Report Overview:
Total Clips (32)
Aeronautics; Alumni (7)
Alternative Spring Break; Students (1)
Alumni (3)
American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
Art, School of (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geography (1)
Higher Education (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (5)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Safety (2)
Students (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics; Alumni (7)
JetBlue hero is Kent State grad (Palcho) 04/02/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Pilots: Quick thinking saved jet 03/30/2012 Amarillo Globe-News - Online Text Attachment Email

...are going to feel in airplanes.” Dowd decided after taking business administration courses at an Akron, Ohio, college that he wanted to transfer to Kent State University to study to be a pilot, his father said. He piloted Lewis Dowd's first plane ride. His family is proud, but worries about...

Co-Pilot Who Landed JetBlue Plane Was Voted 'Most Understanding' (Palcho) 04/02/2012 Bloomberg Businessweek Text Attachment Email

Irish American hero brought plane down safely after JetBlue pilot freak out - VIDEOS 03/31/2012 IrishCentral Text Attachment Email

...ranted about September 11th and yelled ominous instructions in the cabin of the plane carrying 131 passengers and six cabin crew. Dowd, a 41-year-old Kent State University graduate saved the day by asking Osbon to leave the cockpit before locking the door after him and landing the plane. According...

JetBlue copilot's neighbors not surprised at his composure 04/02/2012 Reuters Text Attachment Email

JetBlue Flight 191 'hero' co-pilot a Kent State graduate 03/30/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...northeast Ohio connection. Jason Dowd, the co-pilot of JetBlue Flight 191, which made an emergency landing because of the pilot's erratic behavior, is a Kent State graduate. Dowd graduated in 1995 and majored in aerospace technology with a concentration of aerospace flight technology. His hometown...

JetBlue co-pilot is a Kent State grad 03/30/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

The co-pilot of the JetBlue plane that made an emergency landing received his flight training at Kent State. Earlier this week, Jason Dowd noticed his co-pilot, Clayton Osbon, acting erratically on a New-York-to-Las-Vegas flight. Dowd made...


Alternative Spring Break; Students (1)
Worthy causes lure students on break (Gosky) 03/30/2012 Deseret News - Online Text Attachment Email

...destinations for many college students on spring break. But some headed to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park to dig ditches and lay drainage pipe. University of Akron seniors Abby Gerdes and Nichole Houze are among 31 who were repairing trails for a few recent days in the park's second annual...


Alumni (3)
"WHIP IT" - DEVO 03/30/2012 CKMM-FM (Hot 103) - Online Text Attachment Email

...of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh , Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving,...

Show & Tell: Entertainment News: Cartoonists Donate Mural 03/30/2012 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...men behind the Funky Winkerbean comic strip celebrated its 40th anniversary by donating a 96-foot mural for a new student lounge at their alma mater, Kent State University. The mural, unveiled by artists Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers, features strip characters and students throughout their college...

'Funky Winkerbean' artists donate mural to Kent State University 03/30/2012 WKEF-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...men behind the "Funky Winkerbean" comic strip celebrated its 40th anniversary by donating a 96-foot mural for a new student lounge at their alma mater, Kent State University. The Akron Beacon Journal reports (http://bit.ly/HgpU7h) the full-color border mural features strip characters and students...


American Association University Professors (AAUP) (1)
KSU faculty unhappy about negotiations (Vincent, Garrison) 03/30/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

March 30--The leadership of the Kent State faculty union is unhappy about contract negotiations and might ask members to OK a strike authorization vote. The KSU chapter of the...


Art, School of (1)
Events Calendar 04/01/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

March 28 The Kent State Downtown Gallery Presents One Artist's Journey Through Time Kent Art No Start Time Kent State's Guest of Honor University Artist/Lecture...


Biological Sciences (1)
Research Findings from Kent State University Update Understanding of Alzheimer Disease (Ding) 04/02/2012 Pain & Central Nervous System Week Text Email

...Moreover, a greater amount of oxidized 5S rRNA was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus of AD subjects compared with controls," wrote Q. Ding and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "These results suggest that the increased oxidation of 5S rRNA, especially the oxidation of free...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
My Town: Kent State Fashion Week 03/31/2012 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Kent State University (KSU) Fashion Week is coming up in April. This student-run event takes place April 26, 27 and 28 from 6 to 10 p.m. at 157...


Geography (1)
Indian Wells palm trees' fate focus of community debate (Schmidlin) 03/30/2012 Burlington Free Press - Online Text Attachment Email

...and Newport Beach. The tree was in a median jointly maintained by the cities, which removed 100 more trees along Irvine Avenue after the accident. Kent State University professor Thomas Schmidlin, who has studied wind-related tree deaths in the United States, found there were 407 from 1995 through...


Higher Education (2)
Free speech under 'FIRE' (Vincent) 04/02/2012 News Record - Online Text Attachment Email

...a space or even set up a table in TUC is way too long. UC requires five business days while other nearby state universities [such as] Wright State and Ohio University require only 24 hours. Both universities also provide many more locations where free speech can take place.” McNay also cites a...

Ohio expands online tutoring for college, university students 04/01/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...a goal of making it available to more than 600,000 students. Currently 21 colleges, including Baldwin-Wallace College, Cleveland State University, Kent State University, Lorain County Community College and the University of Akron, participate in eTutoring, which began with five pilot schools...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Business calendar 03/31/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

SATURDAY YouToo Social Media Conference: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Kent State University's Franklin Hall. Go to tinyurl.com/dx7qt4r for pricing and to register.

Metrics’ Marketing Group Selected to Present on User Experience at YouToo Social Media Conference 20 04/01/2012 PR-Canada.net - Online Text Attachment Email

...how both "seek to understand audiences, identify business objectives and measure outcomes." The YouToo Social Media Conference 2012 will take place at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio on Friday April 13, 2012. More than ever, marketing agencies are seeking to employ user experience design professionals...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Internships bring focus on career choices (Ritter, Marino) 04/01/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...decide if they chose the most suitable career field for their future. Dr. Jim Ritter, director of enrollment management and student service at the Kent State University at Trumbull, said that internships are an excellent opportunity for a student to decide upon their professions. "It's a win-win...


KSU at Tuscarawas (5)
Leadership Tuscarawas Class of 2012 selects 'Hunt for Hunger' as project 04/01/2012 Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...a food drive and scavenger hunt to benefit the Akron-Canton Regional Food Bank scheduled to take place on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Kent State Tuscarawas campus. Non-perishable and monetary donations will be collected and directly benefit food pantries in the Tuscarawas County...

Humor columnist Dave Barry to speak at Kent State Tuscarawas 03/31/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Humor columnist and author Dave Barry will present "The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry" at 7 p.m. April 10 in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. "The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry" is offered as part of Kent State University at Tuscarawas' Voices...

Kent State University, Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts to sponsor computer designed art exhibit 03/31/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts will team up to sponsor the eighth annual Student Computer Designed...

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold 'Hunt for Hunger' food drive, scavenger hunt 03/31/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will hold its "Hunt for Hunger" food drive and scavenger hunt April 21. The event will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on campus,...

Kent State University, Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts to sponsor computer designed art exhibi 03/31/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts will team up to sponsor the eighth annual Student Computer Designed...


Pan-African Studies (1)
KENT STATE'S AFRICAN COMMUNITY THEATRE PRESENTS 'AIN'T NOTHING BUT A THANG' (Dorsey) 03/31/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, March 31 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The African Community Theatre of Kent State University will present its Spring 2012...


Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU clock tower plan put on hold (Lefton, Bruder) 04/02/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's plan to construct a clock tower has been withdrawn from the upcoming Centennial Green project, which will expand Risman Plaza...


Safety (2)
Kent State Police investigating assault Thursday night near residence halls (Vincent) 03/30/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Police are investigating an assault that occurred at 10:10 p.m. Thursday night near the Centennial A and B residence halls....

KSU police probe assault near dormitories (Vincent) 03/31/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University police are investigating an assault that occurred shortly after 10 p.m. Thursday near the Centennial A and B residence halls....


Students (1)
Twinsburg woman is first runner up in Ms. Wheelchair pageant 04/01/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...requirements in place, there are still places that are not easily accessible for people in wheelchairs," she said. Royster is focusing on classes at Kent State University where she is studying non-profit management. She has also spoken at many events on behalf of the Muscular Dystrophy Association....


Town-Gown (1)
Kent residents fighting to save landmark with ties to city's founder 03/31/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...prominent figures of Kent's past, including the city's namesake. The home, located at 250 E. Erie St., is slated for demolition to clear the path for Kent State University's Esplanade walkway extension to link the campus and downtown. Several homes have already been cleared for the project and dirt...


News Headline: JetBlue hero is Kent State grad (Palcho) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The JetBlue pilot who averted disaster by locking an erratic captain out of the cockpit is a Kent State graduate.

Jason Dowd's quick thinking may have saved the lives of fellow crew and passengers on Tuesday's ill-fated flight from New York to Las Vegas that made an emergency landing in Amarillo, Texas.

“The co-pilot was brilliant in keeping that plane together and nobody was hurt,” said Andrew Thomas, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Akron who writes widely on airline safety.

Still, little is known about Dowd, 41, who graduated from Salem High in 1990 and attended KSU from 1990 to 1995, earning a bachelor's degree in aeronautic technology in 1995.

Tim Palcho, chief instructor in KSU's aeronautics program, said Dowd may have learned some of his decision-making skills at KSU. But the university program drills would-be pilots on more common crises such as smoke in the cockpit and engine failure.

Pilots undergo further training by airlines that hire them as they step up the ladder to a major carrier such as JetBlue.

“That training at the airline prepared him for the situation that he encountered,” Palcho said.

UA's Thomas said Dowd took the right steps when confronted by the bizarre behavior and religious ramblings of pilot Clayton Osbon.

Dowd locked Osbon out of the cockpit, changed the combination and alerted flight attendants to prepare passengers to intervene — all textbook examples of what to do during an in-flight emergency.

These kinds of incidents happen rarely, he pointed out, but some are bound to occur given that 26,000 planes take off every day nationwide.

Dowd's quick thinking raises comparisons to Capt. Chesley Sullenberger, who successfully ditched a disabled US Airways flight into New York's Hudson River in 2009 without any injuries.

Dowd's heroism also may put him front and center in this year's Memorial Day parade in the 12,300-person city of Salem, Mayor John Berlin said.

The city would love to showcase Dowd in a convertible with a large sign at the annual event.

Berlin said Dowd's wife, Kathy, has agreed to be a guest in the parade when he reached her by phone this week.

But when he asked if Dowd was home yet with her and his two children, she ducked the question, Berlin said. JetBlue referred questions about Dowd's whereabouts to the FBI.

Dowd's wife and other family members in Columbiana County did not return phone calls.

The mayor said he knows little about Salem's newest hero other than he has helped his father grind tree trunks in his spare time.

“We're awfully proud of him here in town,” Berlin said.

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News Headline: Pilots: Quick thinking saved jet | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Amarillo Globe-News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The night before JetBlue Flight 191 co-pilot Jason Dowd left New York, his mother called to ask how he felt about his upcoming five-hour trip to Las Vegas, his father recalled Thursday.

Dowd, 41, of Salem, Ohio, trained under Capt. Clayton Osbon, a JetBlue flight standards pilot who years before supervised test flights for Dowd and others, his father, Lewis, 82, said.

“As far as I know, there was no problem,” Lewis Dowd, 82, said. “He said, ‘I know the guy really well.'”

Shortly after the jetliner took off Tuesday from John F. Kennedy International Airport, signs emerged that the captain aboard Flight 191 was not the man Jason Dowd knew. Osbon raved incoherently and fiddled with flight controls, an FBI affidavit said. After Osbon left the cockpit, raced up an aisle and pounded on the cockpit door, passengers restrained him as Dowd guided the jetliner to Amarillo.

Federal authorities Wednesday charged Osbon with interfering with a flight crew. The airline has suspended him.

Pilots and others said the drama aboard Flight 191 might have turned tragic had it not been for Dowd's quick thinking.

At one point, Osbon, 49, of Richmond Hill, Ga., asked Dowd to take over the controls, proclaiming, “We need to take a leap of faith,” the affidavit said. Dowd suggested inviting an off-duty captain to the cockpit, ordering a flight attendant to summon the extra pilot, the document said.

After Osbon abruptly left the cockpit, Dowd and the off-duty captain locked the door, the affidavit said.

“The co-pilot is the hero,” said Capt. Dave Funk, of Des Moines, Iowa, a retired Northwest Airlines pilot of 20 years. “He recognized pretty quickly he had to get (Osbon) out of (the cockpit) or he could kill everybody. He is truly the guy who made the difference here. He took what could have been a bad situation into a manageable one.”

Lewis Dowd said his son would balk at such praise.

“Jason doesn't realize what he is,” his father said. “He doesn't want anything to do with it. But the more that comes out, the safer people are going to feel in airplanes.”

Dowd decided after taking business administration courses at an Akron, Ohio, college that he wanted to transfer to Kent State University to study to be a pilot, his father said.

He piloted Lewis Dowd's first plane ride. His family is proud, but worries about a work schedule that takes Dowd about 400 miles from home to his flight base in New York.

“Nowadays, we always worry about him,” Lewis Dowd said. “Machinery can always go haywire, but they are very good. He loves to fly. You have to love it to do that.”

Lewis Dowd said he last heard that his son could return to Ohio by Friday.

In addition to a connection that stretches back to Osbon training Dowd, both pilots had faced family tragedy. In 1995, Ronald Osbon was killed when a small plane he was piloting crashed in Daytona Beach, Fla., according to National Transportation Safety Board records.

For the Dowds, the JetBlue incident evoked a sorrowful memory. Ten years ago this week, Jason Dowd's sister, Cindy, lost her battle with cancer, her father said.

“We all think that Cindy was up there with him to help him down Tuesday,” Lewis Dowd said. “It's weird how things happen sometimes.”

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News Headline: Co-Pilot Who Landed JetBlue Plane Was Voted 'Most Understanding' (Palcho) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Bloomberg Businessweek
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The JetBlue Airways Corp. (JLBU) co-pilot who locked his ranting captain out of the cockpit this week was voted his high-school's “most understanding” senior and, his father said, wouldn't like being called a hero.

Jason Dowd, 41, doesn't think he did anything special March 27 when he diverted the plane to a safe landing, Lewis Dowd said in an interview today.

“You do what you have to do, and I guess that was part of his job,” said Lewis Dowd, 82. “There are a lot of good people, a lot of level-headed people out there. He did the right thing.”

There was no answer this morning at Jason Dowd's home in Salem, Ohio (STOOH1), about 25 miles (40 kilometers) southwest of Youngstown. Perry Township Police Chief Michael Emigh, who was patrolling the neighborhood, said that he spoke with the family last night and that Dowd, who is married with 5- and 3-year-old children, wouldn't be available for comment today.

He might not like being called hero, but he deserves it anyway, said Tim Palcho, chief instructor at Kent State University in Ohio, where Dowd earned an aerospace technology degree.

Dowd went “above and beyond” on March 27, Palcho in a telephone interview today.

“He did his job, and he did it well,” Palcho said.

‘Leap of Faith'
The elder Dowd said he spoke with his son by phone last night in New York and that he was told not to say much.

Capt. Clayton Osbon, charged March 28 with interfering with a flight crew, was tackled by passengers as he pounded on the cockpit door after leaving and then demanding to be let back in, according to an FBI affidavit.

Dowd became concerned about Osbon's behavior shortly after the flight to Las Vegas left New York, according to the filing.

The captain yelled over the radio at air-traffic controllers and rambled about religion, according to the FBI. The co-pilot “became really worried” when Osbon said “we need to take a leap of faith” and “We're not going to Vegas,” the FBI said in the affidavit.

Lewis Dowd said his son has flown before with Osbon, though he had no other details. Jason Dowd has been flying with JetBlue for seven or eight years, his father said.

Dowd is licensed to fly the Airbus SAS A320 and the Embaer SA EMB-190, according to records on the FAA's website. He also received a license as a flight instructor, the records showed.

Ready Shoveler
Helen Beachler, 79, who lives across the street from the one-story home in Salem, Ohio, where Dowd grew up, said she wasn't surprised by his actions. Dowd always tried to be helpful and often volunteered to shovel her driveway, Beachler said.

“I knew he could do it,” Beachler said. “He's a smart boy.”

Dowd attended Salem High School, where he ran track and cross-country, was a member of the band, a science lab aide and voted “most understanding” boy of his senior class in 1990, according to the high-school yearbook.

Lewis Dowd said his son decided in college he wanted to be a pilot. He graduated from Kent State in 1995 with a major in aerospace technology and a concentration in aerospace flight technology, Emily Vincent, a spokeswoman, said in a telephone interview.

Dowd received flight training at the university in emergency situations such as engine failures, though nothing like the one he encountered, Palcho said.

John Paul Tolson, a neighbor of Dowd's in Salem, a city of about 12,000, said he knew Dowd from block picnics.

“It was unbelievable to think a guy who lives right down the street had a role in this,” Tolson, 63, said in a telephone interview. “Small-town pride.”

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News Headline: Irish American hero brought plane down safely after JetBlue pilot freak out - VIDEOS | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: IrishCentral
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Co-pilot Jason Dowd locked crazed captain outside of cockpit and landed the plane smoothly saving 136 lives

Brave co-pilot Jason Dowd

He's been called a “reluctant hero” but it was co-pilot Jason Dowd's steady hands and calm wits that landed the JetBlue flight 191 to Nevada after Captain Clayton Osbon (49) went on a religious tirade and lost control of his senses.

Just days after the catastrophe which saw Irish American Dowd lland the passenger plane safely in Amarillo, Texas, Osbon now faces up to 20 years in prison having been charged with “interfering with the flight crew”.

The New York Daily News reports that if it had not been for Dowd's calm thinking there's no knowing what could have happened on board that flight.

Osbon turned off the radios in the cockpit of the plan and began to dim the monitors. He then ranted about September 11th and yelled ominous instructions in the cabin of the plane carrying 131 passengers and six cabin crew.

Dowd, a 41-year-old Kent State University graduate saved the day by asking Osbon to leave the cockpit before locking the door after him and landing the plane.

According to the criminal charges filed against Osbon he yelled comments about Jesus, September 11th, Iraq, Iran and terrorist. It states “He also yelled, 'Guys, push it to full throttle.'"

The brave co-pilot's mom Jean said “I know he was terrified.

“He didn't know what was going on. He had to use his brain.”

The passengers quickly released that Osbon was out of control and help him down in the aisle as they landed.

Lewis Dowd, the co-pilot's father, said “It had to be a pretty upsetting thing. When you go against the captain, that's almost like mutiny on a boat. It took a lot of guts.”

This scare come a decade after the Dowd family lost their daughter Cindy. Lewis said “We figure that Cindy was with Jason helping him out.”

Dowd telephoned his parents shortly after he landed at Amarillo, Texas. His mother said “He didn't want to say anything against the pilot (Osbon). I was very scared. I am just glad he is on the ground and safe.”

Lewis spoke of the pride he felt knowing his son was safe, watching the footage of the plane land. He said “He was landing that plane under all that pressure, and still it was smooth as could be.”

Speaking withABC NewsJean said “We are very proud. But that was the job he was paid to do. And we are always proud of him. We have been proud of him his whole life."

An FBI affidavit accompanied the charges brought against Osbon on Wednesday. It gives a fresh view of what happened in the cockpit.

It states “Osbon began talking about religion, but his statements were not coherent.” It continued "The [first officer] became concerned when Osbon said 'things just don't matter.'

"Osbon yelled over the radio to air traffic control and instructed them to be quiet."

The co-pilot became really anxious when Osbon said "We need to take a leap of faith," "We're not going to Vegas," and "began giving what the FO described as a sermon."

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) called the incident a “medical emergency”.

JetBlue spokeswoman Tamara Young said “As of now, he's been taken off all active duties and responsibilities pending further investigation."

Osbon was taken off the plane in handcuffs and a wheelchair by Amarillo police. He is now in FBI custody.

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News Headline: JetBlue copilot's neighbors not surprised at his composure | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Reuters
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (Reuters) - The day JetBlue copilot Jason Dowd guided a chaotic flight to safety while its screaming captain lay pinned by passengers on the cabin floor was more than just a day of quick thinking and calm under pressure.

It was virtually ten years to the day Dowd lost his eldest sister to cancer.

Dowd, a father of two young children, still lives in suburban Salem, Ohio, where he graduated from high school, where his parents still live and his sister taught elementary school before her death on March 28, 2002, his family said.

Thirteen years apart, she was the eldest and he was the baby of the family. She helped raise him and he took her death especially hard, his parents, Lewis and Jean Dowd, said in an interview on Friday.

But a decade later, his parents, friends and neighbors were glowing with pride.

Dowd, 41, was working as First Officer on JetBlue Flight 191 from New York en route to Las Vegas on Tuesday when the aircraft's pilot, Clayton Osbon, began acting strangely.

Dowd was able to signal to flight attendants that Osbon, who witnesses said was screaming incoherently about religion and terrorists, needed to be restrained in the cabin. Dowd locked the cockpit door.

As six men tackled Osbon and held him pinned, Dowd was joined by an off-duty pilot and flew the jet with its 135 other passengers and crew to an emergency landing in Amarillo, Texas.

Dowd and other crew members have not spoken publicly about the incident, though they have been questioned extensively by aviation authorities. Osbon was taken into custody and faces criminal charges.

Dowd's composure came as no surprise to his neighbor Barbara Stamp in Salem. "He's the most level-headed guy I know," said Stamp, 69.

Dowd lives with his wife Kathy and their son and daughter, both preschoolers, in a brick house on a corner lot in Salem, a town where residents commute to jobs in nearby Youngstown and Cleveland.

Dowd drives a bit more than an hour to Pittsburgh and flies from there to New York, where JetBlue Airways is based, his neighbors said.

When he is home, he attends the First Christian Church of Salem and likes to barbecue outside with his family when the weather is nice, they said.

"They're the perfect neighbors," said Stamp.

Alas, she added, the Dowds sold their three-bedroom house just this week and plan a move to another home in Salem, population about 12,000, with more garage space.

Those who know Dowd best remarked upon how quiet he is.

His father Lewis, 81, said his son was a quiet kid who never got into trouble. "Next thing you know, he wanted to fly," the elder Dowd said on Friday.

Dowd went to Kent State University, where he learned to fly, and on to jobs at now-defunct Allegheny Airlines and U.S. Airways. He started flying for JetBlue in 2003, his parents said.

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News Headline: JetBlue Flight 191 'hero' co-pilot a Kent State graduate | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By: Connor Kiesel, newsnet5.com

KENT, Ohio - The co-pilot who some are calling a hero for his role in dealing with an in-flight emergency has a northeast Ohio connection.

Jason Dowd, the co-pilot of JetBlue Flight 191, which made an emergency landing because of the pilot's erratic behavior, is a Kent State graduate.

Dowd graduated in 1995 and majored in aerospace technology with a concentration of aerospace flight technology.

His hometown is Salem, Ohio.

Federal prosecutors said the JetBlue flight's pilot Clayton Osborn started acting strangely and was wrestled down in the cabin by passengers, while Dowd made an emergency landing in Texas.

Despite his role in the situation, family said Dowd is deflecting the attention from himself.

"He doesn't want to be known as a hero. Thank God he was there," Dowd's mother-in-law Ruth Ann Kostal told the Associated Press.

The pilot, Osborn, was charged with interfering with a flight crew.

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News Headline: JetBlue co-pilot is a Kent State grad | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The co-pilot of the JetBlue plane that made an emergency landing received his flight training at Kent State.

Earlier this week, Jason Dowd noticed his co-pilot, Clayton Osbon, acting erratically on a New-York-to-Las-Vegas flight. Dowd made the decision to lock Osbon and land in Texas.

Dowd is a 1995 graduate of Kent State's aerospace technology, and he still lives in his hometown of Salem, a half hour southwest of Youngstown.

The Akron Beacon-Journal reports that friends and relatives say Dowd doesn't want to be considered a hero.

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News Headline: Worthy causes lure students on break (Gosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Deseret News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sun-drenched beaches may be the top destinations for many college students on spring break.

But some headed to the Cuyahoga Valley National Park to dig ditches and lay drainage pipe.

University of Akron seniors Abby Gerdes and Nichole Houze are among 31 who were repairing trails for a few recent days in the park's second annual Alternative Spring Break.

"They walk away from something thinking, 'I had a major hand in that. I did good today,'" park ranger Josh Bates said. "I hope with sore muscles comes a sense of satisfaction."

The park program is one of dozens of options available to college students who want to do something more productive than party in the sun during their mid-semester break.

Many universities offer alternative spring break programs, sometimes in other countries such as the Dominican Republic and Jamaica, often accompanied by staff and faculty, and sometimes even for credit if the work is related to the students' major.

At Kent State, for example, 86 students volunteered for five trips that began last week, KSU senior special assistant Anne Gosky said.

Students are helping community agencies on Cleveland's near west side, volunteering at the country's largest homeless shelter in Washington, D.C., and building homes with Habitat for Humanity in western New York.

The university has gotten away from the weeklong trips repairing homes in the hurricane-damaged south, a popular venue for students from around the country for the last several years.

KSU is opting for shorter trips that take as little as three days and that are closer to home. Costs are relatively modest - anywhere from $60 to $250 for food, housing and transportation, so they fit into many students' budgets.

"We were spending 20 hours on a bus getting to Biloxi, Miss.," Gosky recalled. "We'd lose a day going and coming back" and that ate up a lot of time.

The University of Akron this spring break offered five trips at $250 each. Students could help with hunger relief in Charlotte, N.C., for instance, or renovate a camp in Winder, Ga.

University of Akron assistant professor Craig Wise struck off on his own, recruiting 25 students in construction technology to help repair homes in Nashville.

Members of the student group Ambassadors for Rebuilding received some college credit for repairing homes damaged by torrential rains and flooding in May 2010.

Wise divided students into four teams that tackled two or three houses each, repairing sub-floors, installing handrails and demolishing and then pouring concrete for a new sidewalk.

Students got a taste of the planning that goes into construction, as well.

Before the trip, the sponsoring organizations Rebuilding Together and Southeast Nashville Recovery provided students with home inspection reports so they could create tool and material lists.

"That's one of the really beautiful things - watching students appreciate the intricacies of getting the work done on a schedule," Wise said.

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News Headline: "WHIP IT" - DEVO | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: CKMM-FM (Hot 103) - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, OH, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh , Devo took its name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving, mankind has actually regressed, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society. Their music echoed this view of society as rigid, repressive, and mechanical, with appropriate touches -- jerky, robotic rhythms; an obsession with technology and electronics (the group was among the first non-prog rock bands to make the synthesizer a core element); often atonal melodies and chord progressions -- all of which were filtered through the perspectives of geeky misfits. Devo became a cult sensation, helped in part by their concurrent emphasis on highly stylized visuals, and briefly broke through to the mainstream with the smash single "Whip It," whose accompanying video was made a staple by the fledgling MTV network. Sometimes resembling a less forbidding version of the Residents , Devo 's simple, basic electronic pop sound proved very influential, but it was also somewhat limited, and as other bands began expanding on the group's ideas, Devo seemed unable to keep pace. After a series of largely uninteresting albums, the band called it quits early in the '90s, and Casale and Mothersbaugh concentrated on other projects.

Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh both attended art school at Kent State University at the outset of the '70s. With friend Bob Lewis, who joined an early version of Devo and later became their manager, the theory of de-evolution was developed with the aid of a book entitled The Beginning Was the End: Knowledge Can Be Eaten, which held that mankind had evolved from mutant, brain-eating apes. The trio adapted the theory to fit their view of American society as a rigid, dichotomized instrument of repression which ensured that its members behaved like clones, marching through life with mechanical, assembly-line precision and no tolerance for ambiguity. The whole concept was treated as an elaborate joke until Casale witnessed the infamous National Guard killings of student protesters at the university; suddenly there seemed to be a legitimate point to be made. The first incarnation of Devo was formed in earnest in 1972, with (lead guitar) and Jim , who played homemade electronic drums. Jerry 's brother Bob joined as an additional guitarist, and Jim left the band to be replaced by Alan Myers . The group honed its sound and approach for several years (a period chronicled on Rykodisc's Hardcore compilations of home recordings), releasing a few singles on its own Booji Boy label and inventing more bizarre concepts: Mothersbaugh dressed in a baby-faced mask as Booji Boy (pronounced "boogie boy"), a symbol of infantile regression; there were recurring images of the potato as a lowly vegetable without individuality; the band's costumes presented them as identical clones with processed hair; and all sorts of sonic experiments were performed on records, using real and homemade synthesizers as well as toys, space heaters, toasters, and other objects. Devo 's big break came with its score for the short film The Truth About De-Evolution, which won a prize at the 1976 Ann Arbor Film Festival; when the film was seen by David Bowie and Iggy Pop , they were impressed enough to secure the group a contract with Warner Bros.

Recorded under the auspices of pioneering producer Brian Eno , Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! was seen as a call to arms by some and became an underground hit. Others found Devo 's sound, imagery, and material threatening; Rolling Stone, for example, called the group fascists. But such criticism missed the point: Devo dramatized conformity, emotional repression, and dehumanization in order to attack them, not to pay tribute to them.

While 1979's Duty Now for the Future was another strong effort, the band broke through to the mainstream with 1980's Freedom of Choice , which contained the gold-selling single "Whip It" and represented a peak in their sometimes erratic songwriting. The video for "Whip It" became an MTV smash, juxtaposing the band's low-budget futuristic look against a down-home farm setting and hints of S&M. However, Devo 's commercial success proved to be short-lived. 1981's New Traditionalists was darker and more serious, not what the public wanted from a band widely perceived as a novelty act, and Devo somehow seemed to be running out of new ideas. Problems plagued the band as well: Bob Lewis successfully sued for theft of intellectual property after a tape of Mothersbaugh was found acknowledging Lewis' role in creating de-evolution philosophy, and the sessions for 1982's Oh, No! It's Devo were marred by an ill-considered attempt to use poetry written by would-be Ronald Reagan assassin John Hinckley, Jr. as lyrical material.

As the '80s wore on, Devo found itself relegated to cult status and critical indifference, not at all helped by the lower quality of albums like 1984's Shout and 1988's Total Devo . With the band's shift toward electronic drums, Alan Myers departed in 1986, to be replaced by ex- . Devo recorded another album of new material, Smooth Noodle Maps , in 1990, after which its members began to concentrate on other projects. Mark Mothersbaugh moved into composing for commercials and soundtracks, writing theme music for MTV's Liquid Television, Nickelodeon's Rugrats, Pee-Wee's Playhouse, and the Jonathan Winters sitcom Davis Rules. He also played keyboards with the Rolling Stones , programmed synthesizers for Sheena Easton , and sang backup with Debbie Harry . Buoyed by this success, Mothersbaugh opened a profitable production company called Mutato Muzika, which employed his fellow Devo bandmates. Jerry Casale , meanwhile, who directed most of the band's videos, directed video clips for the Foo Fighters ' "I'll Stick Around" and Soundgarden 's "Blow Up the Outside World." No reunions were expected, but as Devo 's legend grew and other bands acknowledged their influence ( Nirvana covered "Turnaround," while "Girl U Want" has been recorded by Soundgarden , Superchunk , and even Robert Palmer ), their minimalistic electro-pop was finally given new exposure on six dates of the 1996 Lollapalooza tour, to enthusiastic fan response.

The following year, Devo released a CD-ROM game (The Adventures of the Smart Patrol) and accompanying music soundtrack, in addition to playing selected dates on the Lollapalooza tour. 2000 saw the release of a pair of double-disc Devo anthologies: the first was the half-hits/half-rarities Pioneers Who Got Scalped: The Anthology (on Rhino), while the second was the limited-edition mail-order release Recombo DNA (on Rhino's Handmade label), the latter of which was comprised solely of previously unreleased demos. In 2001, the Mothersbaugh and Casale brothers reunited under the name the Wipeouters for a one-off surf release, P'Twaaang!!! Casale would introduce his Jihad Jerry & the Evildoers solo project with the 2006 album Mine Is Not a Holy War . It was that same year that the band teamed with Disney for Dev2.0 , a band/project/album that involved a set of pre-teens re-recording classic Devo tracks, although some lyrics were adjusted to be more “family friendly.” Devo got back to releasing their own material in 2007 with the downloadable single "Watch Us Work It," but a new, promised album failed to materialize. In 2008 they returned to Akron for a rare show and in support of Barack Obama's presidential campaign with all proceeds going towards the Summit County Democratic Party. After deluxe 2009 reissues of Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! and Freedom of Choice sent the band back on the road to play said albums live in their entirety, work resumed on a new album. By the end of the year, it was announced that the band had once again signed with Warner for an album originally titled "Fresh." An internet campaign where fans got to choose the full-length's 12 tracks inspired the 2010 effort, Something for Everybody .

_ Steve Huey & Greg Prato, Rovi



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News Headline: Show & Tell: Entertainment News: Cartoonists Donate Mural | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The men behind the Funky Winkerbean comic strip celebrated its 40th anniversary by donating a

96-foot mural for a new student lounge at their alma mater, Kent State University.

The mural, unveiled by artists Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers, features strip characters and

students throughout their college careers.

Funky Winkerbean, created by Batiuk, made its debut on March 27, 1972.

Ayers joined Batiuk as illustrator in 1994.

The mural unveiling marked the launch of the first volume of the

Complete Funky Winkerbean book.

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News Headline: 'Funky Winkerbean' artists donate mural to Kent State University | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKEF-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) -- The men behind the "Funky Winkerbean" comic strip celebrated its 40th anniversary by donating a 96-foot mural for a new student lounge at their alma mater, Kent State University.

The Akron Beacon Journal reports (http://bit.ly/HgpU7h) the full-color border mural features strip characters and students throughout their college careers. It was unveiled Tuesday by artists Tom Batiuk of Medina and Chuck Ayers of Akron.

Batiuk's "Funky Winkerbean" debuted March 27, 1972. Ayers joined him as illustrator in 1994.

The strip at first focused on gags about teenagers at the imaginary Westview High School. Over the years, it explored sensitive topics such as dyslexia, alcoholism, teen suicide and cancer.

The unveiling also was the kick-off of the first volume of Batiuk's book, "The Complete Funky Winkerbean."

Information from: Akron Beacon Journal, http://www.ohio.com

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News Headline: KSU faculty unhappy about negotiations (Vincent, Garrison) | Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: March 30--The leadership of the Kent State faculty union is unhappy about contract negotiations and might ask members to OK a strike authorization vote.

The KSU chapter of the American Association of University Professors told members this week that the administration wants "severe cutbacks in governance and minimal salary increases."

If significant progress isn't made in the next couple of weeks, the AAUP leadership might seek a strike authorization vote, authorize informational picketing or request federal mediation assistance, according to the unsigned email.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said it was inappropriate to respond to ongoing negotiations. AAUP chief negotiator Eric Mintz, an associate professor of biology, declined comment.

The union and administration have been negotiating since July on a contract to replace the three-year deal that ended in August.

In the letter to 800-some full-time faculty, the AAUP said a limited number of issues remain to be resolved but they are important ones.

Among them, the AAUP says the administration is offering 2 percent raises and the possibility that there will be no retroactive raises if there isn't a tentative accord by Saturday.

The administration also would increase medical premiums to 17 percent of costs by 2014, parallel with a new negotiated agreement with the KSU chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Currently, KSU's 3,400 benefits-eligible employees pay about 14 percent of the university's cost for health care, Vincent said. Employees in the lower tiers pay a lower percentage and those in the higher tiers pay a higher percentage.

Among other issues, the administration would change the "structure and organization" of college, campus and unit handbooks. That would water down the issues that faculty could grieve, according to the AAUP.

The administration's positions would amount to a wage cut "at a time when most people could least afford it," according to an email from George Garrison, a KSU professor of pan-African studies and president of the Pan-African Faculty and Staff Association. His organization is not directly involved in the AAUP negotiations.

In emails sent to faculty and administrators, Garrison appealed for a 5 percent wage hike and no raise in the medical premium.

"This is not too much to request; it is not too much to expect; it is not a large bonus; nor is it unreasonable," wrote Garrison, who is chairman of the AAUP's Racial and Ethnic Concerns Committee.

His organization is seeking "proper recognition and valuing of the role of the faculty in the success of this institution," according to the emails.

Garrison could not be reached for comment.

According to an Ohio State survey of faculty salaries at the 12 tax-supported colleges statewide in 2010-11, the average nine-month salary for a full KSU professor was $106,444, third-highest statewide.

The average salary for KSU associate professors was $77,356 and for assistant professors, $66,540, both fourth-highest statewide.

The AAUP represents full-time tenure or tenure-track faculty on all eight KSU campuses. Tenure confers virtual lifetime employment.


Copyright © 2012 The Akron Beacon Journal, Ohio

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News Headline: Events Calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: March 28

The Kent State Downtown Gallery Presents One Artist's Journey Through Time
Kent
Art
No Start Time

Kent State's Guest of Honor University Artist/Lecture Series Presents Renowned Author and Poet
Kent
Speakers
6:00p

Kent State's Guest of Honor University Artist/Lecture Series Presents Renowned Author and Poet
Kent
Speakers
Portage County
Education
6:30p

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News Headline: Research Findings from Kent State University Update Understanding of Alzheimer Disease (Ding) | Email

News Date: 04/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Pain & Central Nervous System Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Research findings, "Increased 5S rRNA Oxidation in Alzheimer's Disease," are discussed in a new report. "It is widely accepted that oxidative stress is involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is one of the most abundant molecules in most cells and is affected by oxidative stress in the human brain," investigators in East Liverpool, Ohio report (see also ).

"Previous data have indicated that total rRNA levels were decreased in the brains of subjects with AD and mild cognitive impairment concomitant with an increase in rRNA oxidation. In addition, level of 5S rRNA, one of the essential components of the ribosome complex, was significantly lower in the inferior parietal lobule (IP) brain area of subjects with AD compared with control subjects. To further evaluate the alteration of 5S rRNA in neurodegenerative human brains, multiple brain regions from both AD and age-matched control subjects were used in this study, including IP, superior and middle temporal gyro, temporal pole, and cerebellum. Different molecular pools including 5S rRNA integrated into ribosome complexes, free 5S rRNA, cytoplasmic 5S rRNA, and nuclear 5S rRNA were studied. Free 5S rRNA levels were significantly decreased in the temporal pole region of AD subjects and the oxidation of ribosome-integrated and free 5S rRNA was significantly increased in multiple brain regions in AD subjects compared with controls. Moreover, a greater amount of oxidized 5S rRNA was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus of AD subjects compared with controls," wrote Q. Ding and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "These results suggest that the increased oxidation of 5S rRNA, especially the oxidation of free 5S rRNA, may be involved in the neurodegeneration observed in AD."

Ding and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (Increased 5S rRNA Oxidation in Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 2012;29(1):201-9).

For additional information, contact Q. Ding, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent State University at East Liverpool, East Liverpool, OH, United States.

The publisher of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease can be contacted at: IOS Press, Nieuwe Hemweg 6B, 1013 BG Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Copyright © 2012 Pain & Central Nervous System Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: My Town: Kent State Fashion Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Kent State University (KSU) Fashion Week is coming up in April.

This student-run event takes place April 26, 27 and 28 from 6 to 10 p.m. at 157 Lounge, located at 157 S. Water St. in Kent.

Forty-two KSU senior fashion design students conduct this event, in which two designers present their work every 30 minutes.

The event is free and open to the public.

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News Headline: Indian Wells palm trees' fate focus of community debate (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Burlington Free Press - Online
Contact Name: Blake Herzog The Desert Sun
News OCR Text: Experts: Falling trees do kill or injure, but only in rare instances

Palm trees line the border between the Casa Dorado community and its neighbors on Friday March 23, 2012 in Indian Wells. / Richard Lui The Desert Sun

INDIAN WELLS — Are palm trees, the ubiquitous botanical icon of the Coachella Valley, dangerous?

Indian Wells and its Casa Dorado subdivision are mired in such a debate after two date palms fell and crashed into the roofs of houses in the adjacent Sundance neighborhood — one being Councilman Patrick Mullany's home — where it caused $75,000 in damage. No one was hurt.

Now the fate of the 38 other palms lining Casa Dorado's main drag is being debated with dueling arborists — the city saying the trees are hazardous and need to be chopped down, and the neighborhood's HOA saying that's just hysterics.

It's created enough of a stir that the issue has made the April 5 City Council meeting agenda, and a letter from Interim City Manager Rod Wood is being inserted into the city's April newsletter.

Mullany has declined to comment further on the tree fracas, citing advice from legal counsel.

Death or injury from falling palm trees is rare, but not unheard of.

A 15-year-old Hesperia boy, Moises Casas, was killed in September 2010 when a recently planted palm in his family's front yard fell over while he was taking out the trash.

In 2000, Los Angeles paid a $7.6 million settlement to a man who was paralyzed after being hit by a falling palm tree. The city had marked the tree for removal earlier because it was dead.

As for other stands of trees deemed dangerous and taken down en masse, in September 2011, a 50-foot blue gum eucalyptus tree fell and crushed 29-year-old Haeyoon Miller in her car as she waited for a red light on the border of Costa Mesa and Newport Beach.

The tree was in a median jointly maintained by the cities, which removed 100 more trees along Irvine Avenue after the accident.

Kent State University professor Thomas Schmidlin, who has studied wind-related tree deaths in the United States, found there were 407 from 1995 through 2007.

A map accompanying the study indicates only a handful happened in Southern California. It's unclear if any were from palms.

The Casa Dorado tree that hit Mullany's house in January went down in a windstorm, but the city and HOA dispute whether the first tree, which fell in April 2011, also was a victim of wind.

Sam Aslan, a retired U.S. Department of Agriculture district conservationist who managed the Indio USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service office for 30 years, said he has heard of “one or two” deaths locally due to falling palm trees, dating back more than a decade.

“I've seen hundreds of palm trees go down over the years,” he said. “You see them on cars, in pools, at country clubs. There was one that landed in a pool and almost killed a little girl,” he said.

Desert Sun archives going back to 1998 don't show stories about palm tree deaths, though at least 20 people have been killed when vehicles slammed into palm trees.

Aslan is the second consultant called in by Indian Wells to evaluate the palms. The first also deemed the trees treacherous.

The roots are “very brittle, not healthy, not able to pump water to the top, to the leaves,” Aslan said.

His recommendation was to remove seven of the palms right away, which the HOA did. “The rest also pose a danger to society,” he said.

But the HOA's arborist called in from San Diego, Mark Robinson, said he saw no signs that the trees were unhealthy or water-deprived.

Even when he came back to look at cross-sections of those seven trees that were cut down, he saw only healthy vascular tissue, indicative of a tree that was getting enough water.

“It was actually exciting because I never get to dissect healthy trees,” he said. “I'm usually called in when there's a problem.”

He stands by his verdict that the trees are fine.

“I would have been the first one to say you need to take these trees out if I thought there was a problem,” he said.

Maureen Gilmer, a nationally known horticulturalist and author who is a columnist for The Desert Sun, said she wouldn't be overly concerned about the remaining trees, even if they haven't been getting enough water.

“The fact that they are falling over due to lack of water is an easy fix, and the additional irrigation should help. But the notion of removing all of them is just crazy and wasteful,” she wrote in an email.

P.S. Freberg, a Casa Dorado resident who was the HOA's landscape chair for nine years, said she's gotten about 30 phone calls from people outside of the community who support the HOA's fight to keep the trees.

The HOA has scheduled a member meeting for Saturday afternoon.

“I imagine it'll be an interesting meeting,” she said.

The only way out of the impasse is for the HOA and city to pay equally for another arborist, she said, as long as both sides agree to “bite the bullet” and let the arborist decide which trees need to stay or go.

Wood said he's willing to do that. It was an offer already made during tree negotiations with the HOA.

“If it means fewer trees are taken out, I'll be just as happy as the residents,” Wood said.

The city has only issued one other citation for having a dead, diseased or hazardous palm tree, according to Mel Winsor, Indian Wells' personnel/public safety director. That was to a homeowner last August.

Blake Herzog covers Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage for The Desert Sun, and can be reached at (760) 778-4757 or blake.herzog@thedesertsun.com.

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News Headline: Free speech under 'FIRE' (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: News Record - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In the midst of a federal civil rights lawsuit alleging First Amendment violations by the University of Cincinnati, the school received another black eye last week when it was named one of the nation's worst colleges for free speech.

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education ( FIRE ) — a nonprofit educational foundation that promotes individual rights and due process at colleges and universities throughout the United States — named UC to its 2012 list of “The 12 Worst Colleges for Free Speech” March 27.

The list — which includes such schools as Harvard University, Yale University, Syracuse University and Michigan State University — was for institutions “severely violating the speech rights of students, faculty members, or both,” according to a statement accompanying FIRE's list.

UC was the only Ohio college or university named among the 12 schools and was pinpointed by FIRE based primarily on the university's “Free Speech Area” policy, which FIRE labeled “shockingly restrictive.”

“These colleges and universities have deeply violated the principles that are supposed to animate higher education,” said Greg Lukianoff, president of FIRE . “Sunlight is one of the best disinfectants, and the public needs to know which schools to watch out for.”

The distinction is the latest in what has become a growing issue at UC, which finds itself embroiled as the defendant in a federal civil rights lawsuit filed in February by the UC chapter of Young Americans for Liberty ( YAL ) with the cooperation of FIRE and Ohio's 1851 Center for Constitutional Law.

The lawsuit was brought against the university after a request was denied for YAL to gather signatures and speak to students throughout campus regarding support of a “right to work” ballot initiative. The group was instead placed in the campus “Free Speech Area” located in the northwest corner of McMicken Commons.

The lawsuit alleges First Amendment violations on the part of UC and asks for an immediate injunction against the university's free speech policy. A temporary compromise was reached in March between UC and YAL , allowing the group to petition throughout most open outdoor spaces on campus without having to reregister with UC's scheduling office, and a hearing regarding the lawsuit is slated for May 30.

Legal action FIRE previously participated in resulted in the elimination of similar free speech areas at West Virginia University, Texas Tech University and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

The list isn't the first time, however, UC has been in the crosshairs of FIRE .

The organization criticized the university's free speech policy by naming it “Speech Code of the Month” in December 2007 and also wrote a letter to former UC President Nancy Zimpher in December 2008 regarding the policy, calling it “imperative that Cincinnati immediately revise its illegal and immoral ‘Free Speech Area' policy” and offering guidelines for how UC could revise the regulation.

UC's free speech policy details the procedures and regulations that have incurred the wrath of FIRE .

Policy outlines freedoms

Found on pages 14 and 15 of UC's “Use of Facilities Policy Manual” is the policy that has garnered UC the recent spate of negative attention.

The university's “Free Speech Area” is detailed on page 14 as being “the northwest section of McMicken Commons immediately east of McMicken Hall on the West Campus ... Individuals or groups wanting to use these areas must schedule the activity in the Campus Scheduling Office. Anyone violating this policy might be charged with trespassing. No more than one musical or speaking activity is permitted at the same time.”

The area described in the policy constitutes approximately 0.1 percent of UC's 137-acre Main Campus, one of many areas of criticism by FIRE .

Among other points of contention with UC's policy are the specific times and places allowing the use of amplification, such as megaphones; the amount of time required for notification of a demonstration, picket or rally — 10 days; and such activities being confined to the campus Free Speech Area.

The policy also forbids the disruption of classes or administrative functions on campus due to rallies or demonstrations and access to campus buildings for those activities.

Such an occurrence took place in February 2011, when dozens of UC students and faculty, equipped with signs and chanting slogans, marched to the office of UC President Greg Williams to deliver a letter condemning Ohio Senate Bill 5 — the now-defeated bill which proposed collective bargaining reform.

It is the portion of the policy regarding violators being charged with trespassing, however, which has drawn the most heat. In 2007, FIRE called it “truly shameful” in the fact that the policy “threatens students with criminal prosecution merely for exercising their constitutionally protected rights outside of the paltry area it has designated for free speech.”

Part of the current lawsuit filed by YAL against UC alleges that if any members of the student group were found “walking around campus gathering signatures, campus security would be alerted.”

Multiple attempts by The News Record to contact Daniel Cummins, director of Judicial Affairs at UC, to learn the number of students — if any — who have been disciplined for violating the university's free speech policy were unsuccessful.

A News Record analysis of the UC Police Division daily call logs shows that since September 2011 — the beginning of the 2011-12 academic year — there have been 20 citations for trespassing on UC's Main Campus and one trespass warning given.

UC Police Chief Michael Cureton declined to comment on whether any of those citations by the UCPD were given to individuals for violating the policy, due to the current lawsuit pending against the university.

“This issue of free speech is currently in litigation,” Cureton said. “There is likely to be a settlement that moves all parties forward. It would be premature for me to comment until the court has ruled.”

UC denies injustice

Despite the recent wave of criticism, the idea that UC is a repressive campus violating the right to free speech is incredulous, said Greg Hand, UC spokesman.

“I would ask anyone to visit this campus on any given day and walk by almost any point in the campus, and they're going to see free speech activities going on,” Hand said. “Every single bulletin board, any space that holds a folding table both outside and inside Tangeman [University Center], you have free speech activities going on.”

Hand even cites personal experiences at UC as examples of the university being both open and committed to open dialogue on campus.

“I've been witness to semi truck-sized posters of aborted fetuses in the middle of McMicken Commons, seen Michael Moore speaking and been asked for signatures on petitions from every point of the political spectrum,” Hand said.

While Hand was unsure when the policy for a “free speech zone” on UC's campus was instituted — it was last updated in August 2008 — the idea for it originated in the 1960s, he said.

“At the time, there actually was a lot of control on this and other college campuses as far as who was allowed to speak,” Hand said. “The free speech zone was a way to open up speech beyond the immediate campus community.”

Hand references a staff editorial in the Nov. 18, 1965 edition of The News Record — suggesting the need for a ‘free speech alley' — as an example of how, at one time, UC students wanted an area similar to the one on McMicken Commons that is now in dispute.

The editorial detailed how “with the Free Speech Alley, everyone would have the opportunity to express his opinions and would not have to fear ostracism or unnecessary criticism. This idea has been very successful on many other college campuses, some of them with smaller populations than UC.”

The purpose behind UC's current free speech zone on McMicken Commons is to give those individuals or groups that don't meet certain criteria, such as sponsorship by a university organization, an area for their voice to still be heard, Hand said.

“If you're not part of the community or meet criteria, there's still a place you can go,” Hand said.

Roughly 90 percent of those who utilize the Free Speech Zone are religious speakers, such as the traveling preacher Brother Micah, Hand said. Hand also receives polarized complaints about the area, he said.

“You always hear the same two things: We don't like using it, because it's away from the center of campus, and how can the university allow this offensive speech to take place right in the middle of campus?” Hand said. “That kind of indicates that whoever picked that space found a happy medium.”

The mission of the university, however, isn't to be an open public forum for everything, Hand said.

“I don't think there is a lot of disagreement with the concept that [UC] is an educational institution,” Hand said. “It doesn't exist to provide a public forum. Our job is to provide education, and we have the responsibility that the educational process is not disrupted.”

Even with that responsibility, students are provided opportunity for freedom of expression, Hand said.

“We want people to have access to a free exchange of ideas,” Hand said.

Students, faculty respond

While the UC administration might view the university's policy as one supporting and encouraging free speech, some student groups and faculty feel differently.

“[The policy] definitely hampers student expression,” said John McNay, a history professor at UC's Blue Ash campus and former president of the UC chapter of the American Association of University Professors. “The AAUP strongly supports freedom of inquiry for the student body, but it is difficult to have such freedom with such tight restrictions.”

Landon Gray, a third-year history student and member of UC Young Americans for Liberty — which recently contested the proposed tobacco-free campus initiative at UC — agrees with McNay concerning student's voices being suppressed.

“I find it hard to believe that we really adhere to a system that restricts the rights of students in such a way, especially since we pay to go here, to a public institution,” Gray said. “I find it hard to believe that a public institution is to be in such a violation of constitutional policy, and in doing so violating students, staff and the average citizen's rights.”

Policies like the waiting period to use a table in TUC are among some of those restrictions UC places on students, McNay said.

“It is not just the free speech zone that is bad,” McNay said. “The wait time before you can occupy a space or even set up a table in TUC is way too long. UC requires five business days while other nearby state universities [such as] Wright State and Ohio University require only 24 hours. Both universities also provide many more locations where free speech can take place.”

McNay also cites a recent movement by college students nationwide to protest the issue of rising student debt as one example of how UC's policy hampered local efforts.

“By the time UC students were prepared to join the protest, there was not adequate time to apply for a permit,” McNay said.

While UC students have adapted to the policy and are adhering to it, McNay said, it has made student efforts to have their voices heard more difficult.

“Students protesting Senate Bill 5 and the charter university concept became very adept at following the rules, but organizing a rally of some kind or collecting signatures should be easy, not difficult,” McNay said.

Despite the recent attention, however, McNay admits he has not seen student's ability to voice their opinions decrease during his tenure at UC nor has seen it negatively affect faculty instruction, due to academic freedom for faculty being a staple of the AAUP's contract with UC.

“I've not seen things get worse, though the incident during [Ohio Gov. John Kasich's] visit may be a low point,” McNay said.

Kasich's visit to UC in 2011 drew the ire of both students and faculty — including McNay — when demonstrators protesting Kasich's support of charter universities and Senate Bill 5 were escorted by UCPD officers from outside Baldwin Hall — where Kasich was visiting — to the free speech area on McMicken Commons, due to the demonstration not being sponsored by a university group or being scheduled in advance.

“Faculty, students and even some local labor leaders who had gathered to question the governor were forced into the free speech zone by UC security,” McNay said. “I don't think any university should demonstrate this kind of attitude toward free speech or to

its faculty.”

McNay hopes the recent situations concerning free speech at UC opens the eyes of administration, he said.

“I hope that the negative attention causes the administration to be open to change,” McNay said. “The UC policy just really stands out as being the most restrictive among public universities. I don't think that is the kind of recognition or the excellence that we all strive to attain at UC.”

Gray said he hopes it is the attention of students that is gained, in addition to the administration.

“I certainly hope that UC will recognize the fact that universities initially embraced all sorts of ideas, changes and social revolutions … But above all, my most sincere hope is that students realize what an infringement [the policy] is, for if you do not know your rights, you have lost them,” Gray said.

Gray also believes there will be increased opposition from the student body to the policy as time progresses, he said.

“No matter what the court decision is, I believe as the majority of the student population begins to realize what is going on, there will be progressively more resistance to this unconstitutional idea of a ‘free speech zone,'” Gray said.

To date, the UC Undergraduate Student Government has not received any complaints regarding the policy from the UC student body, said SG President Alan Hagerty.

“Student Government has received no grievances from students or student groups about the free speech policy,” Hagerty said. “We did encounter one issue with one particular organization soliciting on campus to promote an event. However, the issue was resolved and the solicitation policy was clearly communicated to the organization.”

The policy, however, could be a talking point for SG in the future, Hagerty said.

“Student Government may examine the issue; however, no action has been taken at this point in time,” Hagerty said. “Personally, as Student Body president, I cannot deny that a mere 0.1 percent of our campus is designated as a free speech zone. Moreover, I acknowledge many visits by political leaders are announced after the required 15-day reservation window has closed.”

The rest of Ohio's universities

While UC is the only Ohio school on FIRE's list of the 12 worst colleges for free speech, it is not the only Ohio school being scrutinized by the organization.

A News Record analysis of the 14 four-year state universities making up the University System of Ohio shows that FIRE lists six of those schools — the University of Toledo, Wright State University, Youngstown State University, Ohio University, The Ohio State University and UC — each as a “red light university,” meaning that at least one policy at the university significantly restricts free speech.

Those policies range from free speech areas — such as UC's — to harassment policies and Internet use policies.

Multiple attempts to contact Kim Norris, spokesperson for the Ohio Board of Regents — which oversees the University System of Ohio — for comment were unsuccessful.

The analysis also shows that Bowling Green State University has a similar “Speak Out Area” located in front of its student union designated for individuals and groups, while Kent State University has five recommended areas on its campus for groups or non-registered speakers to host demonstrations or marches.

Kent State has recommended areas for free speech that can accommodate a large gathering of people, but it is not limited to those specific areas,” said Emily Vincent, a KSU spokeswoman.

KSU even goes as far as to limit the use of those areas to one-hour time blocks, unlike UC, which doesn't have a time limit concerning its “Free Speech Area” on McMicken Commons.

OU has 25 specific outdoor areas on its campus that can be reserved for speakers or demonstrations.

“We have not designated any area on campus as a ‘free speech zone,'” said Katie Quaranta, an OU spokeswoman.

“University Policy 24-016 is our only policy on this issue. It lists outdoor spaces that can be reserved for appropriate functions and imposes reasonable restrictions to protect health, safety and university operations.”

Like UC, however, KSU does not allow demonstrations or non-university affiliated speakers to take place inside campus buildings, Vincent said.

In fact, a recurring theme in all 14 universities' policies was one of preventing disruption of the learning environment on their respective campuses and preventing violations of fire and safety codes.

Several others Ohio universities have policies similar to UC's regarding to the amount of time required for reserving space on campus for activities and the use of amplification equipment.

Such schools as BGSU and YSU require a 10-day notice to reserve an area for a speaker or event on their respective campuses, much like UC.

While there is not a designated area for speech, The OSU does require a two-week notice to reserve space on its campus.

“We do as a matter of good practice try to work with any group that desires to express their constitutional rights in a respectful and non-disruptive or destructive manner,” said Amy Murray, an OSU spokeswoman.

Policies like UC's “Free Speech Area” have also existed previously at some Ohio schools, such as WSU , which had a designated “Speaker's Corner” between two of its campus buildings before revising its policy.

“Wright State University does not now have a policy restricting free speech activities such as demonstrations or petitions to a specific area of campus,” said Timothy Gaffney, a WSU spokesman.

“Such a policy existed in the past. The Faculty Senate has revised its Faculty Handbook to reflect the change in policy.”

That change in policy now allows individuals and groups at any time during daylight hours to collect signatures, distribute material and speak in any publicly accessible outdoor area on the WSU campus.

It's a change McNay feels would be effective for UC concerning its free speech, he said.

“This section of Wright State's free speech policy seems to demonstrate a more appropriate attitude,” McNay said.

The current policy already reflects that attitude, Hand said.

“For the students at UC, I think the issue is that they can just take a look around them,” Hand said. “I can't think of anybody's free speech rights being suppressed.”

Either way, it is a subject that FIRE has brought to the forefront at UC.

“Before they sign on the dotted line, prospective college students should consider the free speech record of the school they choose to attend,” said Robert Shibley, senior vice president of FIRE . “Don't believe universities' paper promises of free speech if they are violating those promises in practice.”

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News Headline: Ohio expands online tutoring for college, university students | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas
News OCR Text: The eTutoring program offers help in accounting, anatomy and physiology, biology, calculus, chemistry, math and statistics.

More of Ohio's public and private universities have been invited to join eTutoring -- a statewide collaborative that allows college students to get free help from online tutors provided by participating schools.

The Ohio Board of Regents is expanding the program to all two- and four-year universities with a goal of making it available to more than 600,000 students.

Currently 21 colleges, including Baldwin-Wallace College, Cleveland State University, Kent State University, Lorain County Community College and the University of Akron, participate in eTutoring, which began with five pilot schools in fall 2009.

Schools provide tutors -- often faculty members or retired professionals -- whose services are available to students from any member of the collaborative.

More than 3,000 students this school year are regularly seeking online help in seven subjects and a writing lab, said Karen Boyd, the coordinator of the collaborative, which is part of OhioLearns, a University System of Ohio site for distance learning.

Where it's offered

The eTutoring collaborative offers free online tutoring to students at participating public and private universities through the Ohio Board of Regents. More information is available at ohiolearns.org/e-tutoring. Institutions currently participating are:

Baldwin-Wallace College, Belmont College, Capital University, Central State University, Central Ohio Technical College, The Ohio State University at Newark, Clark State Community College, Cleveland State University, Edison Community College, Kent State University, Lorain County Community College, Marietta College, North Central State College, Northwest State Community College, Rhodes State College, Rio Grande Community College, Sinclair Community College, Terra Community College, University of Akron, University of Rio Grande and the University of Toledo.

"Schools can pool their resources to provide hours of academic support," she said.

The program saves universities money since they share tutors, and they coordinate who can provide the stronger tutors.

"If Kent State provides a science tutor it fills a need at Marietta College," she said.

Tutoring is offered in accounting, anatomy and physiology, biology, calculus, chemistry, math, and statistics. The majority of students are seeking writing help, she said.

The concept is rather simple, but the execution is complicated since Boyd and the member universities need to determine how many tutors are needed in each subject and what hours they will work.

When a university joins the collaborative it agrees to hire and pay tutors. All tutors receive online eTutoring training.

For every five hours per week of online tutoring a college provides each semester, its students receive a total of 150 tutoring sessions. Most schools start with five hours a semester and add more tutors as student use increases. The University of Akron is among the institutions providing the most tutoring -- 20 hours a week -- she said.

Participating schools had paid a $2,500 annual fee but eStudent Services, a division of the Ohio Technology Consortium, will now underwrite that cost, the regents said.

Each university decides which students have access to the eTutoring site through their college website, Boyd said.

"No two schools are using it the same way," she said. Some offer it for students in distance learning classes, others for students in developmental courses and others open it up to every student in a class.

Tutors are usually available from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m., seven days a week. Hours of availability in specific subjects may vary. If a tutor is not available, a student can submit a question to be answered later.

The eTutor program was modeled on one that began in Connecticut in 2001 for a cluster of schools, Boyd said. She said there are other collaboratives in the northeast and northwest, but Ohio is the only state to offer a statewide program.

This spring the site added digital literacy programs to help students learn how to create a online paper or prepare a spreadsheet.

"We pilot and test the waters and see what works and what we need to tweak," she said.

Boyd said the program has been expanding on campuses through word-of-mouth and as faculty learn about it.

"They are understanding we are here to support the students and it is a combination of everyone working together," she said.

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News Headline: Business calendar | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SATURDAY

YouToo Social Media Conference: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Kent State University's Franklin Hall. Go to tinyurl.com/dx7qt4r for pricing and to register.

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News Headline: Metrics’ Marketing Group Selected to Present on User Experience at YouToo Social Media Conference 20 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: PR-Canada.net - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Metrics’ Marketing Group Selected to Present on User Experience at YouToo Social Media Conference 20
Metrics Marketing Group, an analytics-driven database marketing and interactive services firm, announced today that Research and Customer Experience Senior Analyst, Damon Herren has been selected as a panelist for the YouToo Social Media conference. Herren will join other industry professionals in discussing the importance of user experience design (UXD) in public relations and how both "seek to understand audiences, identify business objectives and measure outcomes." The YouToo Social Media Conference 2012 will take place at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio on Friday April 13, 2012.

More than ever, marketing agencies are seeking to employ user experience design professionals who have the ability to create positive user experiences for interactive campaigns. These unique professionals address the structural, informational, psychological and emotional aspects of what makes a successful user interface, whether it's web, mobile, tablet or any other device. Both public relations and UXD professionals underlying goals are to understand their clients' audiences in order to create mobile technology campaigns with a positive user experience. Herren will be joined by other PR and UXD professionals to discuss this intersection and how it affects marketers today.

Damon Herren has more than 10 years of professional experience with a diverse background, specializing in user experience design. As a Research & Customer Experience Senior Analyst at Metrics Marketing Group, Herren works with a variety of clients across numerous industries to improve the user experience of their products and services. In his previous role at InfoCision Management Corporation, Herren's work greatly influenced the internal user experience for mission-critical enterprise systems, which are currently used daily by thousands of users. Herren is also involved with the Northeast Ohio Usability Professionals' Association (NEOUPA), Information Architecture Institute (IAI), and Interaction Design Association (IXDA). He earned a B.S. in Computer Science from Harding University and is currently working towards a Master's Degree in User Experience Design at Kent State University.

"Knowing and understanding your users and their goals is key to any successful user experience," remarked Cathleen Zapata, VP, Research and Customer Experience at Metrics Marketing. "Damon's wealth of expertise and knowledge in UXD will give professionals a perspective on how marketers can truly optimize their campaigns by leveraging customer insights."

Metrics Marketing offers a full suite of customizable user research and user experience services that go beyond identifying opportunities for conversion. Amongst Metrics' user research services are lab-based testing usability testing, card sorting, user personas, heuristic evaluations, online research, surveys, focus groups, in-depth interviews and more. Metrics' Research and Customer Experience professionals, like Herren, also provide information architecture and interaction design expertise. In addition, Metrics Marketing is one of the only interactive marketing firms with full eye tracking capabilities across the U.S., including lab-based testing at MetricsLabSM as well as mobile.

Those who are interested in attending the YouToo Social Media conference should register by visiting, www.youtoosm.com. To learn more about Metrics Marketing's Research and Customer Experience offerings, visit www.metricsmarketing.com/lab.

About Metrics Marketing

Based in Cleveland, Metrics Marketing offers comprehensive analytics-driven database and interactive marketing services that include: automated/triggered marketing systems, marketing database development and hosting, email strategy and deployment, predictive modeling, segmentation analysis, search marketing, creative services, website design, development and hosting, eCommerce solutions, web usability, web analytics, user research, traditional market research and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) strategy consulting. Metrics Marketing Group is a Precision Dialogue company and is located at 905 Corporate Way in Westlake, Ohio. Additional information can be found at www.metricsmarketing.com.

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News Headline: Internships bring focus on career choices (Ritter, Marino) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: While in the midst of college years, students can often conclude that experience is by far the best teacher. An internship can help college students decide if they chose the most suitable career field for their future.

Dr. Jim Ritter, director of enrollment management and student service at the Kent State University at Trumbull, said that internships are an excellent opportunity for a student to decide upon their professions.

"It's a win-win situation," Ritter said. "Students get useful experience in their fields. Internships give students the opportunity to test out a company, and they also give employers the opportunity to see whether or not the student is suited for the profession."

One of the most important aspects of an internship is on-the-spot training. Dr. Craig Campbell, professor and chair of the department of geography at Youngstown State University, said some recent fields in which geography interns learn skills include remote sensing, satellite imagery, and working with global positioning systems and graphic information systems.

"We had interns working at the City of Youngstown, doing mapping with the auditor's departments," Campbell said. "We had interns working with Trumbull County Planning Commission, doing a variety of tasks such as GIS mapping, working with the auditor's department and working with tax maps."

Finding an internship is all about transitioning comfortably from classroom atmosphere to career experience, work, training and discipline.

"Internships give students real-world experience, and several of our interns received jobs at the places they interned for while at Youngstown State University," Campbell said.

Ed Davis, a geography graduate of YSU, is a program manager at Eastgate Regional Council of Governments in Youngstown, working in his field of study.

"We try to hire one intern every semester," Davis said. "Interns get experience with computer mapping that is concerned with transportation-related material. We also do work with our interns with traffic count data and crash data."

Davis said that an internship helps students to see what a job in their selected profession is really about.

"Students see what their job is like in the real world, different from the classroom," Davis said. "Students work alongside professionals, gaining work experience. We try to give interns a lot of different tasks so they can learn a variety of skills."

John Marino, business management associate professor and business management coordinator at KSU Trumbull, said that it is important for employers to oversee an intern's activity.

"Interns have to seek out an employer who acts as a coordinator, who is somebody to guide the students through the internship experience," Marino said.

The best internships are the internships where the employers allow their interns to work in different departments of the company, he said.

"Internships are beneficial for a student because they allow them to see the inside of an organization or company," Marino said. "Internships give students hands-on experience in a business-oriented real-world environment."

Zachary Thobe, a senior at The Ohio State University, said that co-ops and internships give students a chance to evaluate themselves, their skills and the company they are interning for during college. Thobe is a mechanical engineering major who has interned at Dominion East Ohio and did two co-ops at Marathon Petroleum.

"It was nice working for Dominion East Ohio," Thobe said. "As a young engineer, this internship gave me valuable experience and gave me a lot of responsibility."

Thobe also did two co-ops at Marathon Petroleum.

"I did a variety of things at my first co-op at Marathon Petroleum," Thobe said. "I was placed with a mentor who was an engineer. As I got more comfortable with the co-op position, Marathon Petroleum gave me more projects."

When Thobe completed his

co-op at Marathon Petroleum, he said he was working on projects that would be assigned to full-time employees. He came to the realization that he wanted to be a project engineer after he did his co-op and internship at Marathon Petroleum.

Ritter said that internships give students time to decide whether they want to tweak or change their majors and minors, so it is important for students to select an internship before their senior year in college.

"We encourage students to start their internships during their junior year," Ritter said. "We tell students to do their internships before their senior year just in case they decide they want to switch their fields."

"Internships and co-ops teach students to handle responsibility, manage their time and work with others," Thobe said. "It gives students a chance to evaluate themselves to see if there are any areas they need to improve on during their internship. Students should ask themselves, 'Is this job something they could see themselves doing for the rest of their lives?'"

Tribune Chronicle | TribToday.com

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News Headline: Leadership Tuscarawas Class of 2012 selects 'Hunt for Hunger' as project | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Members of the Leadership Tuscarawas Class of 2012 have selected "Hunt for Hunger" as its class project. They are in the process of organizing a food drive and scavenger hunt to benefit the Akron-Canton Regional Food Bank scheduled to take place on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Kent State Tuscarawas campus. Non-perishable and monetary donations will be collected and directly benefit food pantries in the Tuscarawas County community. For information on the Hunt for Hunger, visit www.facebook.com/huntforhunger. Donations may also be made at www.akroncantonfoodbank.org or by calling 330-535-6900.

The Mission of Leadership Tuscarawas is to develop passionate, visionary leaders to strengthen the community. Preparing for its ninth year, the program is designed to build leadership skills, create awareness of community needs and provide hands-on training, experience and problem solving within a diverse group of community leaders.

Leadership Tuscarawas is now accepting applications for the 2013 class. Applications are available online at www.leadershiptusc.org, or by emailing Lynn Angelozzi at information@leadershiptusc.org, or by calling 330-340-5105.

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News Headline: Humor columnist Dave Barry to speak at Kent State Tuscarawas | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Humor columnist and author Dave Barry will present "The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry" at 7 p.m. April 10 in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

"The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry" is offered as part of Kent State University at Tuscarawas' Voices of Distinction lecture series.

The presentation is free and open to the public, although admission tickets are required. Beginning Tuesday, April 3, tickets will be available at the Performing Arts Center box office from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Tickets are limited to four per person.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

Humor columnist and author Dave Barry will present "The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry" at 7 p.m. April 10 in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

"The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry" is offered as part of Kent State University at Tuscarawas' Voices of Distinction lecture series.

The presentation is free and open to the public, although admission tickets are required. Beginning Tuesday, April 3, tickets will be available at the Performing Arts Center box office from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Tickets are limited to four per person.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Kent State University, Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts to sponsor computer designed art exhibit | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts will team up to sponsor the eighth annual Student Computer Designed Art Exhibit and Silent Auction from 7-9 p.m. April 12.

The exhibit will be held at the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts, and will feature more than 80 pieces of student artwork.

Artwork will be judged, and the top three pieces will receive the honor of Best of Show. All artwork will also be available for a silent auction.

Proceeds generated by the auction will benefit the Animation Imagineers Club, a campus club for students who major in computer design, animation and game design.

Some of the art in the exhibit includes work by high school students who are members of the 12 local high school Cyber Clubs.

The Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts is located at 461 Robinson Drive S.E., in New Philadelphia.

The event is free and open to the public.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold 'Hunt for Hunger' food drive, scavenger hunt | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Cody Tucker
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will hold its "Hunt for Hunger" food drive and scavenger hunt April 21.

The event will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on campus, 330 University Drive NE in New Philadelphia. Registration is 10 a.m. to noon at Founders Hall.

Admission is free with donation of one “Super Six” item: boxed cereal, peanut butter, canned tuna, canned veggies, canned beef stew or canned soup.

For more information, call 330-364-4474, ext. 234.

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News Headline: Kent State University, Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts to sponsor computer designed art exhibi | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Vivian Gomez
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts will team up to sponsor the eighth annual Student Computer Designed Art Exhibit and Silent Auction from 7-9 p.m. April 12.

The exhibit will be held at the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts, and will feature more than 80 pieces of student artwork.

Artwork will be judged, and the top three pieces will receive the honor of Best of Show. All artwork will also be available for a silent auction.

Proceeds generated by the auction will benefit the Animation Imagineers Club, a campus club for students who major in computer design, animation and game design.

Some of the art in the exhibit includes work by high school students who are members of the 12 local high school Cyber Clubs.

The Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts is located at 461 Robinson Drive S.E., in New Philadelphia.

The event is free and open to the public.

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News Headline: KENT STATE'S AFRICAN COMMUNITY THEATRE PRESENTS 'AIN'T NOTHING BUT A THANG' (Dorsey) | Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, March 31 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The African Community Theatre of Kent State University will present its Spring 2012 production of "Ain't Nothing But a Thang" by Marlin T.Tazewell and directed by Fran Dorsey, Ph.D.The theatre is located in Ritchie Hall on the university's campus in Kent, Ohio.The street address is 225 Terrace Drive.

The play runs from Friday, April 13, through Sunday, April 15, and Friday, April 20, through Sunday, April 22.Friday and Saturday shows begin at 8 p.m., and the Sunday matinee begins at 3 p.m.

"Aint' Nothing But a Thang" is a gripping drama that tells the story of one black family, a young mother with three teenage children struggling to survive.The Fazes family, like many others, has been thrown curves by life.Now they must step up to the plate and play to win or lose the game of life.

"This is a story about love, hate, distrust, understanding and misunderstanding," Dorsey said."It is a story about the will to survive or die.It is a story about drug addiction and how to cope when it is discovered that a family member has AIDS.The language that tells this story is raw, brutal at times and disheartening, but it is a story that must be told.This is a story about a family that is taught to remember that each new curve life throws them, 'ain't nothing but a thang' with which all of them must deal with if they want to survive and win the game of life."

The play is the winner of the National AIDS Fund/CFDA-Vogue Initiative Playwriting Award and is not recommended for children or youth under the age of 15.

The play features the talents of Kent State students Cara White of Warren, Ohio; Tyeasha Doss of Mayfield Heights, Ohio; Jessica Ransome and Bryan Miller-Foster, both of Washington, D.C.; and Denzel Washington and Stacee Starr, both of Akron, Ohio.

Tickets are $7 for students and senior citizens and $10 for general admission.For more information and reservations, please call 330-672-2300 from 8 a.m.to 5 p.m.or 330-672-0151 after 5 p.m.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: KSU clock tower plan put on hold (Lefton, Bruder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/02/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's plan to construct a clock tower has been withdrawn from the upcoming Centennial Green project, which will expand Risman Plaza to Summit Street.

KSU President Lester Lefton said the clock tower will be built eventually, but is not an immediate priority compared with upcoming classroom and campus renovations.

"At the end of the day, I thought the classroom renovations were just more important," he said during the university's Board of Trustees meeting. "The bids for the entire (Centennial Green) project, including the clock tower, came in at more than we anticipated they would."

Work on the $2.8 million Centennial Green project is set to begin in April with traffic and parking maintained, said Michael Bruder, KSU's director of design and construction. Following commencement in May, traffic on Risman Drive will be curtailed and parking will be reduced and relocated to other lots to accommodate visitors.

The eastern portion of Risman Drive, which currently separates the lawn space from the plaza, will be closed and traffic will be redirected to the western end and a new traffic light will be installed. A new drive aisle will be constructed for bus and vehicle drop-off at the Kent Student Center bus stop.

The project includes a "student-centered" lawn area that includes an outdoor stage and plaza for special invents and extends from Risman Plaza to Summit Street, creating "contiguous outdoor space," Bruder said. "This area will provide needed pedestrian connections with new sidewalks, open space for informal recreation, an outdoor stage and plaza for special events, new trees and new landscaping beds and capped with a new architectural sign welcoming visitors to Kent State University near Summit Street and Campus Center Drive."

The estimated project cost is approximately $2.8 million and should be substantially complete by the start of fall classes, Bruder said. Some landscaping, irrigation system and other details will be completed in September or October, depending on the weather.

Lefton said the base and infrastructure of the clock tower will be built during the summer expansion, with a goal to find a donor or other revenue stream to complete the tower.

"The tower will get done," he said. "We see it as an important symbol to the institution, and in some ways, it's motivational for people to say, ‘It's right there. You're money can help get it done.'"

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News Headline: Kent State Police investigating assault Thursday night near residence halls (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/30/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Police are investigating an assault that occurred at 10:10 p.m. Thursday night near the Centennial A and B residence halls.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the assault is not believed to be random and police are working to identify the participants and witnesses.

The university has an alert system to issue warnings when there is a concern for the safety of the community.

No alert was issued Thursday because police did not believe the assault posed any safety issue on campus, Vincent said.

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News Headline: KSU police probe assault near dormitories (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University police are investigating an assault that occurred shortly after 10 p.m. Thursday near the Centennial A and B residence halls.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the assault is not believed to be a random event, and police are working to identify the participants and witnesses.

Anyone who witnessed the incident or has knowledge of it is asked to call KSU police at 330-672-3070.

The university has an alert system to issue warnings when there is a concern for the safety of the community. No alert was issued Thursday because police did not believe the assault posed any safety issue on campus, Vincent said.

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News Headline: Twinsburg woman is first runner up in Ms. Wheelchair pageant | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/01/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Twinsburg -- The chance to dress to the nines and show off her style as a contestant in the 2012 Ms. Wheelchair pageant was no tough task for Stephanie Royster of Woodland Court, a self-described girly girl with an eye for pretty dresses and glamorous hairstyles.

"I still remember seeing the dress I wore on the mannequin at the mall. I knew it was the one I had to have," Royster, 21, said of the elegant navy blue frock she donned for the pageant. "And I started considering how to do my hair days before."

Royster -- who has congenital muscular dystrophy and has used a wheelchair since she was 2 -- was one of three contestants and the first runner up in the pageant, which took place in front of a crowd of 100 people at the Roberts Center in Wilmington. She is the granddaughter of Gail Royster of Hudson.

Angela Hunter of Wooster was crowned Ms. Wheelchair Ohio and will go on to represent Ohio in the Ms. Wheelchair America pageant. Toledo's Stevie Beal was second runner up.

"I was kind of nervous on stage, but mainly because the stage was so high up and I'm kind of afraid of heights," she said. "I'm pretty used to public speaking so that really didn't bother me."

Royster said she would love to compete in the pageant again and hopes to raise awareness about accessibility concerns for people who use wheelchairs.

"Even with all of the [American Disabilities Act] requirements in place, there are still places that are not easily accessible for people in wheelchairs," she said.

Royster is focusing on classes at Kent State University where she is studying non-profit management. She has also spoken at many events on behalf of the Muscular Dystrophy Association. Last December she even coordinated a pancake breakfast to raise funds for the MDA.

"I am already planning for another one this coming December," she said.

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News Headline: Kent residents fighting to save landmark with ties to city's founder | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/31/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Time is short for a group of Kent residents pushing to stop demolition of the Kent Wells-Sherman house - a house believed to have direct historic ties to prominent figures of Kent's past, including the city's namesake.

The home, located at 250 E. Erie St., is slated for demolition to clear the path for Kent State University's Esplanade walkway extension to link the campus and downtown. Several homes have already been cleared for the project and dirt is being moved daily to the site from the Kent Central Gateway project under way on East Erie Street.

The Friends of Kent Wells-Sherman House , or "Friends" group, plans to make bring their case to Kent City Council Wednesday, with a detailed plan suggesting how to fund saving 1850s Greek Revival home and possible future uses of the structure.

"I hope that City Council, the university and people in the community can catch our vision," said Rick Hawksley, one of the group's members, who is a former councilman and architectural historian. "What's really critical to us is the connection of this house to people who are very important to the founding and naming of this city."

The home, also called the Kent/Sherman house, was used for decades as a student boarding house. But, a recent discovery of an engraving in an 1874 Portage County atlas leads local history experts and architects to believe the house was owned by Dr. Aaron M. Sherman, prominent Kent physician, founder of the Portage County Medical Society, Rockton Masonic Lodge in Kent, the Universalist Church of Kent and a Civil War Veteran.

An 1858 deed to the site shows that its original owners were George Wells, whose wife, Frances Kent Wells, was a daughter of Zenas Kent and a sister of Marvin Kent, for whom the city is named.

The 1874 atlas shows the home located at present-day Water and Erie streets. Kent Courier articles dating to 1924 indicate it was likely moved to its current location that year as work on the "Erie Street extension" was done. A two-story commercial structure, which still stands, was erected at its original site.

Councilwoman Tracy Wallach, who is supporting the preservation effort, said it would be sad if council didn't show support in some way, because the many structures have been lost with new development projects.

"It's tied so strongly to the city and university," she said, adding that council has shown a "strong ethic of preservation" in saving the old hotel and supporting the Main Street Kent organization focused on preservation, renovation and economic development. "Now we have another opportunity to preserve heritage in Kent."

In order to save the home, it must first be purchased, then relocated to a new site. KSU has offered to sell the home to any parties wishing to preserve it for $1.

Without factoring in any other costs, including permits, bonds, contractor registrations, temporary removal of overhead utilities and more, the cost of boarding the home up, putting it up on blocks, and moving it to a now location is estimated to be about $27,000. The estimate was provided by Stein House Movers, Inc., the company that recently relocated the May Prentice home to be preserved by the KSU.

The Friends' 32-page report to city council suggests the home's new permanent spot to be on the Esplanade's "Great Lawn," slightly south of its current location.

The report requests that Kent's administration work with the university to cover the costs of site utilities, foundation, donation of a new site and final move, estimated to total $35,000.

The Friends' group notes that the university will save money on demolition costs and recommendations to the city's Bicentennial Plan during the campus link planning phase to "endeavor to preserve, relocate and/or reuse" discovered historical or architecturally significant buildings, "and incorporate them into the design framework of the Campus Link, to the extent feasible."

Kent Historical Society director Tom Hatch told council the society plans to use its fundraising and preservation resources to help save the home if council supports its preservation.

The Friends group suggests the house be used in a way that forms a bond between the university and city. Some ideas include a museum, office of the university liaison, meeting place and historic preservation learning center.

Forging such a partnership between the city, university and local citizen organizations could "create unforeseen synergies," according to the report.

"If this isn't worth saving, what house is?" said Howard Boyle, president of Hometown Bank and historian, adding that the people still lament over the John Brown Tannery that couldn't be saved because of its poor condition. "We're doing so much in Kent. Moving this house on the Esplanade is a nice idea."

The Wells-Sherman house is one of five structures in Kent with ties to the city's founding family. The others are the Kent Masonic Center, which was the homestead of Marvin Kent; the Clapp-Woodward House on East Main Street, now the site of the Kent Historical Society, which was the home of another daughter of Zenas Kent; a neighboring East Main Street structure, now an office building, which was the home of W.H.C. Parkhill, whose wife was a daughter of Frances Kent Wells; and the Charles Kent residence at 125 N. Pearl St., the onetime home of Marvin Kent's brother. The Masonic Center and the North Pearl Street site, a private home, are on the National Register of Historic Places.

City Engineer Jim Bowling said the demolition project is not yet out for bid, adding that mid-May is the earliest the city could open it for bids.

"There's no drop-dead date, though. We're working to be flexible," he said. "We're hoping for a quick resolution to facilitate the best situation possible."

The Friends group will present its plan during city council's April 4 commitee meeting at 7 p.m.

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