Report Overview:
Total Clips (11)
Alumni; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
Geology (4)
Global Education (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Office of the President (1)
Pan-African Studies; University Libraries; Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Comic-strip artists to unveil KSU wall mural 03/19/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Popular comic-strip artists Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers will be at Kent State from noon to 2 p.m. March 27 to open a new student lounge area called the Nest in the Student Center. Batiuk, creator of the Funky Winkerbean...


Biological Sciences (1)
Mind adjustments help you cope with ailments; exercise linked to binge drinking (Glass) 03/19/2012 Washington Post - Online Text Attachment Email

...Alcohol has a similar effect — hence, the buzz you get soothes your worries,” according to J. David Glass, a brain chemistry researcher and professor at Kent State University quoted in the magazine. Aside from the obvious dangers, alcohol consumption can be detrimental to your fitness regimen by slowing...


Board of Trustees (1)
The Week: March 12-18, 2012 03/20/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Geology (4)
This fossil shows lobsters knew how to cuddle 03/20/2012 MSNBC.com Text Attachment Email

Prehistoric Lobsters Made Homes of Ancient Ammonoid Shells 03/20/2012 Wired Magazine Text Attachment Email

Fossil of Cuddling Tiny Lobsters Discovered 03/20/2012 LiveScience.com Text Attachment Email

World record find: Oldest evidence of lobsters living together discovered in gas shale 03/20/2012 PhysOrg.com Text Attachment Email


Global Education (1)
OUR VIEW Global outreach enhances Kent State 03/20/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
This Week on Kaleidoscope- March 25, 2012 03/19/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Director of the Human Development Center and head of Project C.O.P.E. at Kent State University Dr. Gregory Smith and Project C.O.P.E. Peer Leader Mercedes Franklin explain the goal of Project C.O.P.E. and the search for...


Office of the President (1)
Kent State President Kicks Off College Readiness Week in Stow (Vincent) 03/20/2012 Stow Patch Text Attachment Email


Pan-African Studies; University Libraries; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Kent State to Host Pulitzer-Prize Winning Poet 03/20/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Comic-strip artists to unveil KSU wall mural | Email

News Date: 03/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Popular comic-strip artists Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers will be at Kent State from noon to 2 p.m. March 27 to open a new student lounge area called the Nest in the Student Center.

Batiuk, creator of the Funky Winkerbean comic strip, collaborates with Ayers on Crankshaft.

The KSU alumni's new mural will be unveiled at the event.

The Nest's grand opening falls on the 40th anniversary of the Funky Winkerbean debut, and is free and open to the public.

A reception with Batiuk and Ayers will feature a signing of Batiuk's new book, The Complete Funky Winkerbean, which is the first in a multivolume series celebrating the 40th anniversary of the comic strip. The book is published by Black Squirrel Books, an imprint of the KSU Press.

The new student space, formerly called the Music Listening Center, will debut to Kent State students as they return from spring break this weekend.

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News Headline: Mind adjustments help you cope with ailments; exercise linked to binge drinking (Glass) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MIND AND BODY

Accepting physical limitations

How to Say Yes When Your Body Says No, by Lee Jampolsky

At some point we all face injury, illness or other health problems. Lee Jampolsky, a psychologist and author, believes that attitude adjustments can be just as important as medical treatment in fighting physical ailments. He says that by changing your attitude, you can become stronger, achieving positive change through what he calls post-traumatic growth. Jampolsky spent a year in a body cast and suffered severe bacterial pneumonia, so this book is part clinical advice and part memoir. Each chapter includes a short exercise, such as a series of questions or a meditation, to help you apply his principles to your own life. He frequently refers to his own health problems to explain how an attitude shift helped him cope better. If you're content with traditional medical advice and remedies, fine. But if you are looking to adjust your mind-set in hopes of making your condition easier to deal with, Jampolsky's book may help.

MODERATION

Frequent exercise, binge drinking linked

Women's Health, March

Avid exercisers are careful to stay healthy in all aspects of life, right? You may be shocked to learn that workout warriors are more likely to binge-drink than couch potatoes are, at least according to a 2009 University of Miami study of frequent women exercisers. Women's Health says the study found that “the more people exercise, the more they drink — with the most active women consuming the highest amounts every month.” One possible explanation is that those who consume a lot of liquid calories may feel more compelled to burn more the next morning. Or it may be that women who normally burn a lot of calories may feel more entitled to take in the extra at the bar. For many, both drinking and exercising are ways of coping with stress. “Exercising stimulates serotonin, which is your natural antidepressant. It makes us feel good. Alcohol has a similar effect — hence, the buzz you get soothes your worries,” according to J. David Glass, a brain chemistry researcher and professor at Kent State University quoted in the magazine. Aside from the obvious dangers, alcohol consumption can be detrimental to your fitness regimen by slowing your recovery time, causing your body to store fat, disturbing your sleep patterns and depleting your body's water and nutrients. Moderate drinking or a healthy commitment to exercise is fine, but if either interferes with your daily life, the researchers say it's time to raise a red flag.

— Whitney Fetterhoff

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News Headline: The Week: March 12-18, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A fresh look

Kent State University plans to give its main campus in Kent a facelift, though the plan is a scaled-back version of a previous proposal that stalled because of a lack of support for a student fee that would have financed much of it. University trustees authorized the issuance of $170 million in general receipt bonds — about $40 million less than the bond sale originally proposed in late 2009 — to finance the construction initiative. A student fee is not part of the new plan.

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News Headline: This fossil shows lobsters knew how to cuddle | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: MSNBC.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 180-million-year-old shell hold 3 crustaceans, suggests they weren't as menacing as feared

Fossils of tiny lobsters nestled together in a seashell suggest the fearsome-looking crustaceans were sociable far earlier in their evolution than known.

Modern clawless lobsters often cluster together for shelter, and fossils of extinct clawed lobsters found in Canada suggested these crustaceans might be found together in burrows about 70 million years ago.

Now a 180-million-year-old seashell found in a rock quarry in southern Germany holds a trio of fossilized lobsters, suggesting that as menacing as the animals might seem, they have long known the value of cuddling up.

"This is the oldest example of gregarious behavior for lobsters in the fossil record — and not just lobsters but the entire group of decapods, which includes lobsters, crabs and shrimp," said researcher Adiel Klompmaker, a paleontologist at Kent State University.

"What this tells us is that this type of behavior of grouping together may have been very beneficial early on in the evolution of these crustaceans," Klompmaker added.

The translucent, golden-brown seashell in question is a spiral about 9 inches (23 centimeters) in diameter that belonged to an extinct mollusk known as an ammonoid ; though they resembled shelled nautiluses, ammonoids were more closely related to living octopuses, squid and cuttlefish.

The corpses of the lobsters, each only about an inch (2.5 cm) long, were found side by side more than halfway into the spiral within the outermost whorl. The tiny lobsters could be seen through the shell.

"It's a unique specimen — it's one of a kind in the world," Klompmaker told LiveScience.

The researchers suggest the lobsters may have sought temporary shelter in the ammonoid to hide from predatory fish or to prepare to molt their shells.

Alternatively, they may have been feasting on the ammonoid's meat or living together in the shell as a long-term home.

"In this particular locality, there's not a whole lot to be found on the bottom of the ocean — no rocks, no nooks and crannies — and the muddy bottom there was probably not suitable for burrowing, so pretty much the only place to go to for defense against predators would be within these large ammonoid shells," Klompmaker said.

The scientists detailed their findings online March 7 in the journal PLoS ONE.

Please click on link for photos:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46721831/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/fossil-shows-lobsters-knew-how-cuddle/#.T2aVaBHeDkc

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News Headline: Prehistoric Lobsters Made Homes of Ancient Ammonoid Shells | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wired Magazine
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Every fossil has many stories to tell. From the most spectacular dinosaur skeleton to the most common little foram shell, every fossil fragment and trace contains clues about prehistoric lives, ancient ecologies, and worlds that vanished so long before we were born that we can't even fully comprehend the full span of time between ourselves and those vestiges. Even the most mundane turtle shell fragment or brachiopod is a time capsule which testifies to the intricacies of prehistoric lives. And, every now and then, paleontologists are fortunate enough to find rare hints of prehistoric behaviors among the collected bits of shell, tooth, and bone.

In the case of a fossil described last week by paleontologists Adiël Klompmaker of Kent State University, Ohio, and René Fraaije from Oertijdmuseum De Groene Poort, the Netherlands, fortuitous conditions of fossilization created a literal window inside the coiled shell of a Jurassic ammonoid. The shelled cephalopod specimen in question belonged to the species Harpoceras falciferum, and, as in other mollusks, this 180 million-year-old ammonoid's shell was coated in a thin outer layer called the periostracum. That organic patina was all that remained of the ammonoid — a translucent fossilized layer which allowed Klompmaker and Fraaije to look inside the creature's body cavity. There were three minuscule lobsters inside.

The lobsters were not quite like those you might see on the dinner table. These small crustaceans belonged to an entirely extinct group of lobsters called the Eryonidae — a group which had compressed, circular bodies with spikes around the rim. That's as specifically as Klompmaker and Fraaije were able to identify the decapods. But the fact that the three lobsters were preserved together, more than halfway inside the coiled shell of the ammonoid, hinted that the minuscule lobsters had taken up residence inside the ammonoid's empty shell.

It's amazing that anyone was able to see the lobsters. The fossils, each only about an inch long, look like little discolored smudges inside the ammonoid. Yet, when viewed close up, their claws and body segments stand out from the grey and tan of the ammonoid fossil. The question is how the crustaceans entered the cephalopod shell. It would not be unreasonable if the fossils were the molted shells of lobsters which were washed inside an empty shell and then preserved. Just because the lobsters were found inside the ammonoid shell does not automatically mean that the fossil is a snapshot of ancient behavior.

Klompmaker and Fraaije considered several explanations for the fossil juxtaposition. The lobsters were certainly not ammonoid food — if the cephalopod had eaten them, the lobsters would have been mashed up into chunklets and preserved in the location of the ammonoid's digestive tract. Nor is there any evidence that the lobsters were scattered by currents, and the fossils appear to represent actual lobsters rather than just molted shells. (Molted shells would be expected to show a characteristic split down the midline, among other clues.) And the positioning of the lobsters in relation to each other is another indication that the crustaceans were alive when entombed. The three lobsters form a semicircle facing away from each other, with their tails centered around the same point. This kind of coreography hints at some kind of behavior rather than just a random assemblage of flotsam which washed inside a vacated shell.

Lobsters weren't the only creatures to utilize empty mollusk shells. Nor were they the first. Trilobites sometimes congregated in cephalopod shells, and small groups of fish have been discovered inside the shells of huge inoceramid clams. Even small ammonoids have been found inside the shells of larger ammonoids. Empty shells have been prime real estate for marine organisms for millions upon millions of years. What remains uncertain is why so many different species used empty mollusk shells.

Why the lobsters congregated inside the ammonoid shell is a mystery. There is more than one possible answer. The lobsters may have entered the spacious shell to molt, in search of protection from predators, because there were some tasty ammonoid bits left to scavenge, or because the shell was a suitable place to store collected food and otherwise be a cozy home. At the moment, there's no way to tell which of these hypotheses is correct.

Whatever the reason for their occupancy, though, the lobsters appear to have had a close relationship with ammonoids. “These particular, small lobsters have only been found in ammonoid body chambers so far,” Klompmaker and Fraaije write, and point out “Not a single specimen [of this lobster species] is known that was not associated with an ammonoid shell” after fifty years of collecting at the fossil site the new specimen came from. The coincidence could be attributable to the ammonoid shells — perhaps the lobsters were so small and fragile that they were always destroyed unless protected inside the shell of another creature. Then again, Klompmaker and Fraaije explain, other fossil crustaceans have been found inside ammonoid shells and as isolated specimens in the same deposits. The fact that the lobsters Klompmaker and Fraaije examined have only been found in ammonoids, by contrast, might be a true signal that these lobsters specialized in making homes out of empty shells. Perhaps, with the description of additional specimens, these little lobsters can contribute a unique story to the ever-growing book of prehistory.

Read on — Paleontologists recently discovered that a very different kind of creature also lived in ammonoid shells. Parasites infested ammonoid shells while the cephalopods were still alive, and the tentacled mollusks retaliated by creating pearls.

References:

Klompmaker, A., & Fraaije, R. (2012). Animal Behavior Frozen in Time: Gregarious Behavior of Early Jurassic Lobsters within an Ammonoid Body Chamber PLoS ONE, 7 (3) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0031893

Please click on link for photos:
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/03/prehistoric-lobsters-made-homes-of-ancient-ammonoid-shells/

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News Headline: Fossil of Cuddling Tiny Lobsters Discovered | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: LiveScience.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fossils of tiny lobsters nestled together in a seashell suggest the fearsome-looking crustaceans were sociable far earlier in their evolution than known.

Modern clawless lobsters often cluster together for shelter, and fossils of extinct clawed lobsters found in Canada suggested these crustaceans might be found together in burrows approximately 70 million years ago.

Now a 180-million-year-old seashell found in a rock quarry in southern Germany holds a trio of fossilized lobsters, suggesting that as menacing as the animals might seem, they have long known the value of cuddling up.

"This is the oldest example of gregarious behavior for lobsters in the fossil record ?and not just lobsters but the entire group of decapods, which includes lobsters, crabs and shrimp," said researcher Adiël Klompmaker, a paleontologist at Kent State University.

"What this tells us is that this type of behavior of grouping together may have been very beneficial early on in the evolution of these crustaceans," Klompmaker added.

The translucent, golden-brown seashell in question is a spiral about 9 inches (23 centimeters) in diameter that belonged to an extinct mollusk known as an ammonoid; though they resembled shelled nautiluses, ammonoids were more closely related to living octopuses, squid and cuttlefish. The corpses of the lobsters, each only about an inch (2.5 cm) long, were found side by side more than halfway into the spiral within the outermost whorl. The tiny lobsters could be seen through the shell.

"It's a unique specimen — it's one of a kind in the world," Klompmaker told LiveScience.

The researchers suggest the lobsters may have sought temporary shelter in the ammonoid to hide from predatory fish or to prepare to molt their shells. Alternatively, they may have been feasting on the ammonoid's meat or living together in the shell as a long-term home.

"In this particular locality, there's not a whole lot to be found on the bottom of the ocean — no rocks, no nooks and crannies — and the muddy bottom there was probably not suitable for burrowing, so pretty much the only place to go to for defense against predators would be within these large ammonoid shells," Klompmaker said.

The scientists detailed their findings online March 7 in the journal PLoS ONE.

Please click on link for photos:
http://www.livescience.com/19014-fossils-lobsters-cuddling.html

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News Headline: World record find: Oldest evidence of lobsters living together discovered in gas shale | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: PhysOrg.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PhysOrg.com) -- Discovering direct animal behavior from the fossil record can only be done in exceptional circumstances. Such circumstances exist in the German Posidonia gas shale from the Jurassic period in which organic material from fossils is preserved. A treasure trove of fossils found in the Dotternhausen quarry south of Stuttgart, Germany, has now yielded a world record for fossil lobsters living together, according to Kent State University researcher Adiël Klompmaker.

The news was published on March 7 in the multidisciplinary journal PLoS ONE.

“This is also a world record for decapods, a group that includes crabs and shrimp as well as lobsters,” explains lead author Klompmaker, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geology at Kent State University. “These 180 million-year-old lobsters from the Eryonidae family are millions of years older than the previous record for lobsters from Greenland, and about 100 million years older than the record for shrimp. Thus, this type of behavior for decapods developed earlier in earth's history than previously known.”

“The lobsters were discovered in a flattened shell of an extinct squid-like animal, the ammonite Harpoceras falciferum,” said co-author Dr. René Fraaije, director of the Dutch Oertijdmuseum. “This ammonite died, upon which the shell sank to the sea floor and became available for the lobsters.”

The three lobsters inside the ammonite shell. Credit: PLoS ONE

“The exceptional mode of preservation allowed us to look through the only preserved part of the ammonite shell, the periostracum,” Klompmaker said. “This organic material is very thin and translucent, which is why we could discover the three lobsters under low angle light.”

The well-preserved corpses of lobsters were oriented in a circle with the tails toward each other. Why exactly the lobsters were gathered inside the ammonite remains mysterious. “They may have sought a temporary shelter against predators, such as fish, or used it as a long-term residency,” Klompmaker said.

The lobsters were found in the same German shale in which the sea reptiles Ichthyosaurus and Plesiosaurus were discovered. These types of shales may contain significant amounts of natural gas, which is why they can be important economically. Shales containing natural gas are found also in the subsurface of Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Fraaije and Klompmaker were recently involved in the discovery of a new hermit crab named after the late singer Michael Jackson because it was found on the date the superstar passed away. Earlier, Kent State researchers studied and reported on the oldest known fossil shrimp, extraordinarily preserved with muscles.

More information: The article can be found at http://dx.plos.org … one.0031893.

Please click on link for photos:
http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-world-oldest-evidence-lobsters-gas.html

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Global outreach enhances Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CAMPUS REFLECTING THE WORLD
IMPROVES EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY HAS
been opening its door to international
students for decades, but
the growing importance of globalization
in reshaping our world is fueling a significant
increase in their numbers at the
Kent campus.
In just three years,
KSU has seen a 127
percent boost in international
students, with
1,927 now enrolled at
the Kent campus, compared
with 848 during the 2009 spring semester.
Kent State now hosts students
from 95 countries, with a significant number
of internationals coming here from
China, Saudi Arabia and India.
International students contribute about
$33.8 million to the economy of Portage
County, according to university officials.
That amount includes not only the tuition,
room and board and other fees they
pay for their schooling in Kent but money
spent for day-to-day living expenses.
In addition to welcoming international
students to the Kent campus, KSU also
is involved in education abroad, through
exchange programs and partnerships
with universities around the world. This
enables students from Kent to become
acquainted with other cultures, providing
educational experiences that broaden
their perspective and enhance their
chances of future employment.
Kent State University's Office of Global
Education hosted a Global Education
Summit last week, drawing together educators
and others who discussed the
benefits of an international approach to
learning as well as the challenges it presents
to its host campus.
Kent State, for most of its history, has
taken a progressive approach toward international
learning. During the era following
World War II, the administrations
of George Bowman, Robert White and especially
Glenn Olds encouraged the formation
of partnerships with universities
throughout the world, including institutions
located in Iran, Tanzania and China.
Kent, in turn, became home to many
international students, whose diversity
enriched the campus.
The increase in Kent State's international
population is likely to continue in
the years to come. A “globalized” campus,
reflecting the world in which its students
must compete, is the wave of the future,
and we welcome it.

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News Headline: This Week on Kaleidoscope- March 25, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Director of the Human Development Center and head of Project C.O.P.E. at Kent State University Dr. Gregory Smith and Project C.O.P.E. Peer Leader Mercedes Franklin explain the goal of Project C.O.P.E. and the search for grandmothers who are raising their grandchildren to participate in Project C.O.P.E. For more information or to participate call toll free 855.260.2433 or email grandmothers@kent.edu

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News Headline: Kent State President Kicks Off College Readiness Week in Stow (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Lester Lefton was keynote speaker for first-ever event at Stow-Munroe Falls High School.

Kent State University President Lester Lefton and his entourage of university cheerleaders, marching band members and Flash the mascot kicked off the first-ever college readiness week at Stow-Munroe Falls High School last Monday.

According to the January edition of the Maroon and Gold Gazette, “Discover U Week (Destination: College)” is a school-wide endeavor created by high school staff members to encourage and inform students of the possibilities for educational experiences and opportunities beyond high school.

Throughout last week the high school hosted a series of events designed to encourage continued learning after graduation and build career awareness.

In addition to contests and “Spirit Days,” there were guest speakers in the Library-Media Center during lunch periods throughout the week. Various successful community members shared their career and education success stories with students.

Lefton was invited to serve as the event's keynote speaker by Stow-Munroe Falls science teacher Mark Treen, who earned his undergraduate degree at Kent State and was a cheerleader there.

Emily Vincent, director of media relations at Kent State, said Lefton shared advice on college readiness with about 2,000 students in two sessions, one of freshmen and sophomores and another of juniors and seniors.

“His message was, ‘Your investment in good grades now will pay off not only in getting admitted to college, but also in getting scholarships,'” Vincent said. “He also reminded them that they have world-class university located practically in their own back yard.”

Jacquie Mazziotta, school district spokesperson, said Lefton also strongly encouraged students to read – a lot.

“He challenged the 9th and 10th to read 30 books this summer. He said reading would translate to better grades, which would help them with college scholarships,” Mazziotta said. “He also told students to take the hardest classes they could while in high school and get good grades. Those grades will translate into cash in the form of scholarships.”

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News Headline: Kent State to Host Pulitzer-Prize Winning Poet | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Yusef Komunyakaa to give reading on March 29

Pulitzer prize-winning poet, Yusef Komunyakaa, will read at Kent State University's Oscar Ritchie Hall, room 214, at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 29 as part of the Wick Poetry Center's 2011-2012 Reading Series.

A discussion of Komunyakaa's poetry will take place on Sunday, March 25 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Kent Free Library as part of the Poetically Speaking series.

Mwatabu Okantah, Assistant Professor and Poet-in-Residence in the Department
of Pan-African Studies and Director of the Center of Pan-African Culture at Kent State, will lead the discussion. Packets of Komunyakaa's selected works can be
downloaded in advance from kentfreelibrary.org; however, no previous knowledge of his work is necessary to attend the event. Advanced registration is recommended via the library at 330-673-4414.

Grandson of Trinidadian stowaways, Komunyakaa was born in Bogalusa, LA. After high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Army where he served as a combat reporter in South Vietnam, eventually becoming managing editor for the military paper, Southern Cross. The work he did as a reporter and editor earned him the Bronze Star.

Komunyakaa is best known for his montage and surrealistic poetic imagery that often draws on his experiences growing up as an African American in small town Louisiana and later as a soldier in Vietnam. Readers of his work will confront the splendid precision of restrained metaphor and persona, and themes ranging from racism, poverty, and the moral degradation of war to beauty, jazz and even hope.

Komunyakaa attended the University of Colorado where he graduated in 1975 with a B.A. Later he attended Colorado State University where he earned an M.A. in 1978, after which he earned an M.F.A at the University of California at Irvine in 1980. His first collection of poems, Dedications and Other Darkhorses, was published in 1977.

In addition to the Pulitzer Prize, which he won for Neon Vernacular: New and Selected Poems, Komunyakaa has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award and the William Faulkner Prize. From 1999 to 2005 he served as a Chancellor for the Academy of American Poets and he is currently Professor and Distinguished Senior Poet at New York University.

Yusef Komunyakaa's reading is co-sponsored by Kent State University Libraries and the Department of Pan-African Studies, and is free and open to the public.

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