Report Overview:
Total Clips (11)
Art, School of (1)
Board of Trustees (2)
KSU at Geauga; Partnerships (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Town-Gown (4)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of (1)
Cuban artist speaks today at KSU 03/13/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Board of Trustees (2)
KSU trustees to vote on fall 2012 room rates, tuition on Wednesday 03/13/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Tuition at Kent State on Trustees' Agenda this Week 03/13/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


KSU at Geauga; Partnerships (1)
Area colleges shine through specialties (Hoiles) 03/12/2012 Individual.com Text Attachment Email

...without traveling far, Lakeland President Morris Beverage said. The school has partnered with several four-year universities and colleges, including Kent State, Cleveland State and LEC, to offer degree-earning coursework at the Holden Center at Lakeland tuition for up to one year, depending on...


KSU at Salem (1)
Women's Night Out is March 28 03/12/2012 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association, the Ohio Bureau for Children with Medical Handicaps for Columbiana and Mahoning counties and an instructor at Youngstown State University. - "Top 10 Exercises and Stretches You Shouldn't Live Without" by Laurie Camp, who has been on staff at SCC since 2002...


KSU at Stark (1)
KSU-Stark's annual faculty art show open through March 03/12/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KSU-Stark's annual faculty art show open through March Kent State University at Stark's 39th Annual Faculty Exhibition, showcasing artwork of various media by members of the Kent State Stark faculty,...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Youth Symposium Teaches About STEM 03/12/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...held at Helen Arnold Community Learning Center on Vernon Odom Blvd. Demonstrations were given by representatives from the engineering department of the University of Akron, The Liquid Crystal Institute of Kent State University, and by a member of the faculty of Copley/Fairlawn public schools....


Town-Gown (4)
Kent's downtown makeover seeks to blend present with past (Euclide) 03/13/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State to investigate history of house (Vincent) 03/13/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

State approves $1.42 million for KSU work 03/13/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Petitioners Buy Time for House with Historic Ties to Kent (Vincent) 03/13/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Cuban artist speaks today at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cuban artist Jose Toirac will talk about his work, life in Havana as a practicing artist, and the Cuban art scene at 5 p.m. today in room 202 of the Art Building, 325 Terrace Drive, Kent State University.

He is a versatile and inventive painter, videographer, and creator of installations, many of which remain outside of Cuba, with subtle (or sometimes not so subtle) commentary on national icons and shibboleths. Toirac graduated from the Academia de San Alejandro in 1985 and from the Institute Superior de Arte in Havana in 1990. His work has been exhibited internationally since 1988. In 2001, Gallery 106 presented the artist's first solo show in the United States. His work is represented in many private and public collections throughout the world. Toirac currently lives and works in Havana.

It happens that School of Art director Christine Havice met Toirac in Havana in November, 2000, and a year later Toirac came to the United States to do a two-month residency at the University of Kentucky's Department of Art, in conjunction with a project organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cincinnati. This culminated in an exhibition of new work by Toirac and about eight other Cuban artists working in Ohio and Kentucky in the fall of 2001.

Toirac has been exceptionally astute at creating and exhibiting work outside of Cuba and has had many residencies in the U.S., where his work is widely collected, as well as in Europe and Central America. He and his wife, art historian/curator Meira Marrero, currently work at the Cleveland Institute of Art as part of a Cuban project residency; they will visit KSU to meet students, faculty, and others interested in the arts in Cuba and Cuba in general.

For more information please call the Kent State University School of Art at 330-672-2192.

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News Headline: KSU trustees to vote on fall 2012 room rates, tuition on Wednesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Board of Trustees will approve room and board rates, tuition and fees effective fall 2012, along with other agenda items.

The board also will consider property purchases in the city of Kent and approval of the College of Podiatric Medicine when the board meets Wednesday.

The board will convene at 2 p.m. in the George Urban Board of Trustees Conference room located on the second floor of the Kent Campus Library.

The trustees will hold an executive session at 9 a.m. in the Urban Conference Room, followed by board committee meetings.

Board committees will meet as follows:

Academic Excellence and Student Success Committee -- 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the Urban Conference Room

Audit/Finance and Administration Committee -- 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in Room 222

External Relations and Development Committee -- 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Urban Conference Room.

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News Headline: Tuition at Kent State on Trustees' Agenda this Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If tuition at Kent State University is going to change next year, students should know as early as Wednesday.

Rates for tuition and room and board at the eight-campus system are on the agenda for Wednesday's Kent State Board of Trustees meeting.

Last year, the Ohio legislature approved a biennium budget that put a cap on tuition increases of 3.5 percent, effectively limiting how much the state's 14 public universities can raise tuition for this year and the coming year.

In June, Kent State increased tuition for the 2011-2012 school year by the maximum 3.5 percent, and legally the university could increase rates again by as much for the 2012-2013 school year.

On its website, Kent State's estimated tuition for 2012-2013 academic year is the same as it is now at $9,346 for an Ohio resident plus $8,830 for room and board, which puts the total at $18,176 for an in-state student.

The same state budget that put a cap on tuition increases also cut financial support to Kent State by about $16 million this school year. The university has been bracing for a big hit in state support since 2009, when Kent State administrators started a number of programs to cut costs and save money.

Look for coverage of the trustee meeting Wednesday on Kent Patch.

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News Headline: Area colleges shine through specialties (Hoiles) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Individual.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Area colleges shine through specialties

While colleges work to prepare students for the future in similar ways, each school also offers something unique to attract degree-seeking high school graduates.

Whether it's programs, class size or tuition rates, each campus looks to set itself apart and produce successful, driven professionals.

Lake Erie College in Painesville takes the most pride in its equine studies program, which President Michael T. Victor touts as the first program of its kind in the nation.

Students get hands-on learning with horses, whether they're in pursuit of pre-veterinary training or plan to take their education on to entrepreneurship.

Their exposure ranges from accounting and business classes with faculty from those departments, to direct work with the horses in the equine program, said Dean of Equine Studies Elisabeth Giedt.

"Our program looks at preparing people to have both a background in the science of horses -- you know, how would you feed them, how do you manage this disease process, how do you care for this injury -- but also a business background in terms of sitting down and reading a business plan, looking at the economics; what's a good way to make a living ... how would you advertise a business, how would you market a business," she said.

She explained that Ohio is "big horse country" and the state ranks seventh in the nation for horse population.

Victor also notes the college will have its physician assistant program accredited in 2013.

That program will work to expand the science options on LEC's campus and is expected to host the first class in 2014.

Director Joe Weber said he looks forward to the collaboration between the school and its partners for the program.

Students who enroll will have hands-on experience in a number of specialities within the assistant-physician realm, he said.

"Our students will have rotations in various fields such as the emergency room, operating room, internal medicine, women's health, and then they'll have two electives," Weber said.

Graduates can expect high salaries once they land a job in the field. Weber said those salaries range from $70,000 to $85,000, depending on specialty and location.

"It gives students a career path that is solid," he said. "We're certainly excited to bring this, we're looking for this to be the first of several other health science professions -- more will hopefully follow."

A partnership with University Hospitals will allow students access to critical experience as they learn, and a partnership with Lakeland Community College in Kirtland is something the school hopes to achieve in the future.

"We'd like to work with Lakeland to maybe offer eventually some type of bridge so students with associate degrees can come to LEC to finish a bachelor's and subsequently master's degree," Weber said.

Lakeland, however, does have its own options for completing a bachelor's right on campus.

The Arlene and Arthur Holden University Center opened last fall to allow students to earn their higher degree without traveling far, Lakeland President Morris Beverage said.

The school has partnered with several four-year universities and colleges, including Kent State, Cleveland State and LEC, to offer degree-earning coursework at the Holden Center at Lakeland tuition for up to one year, depending on the program.

Beverage also pointed out that Lakeland has several science-related programs that are successful, and that the transfer program receives high praise from students and the institutions they continue on to.

Beverage said the biotechnology program was the first of its kind in the state, and has been in place for 15 years.

"We have so many really top-notch programs: our allied health programs, our nursing, dental hygiene... all of those are really outstanding programs," he said. "I think Lakeland has a great number of areas of high quality educational opportunities at great value."

Students benefit from lower tuition rates at schools like Lakeland and Kent State University Geauga in Burton Township. Kent State Geauga offers some of the same classes as Kent's main campus, with about 40 percent less out-of-pocket expenses, said Thomas Hoiles, director of enrollment management and student services.

In addition to lower costs, Hoiles said the school's small environment leads to success for students, and that the lack of clubs or activities means more focus on smaller class sizes and seasoned educators.

"We do all that we can do to give them what they need to have the education," he added.

Notre Dame College in South Euclid values its new nursing program as one of the higher offerings of the school.

Beth Kaskel, chairwoman of the division of nursing, said that incorporating faith into education is what makes NDC's program stand out.

"We talk about faith and how faith impacts in terms of nursing, how your faith sustains you and how your faith and belief system impacts you as you deliver hands-on care, because when you touch somebody as a healer, who you are comes out," she said. "It comes out by your actions, by your words, so being mission driven and faith driven in terms of nursing, I believe you deliver a different, a better and a higher quality of care. So that's what makes my students different."

The program is very young, having started in 2009, but looks to offer community experience for its students by putting them out of the classroom for service work, whether that be close to home, or internationally where needed, Kaskel said.

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News Headline: Women's Night Out is March 28 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Women's Night Out is March 28

SALEM - The third annual Women's Night Out which combines health and nutrition educational opportunities with shopping, eating, chocolate and tuxedo-clad men is set from 4 to 9 p.m. March 28 at the Salem Community Center.

The event caters to women, but benefits children through funding for the Children's Fitness Center and its programs within SCC.

SCC Executive Director Heather Young said the hope is for the women to have a night for themselves, but to also gain an education that could roll into a lifetime of changes and healthy options for themselves and their families.

Those changes could trickle down to the younger generation, which

is the whole idea behind the Children's Fitness Center.

"That's our goal with this - educating early and creating a habit...for exercising and eating properly," she said.

Women's Night Out is the biggest fundraiser for that area to provide access to the Children's Fitness Center and its programs, including the program for area school children, at no cost to the children.

"We're truly blessed the community is behind a project like this," Young said.

Tickets are $25 per person and available for purchase at SCC, 1098 N. Ellsworth Ave., Salem Giant Eagle, 2401 E. State St., and The Look Nook Gift Shop inside Salem Community Hospital, 1995 E. State St. Ticket sales close March 19.

Participants will have the opportunity to attend two 45-minute breakout sessions by physicians and other local health experts, choosing from a list of seven topics. The sessions will be held from 6 to 6:45 and 7 to 7:45 p.m., with the keynote address at 8 p.m. by Julia Fuhrman Davis of North Lima.

Davis is described as an author, motivational speaker, environmental activist, licensed massage therapist and certified yoga teacher. Her topic will be "The Art of Taking Care of Yourself: It's an Inside Job."

According to her bio, she shares her life lessons by writing books and speaking professionally, encouraging others to "get more in tune with their true feelings, and express those feelings in a clear, direct, kind way."

The breakout sessions will include:

- "You Can Eat Anything" by Linda Ro, a registered and licensed dietitian at the Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association, the Ohio Bureau for Children with Medical Handicaps for Columbiana and Mahoning counties and an instructor at Youngstown State University.

- "Top 10 Exercises and Stretches You Shouldn't Live Without" by Laurie Camp, who has been on staff at SCC since 2002 and currently serves as a fitness instructor, personal trainer and wellness assistant, leading both Fit, Fabulous Females and Run Salem.

- "Edible Landscaping Basics" by Maurice Peoples, the Horticulture Facilities Coordinator at Kent State University Salem Campus who assists in classroom and lab instruction and oversees greenhouse, nursery and display plantings.

- "Minimizing Migraines" by Anita Hackstedde, M.D., vice president of medical affairs at Salem Community Hospital and board certified in internal medicine and pediatrics, practicing part-time at the Lisbon Community Health Center.

- "10 Most Common Questions Women Want To Ask Their Doctor" by Michael Sevilla, M.D., Family Practice, board certified by the American Board of Family Practice and practicing at SCH since 2001 as an active staff member.

- "Skin Through the Ages" by Susan Woods, M.D.

- "Who Has Mental Stress" by Jamie Benner, a 2002 graduate of Mount Union College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and several years of experience in the mental health field, working at SCH since July.

"The talks are going to be a little more interactive, which is a little bit different from last year," Young said. "I'm very excited about all of our speakers."

As in previous years, attendees who don't have as much time available can still have access to the shopping, the chocolate fountain and the dinner served by Steve James and The Fifth Seasons throughout the evening. The menu will include wedding soup, broccoli cheese soup, roasted vegetable bruschetta, chicken caeser wrap and pulled pork sliders, along with a selection of finger foods, such as cheese, vegetables and fruits.

The Vendors' Marketplace will include a variety of offerings with over 75 local vendors. There will also be a variety of gift baskets to be raffled off at the end of the evening, with all attendees receiving a gift bag full of fun sample products and information.

Platinum sponsors for the event include Salem Community Hospital, Stadium GM Superstore and Haltec Corporation. Other sponsors include Copeland Oaks/Crandall Medical Center, BOC Water Hydraulics Inc., Essex of Salem, Salem Radiologists Inc., Piranha Aquatic, Sterling House, Bahama Bay Tanning, and BPW Business & Professional Women's Club.

SCC can be reached at 330-332-5885 or check the website at www.salemcommunitycenter.com .

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News Headline: KSU-Stark's annual faculty art show open through March | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU-Stark's annual faculty art show open through March

Kent State University at Stark's 39th Annual Faculty Exhibition, showcasing artwork of various media by members of the Kent State Stark faculty, is open to the public 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, and 10 a.m. Saturday, through March 31, in the Kent State Stark Main Hall Art Gallery, located in the lower level of the building at 6000 Frank Avenue NW in Jackson Township. The gallery is free and open for public viewing

The 39th Annual Faculty Exhibition features ceramics, drawings, paintings, prints, photography, video and sculpture by the following faculty members: Jeannene Mathis-Bertossa, Christine Gorbach, Chad Hansen, Kimberly Eggleston-Krauss, Carey McDougall, Jack McWhorter, Erica Raby, Emily Sullivan, Grace Summanen and Tom Wachunas.

Kent State Stark also features an art gallery of rotating exhibits in the Fine Arts Building. For more information about the Kent State Stark art galleries or the art program, call 330-499-9600.

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News Headline: Youth Symposium Teaches About STEM | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Youth Symposium Teaches About STEM

The Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. Akron/Canton Alumnae chapter Sorors and Philos participated in the annual Youth Symposium on March 10, 2012. It was the chapter's first endeavor with the Youth Symposium and it was a great success. The participants were children ages 10 and up, although there were a few younger ones in attendance. Nearly 30 children were registered and participated. There were demonstrations in Engineering, Liquid Crystal Technology, Science and Math.

The symposium was held at Helen Arnold Community Learning Center on Vernon Odom Blvd. Demonstrations were given by representatives from the engineering department of the University of Akron, The Liquid Crystal Institute of Kent State University, and by a member of the faculty of Copley/Fairlawn public schools. Representatives from the Akron-Summit County Public Library and CSA International were on hand with informational displays.

The program began with a welcome from Shantia Priester, president of the Eta Delta Sigma Alumnae Chapter, followed by remarks from Committee Chair Lisa Hilliard and Co-Chair Jerita Williams. A proclamation from the mayor of Akron was read by Soror Priester. There were break-out sessions in which the kids got to experience hands-on instruction about engineering, liquid crystals, and playing math games.

The engineering session given by the University of Akron representatives proved to be very popular. It was a "Survivor" exercise. The kids were told that they were on a deserted island, and their supplies were on a raft that had drifted away from the island. They were given a bag filled with various items and were told that they were to use those items, along with something that they had, to create a device that would recover their raft without getting into the water. One team managed to accomplish this with a shoe, some wire, shoestrings, and hosiery!

Lunch was provided, during which time the kids got to participate in a hula hoop contest, (and learn about force and gravity), and answer science brain teasers. A few of the children had brain teasers of their own! There were prizes and giveaways. No one left empty-handed. The 2012 Youth Symposium was a great success.

For more information on upcoming events, visit www.sgrhoeds.com

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News Headline: Kent's downtown makeover seeks to blend present with past (Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: More than a dozen old buildings have fallen. Others have a date with the wrecking ball. In their place, entire new downtown blocks are rising from the dust.

In a way, the city hopes nobody notices.

Kent doesn't want to lose its historic ambience as it goes through a $100 million makeover.

“I've been to downtowns where it looks like an entire block was just dropped in,” Economic Development Director Dan Smith said.

So project leaders repeatedly have chanted the mantra, “The best of the old with the best of the new,” to show their focus on preserving the past in the face of wholesale change.

Their choice is neither easy nor cheap.

Consider the former Franklin Hotel.

City Council is seeking Certified Local Government status from the Ohio Historic Preservation Office, which would enable developer Ron Burbick to apply for a state tax credit for renovating the 1919 landmark.

The upper floors of the pigeon-infested five-story building have stood empty since 1979, and condemned for nearly as long. Replacing it with a fresh new building would cost a fraction of trying to save the old.

But the city purchased the building last year for $735,000 and undersold it to Burbick for $400,000 without even taking bids — a nod to Burbick's track record for preservation.

After all, Burbick is the philanthropist who self-financed a $6.5 million renovation of the south side of East Main Street during the Great Recession because banks had tightened their purse strings.

This winter he launched a fundraising campaign, hoping to get help with the $4 million it will take to restore the hotel. His own foundation fronted the first $1 million.

“You have to have historic preservation in your heart to want to do these things,” Smith said.

Letting go

The city and Kent State University, a partner in the downtown project, have willingly let go several other old structures.

Gone are the former homes of Kent Hardware, the Bar'n nightclub, the Rock Cafe, Our Father Church, Jacob's Paints, the Record-Courier's Kent office, four rental complexes and a barbershop.

On property KSU purchased for its hotel and an esplanade to connect the campus to the city center, 12 buildings, mostly homes, will disappear.

Residents weren't always silent about what they saw happening.

Some flinched at the demolition of the hardware store, a nondescript building that held cherished memories. Others complained when the Robin Hood Inn on Main Street, an iconic Tudor-style structure built in 1936, was tagged.

“There was a conversation as the buildings came down, but the majority of people recognize what we're trying to do,” City Manager Dave Ruller said.

But twice, respect for history has led to structures being relocated.

KSU saved a home once owned by the university's first female faculty member by moving the two-story frame house to a nearby bare lot. The permanent future of the century-old May Prentice house remains undecided, but it won't be in the path of the esplanade.

The city also saved Jerry's Diner, a 60-year-old eatery that was in the way of the new commercial block.

Smith found a Cleveland-area man willing to adopt the small red structure for a restoration project and haul it away, but first threw a hot dog lunch on the site for anyone who wanted to pay their last respects and share old stories.

“It had history. We thought it deserved a nice send-off,” Ruller said.

But overall, Ruller is confident residents will not miss the buildings that have been lost since most of them made up a tired, even decrepit, corner of the city.

“We are not stretching the term ‘blight,' ” he said.

Holding on

In other cases, officials and developers have gone out of their way to hang onto history.

The city is in final negotiations to purchase the county-owned municipal court. The court will build new digs on the eastern edge of downtown using land being purchased by the city for trade.

City Council already has stipulated the old courthouse will be preserved. The Depression-era Work Projects Administration (WPA) project is a former post office.

“The most likely path would be for us to recoup the cost [of the courthouse land swap] by selling it, but council wants to keep control, so it won't be torn down,” Ruller said.

Smith pointed out other ways in which the city has expressed its appreciation of history.

Because an old Erie Train Depot was saved by the Kent Historic Society in the 1970s and turned into the Pufferbelly restaurant, the city has maintained the original brick street that runs before it. Franklin Street also features period lampposts, and businesses directly across the street — Ray's Place and Dominick's pub — have been renovated in the past couple of years using city guidelines that require they keep up the ambience.

Moving forward

Those guidelines were adopted in 2009, just as the city was about to embark on its downtown project.

Ruller said putting any kind of limitation on potential development was a brave thing to do during a recession.

“It took the courage of the community to adopt those guidelines in the midst of economic stress,” he said.

Burbick was the first to go through the process as he created Acorn Alley, a series of shops and restaurants in an alley running off Main Street.

“He showed people how to do it, and it worked beautifully,” Smith said. “It's more than just architecture, but also how to blend in with [existing streets] in a way that feels natural. The goal is synergy, and Acorn Alley demonstrates that historic feel.”

Burbick is now working on an extension of his successful Acorn Alley.

Fairmount Properties is developing one of the new blocks, bordered by Haymaker Parkway and South Water, Erie and South Depeyster streets. The first floor will feature retail spaces; the second floor will be corporate offices.

Fairmount “has done a great job of matching the historic character of the building with the existing downtown,” Smith said.

One block to the east, the building of the Kent State University hotel is under way.

Tom Euclide, associate vice president of facilities planning and operations at KSU, said architects walked a fine line in designing the hotel.

“We wanted to make sure it was an iconic structure that stood out from the other buildings and drew the eye to it,” he said, “but also reflect the historic look of downtown.”

From the style of brick chosen to detailing around the windows, “we made sure the design team brought that into mind,” Euclide said.

Amid the major projects are numerous little touches, like an alley between Water and Depeyster streets given a fresh surface of pressed concrete made to look like brick, along with period lighting.

“To be honest, some of these projects, people look at you like you have a hole in your head,” Smith said.

But officials are expected to be visionaries, and Kent leaders are confident that when all is said and done, residents will be proud of the outcome.

“It hasn't been an easy process,” Ruller said, “but we've done things to keep the scale balanced and it will make all the difference.”

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News Headline: Kent State to investigate history of house (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Demolition of the Kent house at 250 E. Erie St. may not be imminent — action is currently halted while the city investigates ties to prominent and historical Kent figures.

Kent State University spokeswoman Emily Vincent said if the house does turn out to have a historic value for the city of Kent, “the university would be happy to sell the house for $1 to an interested buyer for relocation.”

“We want to be good neighbors, and we are not going to do anything to the house until we further investigate it,” she said.

The house is slated for demolition to make way for the KSU Esplanade extension, a pedestrian walkway that will connect KSU to downtown Kent through the neighborhood between South Lincoln and Kent's business district.

The Record-Courier published an article on March 6 stating the house likely dates to the 1850s and strongly resembles a home with ties to the family of Zenas Kent and Dr. Aaron Sherman, two prominent figures in Kent's history. It is believed that the house was moved from its location at South Water and East Erie streets to a newer section of Erie Street.

In a letter to the city, a historical and architectural consulting firm said the likely historic tie with the city has merit. But, the letter continues stating that house is ineligible to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places because it has lost integrity through its relocation, design modifications, lack of original materials and more.

The consulting firm, Kramb Consulting, conducted cultural and historical investigations in the neighborhood more than a year ago during initial phases of the Esplanade extension project. The letter to the city came after historical information and the Record-Courier article were forwarded to the firm.

Vincent said the university is working with the city as the home's significance is probed.

“The city is taking the lead on this, and we are sensitive to and appreciate the interest in this house should it have any historical significance to the city,” she said.

Vincent said investigations conducted by the Ohio State Historic Preservation Office into the history of houses affected by Esplanade construction found no issues of historic significance to the university.

In late February, the university saved and relocate the former home to May Prentice, one of KSU's original faculty members and the first woman to teach at the university. The May Prentice home, which was located at 128 S. Willow St., also stood in the future Esplanade extension's path.

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News Headline: State approves $1.42 million for KSU work | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The state of Ohio approved $1.42 million for additional land expansion for Kent State University's Esplanade expansion to downtown Kent, as well as more than $500,000 in funds to repair and update the university's Science Research Building.
The properties approved by the state for purchase are located between KSU's western edge on South Lincoln Street and the city of Kent's downtown business district.
Kent State University's Esplanade extension, which will connect the university at South Lincoln Street to downtown Kent at the future site of Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway. The project is intended to increase the convenience of traveling from campus to downtown by foot and bicycle. It will also include a sculpture walk and part of the Portage Hike and Bike Trail.
The Science Research Building, which was constructed in 1986, has not undergone any exterior renovations since it was built. The state funds will help pay the cost of design, engineering and construction administration to correct roofing failure.
“These funds will allow Kent State students and faculty to conduct their scientific research in a state-of-the-art facility,” said State Rep. Kathleen Clyde in a statement announcing the funds. “These repairs will better enable the cutting-edge work being done by members of our learning community.”

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News Headline: Petitioners Buy Time for House with Historic Ties to Kent (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State, city officials investigating significance of Erie Street house

The wrecking crews have been called off — for now — for a house some in the Kent community say has significant ties to the city's history.

Officials at Kent State University and the city are reviewing the possible historic significance of the house at 250 E. Erie St. after one Kent resident sparked a social movement online to save it from demolition.

The house, dubbed the Sherman House, stands in the path of the university's Esplande extension from campus towards downtown, and several houses have already been demolished to make way for the new pathway. Construction on the Esplanade is scheduled to start this spring.

The campaign, started by Kent resident Sally Burnell, urges the university to save the building and possibly turn it into a visitor's center for Kent State.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said the city and university are partnering to determine the historic value of the house, which the university bought in 2010.

"We are sensitive to and appreciate the interest in this house should it have any historical significance to the city," she said. "We want to be good neighbors, and we are not going to do anything to the house until we further investigate it."

Historically significant?

In an online petition to save the Sherman House, Burnell states it was built in 1853 for a daughter of Zenas Kent, who was an early settler in the city and for whose son, Marvin, the city adopted the family's last name. The Record-Courier reported, based largely on old newspaper articles and other accounts, that the house was later owned by Dr. Aaron M. Sherman, who was a prominent local physician and Civil War veteran.

Vincent said the university consulted experts at the Ohio Historic Preservation Office about numerous houses in the path of the Esplanade.

"The city and the university are not aware of any historical significance of the house located at 250 E. Erie Street," Vincent said in an email sent Friday. She said the house was determined ineligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

Despite its ineligibility, Kent City Manager Dave Ruller said the city is working with university officials to try and verify the house's historic nature.

"The interior and exterior walls have been covered over, (so) the university offered to selectively remove some of the exterior vinyl siding or interior drywall to see what lies underneath," Ruller told members of Kent City Council last week. "If this was Zenas' house, we should be able to find some appropriately dated material under the siding or perhaps in the walls."

Tom Hatch, administrator for the Kent Historical Society, said he believes the house has historic significance to Kent based on the prominent residents who once lived there.

But Hatch said the actual structure's historic value may not be as evident.

"I suspect that it's historic value has been significantly diminished because it was moved in 1924 and substantially renovated at that time, and it's been a rental business for many years," he said. "Historic preservation is very important, and it's important to the historical society. But historical preservation really starts with ongoing care of the properties that people own, and respect for those properties."

The university bought the house for $225,000 in 2010 from Frank Hornyak, who bought it in 1995. Hornyak operated it as a rental house and licensed it with the city for such purposes.

The house was registered as a licensed rooming house with Kent as far back as 1978, according to Kent Health Department records. The most recent license issued in 2011 permitted a maximum six tenants in the house.

The house's historic relevance so far seems to only have been confirmed anecdotally.

Burnell said she would like to see research done at various Portage County offices, such as the auditor's office and tax map office, to try and find air-tight proof that the house has historic provenance.

"If someone with the time is willing and able to do that, it would be most appreciated," she said.

Potential options

Kent State is willing to sell the house for $1 to an interested buyer for relocation if it's determined to have any historical value, Vincent said.

Much would need to happen before relocation could take place.

Land would need to be bought or donated so the house could be moved from the Esplanade site. And the city's chief building official, Robert Nitzsche, must inspect the house first to determine if it's structurally sound enough to withstand a move. The cost to move the house is estimated at as much as $35,000.

Ruller said the university might be willing to provide a temporary location for the house.

"Because we have to stay on track with the planned timing of the Esplanade project the house may need to be moved twice unless a permanent site can be found quickly," Ruller said. "Fortunately, once the house is moved the first time it would be set on blocks, and any second move would be much cheaper."

One member of council suggested possibly moving it to one of the city's parks, as was done with the Old Jail at the Kent Parks and Recreation Offices on Middlebury Road.

Burnell said she agrees with one suggestion to make the house a visitor's center incorporated into the Esplanade project.

"After all, if this house is indeed what we all think it is, then Kent State's history is a part of it, too," Burnell said. "Zenas Kent's grandson William donated his farm for the site of what we now know as Kent State University. So this house is irretrievably linked to both the history of Kent and Kent State."

Kent's changing landscape

The university already moved one house that was in the path of the Esplanade to save it from the wrecking ball.

In February, movers relocated the former home of May H. Prentice, Kent State University's first female faculty member, from 128 S. Willow St.

It wasn't the first historic structure in Kent to be saved in light of dozens of buildings that have been demolished in the past three years.

Prominent restoration efforts in Kent include the historical society's restoration of the Clapp-Woodward house last year to create a permanent museum of the city's history. And the most recent example is Ron Burbick's efforts to revitalize the Franklin Hotel.

Burnell said she laments other losses either to wrecking crews or fire — such as the Robin Hood Inn — and she believes the Sherman House should be saved from a similar fate.

"I do hope that, at the end of the day, we can save one of the last vestiges of early Kent history from the wrecking ball," she said.

If nothing else, Hatch said he wants to see the stories and images of the house that have appeared in recent weeks documented for preservation's sake.

"We can collect the stories about it that people have been telling in the last couple of weeks, and we can make sure that we collect those stories, that we preserve the stories and that we tell the stories," he said. "What's going on in Kent in terms of rebuilding is a very positive thing. Yes, we have lost 61 structures, but I suspect that many of those structures, their useful life is over."

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