Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Anthropology (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Communication Studies (1)
Health Sciences (1)
Higher Education (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
May 4; Symposium on Democracy (1)
Students (3)
Town-Gown (2)
University Communications and Marketing (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Anthropology (1)
WKSU News: Exploradio - Our cousin in the trees (Lovejoy) 04/09/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...trees while our ancestor Lucy strode across the ground. "You can imagine that you'd have had Lucy looking up and wondering, ‘What is that thing?'" Kent State's Owen Lovejoy, who was not involved in the foot find, says it complicates our picture of the past. "The evolution into Australopithecus...


Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)
Reports Outline Molecular Biology Study Results from Kent State University 04/10/2012 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...interactions with proteins, metals, or other small molecules. All major classes of catalytic RNAs have been probed by NAIM," wrote S. Basu and colleagues, Kent State University. The researchers concluded: "This is a generalized approach that should provide the scientific community with the tools to...


Communication Studies (1)
In Environmental Disasters, Families Respond With Conflict, Denial, Silence 04/09/2012 Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Funding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Co-authors with Orom are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer...


Health Sciences (1)
Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkely) 04/09/2012 Telegraph - Online, The Text Attachment Email

AKRON, Ohio -- The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise. A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically...


Higher Education (1)
Group that helps city's students finish college is moving ahead 04/09/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Baldwin-Wallace College, Bowling Green State University, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Tri-C, Hiram College, John Carroll University, Kent State University, Notre Dame College, Oberlin College, Ohio State University, Ohio University, the University of Akron, the University...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Going Places: April 9, 2012 04/10/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

AUDIO Retail Strategies That Work For You Featured (Coombs) 04/09/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...sometimes means more or less work on the consumer's end. Before you take your credit card on a swiping spree, a former branding consultant and current Kent State University assistant professor in advertising, Danielle Coombs, shares her advice on what to watch for. If you open your Sunday newspaper...


KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Larry Miller postpones performance at Kent State Tuscarawas 04/10/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

"Cocktails with Larry Miller," a performance originally scheduled for April 20 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas' Performing Arts Center, has been postponed until further notice. "Due to a recently sustained injury, Larry...

Some tickets remain for Dave Barry presentation Tuesday 04/10/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

About 100 tickets remain for the Dave Barry Voices of Distinction event at 7 p.m. tonight at The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas. Barry, a humor columnist, will present "The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry." Public relations coordinator Pam...

Larry Miller postpones performance at Kent State Tuscarawas 04/09/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

"Cocktails with Larry Miller," a performance originally scheduled for April 20 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas' Performing Arts Center, has been postponed until further notice. "Due to a recently sustained injury, Larry...


May 4; Symposium on Democracy (1)
KENT STATE HOLDS 13TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM ON DEMOCRACY, APRIL 23-25 (Underwood) 04/09/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, April 9 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's 13th annual Symposium on Democracy will be held at the Kent...


Students (3)
Kent State student stages protest 04/10/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: A Kent State student has taken her protest over a planned tuition hike right to the doorstep of the university's president. Lucy Merriman, a freshman...

'Ambition Penalty' Sparks Protests by Kent State Students (Vincent) 04/10/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Morning news headlines for April 10, 2012 - Kent students protest tuition fee 04/10/2012 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (2)
Longtime Kent businessman Ron Burbick primes the city's development pump 04/10/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Electronic Community Sign Could be Running by Fall Semester 04/10/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


University Communications and Marketing (1)
Going Places: April 9, 2012 04/10/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email


News Headline: WKSU News: Exploradio - Our cousin in the trees (Lovejoy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A fossil foot discovered in Ethiopia shows that nature experimented with more than one manner of upright walking on the path to humankind.

'Ardi' was was a survivor. Ardipithicus ramadis is 4.4 million years old, and its descendants were still around when "Lucy" walked the earth a million years later.

The human family tree just got a little bushier. Cleveland researchers say fossil foot bones recently discovered in Ethiopia belong to a distant cousin of humankind. But, while the foot's original owner lived in trees, they say our direct ancestors walked a different evolutionary pathway.

Trees by a lake

Yohannes Haile-Selassie celebrated his discovery at a press conference late last month in Ethiopia.

On his way back to Ohio, the Cleveland Museum of Natural History curator described where in the Ethiopian desert he found the eight fossilized foot bones.

"The local name where we found this partial foot is Burtele. It's located in the central Afar region of Ethiopia."

The area is bone dry now. But Haile-Selassie says it once at the edge of a large lake.

"And also trees [were] associated with this water body. So we think that it was sort of a wooded environment where this species to which this partial foot belongs, was living in."

Trees were the home of this animal 3.4 million years ago, according to Case Western Reserve University professor Bruce Latimer, who worked with Haile-Selassie in publishing the find. Its mode of locomotion surprised Latimer. He says the creature had a grasping big toe, ideal for tree climbing. But it also stood tall like a human.

"This is an animal that was still climbing trees. However when it came to the ground, it walked on the side of its foot as a biped, an erect biped. Which is peculiar. Who would have thought?"

Our cousin in the trees

It's the ability to walk upright that defines the human lineage. And the human foot is uniquely adapted to handle the stress of a vertical lifestyle. But Latimer says, THIS foot, with its thumb-like big toe, was not.

"When it came down, we can say that, but it was doing it with an awkward kind of gait, and it certainly didn't go distances. It wasn't going long distances at all."

What's significant about the find is that there already was a primate living 3.4 million years ago in that part of Ethiopia. But it walked just like us. Her name was "Lucy."

Latimer says the foot discovered recently in Ethiopia belonged to a much older animal that persisted in the trees while our ancestor Lucy strode across the ground.

"You can imagine that you'd have had Lucy looking up and wondering, ‘What is that thing?'"

Kent State's Owen Lovejoy, who was not involved in the foot find, says it complicates our picture of the past.

"The evolution into Australopithecus afarensis, or Lucy's species was a bit messier than we'd like to have it if we were going to draw it on a blackboard."

But he says the foot provides an important clue as to what may have led to our existence.

Lucy takes the low road

Lovejoy says the foot probably belonged to an older species, similar to Ardipithicus, which lived a million years earlier than Lucy.

Lovejoy says with Ardipithicus still hanging around in the trees a million years later, Lucy and her kin sought opportunities for survival on the ground.

"Probably the existence of these descendants of Ardipithicus accentuated and accelerated the evolution of upright walking in our ancestors."

But what was the advantage of upright walking in the first place? Lovejoy has a theory for that too.

"Upright walking provides the capacity to carry things."

The first family

Lovejoy says the ability to carry two things in particular, babies and food, was the genesis of human kind.

"The selection for upright walking was in fact a shift in reproductive strategy where males would pair bond with a specific female and exchange food for that pair bond."

In essence, according to Lovejoy, the invention of the family in the first primates to walk upright, is the defining moment in human evolution.

"Humans are the only example of where you have monogamy but within a social setting, and that was probably the big breakthrough in our evolution."

Back in Ethiopia, Yohannes Haile-Selassie and his team are trying to figure out just who the newly discovered fossil foot belongs to. He says fossil teeth discovered nearby don't belong to any known species of human ancestor. Another few years of fossil hunting in the Ethiopian desert may provide more clues to the puzzle of how we came to be human.

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News Headline: Reports Outline Molecular Biology Study Results from Kent State University | Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A report, "Analysis of catalytic RNA structure and function by nucleotide analog interference mapping," is newly published data in Methods In Molecular Biology. "Nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) is a quick and efficient method to define concurrently, yet singly, the importance of specific functional groups at particular nucleotide residues to the structure and function of an RNA. Ncan be utilized on virtually any RNA with an assayable function," scientists in Kent, Ohio report (see also ).

"The method hinges on the ability to successfully incorporate, within an RNA transcript, various 5'-O-(1-thio)nucleoside analogs randomly via in vitro transcription. This could be achieved by using wild-type or Y639F mutant T7 RNA polymerase, thereby creating a pool of analog doped RNAs. The pool when subjected to a selection step to separate the active transcripts from the inactive ones leads to the identification of functional groups that are crucial for RNA activity. The technique can be used to study ribozyme structure and function via monitoring of cleavage or ligation reactions, define functional groups critical for RNA folding, RNA-RNA interactions, and RNA interactions with proteins, metals, or other small molecules. All major classes of catalytic RNAs have been probed by NAIM," wrote S. Basu and colleagues, Kent State University.

The researchers concluded: "This is a generalized approach that should provide the scientific community with the tools to better understand RNA structure-activity relationships."

Basu and colleagues published their study in Methods In Molecular Biology (Analysis of catalytic RNA structure and function by nucleotide analog interference mapping. Methods In Molecular Biology, 2012;848():275-96).

For additional information, contact S. Basu, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University, Kent, OH, United States.

Copyright © 2012 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: In Environmental Disasters, Families Respond With Conflict, Denial, Silence | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Environmental disasters impact individuals and communities; they also affect how family members communicate with each other, sometimes in surprising ways, according to a paper published by a faculty member at the University at Buffalo in the Journal of Family Issues.

The study is the first systematic analysis of how families communicate when faced with serious health issues brought on by "slow moving technological disasters," like environmental disasters. The purpose was to identify how people in families communicate when they are facing these issues in order to better characterize the social costs of such disasters.

The findings were, in some ways, counterintuitive, says Heather Orom, PhD, assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions and lead author on the paper.

"The casual observer might assume that when people become seriously ill and there are fatalities, that families would come together and support one another," Orom says. "But our research shows that often times, the opposite happens. That is because whether it's buried toxic waste, such as in Love Canal or contaminated drinking water in Woburn, Massachusetts, these slow moving technological disasters become such a divisive issue in communities. The family dynamics totally mirror what happens in the community."

Orom's research consisted of focus groups conducted with residents of Libby, Montana, who either had asbestos-releated disease, had family members with the disease or were not affected either way. Libby, Montana has significantly elevated incidences of several kinds of asbestos-related disease, such as pleural disease, asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.

For almost 70 years, asbestos-contaminated vermiculite, a mineral commonly used in insulation, construction and as an additive to potting soil, was mined and processed in Libby. As a result, asbestos-related diseases, which often are fatal, are common among former mine employees; family members may also have been affected by the asbestos carried home by workers on their clothes. Cases also have been linked to day-to-day exposures among people residing in the town and surrounding area.

"We found that the people in these situations can be victimized twice," Orom continues. "They become ill and then may be stigmatized because some members of the community view illness claims as lacking credibility, as baseless attempts to get compensation that tarnish the reputation of the town."

According to Orom, what typically occurs is that with the news of contamination, properties are devalued and businesses start leaving the area. "Suddenly, you've got two disasters: an economic disaster and a medical disaster," she says. "It's not surprising that some families decide, 'let's stop talking about it.' Those who continue to bring it up are then labeled troublemakers. Those who are sick and are seen with their oxygen also get labeled. So, many people, especially those with symptoms, start to isolate themselves at home and that affects how and if they discuss their illness with family members." Orom adds that this behavior could prevent people from seeking the medical or psychological help they need; it also could prevent them from discussing important measures that other family members should take, such as screening to find out if they, too, have the disease.

Orom and her colleagues identified five communication patterns within the affected families, which they characterized as open/supportive; silent/supportive; open/conflictual; silent/conflictual and silent/denial. They speculated that the silent and conflictual types of communication could be barriers to attitudes and behaviors that would promote better health, such as screening for asbestos-related diseases, and could increase psychological distress in families.

"There is a reason why people don't like to discuss illness in general, anyway," says Orom. "With an environmental diasaster, there is an additional layer creating a propensity for silence. In our focus groups, we saw instances where families rejected the legitimacy of the illness and estranged the person who was ill."

Orom notes that the negative effects that come from these kinds of responses within families do have significance in the larger community and should be taken into account by policymakers.

"If there are real social and financial costs that result from these disasters and their effects on family relationships, for example, if divorces increase as a result, then maybe this kind of research can help move policies in a direction of being more protective of communities," she says.

The research was conducted as part of a larger communication project by the National Center for Vermiculate and Asbestos-Related Cancers at the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Funding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Co-authors with Orom are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer Institute and John C. Ruckdeschel of Intermountain Healthcare.

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News Headline: Feeling left out could lead kids to opt out of physical activity (Barkely) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Telegraph - Online, The
Contact Name: CHERYL POWELL
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio -- The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise.

A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a virtual ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically active.

These findings -- published recently in the American Academy of Pediatrics’ professional journal Pediatrics -- could help shed light on contributing factors and potential solutions for the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic.

“Ostracism appears to cause a reduction in physical activity,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State. “It could create a scenario where if you’re an overweight or obese child, that ostracism could reduce your physical activity. As you get more ostracized, you get heavier, you get more ostracized because you got heavier and things get worse and worse.”

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of children and adolescents are overweight.

Barkley got the idea for the study while watching his three sons, ages 3 to 7, playing in their backyard.

“I noticed when friends came over, the intensity of their activity increased dramatically,” he said. “After seeing that, I went and looked at the literature in terms of peer influence and physical activity behavior.”

Barkley found other studies showing a link between ostracism or bullying and a decline in physical activity. But previous research didn’t show a clear cause and effect.

For example, one study determined that children who felt teased verbally or physically were less likely to be active and more likely to be overweight, Barkley said. “But does this peer victimization cause them to be less active, or (does) the fact that they’re less active cause victimization?”

In his study, Barkley and his colleagues observed 19 boys and girls ages 8 to 12 who completed two experimental sessions at Kent State.

During one session, children playing a ball-toss computer game received the ball one-third of the time. During the other, the computer was programmed to exclude the children from receiving the ball most of the time.

After playing the computer games, the participants were taken to a gym, where they were allowed to choose sedentary or physical activities.

When they were excluded by the computer game, the study participants spent 41 percent more time with sedentary activities, such as reading books, coloring or playing matching games, the study found. When the children were included in the computer game, their physical activity level in the gym was 22 percent higher.

“I think it’s really important that children have positive peer interaction in their life,” Barkley said.

Barkley is conducting follow-up research exploring whether positive peer interaction encourages physical activity.

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News Headline: Group that helps city's students finish college is moving ahead | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas
News OCR Text: Plain Dealer fileIn addition to monitoring graduates and gathering data on their progress, higher education institutions are also focusing on developmental education and the role of Tri-C, which offers certificates and associate degrees.

An effort to ensure that more Cleveland students graduate from college is well under way six months after local civic leaders and educators decided to team up.

And it's clear that they have plenty of work ahead of them.

Only 136 of the 865 Cleveland school district graduates who enrolled in 14 Ohio private and public universities or at Cuyahoga Community College in 2005 had graduated six years later, according to data provided to the Higher Education Compact of Greater Cleveland.

Those compact partner institutions have developed an intervention plan they hope will increase that 16 percent graduation rate to at least 30 percent for the 1,077 Cleveland school district graduates who enrolled in college last fall, said Corinne Webb, project manager of the compact.

“People within the universities are working with the [Cleveland school district] students to help monitor and guide them through their progression and not let them move off track,” she said.

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson formed the compact, which includes the city and its school district, county government, the colleges and universities, and an array of civic groups and foundations. The program is focused on Cleveland but supporters hope to expand it other communities.

Webb said representatives from nearly all the 62 partners in the compact attended a meeting with Jackson last week to provide updates.

In addition to monitoring graduates and gathering data on their progress, higher education institutions are also focusing on developmental education and the role of Tri-C, which offers certificates and associate degrees, Webb said.

They also plan to find and track students who transfer from one institution to another to make sure they eventually graduate.

The school district is encouraging all students to fill out forms for federal financial aid. The percentage of Cleveland high school graduates going to college has climbed in the past five years from 36 percent to 54 percent, according to the compact. As of mid-March, 40 percent of seniors have submitted the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

Organizations in the compact, including Esperanza and the Boys & Girls Club, have made a commitment to align their programs to support college education and graduation, Webb said.

Colleges that have signed on to the compact are Baldwin-Wallace College, Bowling Green State University, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Tri-C, Hiram College, John Carroll University, Kent State University, Notre Dame College, Oberlin College, Ohio State University, Ohio University, the University of Akron, the University of Toledo and Ursuline College.

Their leaders meet regularly and the schools are sharing information about programs they have developed to lead to student success, retention and graduation, Webb said.

“The higher education community has done an extraordinary job to provide support services to students but it requires the student to pursue and take advantage of the services,” she said. “The universities are finding a proactive way to connect.”

One task force formed by the compact is looking at successful programs in college readiness, access and retention. That group is organizing a June 11 symposium that will include national speakers and will be open to the public, Webb said.

Other groups are looking at creating a public/private scholarship program for students, overseeing the collection and dissemination of all data related to students in college and promoting a college-going culture in Greater Cleveland.

“This is a perfect example of how the community has come together,” Webb said. “We have close to 140 people working on this in some way.”

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News Headline: Going Places: April 9, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AWARDS

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Debra Adams Simmons (The Plain Dealer) received the 2012 Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity from Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

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News Headline: AUDIO Retail Strategies That Work For You Featured (Coombs) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Lindsay McCoy
News OCR Text: Pricing strategies sometimes means more or less work on the consumer's end.

Before you take your credit card on a swiping spree, a former branding consultant and current Kent State University assistant professor in advertising, Danielle Coombs, shares her advice on what to watch for.

If you open your Sunday newspaper or search online to find deals at JCPenny, you may have noticed less clutter and no more coupons. Coombs says the retailer is trying to appeal to busy members of society, especially woman on the hunt for their next outfit. While she's not sure what the end results of the initiative will look like, the "fair and square" approach could work.

"I think it fits with the consumer mindset," she said. "People feel like they're being asked to do a lot of work as consumers."

JCPenny's big push for "everyday prices" is at the opposite end of the spectrum when you compare it to Kohls.

Those who carry a Kohls credit card are offered close to 18 mailers with additional coupons each year. And then there's the Kohls Cash (often earning $10 for every $50 spent).

Layering coupons, watching the weekly ads and the extra Kohls cash is a process that Coombs says works in terms of pricing strategies and creating a trend.

"They really brilliantly bring you in, you get money, and then you have to come back in quickly to spend it again," she said. "So it starts becoming a habit ."

Tips to Better Navigating the Shopping Isles:

Find a store that works for you when it comes to prices.

"Be thoughtful about what places we're going to and are they giving us what we need," Coombs said.

In a busy society, Coombs advises consumers select a store that they can depend on.

"We don't have the time to go to ten store to achieve one goal," she said.

Coupon cutting has gone viral, so click and print away!

"That's really effective and there's a ton out there on the Internet that can give you really specific direction that can give you where to get the best deals at the best time," she said.

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News Headline: Larry Miller postpones performance at Kent State Tuscarawas | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Cocktails with Larry Miller," a performance originally scheduled for April 20 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas' Performing Arts Center, has been postponed until further notice.

"Due to a recently sustained injury, Larry will be postponing his tour until he has received medical clearance for air travel," Michael Hansen, a representative with Miller's management team, said in a press release. "We hope to have the opportunity to reschedule any of these canceled dates and we appreciate the support of Larry's fans during his recovery."

"Cocktails with Larry Miller" is being rescheduled, and more information will be available by the end of next week, according to Kent State Tuscarawas public relations coordinator Pam Patacca.

Those who purchased tickets by credit card will have the charges credited back to them. Those who purchased with cash or check will receive a refund check by mail, which will go out April 20.

If the performance is rescheduled, patrons who bought tickets for the original date will have the first opportunity to purchase tickets.

For more information, contact the Performing Arts Center box office at 330-308-6400 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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News Headline: Some tickets remain for Dave Barry presentation Tuesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About 100 tickets remain for the Dave Barry Voices of Distinction event at 7 p.m. tonight at The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas.

Barry, a humor columnist, will present "The Wit and Wisdom of Dave Barry."

Public relations coordinator Pam Patacca said the presentation is free and open to the public, although admission tickets are required. Tickets  will be available today at the Performing Arts Center box office from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The facility is at 330 University Drive NE in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Larry Miller postpones performance at Kent State Tuscarawas | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Ryan Sweikert
News OCR Text: "Cocktails with Larry Miller," a performance originally scheduled for April 20 at Kent State University at Tuscarawas' Performing Arts Center, has been postponed until further notice.

"Due to a recently sustained injury, Larry will be postponing his tour until he has received medical clearance for air travel," Michael Hansen, a representative with Miller's management team, said in a press release. "We hope to have the opportunity to reschedule any of these canceled dates and we appreciate the support of Larry's fans during his recovery."

"Cocktails with Larry Miller" is being rescheduled, and more information will be available by the end of next week, according to Kent State Tuscarawas public relations coordinator Pam Patacca.

Those who purchased tickets by credit card will have the charges credited back to them. Those who purchased with cash or check will receive a refund check by mail, which will go out April 20.

If the performance is rescheduled, patrons who bought tickets for the original date will have the first opportunity to purchase tickets.

For more information, contact the Performing Arts Center box office at 330-308-6400 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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News Headline: KENT STATE HOLDS 13TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM ON DEMOCRACY, APRIL 23-25 (Underwood) | Email

News Date: 04/09/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, April 9 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's 13th annual Symposium on Democracy will be held at the Kent Student Center Kiva on April 23-25.In recognition of the 150th anniversary of the nation's greatest conflict, this year's theme is "Democracy and the American Civil War." The event is free and open to the public.

Photo of Jeff Shaara"I can't think of a better topic for our fine annual Symposium on Democracy than the anniversary of a conflict whose cause was the continued right of states to allow their citizens to hold other Americans as chattel, property to be bought and sold," said William Underwood, director of the Kent State University Press and one of the co-chairs of the 2012 symposium.

Bestselling novelist Jeff Shaara, author of "Gods and Generals" and "The Last Full Measure," will be the keynote speaker.On Monday, April 23, at 5 p.m.in the Kiva, Shaara will address the question of why the Civil War continues to fascinate Americans and what it is about the war that makes it such an enduring phenomenon in his presentation "The Civil War as an Enduring Phenomenon." Shaara also will participate in Tuesday's panel discussions.Books will be available for sale and signing by the author.

Panel discussions with six leading scholars of the Civil War era will be held on Tuesday and Wednesday, April 24 and 25, in the Kiva.On Tuesday at 9 a.m., Mitchell Snay of Denison University and John David Smith of University of North Carolina Charlotte will discuss "Race and the Civil War." At 2 p.m.on Tuesday, Matt Gallman from the University of Florida and Mark Grimsley from the Ohio State University will examine "The Civil War Home Front." And on Wednesday at 9:30 a.m., Stanley Harrold of South Carolina State University and Fay Yarbrough of the University of Oklahoma will discuss "Reconstruction and the State of the Nation after the Civil War." Audience members will be invited to pose questions to the panelists.

Breakout sessions for teachers will take place following the panel discussions.

Each spring, Kent State inquires, learns and reflects on social, cultural and historical events through the annual Symposium on Democracy, held in commemoration of the events surrounding May 4, 1970.The symposium honors the memories of the four students - Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder - who lost their lives on that day, with an enduring dedication to scholarship that seeks to prevent violence and to promote democratic values and civil discourse.

For more information about the symposium, including the schedule of events and speaker bios, visit www.kent.edu/democracy.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Kent State student stages protest | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: A Kent State student has taken her protest over a planned tuition hike right to the doorstep of the university's president.

Lucy Merriman, a freshman theater design major, began a 24-hour sit-in outside President Lester Lefton's office in the University Library Monday morning.

Merriman was joined by other students upset over the university's plan to begin billing students for taking a heavy class load.

In March, university trustees approved a number of changes, including a tuition hike of 3.5 percent and a room and board increase of nearly 4 percent.

In addition, students will no longer be able to take unlimited courses for the same price as an 11-credit-hour semester. Currently, a full-time rate is applied to a schedule that includes 11 or more credit hours.

But starting next year, students can take up to only 17 hours before an additional fee is levied for each additional credit hour. The fee ranges from $270 to $440 per credit.

In the fall of 2013, the limit will be lowered another hour, with additional fees applied to those carrying loads of 17 hours or more.

Merriman said she thinks the new fees are unfair and she wants to raise awareness about the change.

Julieanne Jimenez, sophomore American sign language major and New Jersey native, said she was attracted to Kent State because it was affordable.

"Right now this increase will make it really hard for me to stay," Jimenez said.

Merriman said she hopes the university will consider lowering the fees or offer additional scholarships.

A petition on Facebook in opposition to the credit charge has collected more than 3,000 signatures.

Merriman said Lefton has offered to meet with her.

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News Headline: 'Ambition Penalty' Sparks Protests by Kent State Students (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Trustees' decision to bring Kent State pricing structure in line with other Ohio universities upsetting to those with heavy course loads.

Kent native Lucy Merriman attends Kent State University for free, but she's so upset about the new “ambition penalty” to be charged to fellow students taking more than 17 credit hours that she spent nearly 12 hours Monday protesting the move.

Merriman, a freshman Honors College student, staged the first of two protests set for this week outside the suite of university administrative offices located at the Kent State Library. Not long after arriving at 9 a.m. Merriman learned President Lester Lefton was not in his office Monday.

But that didn't deter her and numerous other concerned students from talking with passers-by about the new fee structure and encouraging them to sign a petition started by student Michael Crowley, whose group will be staging a second protest this week, likely on Thursday afternoon at the library.

The online petition had garnered more than 3,200 signatures as of this morning. Merriman said her fellow protestors – inspired by her Facebook event page called Protest the Ambition Penalty – “probably nabbed 300 to 400 of those signatures” Monday.

According to a summary of the university's Board of Trustees' March meeting, the board “addressed a fee inequity in which students taking heavy course loads in a semester are charged a flat fee equal to 11 credit hours. The board approved a phased-in, credit-hour charge for all Kent Campus students who take more than 16 credit hours per semester.”

Starting next fall, students will be charged the individual credit-hour fee of $440 for all enrolled hours above 17 credit hours. During the 2013-2014 academic year, students who enroll in more than 16 credit hours per semester will be charged the standard credit-hour rate for each additional hour.

Emily Vincent, director of media relations at Kent State, said the university has long been atypical with its pricing.

“We are one of only two Ohio public universities whose flat rate starts at 11 credits and one of three universities that have allowed credit hours up to infinity without any additional charge. Students have paid a flat rate for taking 11 credits or more without a limit,” Vincent said.

“This means that every full-time Kent State student enjoys the benefit of not paying for that 12th credit hour, as do their peers at all but one of the Ohio universities (Ohio University). Students will continue to see this added value in the new plateau structure,” she explained.

Merriman – who attends the university on a tuition waiver, as her father is a professor there – said she's heard of numerous students who chose Kent State because of its price structure who will now have to transfer elsewhere.

“I was really inspired to take action beyond just signing the petition because if that goes into effect next semester, a friend of mine who's a junior would have to drop one of his minors or transfer back to a school in Pennsylvania,” Merriman said. “He's really stuck between a rock and hard place. I don't want him to transfer or dismiss his dreams of two minors.”

She has been referring to the new fee structure as the “ambition penalty” because Honors College students often need or want to take more credit hours than typical students.

One person who sat in protest with Merriman was Julieanne Jimenez, a sophomore from North Plainfield, NJ. Jimenez said she's currently taking 18 credit hours, but that will jump to 22 credit hours next fall when she begins concentrating on her major in American Sign Language interpreting and double minors in Spanish and dance.

“Originally I was going to go to LaGuardia Community College back home, but (Kent State) was cheaper. But with this happening, I may as well go back home and live with my grandma and go (to LaGuardia),” Jimenez said.

One passer-by in the library was Megan Revere, a sophomore majoring in integrated life sciences. She told Merriman she had already signed the petition because she thinks the fee change is “outrageous. In one of my classes, they calculated the (new) costs and were outraged that it would be cheaper to go to (Ohio State University).”

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News Headline: Morning news headlines for April 10, 2012 - Kent students protest tuition fee | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Several Kent State students staged a sit-in outside university president Lester Lefton's office to protest a change to the school's tuition structure. Students taking more than 17 credit hours will have to pay a fee for the extra credits beginning this fall. One student tells the Beacon Journal the fees will make it difficult for her to keep attending Kent State. University officials say the fees are in line with those at other schools and are meant to ensure fairness. Lefton offered to meet with protestors later this week.

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News Headline: Longtime Kent businessman Ron Burbick primes the city's development pump | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Ronald Burbick retired 13 years ago from Schneller Inc., a maker of aircraft laminates in Kent, he envisioned a relaxing retirement spent primarily on the golf course. Instead, he ignited a wave of development in downtown Kent that had been just a pipedream of many.

Jaded by a lack of action by the city and other developers to overhaul Kent's aging business district, which had come to be dominated by bars and tattoo parlors, Mr. Burbick invested a chunk — make that a large chunk, since it's about $18 million so far — of his own fortune into transforming the small downtown area that had seen little change for decades.

Although he has worked in the Kent area for years, Mr. Burbick, 66, says he was a relative unknown in the city until he opened his checkbook to help overhaul the downtown.

“I have the ability, working with my own money and not having to work with all the politicians to start it, and I can get it done a lot quicker,” said Mr. Burbick, who was vice president of sales and marketing and a part owner at Schneller. “I pulled the trigger and went, and now they're scrambling to catch up.”

Mr. Burbick's investments resulted in two bustling retail and office developments in the heart of Kent's business district — dubbed Acorn Alley I and II. His investments were the first of what morphed into $100 million of new construction in downtown Kent.

Kent State University, for one, is building a $15 million hotel and conference center. Fairmount Properties of Cleveland is leading the development of a $27 million mixed-use complex that will house corporate units of Davey Tree Expert Co. of Kent and Ametek Technical & Industrial Products Co. of Berwyn, Pa. Also, the Portage Area Regional Transit Authority is building a $26 million transportation hub thanks to $20 million in federal stimulus money.

“It's a once-in-a-lifetime type of investment and opportunity to transform a city, and it was Ron's vision that kick-started it all,” said Dan Smith, Kent's economic development director. “It took someone like Ron Burbick to prime the pump.”

Improving an eyesore's look

Last week, construction crews started interior renovations on Mr. Burbick's latest pet project and what he considers the “cherry” of his work — renovating the old Franklin Hotel at the intersection of East Main and South Depeyster streets near his other developments.

Mr. Burbick bought the poorly maintained five-story building nestled at the front door of downtown Kent last year for $400,000 from the city. Now Mr. Burbick is planning nearly $6 million of renovations and construction on the more than 90-year-old structure.

“It's been an eyesore as long as I can remember,” Mr. Burbick noted. “Even when it was operating, it was an eyesore.”

Mr. Burbick last week announced the building's anchor tenant would be Buffalo Wild Wings, which will move from its small location on Franklin Avenue and will contribute about $1 million to renovate the space. The old hotel also will house other retailers, office space, transitional housing for veterans and two or three luxury apartments.

Mr. Burbick said the project, which he's calling Acorn Corner, will be finished and fully occupied by year's end.

Asked whether the hotel project would be his last, Mr. Burbick smiled and said there's one more he wouldn't mind tackling: the old post office building on South Water Street. The more than 100-year-old building now houses the Kent branch of the Portage County Municipal Courthouse; the county plans to build a new courthouse on East Main Street.

“Every year I tell my wife, "This is my last project.' ... But whoever gets that has got to make sure it's done right,” Mr. Burbick said.

Already a difference

Beyond the nearby multimillion-dollar projects financed by the university and other developers, Mr. Burbick's investments have sparked smaller changes that already are paying dividends in the city.

Mike Beder, a longtime Kent-area bar owner and co-owner of Tree City Coffee & Pastry, which recently opened in the second Acorn Alley development, called Mr. Burbick one of the reasons the “town's alive before 7 p.m. now.”

Moreover, the city of Kent's Mr. Smith said both Dominic's and Ray's Place — two local pubs — installed new façades on their buildings. Also, other businesses have contacted the city about relocating to the downtown area, which Mr. Smith attributes largely to Mr. Burbick's work.

“We're getting a lot of calls, and higher quality calls,” Mr. Smith added.

But when Mr. Burbick broke ground on his first Acorn Alley development in late 2008, it wasn't an easy sell convincing businesses to open up shop downtown — a move that he contends now is paying off as some of the small shops scramble for more space.

“It was tough getting the seats in the chairs, but you know, I worked some deals with them,” Mr. Burbick noted. “Now it's standing room only.”

Sue Nelson, a business owner in Kent for more than 30 years, said the momentum stirred by Mr. Burbick's projects has brought an enormous amount of pedestrian traffic downtown, ultimately generating more business for her design studio.

“Ron was definitely a savior for Kent,” Ms. Nelson said. “So many downtowns are really dying. For him to take the plunge and invest and think forward was wonderful.”

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News Headline: Electronic Community Sign Could be Running by Fall Semester | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City, university finalizing plans for downtown community sign

Community Message Board
City and university officials were treated to a demonstration of an electronic message board that will be built as part of the downtown redevelopment on Friday, April 6, 2012. The sign will stand on land at the northeast corner of the Haymaker Parkway and South Water Street intersection in front of the new Davey Resource Group building, which is under construction.

An electronic community message board planned as part of Kent's downtown redevelopment could be online before the start of fall classes at Kent State University.

Both city and university officials met Friday with the firm that submitted the lowest bid for the project, Cleveland-based Brilliant Electric Sign Co. Representatives from the sign company met city and university officials downtown where the sign will eventually stand at the northeast corner of the Haymaker Parkway and South Water Street intersection just in front of the new Davey Resource Group building.

Kent State and the city have agreed to split the costs of the sign evenly. The digital message board will advertise programs and events run by both the city and university.

Kent City Engineer Jim Bowling said the city plans to have the sign finished and operational before fall classes start at Kent State.

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News Headline: Going Places: April 9, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/10/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EDUCATION

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Eric Mansfield to executive director, university media relations.

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