Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
College of Technology (1)
Geography (2)
Government Relations (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Office of the Provost (1)
Police Services (1)
University Communications and Marketing (1)


Headline Date Outlet

College of Technology (1)
Going Places: March 26, 2012 03/27/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


Geography (2)
Shelter from the storm: Be prepared this tornado season (Schmidlin) 03/26/2012 CorneliusNews.net Text Attachment Email

...got in touch with some experts, and what I learned made be feel better. So for this column, I want to share that information with you. Tom Schmidlin (Kent State photo) Professor Tom Schmidlin of Kent State University conducts studies on responses to tornadoes and the social aspects of tornadoes,...

Shelter from the storm: Be prepared this tornado season (Schmidlin) 03/26/2012 DavidsonNews.net Text Attachment Email

...got in touch with some experts, and what I learned made be feel better. So for this column, I want to share that information with you. Tom Schmidlin (Kent State photo) Professor Tom Schmidlin of Kent State University conducts studies on responses to tornadoes and the social aspects of tornadoes,...


Government Relations (1)
'Kent State Day' at Statehouse about Finding Jobs for Students (Lefton, Harvey) 03/27/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Plain Dealer Editor Debra Adams Simmons awarded the 2012 Robert McGruder Award for Diversity 03/27/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


KSU at Stark (1)
AUDIO Changes Proposed For Kent-Stark (Biasella) 03/27/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Tuscarawas County to host Special Olympics basketball tournament 03/27/2012 Repository, The Text Attachment Email


Office of the Provost (1)
New Presidents Provosts Baldwin-Wallace Saint Rose Kent ONU OKCU Maine Waterloo 03/27/2012 Inside Higher Ed Text Attachment Email

New Presidents or Provosts: Baldwin-Wallace College, College of Saint Rose, Kent State U., Ohio Northern U., Oklahoma Christian U., U. of Maine System, U. of Waterloo David Crago, interim vice president of academic affairs...


Police Services (1)
Emergency response training planned at Stow-Munroe Falls schools (Hendry) 03/27/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...good portion of that. After seeing it, we are excited to bring that training to our entire district," Jones said. Lt. Joseph A. Hendry Jr. of the Kent State police department conducts training in school safety using the ALICE program, which he described as "unique because it addresses the moment...


University Communications and Marketing (1)
The Week: March 19-25, 2012 03/27/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Going Places: March 26, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EDUCATION

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Shin-Min Song to dean, College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

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News Headline: Shelter from the storm: Be prepared this tornado season (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: CorneliusNews.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The sky is ominous. Programing for the evening is preempted. Screens are filled with maps with bright colors and directional tracks and forecasters are relaying watches and warnings and calling for neighborhood after neighborhood to “take shelter immediately!”

It's tornado season.

I've spent most of my life in the north, where storm planning consisted of gathering provisions, gassing up the snow blower, and hunkering down until the worst was over. I always knew that we might be inconvenienced, but my family would be safe. As I sit in my Cornelius home with tornado watches in the air, I don't have that sense of security. I've seen too many photos of concrete slabs wiped clean and homes made into match sticks.

Knowing that I needed more information, I got in touch with some experts, and what I learned made be feel better. So for this column, I want to share that information with you.

Tom Schmidlin (Kent State photo)

Professor Tom Schmidlin of Kent State University conducts studies on responses to tornadoes and the social aspects of tornadoes, such as the risk of death.  I asked him how concerned we should be with tornado season already underway. He started by putting the overall risk in perspective.

“The chance of a home being hit by a tornado is very small and the chance of EF-5 damage (the most deadly) at a home is very, very small,” he said.

A look at the data confirms what he says. Between 1991 and 2010, North Carolina averaged 31 tornadoes per year. In Cornelius, the risk of earthquakes is higher than the risk of tornadoes, and both are much lower than the national average. See the chart for risk scores:

From www.americantowns.com

Even more comforting is the fact that most tornadoes are of low intensity. Using the scale developed by professor T. Theodore Fujita in 1971 and modified in 2007, the most deadly tornadoes – those ranked EF-3 through EF-5 – account for just 26 percent of the storms (and 67 percent of storm-related deaths). But, North Carolina is outside the core of high-risk states. On average, an EF-3 through EF-5 tornado will strike the state just once every two years. As Professor Schmidlin suggests, it may be many years before a tornado of any strength would strike anywhere close to our homes.

INTERIOR ROOM OR SEPARATE SHELTER?

I asked Professor Schmidlin if the conventional wisdom of sheltering in an interior room was still valid advice.

“The ideal answer is to build a safe room or a small underground tornado shelter, either under the slab or outdoors near the home,” he said. “If a person feels unsafe in their home, they could identify a sturdier building nearby that will be open and available as a shelter. This would not include retail stores, gas stations, or convenience stores, but some government buildings are probably stronger than a house.”

I asked Cornelius officials about opening government buildings as storm shelters, but they said they don't want people on the roads in the face of a tornado, and would prefer they seek shelter at home. They did agree that a study of the options was necessary, however.

Ernst Kiesling (Texas Tech photo)

With well-constructed storm shelters heading the FEMA storm protection options, I contacted Ernst Kiesling, Professor of Civil Engineering at Texas Tech University and Executive Director of the National Storm Shelter Association. His response was clear: build a shelter.

“There are well established standards (ICC 500) and guidelines (FEMA 320 and 361) for storm shelters that offer a very high degree of protection from the most extreme windstorms,” Professor Kiesling said.  “The design criteria and the designs in these publications lead to the peace of mind of knowing that a safe place is available. Most other strategies leave uneasiness as to the severity of the storm and many, many ‘what if' questions.”

SHELTER: TO BUILD OR NOT TO BUILD?

Professor Kiesling is right. A sturdy timber and metal shelter can be built in a home for about $2,500. A commercial shelter with plywood and Kevlar starts at about $6,000. There are photos of a DuPont Kevlar shelter standing in the wreckage of Joplin and it is clearly impressive protection.

But here's another point to consider: even though tornadoes are scary, few people will die in one. Your odds of a tornado death are 1 in 60,000. Dying in an air crash has odds of 1 in 20,000. Falling down kills 1 in 246. Perhaps it's better to spend $2,000 to fall-proof your home than on a storm shelter.

Many of us simply do not have the space to build a shelter either in  or under our home or in the back yard. We need a practical, cost-effective answer to the sheltering question.

Professor Schmidlin offered this advice:

“I think the best advice is still the standard—get into a small, interior room without windows, wear a helmet, cover up with blankets. Wear sturdy shoes, take work gloves, and keep your phone with you.”

When pressed, storm shelter expert Professor Kiesling gave similar advice.

“I would suggest taking refuge in the most central part of the lowest level of the house. Put as many walls between you and the outdoors as possible. A small room such as a closet, under a stairway, pantry or bathroom has more inherent stiffness and strength due to the higher concentration of structural members. Stay away from windows and the fall radius of chimneys, most of which are not reinforced. If heavy furniture is available, get under it.”

FEMA—The Federal Emergency Management Agency—concurs in this advice and adds the following tips for homeowners:

Most injuries come from flying debris so protect the head.

Do not open windows. The storm may take them out anyway, but keep the envelop closed as long as you can.

Leave a mobile home or vehicle for better shelter. If none is available, lie flat in a depression or ditch, not under an overpass or bridge.

Since half of all tornado injuries occur after the storm has passed, watch for nails and sharp debris, unstable structures, broken gas lines and exposed electrical lines.

There is much more information available on-line. If you want to build a shelter or just have better information to deal with the storm, see the following sources.

CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response—Tornado page at http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/tornadoes/prepared.asp

Texas Tech Wind Science and Engineering Research Center (WiSE) http://www.depts.ttu.edu/weweb/

FEMA Tornado Preparedness at http://www.ready.gov/tornadoes

Tornado Protection: Selecting Refuge Area in Buildings. FEMA P-431. Design details for engineers and architects for tornado protection, http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=1563

Build A Safe Room

Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House. FEMA L-233. Brochure providing details about obtaining information about how to build a wind-safe room to withstand tornado, hurricane and other high winds.

Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House. FEMA L-320. Manual with detailed information about how to build a wind-safe room to withstand tornado, hurricane and other high winds.

DuPont Storm Room with Kevlar at http://www.stormsolutions.us/stormrooms.html

This post was written by:

Christina Ritchie Rogers - who has written 15 posts on Real Estate.

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News Headline: Shelter from the storm: Be prepared this tornado season (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: DavidsonNews.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The sky is ominous. Programing for the evening is preempted. Screens are filled with maps with bright colors and directional tracks and forecasters are relaying watches and warnings and calling for neighborhood after neighborhood to “take shelter immediately!”

It's tornado season.

I've spent most of my life in the north, where storm planning consisted of gathering provisions, gassing up the snow blower, and hunkering down until the worst was over. I always knew that we might be inconvenienced, but my family would be safe. As I sit in my Cornelius home with tornado watches in the air, I don't have that sense of security. I've seen too many photos of concrete slabs wiped clean and homes made into match sticks.

Knowing that I needed more information, I got in touch with some experts, and what I learned made be feel better. So for this column, I want to share that information with you.

Tom Schmidlin (Kent State photo)

Professor Tom Schmidlin of Kent State University conducts studies on responses to tornadoes and the social aspects of tornadoes, such as the risk of death.  I asked him how concerned we should be with tornado season already underway. He started by putting the overall risk in perspective.

“The chance of a home being hit by a tornado is very small and the chance of EF-5 damage (the most deadly) at a home is very, very small,” he said.

A look at the data confirms what he says. Between 1991 and 2010, North Carolina averaged 31 tornadoes per year. In Davidson and Cornelius, the risk of earthquakes is higher than the risk of tornadoes, and both are much lower than the national average. See the chart for risk scores:

From www.americantowns.com

Even more comforting is the fact that most tornadoes are of low intensity. Using the scale developed by professor T. Theodore Fujita in 1971 and modified in 2007, the most deadly tornadoes – those ranked EF-3 through EF-5 – account for just 26 percent of the storms (and 67 percent of storm-related deaths). But, North Carolina is outside the core of high-risk states. On average, an EF-3 through EF-5 tornado will strike the state just once every two years. As Professor Schmidlin suggests, it may be many years before a tornado of any strength would strike anywhere close to our homes.

INTERIOR ROOM OR SEPARATE SHELTER?

I asked Professor Schmidlin if the conventional wisdom of sheltering in an interior room was still valid advice.

“The ideal answer is to build a safe room or a small underground tornado shelter, either under the slab or outdoors near the home,” he said. “If a person feels unsafe in their home, they could identify a sturdier building nearby that will be open and available as a shelter. This would not include retail stores, gas stations, or convenience stores, but some government buildings are probably stronger than a house.”

I asked Cornelius officials about opening government buildings as storm shelters, but they said they don't want people on the roads in the face of a tornado, and would prefer they seek shelter at home. They did agree that a study of the options was necessary, however.

Ernst Kiesling (Texas Tech photo)

With well-constructed storm shelters heading the FEMA storm protection options, I contacted Ernst Kiesling, Professor of Civil Engineering at Texas Tech University and Executive Director of the National Storm Shelter Association. His response was clear: build a shelter.

“There are well established standards (ICC 500) and guidelines (FEMA 320 and 361) for storm shelters that offer a very high degree of protection from the most extreme windstorms,” Professor Kiesling said.  “The design criteria and the designs in these publications lead to the peace of mind of knowing that a safe place is available. Most other strategies leave uneasiness as to the severity of the storm and many, many ‘what if' questions.”

A storm shelter (StormSolutions photo)

SHELTER: TO BUILD OR NOT TO BUILD?

Professor Kiesling is right. A sturdy timber and metal shelter can be built in a home for about $2,500. A commercial shelter with plywood and Kevlar starts at about $6,000. There are photos of a DuPont Kevlar shelter standing in the wreckage of Joplin and it is clearly impressive protection.

But here's another point to consider: even though tornadoes are scary, few people will die in one. Your odds of a tornado death are 1 in 60,000. Dying in an air crash has odds of 1 in 20,000. Falling down kills 1 in 246. Perhaps it's better to spend $2,000 to fall-proof your home than on a storm shelter.

Many of us simply do not have the space to build a shelter either in  or under our home or in the back yard. We need a practical, cost-effective answer to the sheltering question.

Professor Schmidlin offered this advice:

“I think the best advice is still the standard—get into a small, interior room without windows, wear a helmet, cover up with blankets. Wear sturdy shoes, take work gloves, and keep your phone with you.”

When pressed, storm shelter expert Professor Kiesling gave similar advice.

“I would suggest taking refuge in the most central part of the lowest level of the house. Put as many walls between you and the outdoors as possible. A small room such as a closet, under a stairway, pantry or bathroom has more inherent stiffness and strength due to the higher concentration of structural members. Stay away from windows and the fall radius of chimneys, most of which are not reinforced. If heavy furniture is available, get under it.”

FEMA—The Federal Emergency Management Agency—concurs in this advice and adds the following tips for homeowners:

Most injuries come from flying debris so protect the head.

Do not open windows. The storm may take them out anyway, but keep the envelop closed as long as you can.

Leave a mobile home or vehicle for better shelter. If none is available, lie flat in a depression or ditch, not under an overpass or bridge.

Since half of all tornado injuries occur after the storm has passed, watch for nails and sharp debris, unstable structures, broken gas lines and exposed electrical lines.

There is much more information available on-line. If you want to build a shelter or just have better information to deal with the storm, see the following sources.

CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response—Tornado page at http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/tornadoes/prepared.asp

Texas Tech Wind Science and Engineering Research Center (WiSE) http://www.depts.ttu.edu/weweb/

FEMA Tornado Preparedness at http://www.ready.gov/tornadoes

Tornado Protection: Selecting Refuge Area in Buildings. FEMA P-431. Design details for engineers and architects for tornado protection, http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=1563

Build A Safe Room

Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House. FEMA L-233. Brochure providing details about obtaining information about how to build a wind-safe room to withstand tornado, hurricane and other high winds.

Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House. FEMA L-320. Manual with detailed information about how to build a wind-safe room to withstand tornado, hurricane and other high winds.

DuPont Storm Room with Kevlar at http://www.stormsolutions.us/stormrooms.html

This post was written by:

Christina Ritchie Rogers - who has written 12 posts on Real Estate.

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News Headline: 'Kent State Day' at Statehouse about Finding Jobs for Students (Lefton, Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: State legislators to host faculty, alumni and employers

Forty Ohio employers are traveling to Columbus Wednesday to join representatives from Kent State University and alumni in the workforce for the university's annual Kent State Day at the Statehouse.

During this daylong advocacy event with the theme “Talent Meets Jobs: A Kent State Education Aligns with Employer Need,” these major Ohio employers will meet with 21 legislators and other state officials to express their recognition of the important role that Kent State plays in workforce development.

Along with employers of Kent State graduates, successful Kent State alumni in the workforce will join the Kent State delegation, which includes Kent State President Lester A. Lefton, members of the board of trustees, deans from Kent State's eight campuses and students, to tell their personal experiences with Kent State in preparing students for work. The employers and graduates represent a diverse group of industry sectors in Northeast Ohio and Central Ohio.

“We have an impressive group of industry leaders who are making an investment of time and effort to come to the Ohio Statehouse and support higher education by discussing their first-hand experience hiring Kent State graduates,” Lefton said. “Some of these corporate executives are also proud Kent State graduates who will share with legislators how Kent State prepared them for successful careers. In addition, these executives are joining us in Columbus to discuss job creation in Ohio and the importance of college-educated talent for the growth and prosperity of their companies.”

The companies represented at the Kent State Day at the Statehouse event collectively provide more than 100,000 jobs for Ohioans. The list of employers includes Abercrombie & Fitch, Allied Machine & Engineering Corporation, Allstate Insurance, Cleveland Clinic, Fahlgren Mortine, FirstEnergy Corporation, First National Bank, Nationwide Insurance, the North Canton Chamber of Commerce, the Ohio Wine Producers Association, Parker Hannifin Corporation, Robinson Memorial Hospital, Saint-Gobain, the Sherwin-Williams Company, Soft-Lite, Summa Health System, the Timken Company, Tinker Omega Manufacturing, University Hospitals Health System, Victoria's Secret, Vocon, Inc. and W.S. Tyler.

Iris Harvey, Kent State vice president for university relations, said Kent State Day at the Statehouse helps advance the mission of Kent State and discuss issues important to higher education.

“Legislators deal with issues every day that greatly impact higher education and workforce development,” Harvey said. “Our elected senators and representatives are very interested in learning directly from employers and graduates about how well Kent State prepares students to meet employer needs.”

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News Headline: Plain Dealer Editor Debra Adams Simmons awarded the 2012 Robert McGruder Award for Diversity | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communications awarded Plain Dealer editor Debra Adams Simmons the 2012 Robert McGruder Award for Diversity during a luncheon at the school Monday.
The school also honored WOIO Channel 19's Lydia Esparra, who was awarded the 2012 Diversity in Media Distinguished Leadership Award.

The McGruder Award, named after the late Robert McGruder, is given to those who help to promote diversity in journalism. A 1963 Kent graduate, McGruder worked for The Plain Dealer, becoming the paper's first black reporter. He went on to become the first black president of the Associated Press Managing Editors and first black editor at the Detroit Free Press.

Adams Simmons, 47, has been with the Plain Dealer since 2007, when she was named managing editor. She was promoted to editor in October 2010.

Before coming to The Plain Dealer, she served as editor and vice president at the Akron Beacon Journal. She also held reporting and editing positions at The Virginian-Pilot, the Detroit Free Press, the Hartford Courant and the Syracuse Herald-Journal.

Adams Simmons works with a number of organizations. She serves as the vice chairwoman for the Center for Nonprofit Excellence and as board chairwoman of the Youth Excellence Performing Arts Workshop.

She is on the board of directors of ATHENA International and serves as its vice chairwoman. She served on the board of directors of the Associated Press Managing Editors, now the Associated Press Media Editors, and the board of the American Society of News Editors.

The Hartford, Conn., native was named one of Crain's Cleveland Business Forty under 40 executives in 2003 and was the winner of the ATHENA Award. She has served as a juror for the Pulitzer Prize three times.

Esparra, who has been with Channel 19 since 2010, has also worked at WKYC Channel 3, WJW Channel 8 and their affiliates in Georgia and Florida and was a free-lance producer for NBC's "Today Show" and "Entertainment Tonight."

Esparra has also taught in the Justice Studies department at KSU and at the Kent State Police Academy.

In 2004, she was inducted into the Akron Broadcasters Hall of Fame.

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News Headline: AUDIO Changes Proposed For Kent-Stark (Biasella) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Stark Campus could be undergoing some big physical changes over the next several years.

Director of External Affairs Tina Biasella says they have some conceptual ideas on addressing growth, but also making the 200-acres feel more like a campus to the all-commuter study body.

"It will be things that are aesthetic as well as really turning the campus into a community educational amenity, so it could include gardens for the community to use," said Biasella.

She says one of the first items to address is construction of a new nursing and science and building, but even that is not in the immediate future.

Biasella says the recent study was really to identify the types of things that could be done to improve the campus, but it all remains in the conceptual phase.

Please click link to access audio:
http://akronnewsnow.com/news/local/item/28710-audio-changes-proposed-for-kent-stark

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News Headline: Tuscarawas County to host Special Olympics basketball tournament | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Almost 600 Special Olympics Ohio athletes are expected to participate in the 2012 Special Olympics Ohio State Basketball Tournament Finals and Individual Skills Contest this weekend at various venues in Tuscarawas County. The events will be held Friday and Saturday at Claymont High School, Dover Middle School, Kent State-Tuscarawas, New Philadelphia High School, and Strasburg High School.

The state tournament features 26 teams representing 20 Ohio counties. The skills contest features more than 300 athletes representing 12 Ohio counties.

State semifinal games are Friday at 4 p.m., 6 and 8 at the various sites. Championship and consolation games are held Saturday at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 1 p.m.

The skills contest is 9 a.m. Saturday at Claymont. All events are free and open to the public.

Almost 600 Special Olympics Ohio athletes are expected to participate in the 2012 Special Olympics Ohio State Basketball Tournament Finals and Individual Skills Contest this weekend at various venues in Tuscarawas County. The events will be held Friday and Saturday at Claymont High School, Dover Middle School, Kent State-Tuscarawas, New Philadelphia High School, and Strasburg High School.

The state tournament features 26 teams representing 20 Ohio counties. The skills contest features more than 300 athletes representing 12 Ohio counties.

State semifinal games are Friday at 4 p.m., 6 and 8 at the various sites. Championship and consolation games are held Saturday at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 1 p.m.

The skills contest is 9 a.m. Saturday at Claymont. All events are free and open to the public.

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News Headline: New Presidents Provosts Baldwin-Wallace Saint Rose Kent ONU OKCU Maine Waterloo | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Inside Higher Ed
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New Presidents or Provosts: Baldwin-Wallace College, College of Saint Rose, Kent State U., Ohio Northern U., Oklahoma Christian U., U. of Maine System, U. of Waterloo

David Crago, interim vice president of academic affairs and dean of the Pettit College of Law at Ohio Northern University, has been promoted to provost/vice president of academic affairs there.

John deSteiguer, senior vice president for advancement at Oklahoma Christian University, has been promoted to president there.

Todd Diacon, deputy chancellor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has been appointed as senior vice president for academic affairs and provost at Kent State University, in Ohio.

Robert Helmer, president of Lourdes College, in Ohio, has been selected as president of Baldwin-Wallace College, also in Ohio.

Sallie Ann Keller, director of the Institute for Defense Analyses Science and Technology Policy Institute, in Washington, D.C., has been named provost and vice president-academic at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario.

James Page, principal and chief executive officer of the James W. Sewall Company and an adjunct professor of philosophy at the University of Maine, has been chosen as chancellor of the University of Maine System.

David Szczerbacki, provost and vice president for academic affairs at the College of Saint Rose, in New York, has been promoted to president there.

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News Headline: Emergency response training planned at Stow-Munroe Falls schools (Hendry) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STOW: In the wake of last month's fatal shootings at Chardon High School, the Stow-Munroe Falls school district plans to train its employees on what to do if an armed intruder comes into one of its buildings.

"We are all mindful of the fact that things like that can happen in any community, and then it does," Stow Mayor Sara Drew said. "It really makes you remember that you need to be prepared."

Teachers will undergo training in the ALICE program this week. According to the group Response Options, its program - Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate - is designed to enhance current lockdown procedures used in schools.

"You are not just locking the door, cowering down and turning off the lights," Drew said. "They are implementing some other enhanced measures for teachers."

School Superintendent Russell Jones said this training will bring "a whole different philosophy of how to deal with intruders and emergencies in the building.

"The whole high school staff did have an overview of the program during our November in-service day. I was able to see a good portion of that. After seeing it, we are excited to bring that training to our entire district," Jones said.

Lt. Joseph A. Hendry Jr. of the Kent State police department conducts training in school safety using the ALICE program, which he described as "unique because it addresses the moment you become aware of an active shooter and gives you options on how to react based on your circumstance."

Hendry recalled speaking with a parent who went through ALICE training at Kent State. He said the parent went home and shared with her daughter what she had learned. Her daughter then found herself in the cafeteria at Chardon when the shooting started.

When the woman's daughter saw the initial shooting and observed students getting under cafeteria tables, she knew how important it was for everyone to evacuate the room, Hendry said. The girl grabbed one of her friends and a stranger and yelled: "My mom said, �Don't hide under tables. You are an easy target. Run!' "

Several students took that advice, he said.

"If they had stayed under those tables and the gunman reloads, you could have easily had triple the amount of casualties," Hendry said.

Under lockdown procedures used in many schools, students and teachers lock the door, cover the window, shut off the lights and hide.

Hendry said that lockdown is a concept that came out of prisons to secure facilities. It might have a place in schools when dealing with a drug or security sweep, but all it does if there is a shooter "is make sure the targets - the kids - are all bunched up and quiet in the kill zone," Hendry said.

ALICE would train everyone to respond more appropriately, he said.

"We don't just train the teachers in a school," Hendry said. "We train everyone. The concepts are portable to anywhere.

"The students aren't always in classrooms. They are in the halls, cafeterias, buses and outside the building during the days. They may be in a position to have to make a decision all by themselves. That is why you train everyone to respond."

Hendry said police officers who work with schools agree that evacuation is the best response. Leaving the place that is posing a threat is generally the best option.

"I have spoken with hundreds of police officers," Hendry said. "I ask them if they talk to their kids about active shooters and I have them raise their hands. Almost all do.

"I ask them to keep their hands up if they tell their kids to stay in the school. Every hand goes down."

Training in the Stow- Munroe Falls schools will take place Wednesday through Friday. Lt. Chad Cunningham of the University of Akron Police Department will be the facilitator.

More information about the ALICE program and Response Options is available at www.roseminars.com .

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News Headline: The Week: March 19-25, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Back to school

Longtime WKYC-TV, Channel 3 correspondent Eric Mansfield is leaving the station after 18 years for a job at Kent State University. Mr. Mansfield, who starts in his new role June 1, will earn $110,000 a year as Kent State's executive director of university media relations. He'll lead the university's media relations team and will teach and mentor students within Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

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