky and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted."

Dolansky and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Gerontological Nursing (Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 2011;37(12):36-44).

For more information, contact M.A. Dolansky, Kent State University, Dept. of Public Hlth, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Gerontological Nursing is: Slack Inc, 6900 Grove Rd, Thorofare, NJ 08086, USA.

Copyright © 2012 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Thomas Schroth Visiting Artist Series Brings Architect George Miller to Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The annual Thomas Schroth Visiting Artist Series presents world-renowned architect, George H. Miller, managing partner at Pei Cobb Freed and Partners, on March 15, at 7 p.m. in the Kent State University Kiva Auditorium. The lecture is free and open to the public. To ensure a seat, please call 330-672-2760 or email collegeofthearts@kent.edu. For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/artscollege/News/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=C4567BC8-F42C-62AA-6A361C43831F7469.

Cost: Free

Contact: Effie Tsengas, 330-672-8398, etsengas@kent.edu

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News Headline: Anita Borg Announces Famous Women In Computer Science List | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: EFY Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology announced today the publication of its Famous Women in Computer Science List. The list highlights over fifty women who have positively impacted the creation of technology, many of whom have received awards and recognition for their contributions to technology.

This resource was designed to highlight the importance of submitting women as well as men for awards for outstanding work. The list was created by members of the Anita Borg Institute's Advisory Board Awards Committee. The committee includes Katy Dickinson (Director, Huawei Technologies), Fran Allen (IBM Emerita and 2006 Turing Award Winner), Chandra Krintz (Professor, Computer Science Department, University of California at Santa Barbara), Dr. Bob Walker (Professor and Chair, Computer Science Department, Kent State University).

"Today and every day, we celebrate the impact that women have on the creation of technology and the positive impact that technology has on the world. The women on this list have all changed our world through their work. This list is by no means complete and we look forward to continuing to grow this list in the years to come," said Telle Whitney, President and CEO, Anita Borg Institute.

Among the many women highlighted are:

Frances E. Allen, the first female ACM A.M. Turing Award Winner and a pioneer in the optimization of compilers.

Mary Lou Jepsen, founding Chief Technology Officer of One Laptop per Child and a leader in the design of low-cost and low-power LCD screens as CEO of Pixel Qi.

Katherine Johnson, research mathematician and scientist who worked at NASA's Langley Research Center from 1953-1986, who calculated the trajectory of the early space launches.

Hedy Lamarr, the Hollywood star who also co-invented spread-spectrum broadcast communications technologies.

The Anita Borg Institute will be celebrating more leading women technologists and the winner of the Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women Award at its Women of Vision Awards Dinner May 10, 2012 in Santa Clara CA.

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News Headline: Famous women in computer science named by Anita Borg Institute | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: TechJournal South - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Famous women in computer science named by Anita Borg Institute

March 9th, 2012

Hedy Lamar, considered one of the most beautiful actresses in Hollywood history, also co-invented spread-spectrum broadcast technologies

The  Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology  has published its  Famous Women in Computer Science List . The list highlights over fifty women who have positively impacted the creation of technology.

"Today and every day, we celebrate the impact that women have on the creation of technology and the positive impact that technology has on the world. The women on this list have all changed our world through their work. This list is by no means complete and we look forward to continuing to grow this list in the years to come," said Telle Whitney, president and CEO, Anita Borg Institute.

Among the many women highlighted are:

Frances E. Allen, the first female ACM A.M. Turing Award Winner and a pioneer in the optimization of compilers.

Mary Lou Jepsen, founding Chief Technology Officer of One Laptop per Child and a leader in the design of low-cost and low-power LCD screens as CEO of Pixel Qi.

Katherine Johnson, research mathematician and scientist who worked at NASA's Langley Research Center from 1953-1986, who calculated the trajectory of the early space launches.

Hedy Lamarr, the Hollywood star who also co-invented spread-spectrum broadcast communications technologies.

Others on the full list  include: Meg Whitman, Hewlett-Packard CEO; Radia Perlman, "Mother of the Internet," and first Sun Systems female fellow; and Augusta Ada King, the colorful Countess of Lovelace, celebrated in fiction and films. Ada wrote a description of Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. She is credited with being the 1st computer programmer.

This resource was designed to highlight the importance of submitting women as well as men for awards for outstanding work. The list was created by members of the Anita Borg Institute's Advisory Board Awards Committee.

The committee includes Katy Dickinson (Director, Huawei Technologies), Fran Allen (IBM Emerita and 2006 Turing Award Winner), Chandra Krintz (Professor, Computer Science Department, University of California at Santa Barbara), Dr. Bob Walker (Professor and Chair, Computer Science Department, Kent State University).

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News Headline: COLLIDER SERIES EXPLORES INTERACTIVE NEW MEDIA MARCH 19-APRIL 14 AT UNIVERSITY OF AKRON | Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Collider4: Spectacle," an array of events presented by The University of Akron's Myers School of Art, invites visitors to participate in, play with and ponder new media artworks.The events include exhibitions, lectures, workshops, receptions and Kinect Cube interactive artworks.

Running March 19 through April 14, all "Spectacle" events are free and open to the public in three UA campus locations: the Myers School of Art and Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St.; Bierce Library, 302 East Buchtel Ave.; and the Honors College Complex, 180 South College St.Also free are receptions on March 20 and April 13 from 4:30 to 8 p.m.

"Spectacle" is co-curated by Rod Bengston, director of University Art Galleries at UA, UA graphic design faculty members Tony Samangy and Markus Vogl, and guest curator Margarita Benitez, assistant professor of fashion design at Kent State University.Details are at Collider4: Spectacle.

The exhibitions feature works by an array of contemporary artists, including Mark Amerika, Margarita Benitez, Elliott Earls, Chad Mossholder, James Murray, Tony Samangy, Markus Vogl and Chris Yanc.The exhibition also features Kinect Cube interactive artworks juried by the four curators.The Kinect Cube artists include Mauricio Giraldo Arteaga, Katherine Behar, Yuan-Yi Fan, Haru Ji, Eunsu Kang, Lustlab, Silvia Ruzanka, David Stolarsky, Graham Wakefield and Yingcai Xiao.

"Spectacle" is the fourth in the UA Myers School of Art's Collider Series.The series examines the impact, implications and inspiration of new media within design and fine arts.For this exhibition, says co-curator Markus Vogl, the term "Spectacle" refers to an event that is memorable for the appearance it creates."'Spectacle' operates in two contexts simultaneously," says Vogl."On one hand, it refers to high culture performances such as drama and movies, where the draw for an audience is the impressive visual accomplishment.On the other hand, it refers to low cultural shows operating in a folk environment.These can range from freak shows to beast play."

The Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall is the site of many of the exhibition works.The gallery is open Mondays through Thursdays from 10 a.m.to 8 p.m.and Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.to 5 p.m.The gallery is closed Sundays and university holidays.Call 330-972-6030 or visit the School of Art for more information.

"Collider4: Spectacle" events calendar

Monday, March 19 - Friday, April 13

"Collider4: Spectacle" exhibition in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Works by Mark Amerika, Elliott Earls, Chad Mossholder, James Murray and //benitez_vogl (a collaboration of Margarita Benitez and Markus Vogle).

Monday, March 19 - Wednesday, March 21

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

"Swim Browser" by David Stolarsky

Monday, March 19 - Friday, April 13

"Collider4: Spectacle" exhibition in Honors College Complex, 180 South College St., Akron.

Works by Tony Samangy and Chris Yanc

Monday, March 19 - Wednesday, March 28

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Bierce Library Emerging Technologies Lab, 302 E.Buchtel Ave., Akron.

"Membranes" by Eunsu Kang

Tuesday, March 20, 4:30 - 8 p.m.

"Collider4: Spectacle" opening reception in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Thursday, March 22 - Saturday, March 24

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

"Disorientalism" by Silvia Ruzanka and Katherine Behar

Monday, March 26, 7:30 p.m.

"Collider4: Spectacle" lecture by Elliott Earls in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Elliott Earls is designer-In-residence and head of the graduate graphic design program at Cranbrook Academy of Art.

Monday, March 26 - Wednesday, March 28

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

"Body Type" by Mauricio Giraldo Arteaga

Thursday, March 29 - Saturday, March 31

Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

"Ambient Vision" by Yuan-Yi Fan

Thursday, March 29 - Saturday, April 7

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Bierce Library Emerging Technologies Lab, 302 E.Buchtel Ave., Akron.

"Swim Browser" by David Stolarsky

Monday, April 2 - Thursday, April 5

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

"Time of Doubles" by Haru Ji and Graham Wakefield

Tuesday, April 3, 7:30 p.m.

"Collider4: Spectacle" lecture by Golan Levin in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Presented by the Myers Lecture Series, Golan Levin is an associate professor of art at Carnegie Mellon University.

Wednesday, April 4, 9 a.m.

"Collider4: Spectacle" workshop by Golan Levin in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Topic: Introduction to Processing

Wednesday, April 4, 3:30 p.m.

"Collider4: Spectacle" workshop by Golan Levin in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Topic: 25 Technologies that are Revolutionizing Art Practice and Education.

Friday, April 6 - Saturday, April 7

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Featuring work by Dr.Yingcai Xiao of UA's Department of Computer Science

Monday, April 9 - Friday, April 13

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

"VideoWall" by Lustlab

Monday, April 9 - Friday, April 13

"Collider4: Spectacle" Kinect Cube interactive artwork in Bierce Library Emerging Technologies Lab, 302 E.Buchtel Ave., Akron.

Featuring work by Dr.Yingcai Xiao of UA's Department of Computer Science

Monday, April 9, 7:30 p.m.

"Collider4: Spectacle" lecture by Mark Amerika in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.

Mark Amerika, professor of art and art history at the University of Colorado at Boulder, discusses CODEWORK and and his collaboration with electronic music composer Chad Mossholder titled "Micro-Cinematic Essay on the Life and Times of Marcel Duchamp dba Conceptual Parts, Ink," as it relates to Amerika's developments for "The Museum Glitch Aesthetics."

Friday, April 13, 4:30 - 8 p.m.

"Collider4: Spectacle" closing reception in Emily Davis Gallery in Folk Hall, 150 E.Exchange St., Akron.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Jo-Ann Stores, KSU fashion school pick inaugural scholarship winner | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Natalie Sullinger, a Kent State University freshman, received the inaugural $5,000 Jo-Ann Stores, Inc. First Generation Scholarship for Fashion Design and Merchandising at the store's headquarters in Hudson recently.

Jo-Ann Fabrics has partnered with KSU's fashion school to award the $5,000 scholarship to a first-generation college student in the fashion major with a financial need, 3.5 GPA with an interest in fabrics, said Travis Smith, CEO of Jo-Ann Fabrics.

"This is a pretty cool program. We're excited to be a part of this and watch it as it grows," he said.

Smith said Sullinger began sewing quilts for cancer patients, including her mother, while attending Olmsted Falls High School. Sullinger now has a goal to sew 100 quilts.

To help her meet that goal, Smith presented Sullinger with a new sewing machine and plenty of quilt fabric.

Sullinger said she hopes to get a cancer quilt sewing project organized with KSU's fashion student organization to help meet the goal.

"There's a lot of students there that know how to sew and the quilts are easy that, even if you don't know how to sew, it's very easy to learn," she said.

Sullinger's mother, Joann, said she knew her daughter had a talent from early on.

"She was always making something," she said. "When i bought the sewing machine, I didn't know if I would use it much or not, and then she just took it over. I'm very proud of her."

Sullinger said she is very grateful for the scholarship.

"It means a lot. I know that I'm on the right track and it definitely gives me more confidence that this is what I want to do and what I'm meant to do and it will help me to do even better in what I want to do."

Sullinger, who designed her own dress for the day, said her big ambition is to eventually have her own line.

"It's a big dream, but I really want to do actual designing for the runway and have my own line," she said. "I'm definitely determined to get up there."

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News Headline: Wrangler has designs on KSU student's work (Greider) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Shannon Gallagher, in her fifth year studying fashion merchandising at Kent State University, designed a workwear garment in her product development class that will be featured for purchase in Wrangler's Christmas 2012 catalog.

Gallagher says her upbringing on a farm helped to inspire the design. The lifestyle and the clothing her father and brother wore, as well as her experience raising and showing livestock, all came together in the form of the successful design.

But the 22-year-old Garrettsville resident says KSU Fashion School instructor Trista Grieder is responsible for her success with Wrangler. She liked that Grieder's project proposal was encouraging, and Grieder submitted the design to her contact at Wrangler for review.

The work shirt for men, fashioned in a Western style, is long-sleeved and features a designed yoke, pointed collar, breast pockets with flaps and decorative stitching.

Grieder said her students learn that merchandisers and designers are partners in the creation of fashion and that a large network can be the foundation for future successes.

She helps prepare the students in using product development industry sheets, Illustrator, Photoshop and other industry-wide resources.

Grieder said an ongoing friendship with a past mentor at Wrangler helped when they embarked on a men's Western shirt project. Because Gallagher's project stood out, the company wanted to manufacture the design.

The student said she was very excited when she got the news. Her father and brother are proud of being part of the inspiration and are waiting to buy the shirt next Christmas, she said.

Gallagher will graduate with honors in May.

In her free time, she enjoys sewing, scrapbooking and photography. She engages in local entrepreneurship organizations, 4-H, leadership programs and scholarly groups. She works as an independent Mary Kay consultant, a teacher at the Looking Glass Learning center and a sales associate at the Longaberger Factory Store.

© 2012 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.

Shannon Gallagher of Garrettsville proudly shows off the men's Western-style shirt she designed. Wrangler will produce and sell her design, beginning it its Christmas 2012 catalog. Gallagher is in her fifth year as a fashion merchandising major at Kent State University. For more about KSU's Fashion School, visit www.kent.edu/artscollege/fashion.

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News Headline: Tornado activity on the rise in Hamilton County (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Chattanooga Times Free Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students huddle in the corner of a windowless corridor during a tornado drill in February. Eastside Elementary held a tornado drill Thursday afternoon. According to Principal Emily Baker, on April 27th, 2011, the students had to stay crouched in the halls for more than half an hour during that day's severe weather. Baker said that the school conducts a tornado drill in the spring and fall, as well as an intruder drill and the mandatory monthly fire drills.

Hamilton County had more tornadoes in the last 10 months than in the previous 60 years.

And during a tornado, you are 15 times more likely to die in a mobile home than in a permanent structure.

The numbers are frightening, but a few simple steps can improve your chances of surviving when the next devil wind comes.

“There is absolutely no guarantee that it's going to work, but there are certainly things you can put in place that greatly enhance your survivability,” said Greg Carbin, a warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service.

“When you are given a very short period of time to come up with some way of making yourself safe, you're going to have to make some very split-second decisions. Hopefully, you've thought about those split-second decisions ahead of time and you're prepared to make them.”

Some meteorologists predict more than an average number of tornadoes this year, but Carbin also stressed that nothing is certain just because more than 45 tornadoes struck the Chattanooga area on April 27 last year or storms March 2 dropped a tornado on Harrison that plowed through Ooltewah into Bradley County.

The good news is that fewer people die in tornadoes now than they did 100 years ago, partially due to better predictions, longer advance warnings and sturdier buildings. But hundreds of people are still killed every year, the majority of them from blunt-force trauma and more than half of whom were in mobile homes.

The numbers aren't black and white. Tornado winds are capricious. Every storm is different.

Meteorology experts spend their days crunching numbers, looking over data from the people killed in hundreds of tornadoes each year and try to determine how they died.

They debate how safe vehicles may be, and whether you are better off in a mobile home or a vehicle. They say it is difficult to know whether a large basement room with windows is safer than a first-floor interior closet.

But some decisions could save your life, especially knowing the general principles of how a tornado works and how most people are killed.

The first premise is to get as low as you can and put as many walls between you and the tornado as possible, said Harold Brooks, a research meteorologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Severe Storms Lab in Norman, Okla.

The winds and debris are dangerous since most tornado deaths and injuries result from swirling debris. Smaller spaces and rooms are also better because buildings with large rooms do not have support and are more likely to collapse.

A study of an EF3 tornado showed that “the parts that survived, the core remnants, were closets, under stairs, interior bathrooms and the lowest three feet basically,” Brooks said.

The second rule is that mobile homes and cars are not safe places, especially mobile homes. While experts debate whether you are safer outside in the elements than in a mobile home, they all agree you need to find a better place to ride out any tornado.

More than 50 percent of the people killed in tornadoes during the last 60 years were in mobile homes, Brooks and Carbin said, even though the U.S. census shows that only about 10 percent of people in the United States live in mobile homes.

In some rural counties in Tennessee, such as Meigs and Polk, about one-third of the people live in mobile homes, according the census, putting them at great risk.

“A mobile home is simply not even remotely adequate,” tornado expert and meteorologist Chuck Doswell wrote in an email. “Anyone living in a mobile home needs to have a shelter option within two to 10 minutes. There is no other reasonably safe option.”

How much protection vehicles provide is still being debated.

Several years ago, Tom Schmidlin of Kent State University published research that he said showed cars were often safer than mobile homes, particularly in tornadoes with a strength of EF3 or below.

In the study, Schmidlin said the National Weather Service and American Red Cross should change recommendations telling people to abandon their vehicles and take shelter in a low-lying area or ditch.

The Red Cross now includes guidelines about how to protect yourself inside a car.

But in several publications, Doswell said Schmidlin had not done enough research and that cars are not safe havens.

Part of the problem is that vehicles are safer at certain times than others, Brooks said. They are built to withstand impact from things like debris, but they also lift easily and are not good at surviving when tossed long distances.

“In general, cars perform in ways we don't completely understand,” Brooks said. “The mobile home/car problem is really tough. People in mobile homes need to identify a close, good structure to go to quickly and then they need to be willing to go.”

Lastly, experts said people need to monitor the weather when meteorologists predict the possibility of a severe weather outbreak. Those predictions are usually issued several days in advance and should be heeded.

“There are a few days each year when the weather can kill you,” said Brooks. “Those are the days when you need turn on the TV instead of playing video games or listen to the radio instead of driving down the road listening to your MP3 player.”

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News Headline: As tornado approaches, flee mobile homes in favor of vehicles or ditches, experts say (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lexington Herald-Leader - Online
Contact Name: Bill Estep
News OCR Text: Randall Chadwell picks through the wreckage of his mobile home, destroyed in a tornado in Laurel County on 3/2/2012. Chadwell and his wife, Bulah, left their home out of concern over the predicted bad weather. Their neighbors, Sherman Dewayne and Debbie Allen, died when their mobile home was destroyed. Bill Estep photo

Faced with warnings about the potential for strong tornadoes on March 2, Randall and Bulah Chadwell and their daughter left their mobile home on a ridge in northern Laurel County well before the storm front was to come through.

Their next-door neighbors, Sherman and Debbie Allen, stayed at their mobile home with their son, Eric, and his fiancée, Amy Harris.

The Chadwells were miles away when the fast-moving tornado hit just after 7 p.m., tearing both homes to pieces. Sherman and Debbie Allen died, and their son and his girlfriend were grievously injured.

Nearly every year in the U.S., most deaths caused by tornadoes occur among people who live in mobile homes, according to the National Weather Service. Deaths in Kentucky from the March 2 tornadoes bore that out.

Of 23 people who died of injuries sustained as the tornadoes raked Kentucky, 16 died when their mobile homes were destroyed. Others perished when high winds hit their vehicles or site-built homes, which the weather service calls "permanent homes." (One woman was trapped in her closet, apparently while seeking shelter, and one man died after falling at a damaged house the day after the tornadoes hit.)

Nationwide, statistics from 2001 to 2010 show that people who live in mobile homes die in tornadoes at a rate 15 times higher than residents of permanent homes, said Harold Brooks, a research meteorologist with the NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory.

For decades, the weather service, emergency officials and others have preached the same message to mobile-home residents about what to do when a tornado approaches: Get out, as the Chadwells did.

Design standards for mobile homes were improved in 1976 and again in 1994. The homes are called manufactured housing if built after the mid-1970s. In Kentucky, such homes must be able to withstand 70 mph winds.

Kentucky requires that manufactured homes be set up by certified installers, on concrete foundations for sectional homes, and according to the maker's recommendations to anchor them, said Hargis Epperson, a state inspector.

Still, even anchored mobile homes offer little protection from tornadoes, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA. Shawn Harley, meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service office in Jackson, said he thinks people who live in mobile homes should leave when officials issue a tornado watch, and not wait for a warning to be issued.

The issue is important in Kentucky because the state has relatively high percentage of people who live in mobile or manufactured homes.

In 2010, such homes accounted for 12.6 percent of the housing units in Kentucky, compared with 6.1 percent nationwide, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated.

The weather service, FEMA and other agencies agree that instead of staying in mobile home as a tornado approaches, people should go to a storm shelter or the lowest floor of a sturdy building nearby.

There is disagreement on what to do if such shelter is not available, however.

The longtime, official advice was that it was better to get down in a ditch or depression outside rather than ride out a tornado in a mobile home, where flying debris from the disintegrating structure could be deadly.

However, Thomas Schmidlin, a professor at Kent State University who has researched tornado safety among mobile-home residents, has argued that taking shelter in a car or truck would be safer than staying in a mobile home or lying in a ditch.

Schmidlin said that while doing a study in Georgia and Alabama in 1994, he and fellow researchers were surprised at how common it was to see cars or pickup trucks upright, with little damage, near mobile homes where people were killed.

Studies have shown that damage to mobile homes occurs at wind speeds as low as 70 mph, but 50 percent of cars at sites hit by tornadoes with much higher estimated wind speeds were not moved more than a meter, and 82 percent didn't tip over, according to a study by Schmidlin and others published in 2002.

There will be exceptions — tornadoes kill people in vehicles every year — but it is likely a person "encounters less risk of death while belted into a stationary vehicle than while in a mobile home during severe winds," according to the study.

At least one example in Laurel County during the March 2 tornado demonstrated the effectiveness of using a vehicle for shelter. Arthur Parker said he and his wife, Mary, were in the garage next to their single-wide mobile home before the tornado moved in.

Parker said the mobile home was anchored into the ground, but he said he felt the garage was sturdier. His wife was already in their 1987 Chevrolet pickup truck as the tornado roared in, and Parker jumped in with her. The tornado blew away the garage and destroyed their mobile home, but the truck came through with only a dent.

"That old truck is the only thing that saved us," Parker said. "If we'd stayed in that trailer, it would've killed us."

Schmidlin said research shows many residents of mobile homes don't have safe shelter nearby, so they should feel they have the option of driving to shelter. Another factor is that people are reluctant to leave their mobile homes to go outside in the rain and lightning and take cover in a ditch that might be filled with water, with power lines overhead, Schmidlin said.

The debate over taking cover outside versus in a car hasn't been settled, though the National Weather Service and the Red Cross issued an advisory in 2009 saying that if you are caught outside in a tornado and can't get to a safe building, as a last resort you should get in your vehicle and try to drive to safety.

If hit by debris, you should park, leave your seat belt on, get your head below window level and cover your head, according to the advisory.

More neighborliness might also save lives, Schmidlin said.

In a survey of 401 mobile home residents in four states, published in 2007, many people said they did not seek shelter at sturdier frame houses nearby, in part because they didn't know the owners.

County emergency managers, police, fire departments, churches, and service organizations could facilitate the "neighborly gesture" of taking in neighbors during a tornado warning, Schmidlin wrote.

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News Headline: As tornado approaches, flee mobile homes in favor of vehicles or ditches, experts say (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Faced with warnings about the potential for strong tornadoes March 2, Randall and Bulah Chadwell and their daughter left their mobile home on a ridge in northern Laurel County well before the storm front was to come through.

Their next-door neighbors, Sherman and Debbie Allen, stayed at their mobile home with their son, Eric, and his fiancee, Amy Harris.

The Chadwells were miles away when the fast-moving tornado hit just after 7 p.m., tearing both homes to pieces. Sherman and Debbie Allen died, and their son and his girlfriend were seriously injured.

Nearly every year in the United States, most deaths caused by tornadoes occur among people who live in mobile homes, according to the National Weather Service. Deaths in Kentucky from the March 2 tornadoes bore that out.

Of 23 people who died of injuries sustained as the tornadoes raked Kentucky, 16 died when their mobile homes were destroyed. Others perished when high winds hit their vehicles or site-built homes, which the weather service calls "permanent homes." (One woman was trapped in her closet, apparently while seeking shelter, and one man died after falling at a damaged house the day after the tornadoes.)

Nationwide, statistics from 2001 to 2010 show that people who live in mobile homes die in tornadoes at a rate 15 times higher than residents of permanent homes, said Harold Brooks, a research meteorologist with the NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory.

For decades, the weather service, emergency officials and others have preached the same message to mobile-home residents about what to do when a tornado approaches: Get out, as the Chadwells did.

Design standards for mobile homes were improved in 1976 and again in 1994. The homes are called manufactured housing if built after the mid-1970s. In Kentucky, such homes must be able to withstand winds of 70 mph.

Kentucky requires that manufactured homes be set up by certified installers, on concrete foundations for sectional homes, and according to the maker's recommendations to anchor them, said Hargis Epperson, a state inspector.

Still, even anchored mobile homes offer little protection from tornadoes, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA. Shawn Harley, meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service office in Jackson, said he thinks people who live in mobile homes should leave when officials issue a tornado watch and not wait for a warning to be issued.

The issue is important in Kentucky because the state has a relatively high percentage of people who live in mobile or manufactured homes.

In 2010, such homes accounted for 12.6 percent of the housing units in Kentucky, compared with 6.1 percent nationwide, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated.

The weather service, FEMA and other agencies agree that instead of staying in a mobile home as a tornado approaches, residents should go to a storm shelter or the lowest floor of a sturdy building nearby.

There is disagreement on what to do if such shelter is not available, however.

The longtime, official advice was that it was better to get down in a ditch or depression outside rather than ride out a tornado in a mobile home, where flying debris from the disintegrating structure could be deadly.

However, Thomas Schmidlin, a professor at Kent State University who has researched tornado safety among mobile-home residents, has argued that taking shelter in a car or truck would be safer than staying in a mobile home or lying in a ditch.

Schmidlin said that while doing a study in Georgia and Alabama in 1994, he and fellow researchers were surprised at how common it was to see cars or pickups upright, with little damage, near mobile homes where people were killed.

Studies have shown that damage to mobile homes occurs at wind speeds as low as 70 mph, but 50 percent of cars at sites hit by tornadoes with much higher estimated wind speeds were not moved more than a meter, and 82 percent didn't tip over, according to a study by Schmidlin and others published in 2002.

There will be exceptions -- tornadoes kill people in vehicles every year, including at least two in Kentucky this month -- but it is likely a person "encounters less risk of death while belted into a stationary vehicle than while in a mobile home during severe winds," according to the study.

At least one example in Laurel County during the March 2 tornado demonstrated the effectiveness of using a vehicle for shelter. Arthur Parker said he and his wife, Mary, were in the garage next to their single-wide mobile home before the tornado moved in.

Parker said the mobile home was anchored into the ground, but he said he thought the garage was sturdier. His wife was in their 1987 Chevrolet pickup as the tornado roared in, and Parker jumped in with her. The tornado blew away the garage and destroyed their mobile home, but the truck came through with only a dent.

"That old truck is the only thing that saved us," Parker said. "If we'd stayed in that trailer, it would've killed us."

Schmidlin said research shows many residents of mobile homes don't have safe shelter nearby and are reluctant to go outside in the rain and lightning and take cover in a ditch that might be filled with water, with power lines overhead. That's why he thinks it would be better for them to drive to shelter.

The debate over taking cover outside versus in a car hasn't been settled, though the National Weather Service and the Red Cross issued an advisory in 2009 saying that if you are caught outside in a tornado and can't get to a safe building, as a last resort you should get in your vehicle and try to drive to safety.

If the vehicle is hit by debris, you should park, leave your seat belt on, get your head below window level and cover your head, according to the advisory.

More neighborliness might also save lives, Schmidlin said.

In a survey of 401 mobile home residents in four states, published in 2007, many people said they did not seek shelter at sturdier frame houses nearby, in part because they didn't know the owners.

County emergency managers, police, fire departments, churches, and service organizations could facilitate the "neighborly gesture" of taking in neighbors during a tornado warning, Schmidlin wrote.

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News Headline: KENT STATE RESEARCHER ANNOUNCES WORLD RECORD FIND: OLDEST EVIDENCE OF LOBSTERS LIVING TOGETHER DISCOVERED IN GAS SHALE | Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Discovering direct animal behavior from the fossil record can only be done in exceptional circumstances.Such circumstances exist in the German Posidonia gas shale from the Jurassic period in which organic material from fossils is preserved.A treasure trove of fossils found in the Dotternhausen quarry south of Stuttgart, Germany, has now yielded a world record for fossil lobsters living together, according to Kent State University researcher Adiel Klompmaker.

The news was published on March 7 in the multidisciplinary journal PLoS ONE.The article can be found at http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0031893.

"This is also a world record for decapods, a group that includes crabs and shrimp as well as lobsters," explains lead author Klompmaker, a Ph.D.candidate in the Department of Geology at Kent State University."These 180 million-year-old lobsters from the Eryonidae family are millions of years older than the previous record for lobsters from Greenland, and about 100 million years older than the record for shrimp.Thus, this type of behavior for decapods developed earlier in earth's history than previously known."

"The lobsters were discovered in a flattened shell of an extinct squid-like animal, the ammonite Harpoceras falciferum," said co-author Dr.Rene Fraaije, director of the Dutch Oertijdmuseum."This ammonite died, upon which the shell sank to the sea floor and became available for the lobsters."

"The exceptional mode of preservation allowed us to look through the only preserved part of the ammonite shell, the periostracum," Klompmaker said."This organic material is very thin and translucent, which is why we could discover the three lobsters under low angle light."

The well-preserved corpses of lobsters were oriented in a circle with the tails toward each other.Why exactly the lobsters were gathered inside the ammonite remains mysterious."They may have sought a temporary shelter against predators, such as fish, or used it as a long-term residency," Klompmaker said.

The lobsters were found in the same German shale in which the sea reptiles Ichthyosaurus and Plesiosaurus were discovered.These types of shales may contain significant amounts of natural gas, which is why they can be important economically.Shales containing natural gas are found also in the subsurface of Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Fraaije and Klompmaker were recently involved in the discovery of a new hermit crab named after the late singer Michael Jackson because it was found on the date the superstar passed away.Earlier, Kent State researchers studied and reported on the oldest known fossil shrimp, extraordinarily preserved with muscles.

For more information on Kent State's Department of Geology, visit www.kent.edu/geology.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Celebrations: Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kim Peer, an athletic training education program coordinator and associate professor of health sciences at Kent State University, was named to the Ohio Athletic Trainers' Association Hall of Fame. Marisa Lolli, a senior at Lake Center Christian School, won second place in prose/poetry at the State Speech and Debate Tournament. She competed against students from 85 Ohio districts on March 3-4 at Jackson High School. She is the daughter of Robert and Janice Lolli.

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News Headline: Tougher state ratings for schools make 'A' hard to get | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson would be the only school district in Summit County earning an "A" if the state's new rating system had been in place last year.

Stark County's only A school would be Jackson.

Aurora would have the only A in Portage County, and Wadsworth would get the only top grade in Medina County.

Wayne County would have no A schools at all.

Only 17 Ohio districts out of 609 that received report cards last year would be given the top grade under the new system, which begins with this school year.

Last year, 352 districts received the two highest ratings - Excellent and Excellent with Distinction - the equivalent of an A and A+.

The new system replaces the ratings - Excellent, Effective, Continuous Improvement, Academic Watch and Academic Emergency - with simple letter grades A through F.

Akron would have received a D instead of Continuous Improvement last year, based on the new system.

Several districts rated Excellent last year would get B's under the new system, including Copley-Fairlawn, Cuyahoga Falls, Coventry, Norton and Stow-Munroe Falls.

Green, Nordonia Hills, Twinsburg and Revere, which all received the highest mark of Excellent with Distinction last year, would be knocked back to B's, too, under the new system.

Those are the results of a simulation of the new grading system that the state included in paperwork sent to the federal government last month seeking to exempt Ohio from the requirements of the No Child Left Behind education law. The waiver means Ohio won't have to meet 100 percent proficiency targets in reading and math by 2014.

However, the state is promising what it calls a tougher and more honest rating system in exchange for the waiver.

The state legislature will have to approve the system, which uses the same achievement tests but requires better performance to earn higher marks. The tests themselves change when the state fully implements new "common core" standards in 2014.

"In most cases, this is a far more rigorous system than the one currently used, and in general, grades will be ‘lower' by one or even two levels from the counterpart ratings that we have been using in our current accountability system," state Superintendent Stan Heffner wrote in a letter to school districts explaining how the new system would look if it were applied to last year's report cards.

Heffner has argued the current system overstates how well schools prepare students for college, which can be measured by the percentage of first-year college students who need remedial work in math and English.

At main university campuses in Ohio, 25 percent of students under the age of 20 need help in math or English, according to the most recent statistics from the Ohio Board of Regents. The figure is 57 percent at Kent State University's main campus and 31 percent at the University of Akron.

At the state's community colleges, 61 percent of students under age 20 need remedial classes in math or English.

Revere Superintendent Randy Boroff said that doesn't apply to Revere graduates.

"We don't see that issue coming from most of the high-performing districts across the state; it's not just Revere," he said.

Bexley and Upper Arlington in Franklin County also are historically high-performing districts that each received the highest rating last year, but like Revere, would have gotten a B under the revised system.

Boroff said the new rating doesn't square with other measures of excellence, such as a rigorous curriculum fortified with Advanced Placement courses.

"We just got an award as a national Advanced Placement Honor Roll district because of the number of students who take the exam and [their] success on the exam," he said. "So here we are, we're named on the national honor roll, but in the state, we're going to be a B."

As best as Boroff can figure, Revere would miss an A because its index score, which measures student performance at all levels on the achievement tests, was 106.9 out of 120. The new system makes 108 the minimum for an A. Hudson's index score was 109.2 last year.

Boroff isn't worried that a grade change will tarnish the district's reputation. Universities already know Revere's track record for producing college-ready students.

"We're going to continue to do a good job, Hudson is going to continue," Boroff said. "Bay Village and Bexley and Upper Arlington, they're all going to do a good job."

On the other end of the grading scale, only two charter schools in Summit County, Edge Academy and Akros Middle School, would have C grades under the new system. The rest would be D's and F's.

Akron-based White Hat Management's 17 charter high schools (Life Skills Centers) in Ohio would have F's, except for two in Franklin County that would receive D's.

Not all the movement is downward, however.

The one charter school in Summit County slated for closing because of poor academic performance at the end of this school year, Lighthouse Academy, would have increased from an F to a D under the new system.

Romig Road Community School, which is one bad report card away from closing, also would have improved from an F to a D under the new system.

To avoid closing, Romig Road will have to demonstrate a year's expected progress in a year's time on its next report card, a measure known as "value added," which the school met last year.

The new system doesn't change the "value added" measure and wouldn't affect Romig Road's situation, Education Department spokesman Patrick Gallaway said.

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News Headline: Tougher state ratings for schools make 'A' hard to get | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson would be the only school district in Summit County earning an "A" if the state's new rating system had been in place last year.

Stark County's only A school would be Jackson.

Aurora would have the only A in Portage County, and Wadsworth would get the only top grade in Medina County.

Wayne County would have no A schools at all.

Only 17 Ohio districts out of 609 that received report cards last year would be given the top grade under the new system, which begins with this school year.

Last year, 352 districts received the two highest ratings -- Excellent and Excellent with Distinction -- the equivalent of an A and A+.

The new system replaces the ratings -- Excellent, Effective, Continuous Improvement, Academic Watch and Academic Emergency -- with simple letter grades A through F.

Akron would have received a D instead of Continuous Improvement last year, based on the new system.

Several districts rated Excellent last year would get B's under the new system, including Copley-Fairlawn, Cuyahoga Falls, Coventry, Norton and Stow-Munroe Falls.

Green, Nordonia Hills, Twinsburg and Revere, which all received the highest mark of Excellent with Distinction last year, would be knocked back to B's, too, under the new system.

Those are the results of a simulation of the new grading system that the state included in paperwork sent to the federal government last month seeking to exempt Ohio from the requirements of the No Child Left Behind education law. The waiver means Ohio won't have to meet 100 percent proficiency targets in reading and math by 2014.

However, the state is promising what it calls a tougher and more honest rating system in exchange for the waiver.

The state legislature will have to approve the system, which uses the same achievement tests but requires better performance to earn higher marks. The tests themselves change when the state fully implements new "common core" standards in 2014.

"In most cases, this is a far more rigorous system than the one currently used, and in general, grades will be 'lower' by one or even two levels from the counterpart ratings that we have been using in our current accountability system," state Superintendent Stan aEURHeffner wrote in a letter to school districts explaining how the new system would look if it were applied to last year's report cards.

Heffner has argued the current system overstates how well schools prepare students for college, which can be measured by the percentage of first-year college students who need remedial work in math and English.

At main university campuses in Ohio, 25 percent of students under the age of 20 need help in math or English, according to the most recent statistics from the Ohio Board of Regents. The figure is 57 percent at Kent State University's main campus and 31 percent at the University of Akron.

At the state's community colleges, 61 percent of students under age 20 need remedial classes in math or English.

Revere Superintendent Randy Boroff said that doesn't apply to Revere graduates.

"We don't see that issue coming from most of the high-performing districts across the state; it's not just Revere," he said.

Bexley and Upper Arlington in Franklin County also are historically high-performing districts that each received the highest rating last year, but like Revere, would have gotten a B under the revised system.

Boroff said the new rating doesn't square with other measures of excellence, such as a rigorous curriculum fortified with Advanced Placement courses.

"We just got an award as a national Advanced Placement Honor Roll district because of the number of students who take the exam and [their] success on the exam," he said. "So here we are, we're named on the national honor roll, but in the state, we're going to be a B."

As best as Boroff can figure, Revere would miss an A because its index score, which measures student performance at all levels on the achievement tests, was 106.9 out of 120. The new system makes 108 the minimum for an A. Hudson's index score was 109.2 last year.

Boroff isn't worried that a grade change will tarnish the district's reputation. Universities already know Revere's track record for producingaEURcollege-ready students.

"We're going to continue to do a good job, Hudson is going to continue," Boroff said. "Bay Village and Bexley and Upper Arlington, they're all going to do a good job."

On the other end of the grading scale, only two charter schools in Summit County, Edge Academy and Akros Middle School, would have C grades under the new system. The rest would be D's and F's.

Akron-based White Hat Management's 17 charter high schools (Life Skills Centers) in Ohio would have F's, except for two in Franklin County that would receive D's.

Not all the movement is downward, however.

The one charter school in Summit County slated for closing because of poor academic performance at the end of this school year, Lighthouse Academy, would have increased from an F to a D under the new system.

Romig Road Community School, which is one bad report card away from closing, also would have improved from an F to a D under the new system.

To avoid closing, Romig Road will have to demonstrate a year's expected progress in a year's time on its next report card, a measure known as "value added," which the school met last year.

The new system doesn't change the "value added" measure and wouldn't affect Romig Road's situation, Education Department spokesman Patrick Gallaway said.

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News Headline: Seeking Kin: An Ohio man born in the Shoah's shadow searches for answers about his past (Factor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The “Seeking Kin” column aims to help reunite long-lost friends and relatives.

BALTIMORE (JTA) -- Sol Factor recalls a happy childhood in circa-1950s Boston suburbia with his physician-father Joseph, teacher-mother Bernice and younger sister Rachel.

His first life, as Meier Pollak, who was born in 1946 near a displaced persons' camp in Germany, remains in the ether, evasive, ever tantalizing.

Factor, who teaches Jewish history at Kent State University, near Cleveland, began poking at the holes 20 years ago in his biography. In 2007, he came close to locating the natural mother who abandoned him in Germany. Factor tracked her to Israel, but Magen David Adom, Israel's equivalent of the Red Cross, notified him that she had rebuffed its intermediary efforts. Factor expresses no sadness or anger toward the woman whose postwar name he has never known.

Now, he hopes to discover any half-brothers and half-sisters who might shed light on his roots, tell him about his natural mother and even provide helpful medical information. While his early years and search are “not something I dwell on,” Factor said, assembling these pieces of his life would be valuable “so that I can share it with my children nd say], ‘This is your background.'” An Israeli adviser to Kent State's Hillel organization last month broadcast Factor's search on the radio program “Hamador L'chipus Krovim” (Searching for Relatives Bureau).

As to whether he has made any follow-up attempts to locate his natural mother, Factor quickly responds, “No, no, no.” But, he continued, “If by some miracle there are other children and we connect, and if she's still alive and they say to her, ‘You really should meet this guy,' I'm not going to fight it.”

Only in 2001 did Factor begin digging seriously into the matter, with luck helping mightily. A German exchange student in the Cleveland high school where Factor taught for 36 years was intrigued by Factor's roots and urged his mother back in Munich to lend a hand. The woman searched local archives and uncovered the identity of Factor's mother: Roza Pollak, who was born in 1924 in Orosken, Romania, survived Auschwitz and later lived in a displaced person's camp in St. Ottilien, a village near Munich. Roza delivered Meier at the University of Munich's Frauen Clinic on June 25, 1946, and was last heard from three weeks later.

Meier was taken to the Schwabing-Altersheim displaced persons' hospital in Munich. On November 21, 1947, he was flown to New York by the U.S. Committee for the Care of European Children, which gave him over to the Jewish Family and Children's Bureau of Boston. A photograph was taken that day in the Munich airport lounge. It is the only image Factor has of his life as Meier Pollak, including the two years he lived in American foster homes before the Factors adopted him at age 4.

Factor also does not know his father's identity. On one document, Roza listed the boy's father as Schaier Pollak, but Factor thinks that Roza invented the name, if not the man's entire being, because he has found no record of Schaier Pollak's existence. A document in the files of the European Jewish Children's Aid, Inc., states that Canada rejected the infant for immigration “because he was born out of wedlock”; the next sentence adds that “Meier is a very desirable child, irrespective of his unknown background.”

William Connelly, a technical information specialist at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum's Survivors and Victims Resource Center, said that the circumstances of Factor's birth and his search are not rare.

Five years ago, a woman contacted Connelly, presenting a similar background and requesting his assistance in locating her birth mother. Connelly asked an Israeli official to look into the matter. He tracked down the woman's mother, “but she didn't want to have contact,” Connelly recalled.

“The end of the war was a difficult time. Just because Germany surrendered, it doesn't mean there was a cessation of outrages against human decency,” Connelly explained. “There were rapes in many of the [displaced persons'] camps. People made their way through what can only be described as a chaotic wasteland. [Factor's] mother could have been too ill or too shattered by her experiences. There could be any number of reasons why a woman would give up her child at the end of the war.”

Factor appears at peace with the knowledge he has gained, even if it opens no further doors. But as the last interview for this article concluded, he mentioned having just been told of someone near Boston whose Romania-born mother's data closely resembles Factor's mother's.

“It probably would not pan out, but you never know. He could be a half-sibling,” Factor said of a planned telephone conversation with the Boston man. “What's ironic is that where he is living is next door to where I grew up. It would be very weird.”

Please email the writer at if you can help Sol Factor locate his relatives or if you would like the help of “Seeking Kin” searching for long-lost relatives and friends. Include the principal facts and your contact information in a brief (one-paragraph) email.

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News Headline: Author Sherman Alexie coming to KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the Guest of Honor University
Artist/Lecture Series at Kent
State University, prize-winning author
Sherman Alexie will appear at a
lecture, book signing and reception
at 6 p.m. March 28 in the Kiva at the
Kent Student Center. The event is
free and open to the public.
Alexie's latest books include
“Flight”; “The Absolutely True Diary
of a Part-Time Indian,” which won
the 2007 National Book Award in
Young People's Literature; and his
2009 collection of short stories, “War
Dances,” which was the winner of
the PEN Faulkner Award.
For more information or to make
special accommodations for disabilities,
call 330-672-2312.

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News Headline: IA Summit 09 - Day 2 - Boxes And Arrows : The Design Behind the Design (Fast) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Boxes and Arrows
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Links to the presentations and slidecasts will be updated continuously. See the Slideshare IA Summit 2009 page for up-to-the-minute lists of available presentations.

Thanks to the speakers for their hard work and for sharing their knowledge with the community.

Is Interaction Necessary? _ Karl Fast

Do we have the conceptual tools necessary for designing with next-generation technologies? Multi-touch surfaces are going mainstream. New technologies for interacting with information are moving from the lab to our homes.

Karl Fast , professor in the Information Architecture Knowledge Management program at Kent State University, argues that our conceptual tools for interaction design are more limited, and limiting, than we currently believe. The concept of "interaction" as currently understood is based on a host of assumptions, many of which run so deep that we no longer see them as assumptions.

Is interaction necessary? Of course it is. But for what?

Download

Personas and politics: The Discursive Construction of The "User" in IA _ Adrienne Massanari

Adrienne Massanari , Instructor of New/Digital Media in the School of Communication at Loyola University _ Chicago, assesses the problematic relationship between new media designers and "users" in texts written about user-centered design.

Adrienne examines current texts written about user-centered design, information architecture, and interaction design to understand the ways in which users are discursively "written into" the design process. She suggests that personas and their use is as much motivated by political realities within new media organizations as it is by the need to incorporate user needs within the design process.

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Discovering Mining The Everyday _ Richard Ziade Tim Meaney

In our world today, machines are an indelible part of our everyday lives. We rely on powerful devices to help us find information, organize our lives and make decisions. What if all these machines that help us in our everyday lives actually "listened" to our actions? One of the most challenging aspects of the Semantic Web is introducing its concept and benefits to the everyday population. But do we really have to?

In this talk, Arc90 partners Richard Ziade and Timothy Meaney contrast the way we make discoveries today – by testing theories within controlled environments – to a world where correlations can be discovered by simply peering into and querying data gathered out of our everyday actions.

Download

Integrating Effective Prototyping into Your Design Process _ Fred Beecher

Senior User Experience Consultant Fred Beecher shows his audience how to determine what, for your particular situation, is the most effective way to use prototyping to improve the user experience of your site or software.

He shares the factors that influence how effective various prototyping methodologies will be and how to choose wisely; what level of effort you will need to invest in prototyping in order to get useful feedback; and how to permanently integrate prototyping into your software development process in a way that is effective for your organization.

Download

UX Design Deliverable Systems _ Nathan Curtis

One thing is brutally clear: no teams _ in fact, no two individuals _ seem to produce deliverables like wireframes the same way. And that's a shame. Too many designers seem guided by the flawed notion that not just design but documentation too must be ever unique. This leaves readers flustered, confused, and often dismissive. Even worse, not adopting a uniform approach may diminish a team's influence and credibility, and, possibly, our discipline's role in the industry.

This session, lead by Nathan Curtis of EightShapes, shares practical techniques that his organization has learned from, taught, and embedded in teams. Just as important, attendees learn to avoid failures Nathan and his team have experienced along the way.

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User Interface Issues with Metasearch _ Dana Douglas

The user interfaces for search are evolving as new features and capabilities are developed.

One emerging capability that raises new design questions is that of federated search or "metasearch," a search engine that applies the user's keyword search terms across data bases or collections of content. Many government agencies, professional organizations, and private sector entities maintain multiple collections of related publications or bibliographic content.

Dana Douglas , User Experience Specialist at UserWorks, focuses on the current issues in metasearch interfaces and findings from usability tests, as well as related findings from past testing of other search interfaces.

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Usable, INFLUENTIAL Content: We Can Have It All _ Colleen Jones

You wrote some web content. You followed the usability guidelines; it's findable, scannable, relevant, and readable. But it's dry. It's cold. It doesn't win your users over. They're not buying, not converting, or not taking the action you'd like them to take. Turns out that what's missing is a big something—influence. Usability qualifies us to be on the playing field. What gives us the winning edge is influence

Collen Jones from threebrick presents a practical guide to influencing through content. Her approach is neither marketing fluff nor manipulation. but critical to a company and its users achieving their respective goals. Colleen offers useful techniques and examples drawn from a decade of experience to help you turn usable content from blah to brilliant.

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Turning HiPPOs Into Allies: How to Connect with Powerful People in Your Organization _ Samantha Starmer

Most of us have experienced the power of a HiPPO (Highest Paid Person's Opinion) and how it can instantaneously derail a project, kill funding for user research and information architecture work, or approve some marketing feature that will cause a poor user experience.

Samantha Starmer , senior manager at REI .com, says that to find success in moving the practice of IA forward in both our individual companies and in the larger world of business, we must learn how to manage HiPPOs and turn them into allies. She offers her insights and several ideas about how to effectively connect with others including:

Identifying the HiPPO

Listening more than you speak. Watching more than you present.

How to find the HiPPOs breeding ground (it usually isn't in meetings)

Laying pipe, or the art of the pre-sell

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Selling IA – Heuristic Evaluation for the Pitch Process _ Russ Unger

Russ Unger , Director of Experience Planning for Draftfcb, lectures on the basics of Heuristic Evaluation and how it can be utilized for your company's pitch process.

An engaging facilitator, Russ uses the majority of his time in a hands-on group activity that has participants actively engaging in Heuristic Evaluation to create key slides for a sales pitch. Participants were provided with a document template that allowed them to generate leave-behind materials for potential clients.

This "guerilla-style" approach for Heuristic Evaluation will help IAs engage work partners from other disciplines within the organization and to work with them to rapidly in generating useful content for Sales and Account teams.

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Business-Centered Design _ Christina Wodtke

We are all big fans of user-centered design, and all of us have tried our hand at CSS or database design. But somewhere along the way, the third leg of the tripod got lost: business.

It's critical to know what your business model is. Without this information, you have no idea which actions of the user are valuable and which are not. And without knowing that, you are as likely to spend hours working on an aspect of the website that delivers no value as one that does. This is not usually a fatal mistake in a large corporation, but in a start-up it can literally kill the company.

In this talk, Christina Wodtke , founder of Boxes and Arrows and product developer at LinkedIn, walks through the most common business models, the desired user behavior that supports them, and how those business models affect the architecture of the website including features and functionality.

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Time to Spit on the Table: Being Functionally Appropriate Using Culturally Inappropriate Tactics _ Dan Willis

A big man strides into the boardroom. The company's CEO is introduced, but says nothing. After they all sit down, he loudly spits on the middle of the huge table. "You've just seen me do a disgusting thing," he says. "And you'll always remember what I just did." It's from a 1947 movie, "The Hucksters," and it shows the power of being culturally inappropriate in order to be functionally appropriate.

Being inappropriate is a scary and powerful tool that user experience professionals should use more often, taking advantage of humor and non-traditional forms of communication. This session, presented Sapient consultant Dan Willis , explores ways of intentionally and skillfully exceeding historically respected boundaries, including:

Creating culturally inappropriate presentations

Running culturally inappropriate meetings

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News Headline: Regional briefs – March 9 - Holocaust recalled | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Students from the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication will present a Children of the Holocaust exhibit and reception at 2 p.m. Sunday.

The exhibit, which is sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program and Hillel, includes stories of Northeast Ohio Holocaust survivors and their families.

The work of writers and photographers in the journalism school, with the help of design students, has been laid out in magazine format. Photos taken throughout the project over several months also will be included.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be in the lobby of the FirstEnergy Auditorium at Franklin Hall, 550 Hilltop Drive.

Parking is available in the parking lot near East Main and Lincoln streets.

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News Headline: A balance is needed in college aid (Mohan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: President Obama's post-secondary education financial aid plan would help schools like Hiram College, which locks tuition beginning with each student's freshman year, and hurt schools like YSU, which has frequent tuition increases and low retention rates.

While we like Obama's proposal to link financial aid with tuition, we hope he adjusts it to also include fees, room and board.

Obama's higher education plan is similar to Ohio's primary education policy that rewards school districts that achieve and penalizes those that fail. More specifically, Obama wants to supply more federal aid to colleges that keep their tuition under control and reduce it for those that don't.

''We're putting colleges on notice,'' Obama said at a recent speech at the University of Michigan. ''You can't assume that you'll just jack up tuition every single year. If you can't stop tuition from going up, then the funding you get from taxpayers each year will go down.''

Federal aid for Pell Grants, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, Work Study and other programs are given directly to the institutions, including private ones, which then dole them out to the students who qualify. The president wants his administration to redistribute this aid based on a college's performance, including graduation and retention rates.

According to reports, YSU graduates about 35 percent of its students and only about 15 percent of its minority students. The school raised tuition in each of the last two years.

In contrast, Hiram has a policy that locks tuition for four years at the price it was when each student began classes as a freshman. The beauty of this plan is that, unlike most colleges and universities, students and their families know how much they must pay every year.

Obama's plan faces vetting and even opposition. Some in academia expressed concern that the plan could unintentionally hurt needy students. Others fear such a plan would create uniformity among higher education institutions, thus limiting options for students.

But we like Kent State University at Geauga Dean David Mohan's response to the Plain Dealer. ''There needs to be a point where higher education has to be held accountable for its expenditures," Mohan said. ''To constantly ask for money without showing a high level of accountability for the money you already have is not right. The burden on the student has been so great that we must take a careful look at how we conduct ourselves to maximize every dollar we currently receive.

''The answer is not always more money. The answer is enrollment growth through quality programs and good word-of-mouth. You just have to be extremely careful at how many people you bring on to your staff.''

Where Obama's plan might fall short is that it's too similar to plans under past Ohio governors Bob Taft and Ted Strickland. They pushed tuition freezes and tuition caps on Ohio's public universities in exchange for more state funding. But the schools offset their tuition freezes and limits on their increases by jacking up fees, room and board and in some cases creating new fees.

Obama should make sure that the federal government does not reward colleges that keep tuition stable while burdening students with other costs.

editorial@tribtoday.com

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News Headline: Women's Night Out is March 28 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The third annual Women's Night Out which combines health and nutrition educational opportunities with shopping, eating, chocolate and tuxedo-clad men is set from 4 to 9 p.m. March 28 at the Salem Community Center.

The event caters to women, but benefits children through funding for the Children's Fitness Center and its programs within SCC.

SCC Executive Director Heather Young said the hope is for the women to have a night for themselves, but to also gain an education that could roll into a lifetime of changes and healthy options for themselves and their families.

Those changes could trickle down to the younger generation, which

is the whole idea behind the Children's Fitness Center.

"That's our goal with this - educating early and creating a habit...for exercising and eating properly," she said.

Women's Night Out is the biggest fundraiser for that area to provide access to the Children's Fitness Center and its programs, including the program for area school children, at no cost to the children.

"We're truly blessed the community is behind a project like this," Young said.

Tickets are $25 per person and available for purchase at SCC, 1098 N. Ellsworth Ave., Salem Giant Eagle, 2401 E. State St., and The Look Nook Gift Shop inside Salem Community Hospital, 1995 E. State St. Ticket sales close March 19.

Participants will have the opportunity to attend two 45-minute breakout sessions by physicians and other local health experts, choosing from a list of seven topics. The sessions will be held from 6 to 6:45 and 7 to 7:45 p.m., with the keynote address at 8 p.m. by Julia Fuhrman Davis of North Lima.

Davis is described as an author, motivational speaker, environmental activist, licensed massage therapist and certified yoga teacher. Her topic will be "The Art of Taking Care of Yourself: It's an Inside Job."

According to her bio, she shares her life lessons by writing books and speaking professionally, encouraging others to "get more in tune with their true feelings, and express those feelings in a clear, direct, kind way."

The breakout sessions will include:

- "You Can Eat Anything" by Linda Ro, a registered and licensed dietitian at the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association, the Ohio Bureau for Children with Medical Handicaps for Columbiana and Mahoning counties and an instructor at Youngstown State University.

- "Top 10 Exercises and Stretches You Shouldn't Live Without" by Laurie Camp, who has been on staff at SCC since 2002 and currently serves as a fitness instructor, personal trainer and wellness assistant, leading both Fit, Fabulous Females and Run Salem.

- "Edible Landscaping Basics" by Maurice Peoples, the Horticulture Facilities Coordinator at Kent State University Salem Campus who assists in classroom and lab instruction and oversees greenhouse, nursery and display plantings.

- "Minimizing Migraines" by Anita Hackstedde, M.D., vice president of medical affairs at Salem Community Hospital and board certified in internal medicine and pediatrics, practicing part-time at the Lisbon Community Health Center.

- "10 Most Common Questions Women Want To Ask Their Doctor" by Michael Sevilla, M.D., Family Practice, board certified by the American Board of Family Practice and practicing at SCH since 2001 as an active staff member.

- "Skin Through the Ages" by Susan Woods, M.D.

- "Who Has Mental Stress" by Jamie Benner, a 2002 graduate of Mount Union College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and several years of experience in the mental health field, working at SCH since July.

"The talks are going to be a little more interactive, which is a little bit different from last year," Young said. "I'm very excited about all of our speakers."

As in previous years, attendees who don't have as much time available can still have access to the shopping, the chocolate fountain and the dinner served by Steve James and The Fifth Seasons throughout the evening. The menu will include wedding soup, broccoli cheese soup, roasted vegetable bruschetta, chicken caeser wrap and pulled pork sliders, along with a selection of finger foods, such as cheese, vegetables and fruits.

The Vendors' Marketplace will include a variety of offerings with over 75 local vendors. There will also be a variety of gift baskets to be raffled off at the end of the evening, with all attendees receiving a gift bag full of fun sample products and information.

Platinum sponsors for the event include Salem Community Hospital, Stadium GM Superstore and Haltec Corporation. Other sponsors include Copeland Oaks/Crandall Medical Center, BOC Water Hydraulics Inc., Essex of Salem, Salem Radiologists Inc., Piranha Aquatic, Sterling House, Bahama Bay Tanning, and BPW Business & Professional Women's Club.

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News Headline: The artistic talent of KSU Stark students will shine at this year's Duct Tape Festival | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Approximately 10 Kent State University at Stark students are letting their creativity and artistic talents shine and are creating this year's Avon Heritage Duct Tape Festival sculptures. This year's theme is safari.
KSU's involvement
Carey McDougall, associate professor of art at Kent State University at Stark, received a call from Patti Sack of ShurTech Brands, LLC asking her if KSU at Stark would like to create this year's sculptures for the festival.
“I asked my students if they would like to do the project as an extracurricular activity. They jumped on the opportunity like they have never jumped on an opportunity before. They have always wanted to do a duct tape project. It's a medium that students like to work with, and they were very excited!” said Carey.
“Duct tape is a new medium that we haven't really explored,” said Jasmine Berry, a senior fine arts student at Kent State University at Stark. “Just the fact that it's a sculpture is exciting. We really haven't had a lot of opportunity to do a sculpture of this caliber.”
Five teams are participating, and they are creating a giraffe, elephant, lion, alligator, and a lizard.
The criteria for the sculptures
According to Carey, the sculptures have to be about five-feet tall, family friendly, really sturdy, and able to survive outdoors.
ShurTech gave the school unlimited supplies from its factory, as well as $600 to purchase supplementary supplies for the project.
Jasmine's sculpture
Jasmine and her teammate Cody Metz decided to create a five-foot mother and baby giraffe for their sculpture. They selected the giraffe because they felt it was more intricate and interesting.
“We started by researching giraffes and looking at pictures of their physical attributes online. We used tape measures and math to ensure that we had the right dimensions for the animals,” Jasmine said. “We then created an actual drawing of the sculpture before we started creating it. We did all of the work from initial construction to applying the layers of tape. Studio technician Jeff Leadbetter helped with the initial construction.”
The giraffes have a two-by-four frame that is screwed together for stability. The two-by-fours are covered with chicken wire, as well as four layers of gray duct tape that is layered in different directions to ensure that the sculpture is weather- and waterproof.
“They really have a lot of detail in their design like the cloven hoofs, the horns, the ears, the knobby knees, and more. It's remarkable the detail that they have created. It's a very realistic, proportionally-correct mother and baby giraffe,” indicated Carey.
Although the giraffes are still being created, Jasmine and her teammate will add blue, brown, beige, and patterned duct tape over the base gray tape to create authentic-looking giraffes.
“When it is complete, there will be landscape and a watering hole in the final sculpture. The smaller giraffe in the design is actually bowing down for a drink of water,” Jasmine indicated.
Jasmine is really enjoying this opportunity to sculpt with duct tape. “It's definitely challenging!”
She was actually a computer science major before she realized that art was her true passion. “Just being able to express myself is a big thing for me, and you can do that through art. I really like the science and math part of art. It adds to the complexity and overall aesthetics of the sculpture and makes it that much more pleasing,” she said.
The competition
This year, participating students will have the opportunity to win $2,500 in scholarship money. A first, second and third place winner will be selected, and the money will be divided between the winners.
In the past, ShurTech has actually hired some of the participating students to create sculptures for duct tape festivals around the country.
“This could become a real career opportunity for students like Jasmine,” said Carey.
This year's Avon Heritage Duct Tape Festival takes place June 15 to 17 at Veteran's Memorial Park in Avon. The sculptures will be displayed outdoors during the event.

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News Headline: YOUR DAILY CALENDAR | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: • Olde Stark Antiques Faire; antiques and collectibles show; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Stark County Fairgrounds, 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton; $4.

• Initial Family Nature Club meeting; connect with other families who love nature; 2 p.m.; The Wilderness Center, 9877 Alabama Ave. SW, Sugar Creek; free; 330-359-5235, www.wildernesscenter.org .

Kent State Stark Pops Concert; to benefit music and theater scholarships at Kent State University Stark Campus; 3 to 5 p.m.; Fine Arts Theatre, Kent State University at Stark, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; $10; KSU students with current I.D., free; 330-244-3348; www.stark.kent.edu .

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News Headline: Stark's January jobless rate declines from 2011 (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stark County's unemployment rate was 8.9 percent in January, a decline from 10.9 percent for January 2011, according to data released Friday by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

A higher number of people working fueled much of the decline, as the number of employed  increased from 164,000 to 167,800. The workforce was stable, increasing slightly from 184,000 to 184,100. The number of people seeking work who were unemployed declined from 20,000 to 16,300.

Stark County's unemployment rate in January 2010 was 13.2 percent.

The January unemployment rate of 8.9 percent was higher than 7.9 percent in December. But seasonal hiring in December often significantly lowers unemployment, and when it ends, the unemployment rate typically rises in January. The figures are not adjusted for seasonal factors.

Kent State University Stark campus economics professor Lucas Engelhardt said, "The decrease in the unemployment rate in Stark County, it matches what we've seen elsewhere in the U.S. So it just shows that Stark County is sharing the improvement that the rest of the country is seeing."

Walsh University economics professor Joseph Ezzie said, "The trend is moving in a positive way. The economy is growing. ... the economy is moving in the right direction."

Ezzie said barring skyrocketing oil prices or an overseas conflict, "that unemployment rate will go down, but it will go down slowly."

However, he cautioned that the rate does not indicate whether people are getting full-time work and the type of work. Ezzie anticipates that many residents who lost jobs during the last several years will not be able to find the same type of work they did before because technology has probably eliminated their job. Some people give up looking for work and disappear from the workforce and aren't counted in the unemployment rate.

In Canton, the unemployment rate dropped to 10.3 percent in January from 12.1 percent in January 2011. In Massillon, the unemployment rate declined from 11.4 percent in January 2011 to 9.3 percent. In January 2010, the unemployment rate for Canton was 14.4 percent, and the rate for Massillon was 13.2 percent.

Statewide, Stark County had the 52nd highest unemployment rate out of 88 Ohio counties.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services will release the February unemployment rate for Ohio on March 23. The February rates for counties and major cities will be released March 27.

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News Headline: Stark's January jobless rate declines from 2011 (Engelhardt) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stark County's unemployment rate was 8.9 percent in January, a decline from 10.9 percent for January 2011, according to data released Friday by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

A higher number of people working fueled much of the decline, as the number of employed  increased from 164,000 to 167,800. The workforce was stable, increasing slightly from 184,000 to 184,100. The number of people seeking work who were unemployed declined from 20,000 to 16,300.

Stark County's unemployment rate in January 2010 was 13.2 percent.

The January unemployment rate of 8.9 percent was higher than 7.9 percent in December. But seasonal hiring in December often significantly lowers unemployment, and when it ends, the unemployment rate typically rises in January. The figures are not adjusted for seasonal factors.

Kent State University Stark campus economics professor Lucas Engelhardt said, "The decrease in the unemployment rate in Stark County, it matches what we've seen elsewhere in the U.S. So it just shows that Stark County is sharing the improvement that the rest of the country is seeing."

Walsh University economics professor Joseph Ezzie said, "The trend is moving in a positive way. The economy is growing. ... the economy is moving in the right direction."

Ezzie said barring skyrocketing oil prices or an overseas conflict, "that unemployment rate will go down, but it will go down slowly."

However, he cautioned that the rate does not indicate whether people are getting full-time work and the type of work. Ezzie anticipates that many residents who lost jobs during the last several years will not be able to find the same type of work they did before because technology has probably eliminated their job. Some people give up looking for work and disappear from the workforce and aren't counted in the unemployment rate.

In Canton, the unemployment rate dropped to 10.3 percent in January from 12.1 percent in January 2011. In Massillon, the unemployment rate declined from 11.4 percent in January 2011 to 9.3 percent. In January 2010, the unemployment rate for Canton was 14.4 percent, and the rate for Massillon was 13.2 percent.

Statewide, Stark County had the 52nd highest unemployment rate out of 88 Ohio counties.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services will release the February unemployment rate for Ohio on March 23. The February rates for counties and major cities will be released March 27.

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News Headline: Dave Barry returning to speak at KSU Tusc in Phila (Patacca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Dave Barry
News OCR Text: Humor columnist and best-selling author Dave Barry will be the featured speaker at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on April 10.

The presentation begins at 7 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center, with lobby doors opening at 6:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Voices of Distinction Series, Barry will speak on “The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry.”

The event is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and will be available beginning April 3 at the Performing Arts Center Box Office, which is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are limited to four per person and must be picked up in person. They will not be available online.

“This is Dave Barry's second Voices of Distinction appearance at Kent State Tuscarawas,” said Pam Patacca, public relations coordinator. “He spoke in April 2005 to a full house. His presentation was so funny and entertaining, we knew we had to bring him back to campus to speak again.”

For 25 years, Barry was a syndicated columnist whose work appeared in more than 500 newspapers in the United States and abroad. He was a columnist for the Miami Herald from 1983 to 2005. In 1988, he won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

Barry also has written more than 30 books. The two most recently released are “Lunatics,” co-written with Alan Zweibel, and a children's book, “The Bridge to Never Land,” co-written with Ridley Pearson. Among his best-selling books are “Dave Barry Talks Back,” “Dave Barry is from Mars and Venus” and “Dave Barry Hits Below the Beltway.” Two of his books, “Dave Barry Turns 40” and “Dave Barry's Greatest Hits” were used as the basis for the CBS television sitcom “Dave's World.” He also plays lead guitar in a literary rock band, the Rock Bottom Remainders, wth Stephen King, Amy Tan, Ridley Pearson and Mitch Albom.

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News Headline: WKSU News: Former political boss Dimora loses his biggest gamble (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jimmy Dimora and his wife head into federal court in Akron this afternoon to learn his fate. The jury convicted him on dozens of racketeering and corruption charges.

The long public career of Jimmy Dimora is apparently over. A jury in U.S. District court in Akron convicted the former Cuyahoga County Commissioner of 33 of 34 counts related to corruption in office. Co-defendant Michael Gabor was found guilty of seven of the eight counts he was charged with. WKSU's Mark Urycki has details.

In a quiet courtroom you could hear the sound of handcuffs and shackles being locked onto the wrists of Jimmy Dimora and Michael Gabor as U.S. marshals took them into custody.

Federal Judge Sara Lioi had recessed for about 20 minutes to consider arguments over their bonds and to consider alternatives such as house arrest in the months before they're sentenced.

In the end she decided that _ "given the nature of their crimes and the underlying behavior with deception and disregard for the law, we cannot decide they would NOT be a flight risk."

Cleveland State University Provost Geoffery Mearns is a former federal prosecutor. He wasn't surprised by the verdict.

"For any of us who were following the case, this was the inevitable result given the magnitude of the evidence," Mearns says. "There was the possibility that the jury would do something unpredictable, but they didn't."

No more swagger, no more "Jimmy being Jimmy"

Still Mearns noted that it was quite a contrast from the Jimmy Dimora who prosecutors called "King of the County" ... to the man led out of the courtroom today.

"When the investigation began, we saw a lot of swagger, bravado, speaking very defiantly and passionately," Mearns recalls. "And then it ends with this exclamation point, with him not taking the stand at trial, not even speaking to the media during court recesses. And today, being led from the courtroom in handcuff and shackles."

Dimora was not only a county commissioner, and the popular former mayor of Bedford Heights, he had been chairman of the county Democratic party. His political career spanned 31 years.

A sense of relief on Cleveland streets

But people we talked to on the streets of Cleveland were glad to see his trial end in a conviction.

Here's a compilation of the thoughts of Cuyahoga County residents:

I'm pretty happy. ... I think probably the people who are responsible for putting him there put a lot of time, thought and effort into this, and hopefully the judge who sentences him will do the same thing."

"I'm just glad that it's come to that point and maybe we can move forward and ... have more trust in our Cuyahoga County. I think we've lost a lot of that in general and hopefully that will be resolved with this and (we'll) move forward."

"It's sad for the county and obviously sad for Mr. Dimora and people who supported him for years. ... But it seems like they had pretty good ... evidence and I'm surprised it took so long for the jury."

"I figured everything was going to come back guilty. The whole county political structure ... in those ‘70s,'80s, ‘90s years, everyone knew there was something definitely going on. And I'm pretty happy... I feel bad for his family, of course, ... but we need to get this town cleaned up."

"It seemed fairly obvious from the beginning that they had enough evidence. ... I was sorry that it had to go all the way through the process. I was hoping at some point he would sit there and come to reality and say, ‘OK, I've been caught. Let me just end this.'

Defense may have fumbled, or not had much to work with

Dimora's defense attorneys tried unsuccessfully to introduce evidence that Dimora had declared his bribes as gifts and that doing favors or putting in a good word for constituents is routine for public officials. But Christopher Banks, a political science professor at Kent State University, thought defense delays tied to that evidence may ultimately have hurt its case.

"They obviously weren't ready (with)... their case when the prosecution rested. ... And jury experts across the country question, that with all the stops and starts," Banks says. "... It became very problematic for the jury to pay attention and to have any sympathy for the defendant. When you start hating the defense counsel, you're certainly going to have more hatred toward the defendant himself."

Former federal prosecutor Mearns agreed, saying _ in contrast _ the government was methodical, efficient and effective.

But he noted that the case is not over. The jury is back on Tuesday morning to discuss forfeiture of Dimora and Gabor's assets.

Next step, forfeiture

"It's not quite restitution. At sentencing, I anticipate the judge will require him to pay restitution, that is to give back his ill-gotten gains," Mearns explains. But "forfeiture would lead to an order, assuming the jury finds in the prosecution's favor, that he has to forfeit property that he either obtained directly or property that he obtained indirectly with the ill-gotten goods. And I don't know whether that's his house or whatever."

It may be three or four more months before Dimora is sentenced. And he's facing decades in prison.

What price loyalty?

Dimora's one time friend, former Auditor Frank Russo, pleaded guilty and got a sentence of more than 20 years. That may be reduced because he testified for the prosecution.

And though Dimora took bribes amounting to a small fraction of what Russo took, Mearns thinks he could also get 20 years, or more.

Dimora gambled with a not-guilty plea and lost.

"Perhaps from his perspective, he thought this was the only way out because 20 years on a guilty plea, that is not much of a benefit to begin with. ... So it appears he rolled the dice and lost," Means says. "What's interesting is ... Gabor. Gabor I would anticipate was given the opportunity to plead guilty and cooperate, (and) he turned that down.

"He's paying and will continue to pay and extraordinary price for his continuing loyalty to Dimora."

Mearns and others expect Dimora to appeal the verdict to Judge Sara Lioi and to a higher court if she rejects it.

They'll all be back in court Monday morning for procedural matters.

Long-haul trials demand concentration, commitment from jurors

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News Headline: Hickey Karate Center (Hickey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Legal News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Patrick Hickey, karate master teacher, left, pictured with a class from the Hickey Karate Center––all black belts. (Photo courtesy of the Hickey Karate Center).

If you have ever seen the film The Karate Kid, or any other film which features a karate tournament, you can thank a few local folks for the format that many major tournaments take.

It may surprise people who are outside of the world of American karate how important the northeast Ohio area was to the development of that sport in this country. But one local karate master teacher, Patrick Hickey of Stow, was one of the central figures in the popularization of karate in North America.

Pat Hickey and his wife Pamela run the Hickey Karate Center (www.hickeykaratecenter.com) at 4540 Stow Rd., a 7,200 square foot facility that they built in 1996.

That center was in many ways a culmination of a life's work in karate for the Hickeys.

Patrick "Pat" Hickey, now 61, came to the Akron area in the early 1970s after receiving his undergraduate degree from Thiel College in Pennsylvania. While studying for his master's degree in economics at The University of Akron, he took a karate class, he said, "for the exercise."

That exercise regimen quickly became the centerpiece of Hickey's life, combined with the fact that he had met and married Pamela, who shared the same interests. The Hickeys worked out with local karate legend George Anderson, whom Hickey called, "a central figure in American karate." They worked out at Anderson's Akron Karate Center.

American karate in the 1970s was not particularly organized on a national level. With his business sense and economics degree, in conjunction with his karate training, the Hickeys, Anderson and a few of their compatriots set out to change that.

In the early 1970s they began training local police forces in karate. In 1975, they began an affiliation with the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) to conduct karate tournaments, the first such tournaments held in the U.S.

"I developed the format for the tournaments that the main organizations still use today," said Pat Hickey.

Hickey's journey also encompassed a number of karate styles and changes.

Although karate originally developed in Japan, many of the styles that Americans train in originated in Korea in the 1920s. Hickey used the term Songmookwan to differentiate this form of karate he learned from the Japanese Shotokan. Although the two forms are similar, the emphasis in the two can be considerably different. As Hickey explained, "when you look at someone who holds a position, the two look the same. But how you get from one position to another is very different The Korean version is very flowing, as opposed to the Japanese version, which is very rigid." Korean karate became known as Tae Kwon Do, and in 1972 Hickey and friends started their first national organization, Central Tae Kwan Do. That organization still exists.

The AAU karate group became known as the USA Karate Federation in 1986-the first national governing body and Olympic member in the sport. It ran tournaments at the James A. Rhodes Arena on the campus of The University of Akron that would attract more than 3,000 participants from almost every state in the union.

Over time, Hickey explored other forms, helped found and run other karate organizations, worked with the U.S. Olympic karate organization, and somehow found time to create a career in commercial insurance, help rear three sons, and continue to teach the sport locally. He also teaches Latin dancing at Kent State and Pamela teaches yoga at the karate studio as well as yoga, karate and self-defense at Kent State.

Hickey's karate studio does not fit into what most people probably think about when they consider what a karate studio does.

For one, said Hickey, most karate centers do not emphasize competitions. "Less than 10 percent of most members of karate clubs do enter competitions," he said. For the most part, participants are looking for exercise and a community experience. Very few of them actually want to compete-although, of course, the studio does offer that training. But, he said, "Most people don't want to go through that structure."

Hickey Karate Canter spends a lot of time teaching younger folks karate skills and places a special emphasis on therapeutic programs for children who have problems with ADD/ ADHD.

The center runs programs for 3-and-a-half to 5-year-olds, for 5 to - year olds, youth and adult classes, judo and jujitsu, yoga and a new program, martial fighting, that is more fitness-oriented-martial arts training without the colored belts.

But the primary reason to go to the Hickey Karate Center is Pat Hickey himself-one of the founders of American karate.

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News Headline: Patching holes in housing laws | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About four years ago, I rented a ramshackle
house on University Drive in Kent along with four
of my good friends and fellow undergraduates at
Kent State University.
Battered and bruised it was, with an outdated
breaker box that seemed to cut the power to
rooms randomly, a furnace that seemed to quit
only on the coldest nights, plumbing lines that
loved to back up, black mold that never disappeared
and exposed wiring weaving around gas
and water lines in the basement's open ceiling.
The inspectors would make their rounds a few
times a year, pointing out the laundry list of flaws
that should probably be corrected. Occasionally,
our landlord, after numerous tenant pleas, would
send his hired “help” over to remedy the documented
flaws with quick fixes that had a way of
undoing themselves far too soon. Meanwhile, our
$350 security deposits vanished.
The house on University Drive was my first experience
living off campus, and naive I was to think
our lord of the land would fix the maintenance issues
we inherited without a specific written agreement.
After the lease was up, I felt slightly used,
but promised to never let another landlord get
away with a similar scheme.
Tackling interior housing issues
Unfortunately, as Kent City Council's March
7 meeting revealed, students and low-income
renters through Kent suffer from the same woes
consistently, many worse than the issues I dealt
with.
Carol Crimi, an attorney for KSU's Student Legal
Services, provided detailed accounts of student
housing landlords who refused to fix interior
issues or shifted blame to the tenants when it
was apparent the problems were not from their
own doing.
The city has the teeth and code in place to cite
landlords to fix exterior maintenance problems.
Interior maintenance issues are another story,
however, and as the heads of the city's health
department, building department and community
development department noted to council,
there are too many holes in Kent's code preventing
health and safety inspectors from making
sure rental properties are safely maintained for
tenants.
Protecting college town tenants
Kent City Council is now gunning to adopt the
International Property Maintenance Code to
patch the holes in Kent's own code and correct
poor interior maintenance in the city's neighborhoods.
It's important to note that inspectors can't
simply walk up to a property and decide to poke
around. Tenants have to ask for an inspection.
Tenants have a responsibility to keep a rental
in good condition and assume responsibility for
damage of their doing, but obvious existing issues
shouldn't fall on their backs.
Many communities and college towns have already
adopted this set of guidelines, and it's due
time that Kent did so as well. It's tough enough to
find cheap rent in a college town, let alone overpay
for under-maintained living conditions.

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News Headline: Kent State, PARTA work together to save money | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/11/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dump trucks began transporting tons of dirt between the sites of two downtown Kent redevelopment projects recently in a move that should save Kent, Kent State University and PARTA thousands of dollars.

Lockhart Construction, the contractor in charge of site work at the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway transit center, the KSU Hotel and Conference Center as well as the KSU Esplanade walkway extension, is moving thousands of square yards of dirt from the PARTA site for use at the Esplanade site.

The Kent Central Gateway will contain a parking deck, retail space and a bus depot, and will sit on a site at the corner of Erie and DePeyster streets. The Esplanade walkway extension, a joint project between the city of Kent and KSU, will connect the path that currently ends at Hilltop Drive on campus to the hotel and PARTA sites over a portion of Erie Street the city is vacating.

Bryan Smith, director of planning at PARTA, said the cost-saving idea sprung from a weekly meeting between the downtown redevelopment partners where KSU and city officials related that they needed dirt to raise the Esplanade path to meet Haymaker Parkway.

Smith said PARTA officials decided it would make fiscal sense to transport the dirt it needed to remove from its property to the site of two razed houses on Erie Street for future use in the Esplanade's construction.

PARTA would get a spot to dump dirt it was removing from its site, while the city and university would get free dirt to use, virtually eliminating hauling costs for both projects.

"We got to save almost $40,000 and the city got to save money," Smith said. "It's a win-win."

Smith said the trade was a good example of the strong communication between the downtown redevelopment partners.

"This (trade) doesn't happen unless there's trust," Smith said.

While the contractors move the dirt, motorists driving east on Haymaker Parkway during the day may be stopped for short periods of time by a Kent police officer, allowing the dump trucks to travel from the PARTA site to the Esplanade site.

Bill Lillich, Kent's public safety director, said the officer is not at the site as part of his assigned duties, but has been hired by the contractor to make the move more efficient.

Rhonda Boyd, senior engineer for the city of Kent, said PARTA has informed the city it will be finished moving dirt across Haymaker Parkway by April 10.

"They probably will stop (moving dirt) in about a week and then it will pick back up again," she said.

Smith said contractors are scheduled to finish the retaining wall and underground utility work at the PARTA site by April 10 as well.

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