Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Alternative Spring Break (1)
Alumni; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Town-Gown (2)
University Communications and Marketing (4)


Headline Date Outlet

Alternative Spring Break (1)
Worthy causes lure students on break (Gosky) 03/23/2012 News & Observer - Online Text Attachment Email

...destinations for many college students on spring break. But some headed to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park to dig ditches and lay drainage pipe. University of Akron seniors Abby Gerdes and Nichole Houze are among 31 who were repairing trails for a few recent days in the park's second annual...


Alumni; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
VIDEO: 'The Nest' Lounge to Debut at Kent State After Spring Break (Rashid) 03/23/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Energy efficient house in Akron uses straw as insulation (Ferut) 03/22/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...make sure they were in the walls correctly," Maher said. The main architect of this project is Joseph Ferut. Ferut teaches architectural classes at Kent State University. With this latest project, the goal was to use old world techniques and natural materials to create an energy efficient house...


Biological Sciences (1)
Frequent exercise, binge drinking linked (Glass) 03/23/2012 Hamilton Spectator, The Text Email

...natural antidepressant. It makes us feel good. Alcohol has a similar effect - hence, the buzz you get soothes your worries," according to J. David Glass of Kent State University. Alcohol can be detrimental to fitness by slowing recovery time, causing the body to store fat, disturbing sleep patterns...


College of the Arts (CotA) (1)
Boney James to perform at Ohio Theater, Andrew W.K. at House of Blues: Cleveland entertainment picks 03/23/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Beacon First: KSU opens fashion school store (Stanforth) 03/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Fashionistas, a new store in downtown Kent, features designs by Kent State students, alums and faculty. The fledgling Fashion School store offers clothing, jewelry and other accessories in a small, post-modern...


KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Drilling could bring 10 times the truck traffic 03/23/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Coudersport; and Timothy Kelsey, professor of agricultural economics, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, College of Agricultural Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pa. In regard to the impact of oil and gas development, "their overall feeling is that this is a...

Author Jon Baker to present ghost stories at Kent State Tuscarawas 03/22/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Jon Baker, an author, historical columnist and reporter, will be presenting "Ghost Stories and Legends of the Tuscarawas Valley" at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7 p.m. April 3. The presentation will include several area legends such as "The Legend of Earley's Church,"...

Veterans in Business Conference to be held at Kent State 03/22/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Veterans in Business Conference is set for 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, March 28 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The free conference will provide resources and information for veteran-owned businesses and veteran entrepreneurs....

Veterans in Business Conference to be held at Kent State 03/22/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

The Veterans in Business Conference is set for 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, March 28 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The free conference will provide resources and information for veteran-owned businesses and veteran entrepreneurs....


Renovation at KSU (1)
Ohio House Votes to Give Kent State $21 Million for Campus Renovation (Lefton) 03/23/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (2)
AREA BRIEFS DePeyster in Kent to close for construction 03/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Major Downtown Projects Get Building Permits 03/23/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


University Communications and Marketing (4)
Eric Mansfield leaving Channel 3 for Kent State post 03/23/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Eric Mansfield to leave WKYC-TV for Kent State media relations post 03/23/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Local news briefs - March 22 03/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

TV Anchor Joins Kent State Marketing Team (Neumann) 03/23/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Worthy causes lure students on break (Gosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: News & Observer - Online
Contact Name: CAROL BILICZKY
News OCR Text: Sun-drenched beaches may be the top destinations for many college students on spring break.

But some headed to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park to dig ditches and lay drainage pipe.

University of Akron seniors Abby Gerdes and Nichole Houze are among 31 who were repairing trails for a few recent days in the park's second annual Alternative Spring Break.

"They walk away from something thinking, 'I had a major hand in that. I did good today,' " park ranger Josh Bates said. "I hope with sore muscles comes a sense of satisfaction."

The park program is one of dozens of options available to college students who want to do something more productive than party in the sun during their mid-semester break.

Many universities offer alternative spring break programs, sometimes in other countries such as the Dominican Republic and Jamaica, often accompanied by staff and faculty, and sometimes even for credit if the work is related to the students' major.

At Kent State, for example, 86 students volunteered for five trips that began last week, KSU senior special assistant Anne Gosky said.

Students are helping community agencies on Cleveland's near west side, volunteering at the country's largest homeless shelter in Washington, D.C., and building homes with Habitat for Humanity in western New York.

The university has gotten away from the weeklong trips repairing homes in the hurricane-damaged south, a popular venue for students from around the country for the last several years.

KSU is opting for shorter trips that take as little as three days and that are closer to home. Costs are relatively modest - anywhere from $60 to $250 for food, housing and transportation, so they fit into many students' budgets.

"We were spending 20 hours on a bus getting to Biloxi, Miss.," Gosky recalled. "We'd lose a day going and coming back" and that ate up a lot of time.

The University of Akron this spring break offered five trips at $250 each. Students could help with hunger relief in Charlotte, N.C., for instance, or renovate a camp in Winder, Ga.

University of Akron assistant professor Craig Wise struck off on his own, recruiting 25 students in construction technology to help repair homes in Nashville.

Members of the student group Ambassadors for Rebuilding received some college credit for repairing homes damaged by torrential rains and flooding in May 2010.

Wise divided students into four teams that tackled two or three houses each, repairing sub-floors, installing handrails and demolishing and then pouring concrete for a new sidewalk.

Students got a taste of the planning that goes into construction, as well.

Before the trip, the sponsoring organizations Rebuilding Together and Southeast Nashville Recovery provided students with home inspection reports so they could create tool and material lists.

"That's one of the really beautiful things - watching students appreciate the intricacies of getting the work done on a schedule," Wise said.

For the Cuyahoga Valley park repairs, the Conservancy for the CVNP and National Park Service recruited students from six Ohio universities. In addition to the University of Akron, they were Kent State, Cleveland State, Cuyahoga Community College, John Carroll and Wooster.

Students are tackling six stretches of trails at the side of an established volunteer group, the Cuyahoga Valley Trails Council. The work is not glamorous, but it came with early morning trail hikes, yoga and campfires.

The program aims to grow, as the 33,000-acre park has 105 miles of trail that need repair after the winter season.

It will be able to do so if it finds other enthusiasts like Gerdes and Houze, who interned at the park for the last two summers.

They spent the first part of the week in a UAsponsored, five-day trip to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, getting home just in time to take part in the three-day Cuyahoga Valley park project.

"This is something we're passionate about," said Gerdes, who will graduate in August with a bachelor's degree in geography and planning.

At a cost of $55 per student, it is "so cheap," said Houze, who will earn a bachelor's in biology. "I can't believe how cheap it is."

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News Headline: VIDEO: 'The Nest' Lounge to Debut at Kent State After Spring Break (Rashid) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New student center lounge decorated with alumni mural by Crankshaft, Funky Winkerbean creators

A new mural decorated in the art of two famous Kent State University alumni debuts to students Monday after they return from spring break.

"The Nest" lounge is lined with a mural created by Crankshaft and Funky Winkerbean comic strip creators Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers.

Ayers, class of 1971, partnered with friend and colleage Batiuk, author of the comic strip Funky Winkerbean and fellow Kent State alumnus, to create the mural depicting the college student experience from acceptance to graduation.

The university will dedicate it on the 40th anniversary of the debut of Funky Winkerbean on Tuesday, March 27, from noon to 2 p.m. during the official opening of the new student lounge.

Timeka Rashid, director of the Center for Student Involvement at Kent State, approached Batiuk and Ayers with the idea of putting their characters in a mural to give the lounge a sense of alumni pride.

Batiuk graduated from Kent State in 1969 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and a certificate in education, and became a junior high school teacher. His teaching experiences inspired him to create the Funky Winkerbean comic strip that chronicles the lives of a group of students from the fictitious Westview High School. The comic strip is syndicated internationally to about 600 newspapers and has a fan base of about 50 million.

Ayers graduated from Kent State in 1971 with a degree in graphic design and worked as an artist at the Akron Beacon Journal for more than 25 years. He served as the paper's editorial cartoonist for 13 years, and also taught cartooning for several years at Kent State and the University of Akron. Ayers began working on the Crankshaft comic strip with Batiuk in 1987.

Please click on link for video:
http://kent.patch.com/articles/video-the-nest-lounge-to-debut-at-kent-state-after-spring-break#video-9387587

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News Headline: Energy efficient house in Akron uses straw as insulation (Ferut) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Old building techniques used in new home

AKRON, Ohio - The house being built near the corner of North Maple and Hickory Streets fits right in this quiet wooded neighborhood in north Akron.  It has a large front porch, energy efficient windows, a heat reflecting metal roof and even an outside sleeping porch on the second floor. Owner Patricia Maher is excited as her house takes shape.

"I'm not sure I even ever imagined that I would build my own house," Maher said.

While plasterers are finishing the interior walls with wallboard "mud" in the bedroom upstairs, workers downstairs are inside finishing the walls with their own kind of mud - real mud.

Construction Supervisor Joe Rogers said the mud is a combination of ground straw, clay and sand.

"This is the way they did it hundreds of years ago and we're doing it now," Rogers said.

Three layers of mud or "earth plaster" are used, each one a finer consistency than the last, to cover the material used as the main form of insulation in this house - straw. About 350 bales of straw were delivered from a Wellington, Ohio farm and used to surround the Akron home's walls.

Maher said the job was difficult, dirty and labor intensive.

"The straw thing was very hard. The bales are not easy to maneuver. We had to make sure they were in the walls correctly," Maher said.

The main architect of this project is Joseph Ferut.

Ferut teaches architectural classes at Kent State University. With this latest project, the goal was to use old world techniques and natural materials to create an energy efficient house that looks like every other home in the neighborhood.

"It's a house that looks like a traditional home with front porches and things like sleeping porches and make it comfortable within its setting," Ferut said.

The main purpose of this type of construction is the incredible energy efficiency. The insulation prevents heat loss during the winter months and keeps the inside of the home cool during the summer. While it costs more up front to build her house this way, Maher expects enormous savings on energy costs. By installing a simple heat pump and using a wood pellet burning stove, she expects her annual heating costs to be about $300 per year. Many neighborhood homes can spend that much on winter heating in one month.

Maher's satisfaction with the project goes beyond just saving on energy costs. Her new home is her statement about creating a way of life that is efficient and sustainable, drawing from things old and new.

"I love that we've been able to mix some really innovative technology, a newer green technology with this old system of building.  I love that. And I love how it looks...I just love how it looks," Maher said.

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News Headline: Frequent exercise, binge drinking linked (Glass) | Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hamilton Spectator, The
Contact Name: Health, Women's
News OCR Text: Avid exercisers are careful to stay healthy in all aspects of life, right? It seems workout warriors are more likely to binge drink than couch potatoes, says a University of Miami study of frequent women exercisers. Women's Health says the study found that "the more people exercise, the more they drink - with the most active women consuming the highest amounts every month."

Those who consume a lot of liquor calories may feel more compelled to burn more working out. Or perhaps women who normally burn a lot of calories feel more entitled to have one more at the bar. For many, drinking and exercising are ways of coping with stress.

"Exercising stimulates serotonin, which is your natural antidepressant. It makes us feel good. Alcohol has a similar effect - hence, the buzz you get soothes your worries," according to J. David Glass of Kent State University.

Alcohol can be detrimental to fitness by slowing recovery time, causing the body to store fat, disturbing sleep patterns and depleting the body's water and nutrients.

Copyright © 2012 The Hamilton Spectator

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News Headline: Boney James to perform at Ohio Theater, Andrew W.K. at House of Blues: Cleveland entertainment picks | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Apollo's Fire, the Cleveland Baroque Orchestra, performs a semistaged production of Mozart's "The Magic Flute" at 8 p.m. Friday at Severance Hall, 11001 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, and 8 p.m. Saturday at Kent State University's Cartwright Auditorium, 450 Hilltop Drive, Kent. $25-$100 with discounts for students and seniors; 1-800-314-2535.

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News Headline: Beacon First: KSU opens fashion school store (Stanforth) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Fashionistas, a new store in downtown Kent, features designs by Kent State students, alums and faculty.

The fledgling Fashion School store offers clothing, jewelry and other accessories in a small, post-modern space suffused with gray and black.

"This is a real store that is selling product," said Nancy Stanforth, the KSU associate professor of fashion design and merchandising who is quarterbacking the project.

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News Headline: Drilling could bring 10 times the truck traffic | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The oil and gas boom in eastern Ohio likely will bring a tenfold increase in truck traffic and an increased need for safety, emergency and social services, based on the experience of Pennsylvania officials who already have lived through the boom in their state.

But expanded drilling in the Keystone State also has proved beneficial to landowners and helped attract new companies and oil industry spinoff businesses.

That is some of the information Tuscarawas County Commissioner Chris Abbuhl brought home from the Development District Association of Appalachia Annual Conference, held Monday and Tuesday in Arlington, Va. He went there representing the county, as well as the Ohio Mid-Eastern Governments Association in Cambridge. He serves on the OMEGA executive board.

Abbuhl attended a session Monday on shale gas production and the impact on communities, which featured as panelists Ohio state Rep. David Hall, R-Millersburg; Paul Heimel, a Potter County, Pa., commissioner from Coudersport; and Timothy Kelsey, professor of agricultural economics, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, College of Agricultural Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pa.

In regard to the impact of oil and gas development, "their overall feeling is that this is a good thing for the community and beneficial economically," Abbuhl said. "But there are things to be prepared for."

Panelists all spoke about an increase in truck traffic in Pennsylvania and the need for increasing safety and emergency services to deal with the influx of people.

Abbuhl attended another session that focused on educating the nation's work force. Factories remain an important part of the U.S. economy, panelists said, but they are not the same kind of factories that existed decades ago. Industries now need highly trained workers who have solid technological skills.

Panelists stressed the importance of vocational and technical education. "They want us to make sure we do what we can do to educate the community to be prepared for the future," Abbuhl said.

The commissioner praised the efforts of area vocational schools, such as Buckeye Career Center in New Philadelphia and Kent State University at Tuscarawas, in preparing students for the workplace.

"I think locally we do a great job," he said.

The career center, for instance, is the only school in Ohio that offers SafeLand USA safety training for the oil and gas industry. It is required for any employee of a company that does exploration, production, drilling and/or refining work for any of the leading operators.

Both Kent State Tuscarawas and the career center are working on programs to train workers for the industry.

At the conference, importance was also placed on the necessity of maintaining infrastructure _ including roads, bridges and railroads _ to keep a community moving forward.

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News Headline: Author Jon Baker to present ghost stories at Kent State Tuscarawas | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jon Baker, an author, historical columnist and reporter, will be presenting "Ghost Stories and Legends of the Tuscarawas Valley" at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7 p.m. April 3.

The presentation will include several area legends such as "The Legend of Earley's Church," "Murder at the Brisben House" and "The Legend of the Black Horse Tavern." Baker is employed by the Times-Reporter and has been a reporter for six years, as well as writing a history column for the paper. He is a member of the Tuscarawas County, Dover and Ragersville historical societies, and a 1984 Kent State University graduate.

The event is sponsored by the Kent State Tuscarawas Artist/Lecture Series, and is free to the public with no tickets necessary. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. Seating is first come, first served.

The University is located at 330 University Drive, NE in New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Veterans in Business Conference to be held at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Veterans in Business Conference is set for 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, March 28 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The free conference will provide resources and information for veteran-owned businesses and veteran entrepreneurs.

Topics to be discussed include the Federal Contractor Certification program for veteran-owned business, how to sell to the government, business financing and business start-ups.

The conference will be held in Room 113 of the university's Science and Advanced Technology Center.

To register or for more information, call 330-308-7522 or email dmspence@kent.edu.

Kent State University Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE in New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Veterans in Business Conference to be held at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Matt Alpert
News OCR Text: The Veterans in Business Conference is set for 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, March 28 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The free conference will provide resources and information for veteran-owned businesses and veteran entrepreneurs.

Topics to be discussed include the Federal Contractor Certification program for veteran-owned business, how to sell to the government, business financing and business start-ups.

The conference will be held in Room 113 of the university's Science and Advanced Technology Center.

To register or for more information, call 330-308-7522 or email dmspence@kent.edu.

Kent State University Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE in New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Ohio House Votes to Give Kent State $21 Million for Campus Renovation (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University trustees already approved spending $170 million on Kent campus facelift

The Ohio House voted Thursday to throw almost $21 million into the pot for Kent State University's renovation plans at its main and regional campuses.

The House voted to allocate $20.95 million to Kent State for various renovations and improvements as part of the state's more than $800 million capital appropriations bill.

The vote in Columbus follows one by the university trustees earlier this month to issue $170 million in bonds to renovate the main campus as part of a multi-year construction project expected to be under way within a year.

The Ohio Senate now must consider the state appropriations bill following today's vote in the House.

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde, of Kent, said she was happy to see Kent State get the money for the requested projects.

"Even in these tough economic times, it is still very important for the legislature to focus resources on maintaining and improving the facilities at our institutions of higher education," Clyde said in prepared remarks. "This funding will contribute to the high-quality learning environment at Kent State, while also creating important construction jobs right here in our community."

The appropriations bill, as approved by the house, includes $400 million for higher education facilities in Ohio and $427 million for primary and secondary facilities.

Kent State President Lester Lefton said earlier this month the university's main campus renovation plans are not final and could not say what colleges might get new buildings and which would only see renovations. Those decisions, he said, would be made over several weeks following the bond vote.

"We have ideas," he said. "Clearly there are projects everyone knows have been on the drawing board for some time, not the least of which is architecture, art, technology."

State legislators, however, dictated how the money in the house appropriations bill would be allocated to what renovation projects, some of which are located on the university's regional campuses.

The bulk of the money allocated to Kent State, at least $11 million, would go to the main campus and be split as follows:

$5 million, Cunningham Hall repairs
$5 million, Williams Hall repairs
$1 million, Smith Hall repairs
Another $5 million will be spent on improvements to multidiscipline research labs. The rest, about $5 million, will go to various upgrades at the Stark, Geauga, Ashtabula, Tuscarawas, Trumbull and East Liverpool campuses, according to Clyde's office.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said in an email the university's main campus renovation plan relied on both the $170 million in bonds and the state capital improvement money in the appropriations bill.

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News Headline: AREA BRIEFS DePeyster in Kent to close for construction | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of Kent will close De-
Peyster Street between Erie Street
and Haymaker Parkway starting
Monday to allow for additional
construction work on the Kent
State University Hotel and Conference
Center.
Road closed signs will be posted.
DePeyster street from Erie Street
to East Main Street will remain
open, but motorists are asked to
avoid the area if possible.

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News Headline: Major Downtown Projects Get Building Permits | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PARTA, Kent State and city redevelopment projects all get OK from building department

Three of the critical components of downtown Kent's redevelopment have been formally approved by the city for construction.

The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, PARTA's transit center and a portion of the city's public-private commercial redevelopment all got building permits for construction within the past week.

The hotel, which is being built through a partnership between the Kent State Foundation and The Pizzuti Companies, got building construction approval for the $15 million complex at 215 S. DePeyster Street. The hotel has a listed construction price tag of $15 million.

PARTA received approval to build the intermodal facility with bus transfer bays, office space and public parking at 201 E. Erie St. The actual building construction has an $18.5 million price tag.

And "Building B," which is under construction on Erie Street across from Acorn Alley, is part of the city's partnership with Cleveland developer Fairmount Properties. The project got approval for construction of the AMETEK offices on the second and third floor of the building. That work has a listed $2.1 million price tag.

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News Headline: Eric Mansfield leaving Channel 3 for Kent State post | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- WKYC Channel 3 is losing another veteran anchor-reporter.

Eric Mansfield, who has been with the Gannett-owned Cleveland station for 18 years, is leaving the local-news grind to become the executive director of university media relations at Kent State University.

Mansfield, a reporter and weekend anchor at Channel 3, will remain on the air at the NBC affiliate station through Memorial Day. He starts at Kent State on June 1.

"It's a new position that's been created to beef up their media relations department," Mansfield said during a telephone interview. "And they really wanted to bring in a journalist to help them every day to get the good news out about what's happening at Kent State. So I'll actually still be talking to reporters and assignment editors every day, just from the other side."

Mansfield's decision comes on the heels of Channel 3 losing such high-profile longtime anchors as Romona Robinson, now at WOIO Channel 19, and Mark Nolan, now the midday host at radio station WMJI FM/105.7. But this move is about lifestyle, Mansfield says, not any dissatisfaction with Channel 3.

"I've been in this business for 20 years, the last 18 at WKYC, and my kids are older and I needed the opportunity to spend more time with them," said Mansfield, 43, who joined Channel 3 in 1994 as an Akron reporter after two years with WAKC Channel 23 (now WVPX). "Nobody in television works 9 to 5. You work nights, you work weekends, you work holidays. After 20 years of that, I wanted to have more time with my family and reduce the stress. If you're fully engaged with the lifestyle, which I was, you're always working.

"You know, a few weeks ago, one of my sons was in a play at Kent State and another son had a school dance, and I missed both events because I was off being a journalist. So I needed something that was more family friendly. More family time and a less-stressful environment were the big factors."

Mansfield, a major in the Ohio National Guard, spent 14 months away from his family for a 2003-04 active-duty tour in Iraq and Kuwait.

"This was totally Eric's decision," said Brooke Spectorsky, Channel 3's president and general manager. "We understand this is important to him personally and we wish him nothing but the best at his new job."

An Akron native, Mansfield earned bachelor's degrees in journalism and broadcasting in 1991 from the University of Dayton. He joined WAKC in 1992. He moved to Channel 3 two years later as Akron bureau chief.

Mansfield was the anchor of a 2001-08 newscast focusing on Akron and Canton. It was produced by Channel 3 for Channel 23 as "PAX 23 News," later becoming the "Akron-Canton News" on Time Warner Cable. His current duties at Channel 3 include reporting for the 6, 7 and 11 p.m. newscasts and anchoring the 6 and 11 p.m. weekend news.

"I'll always be grateful to Brooke and to Channel 3," Mansfield said. "Whenever I went to Brooke with anything, from the deployment in Iraq to attending school, he was incredibly supportive.

He will receive his master's degree in public relations from Kent State this fall.

"Years ago, I thought I'd be in television until I retired," Mansfield said. "But, in recent years, the demands have grown. We've become what's called an MMJ -- multimedia journalist. I shoot, edit and write my own stories, so the days are lot more demanding. Going back to college made sense because the military offered college benefits."

Another attractive aspect of this lifestyle change: free tuition for his sons at Kent State.

"My oldest turns 18 in July and we have two more right behind him, ages 14 and 10," Mansfield said. "So this was an exponential game-changing economic opportunity for the family. I'll also be teaching at the Journalism and Mass Communications school, which is exciting. I'll try to give them a fresh perspective of what it's really like on the front lines of the evening news, because it's a lot different now than it was even five years ago."

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News Headline: Eric Mansfield to leave WKYC-TV for Kent State media relations post | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The face of WKYC-TV, Channel 3, continues to change as one of its longtime correspondents, Eric Mansfield, is leaving the station after 18 years for a media relations post at Kent State University.

Mr. Mansfield, who starts in his new role June 1, will earn $110,000 a year as Kent State's executive director of university media relations.

In his new role, Mr. Mansfield will lead the university's media relations team and be responsible for “developing and implementing public relations plans and strategies to enhance the university's image,” according to a university press release. He also will be involved teaching and mentoring students within Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

“This is a great opportunity for me to join a world-class organization,” Mr. Mansfield said in a news release. “I can't wait to be part of telling the great news of Kent State University every day. As much as I love being a journalist, I'm really excited about working with young journalists, crafting their skills at Kent State.”

Mr. Mansfield, who also expects to earn a master's degree in public relations from Kent State this fall, is the latest WKYC veteran to leave the news station, which is owned by Gannett Co. Longtime anchor Romona Robinson left the station late last year and took over as an anchor on WOIO-TV, Channel 19. She was replaced on WKYC by Russ Mitchell, a former anchor at CBS News, in December.

Mark Nolan, another popular anchor at WKYC, left the station in January and landed as a mid-day host on WMJI-FM, 105.7.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - March 22 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE

KSU discloses pay

KENT: WKYC reporter Eric Mansfield will make $110,000 in his new position at Kent State University.

He will become executive director of university media relations on June 1, KSU confirmed Thursday.

In the newly created position, Mansfield, 43, will lead the media relations team and will teach and mentor students in KSU's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

He will report to Tom Neumann, associate vice president of university communications and marketing.

Mansfield joined the Cleveland TV station in 1994 as an Akron reporter after two years with WAKC (Channel 23), now WVPX.

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News Headline: TV Anchor Joins Kent State Marketing Team (Neumann) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Eric Mansfield is new executive director of media relations

WKYC-TV anchor and reporter Eric Mansfield will become Kent State University's new executive director for university media relations. The award-winning journalist and Akron native begins his new position with the university on June 1.

Mansfield will lead the media relations team in the University Communications and Marketing department. He will be responsible for developing and implementing public relations plans and strategies to enhance the university's image with internal and external audience. He also will be involved with Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, teaching and mentoring journalism students.

“Eric brings a wealth of media knowledge and contacts to Kent State,” said Tom Neumann, associate vice president for university communications and marketing. “He will add to a great team, increase our capacity to continue to tell our great story and reinforce Kent State's role as Northeast Ohio's leading public university, and help us leverage the recognition we are gaining nationally. He has a great reputation, is well-respected and is a true class act.

“Eric is no stranger to Kent State,” Neumann continued. “Over the years, he has covered Kent State and has done stories on our students' successes, served as a guest speaker at our School of Journalism and Mass Communication and has spent many hours on our campus with his youngest son's involvement in our musical productions. He also is pursuing his master's degree from Kent State. We're excited to have him join us to share the many great stories and news coming out of this great university.”

Mansfield said he is looking forward to this new position with Kent State.

“This is a great opportunity for me to join a world-class organization,” Mansfield said. “I can't wait to be part of telling the great news of Kent state University every day. As much as I love being a journalist, I'm really excited about working with young journalist, crafting their skills at Kent State.”

Mansfield received bachelor's degrees in journalism and broadcasting from the University of Dayton. He expects to earn a master's degree in public relations from Kent State in fall 2012. While at the University of Dayton, Mansfield hosted an evening sports call-in show on WDCR-AM (campus radio) while completing television internships with WAKC-TV (Akron), WHIO-TV (Dayton) and ESPN. In 1991, he was named the Omar Williams Award winner as the university's top broadcasting graduate.

He began his professional broadcast career doing play-by-play sports announcing in college and later anchored overnight news reports at WHIO-TV in Dayton. In 1992, Mansfield came home to Akron as an anchor-reporter with WAKC-TV.

Mansfield's recognition includes Emmy awards for Outstanding Service Reporting, Outstanding Live Reporting, and Outstanding Continuous Coverage for the Channel 3 News series “Project AED,” which identified dozens of local areas that were in need of the life-saving devices. He has been nominated for many other Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Anchor. His work also has been honored by the Cleveland Press Club, the Ohio Associated Press and the Ohio Broadcasters Hall of Fame.

A major in the Ohio National Guard, Mansfield spent 14 months on active duty in 2003-2004 in Iraq and Kuwait and responded with other Ohio Guardsmen in 2005 to the Gulf Coast to assist with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. He also responded to help lead a platoon of MPs at the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993, and he was the honor graduate and class president of his Officer Candidate School class. Mansfield is a graduate of multiple military leadership and management academies, including the Defense Equal Opportunity Military Institute (DEOMI) in Coco Beach, Fla. His awards include the Army Commendation Medal (two) and service ribbons for Iraq, Hurricane Katrina and other deployments. His commander nominated him for the Bronze Star for his service in Iraq. Mansfield retired from the military with 20 years of faithful service.

He lives in Akron with his wife, Lisa, and their three sons.

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