Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Communication Studies (1)
KSU at Trumbull (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Renovation at KSU (1)
Students (6)
Theatre and Dance (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Military assistance is available locally 04/13/2012 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...for returning veterans on May 2. Educational opportunities for veterans, including the GI bill, will be the topic on May 9 with a representative from Kent State University's Center for Adult and Veteran Services. Gary Ickes, Stark County veteran services officer, will discuss veterans benefits,...


Communication Studies (1)
In Environmental Disasters, Families Respond With Conflict, Denial, Silence 04/13/2012 ScienceDaily Text Attachment Email

...Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Funding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Co-authors with Orom are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer...


KSU at Trumbull (2)
Summit stresses the need for more workers (Goetsch) 04/13/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...kindergarten, or even before, should be exposed to manufacturing. The message helps get the word out about what the Trumbull Career and Technical Center and Kent State University at Trumbull already are doing, spokesmen said. However, lack of information among employers and students is making it difficult...

Researchers from Kent State University Describe Findings in Medical Research 04/13/2012 NewsRx.com Text Email

...do participate in such activities, and 29 (67%) of 43 item respondents have been doing so for more than five years," wrote R. Guerrieri and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ). The researchers concluded: "Thirty-two (64%) of 50 item respondents provide resources on biomedical careers...


KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Kent State Tuscarawas to host Safe Kids Day event 04/12/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will host Safe Kids Day beginning at 1 p.m. May 20. The event will feature health educational exhibits and wil be held in...

Kent State University at Tuscarawas to present 'Pirates of Penzance' April 26 04/12/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players repertory ensemble will present "Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10:30 p.m. April 26 in the Performing Arts Center of Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The comic opera follows the exploits of Frederic, a pirate apprentice approaching the end of his apprenticeship....

Kent State Tuscarawas to host Safe Kids Day event 04/13/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will host Safe Kids Day beginning at 1 p.m. May 20. The event will feature health educational exhibits and wil be held in...

Kent State University at Tuscarawas to present 'Pirates of Penzance' April 26 04/13/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

...New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players repertory ensemble will present "Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10:30 p.m. April 26 in the Performing Arts Center of Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The comic opera follows the exploits of Frederic, a pirate apprentice approaching the end of his apprenticeship....


Renovation at KSU (1)
School Notes (Floyd) 04/12/2012 Aurora Advocate Text Attachment Email

$2.8 million KSU 'Green' project gets under way Kent State University began construction last week on the Student Green, a $2.8 million project to revamp the Summit Street entrance to campus located...


Students (6)
Kent State's new tuition surcharge most costly in state (Diacon, Harvey) 04/13/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Video: Kent State University students protest new credit-hour fee (with gallery, video) (Rashid, Burford) 04/13/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Snapshot: Students Crowd Plaza for Protest at Kent State 04/13/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Protestors Decry Kent State Student Fee Change (Diacon) 04/13/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Video: Kent State students say no to $440 fee attached to school's new credit hour cap policy (Diacon) 04/13/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Video: Kent students protest credit hour cap policy (Diacon) 04/13/2012 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email


Theatre and Dance (1)
Tolerance, friendship themes of KSU's 'Nathan the Wise' 04/13/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Press (1)
Funky Winkerbean Celebrates 40th Anniversary on March 27 04/13/2012 NewsRx.com Text Email

...suicide, guns in the classroom, racial discrimination, teen-dating abuse, alcoholism and post-traumatic stress disorder into Funky Winkerbean. The Kent State University Press Publishes The Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1 On the 40th Anniversary As part of the 40th Anniversary celebration,...


News Headline: Military assistance is available locally | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Transitioning from military to civilian life is not easy.

Rodman Public Library is seeking to help members of the military and veterans with its Transition Assistance programming at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays during the month of May.

A representative from The Employment Source in Canton will be on hand to discuss job opportunities for returning veterans on May 2.

Educational opportunities for veterans, including the GI bill, will be the topic on May 9 with a representative from Kent State University's Center for Adult and Veteran Services.

Gary Ickes, Stark County veteran services officer, will discuss veterans benefits, non-service pensions and more during his visit on May 16.

A suicide prevention program will be presented by the Canton-based Outpatient Clinic of the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center on May 23 with a representative of the Ohio Natural Guard's Family Readiness and Warrior Support program discussing finances and financial assistance to wrap up the library's offerings on May 30.

Registration is required for each of these programs being hosted at Rodman Public Library by calling 330-821-2665 and pressing "O."

Alliance Municipal Court also is preparing to host the second of its monthly Veterans' Court programs at 3:30 p.m. April 26 in the main courtroom, where veterans or family members can learn about counseling, housing, treatment and legal resources options. For more information, call Jean Madden at 330-823-6181.

The American Red Cross Stark County also hosts Military Family Connection Group sessions at no cost to family members, so they "can meet to support each other and gain valuable information on many local resources," according to Melissa Seibert, Red Cross military outreach manager.

The Military Family Connection Group once again will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday (of the third Tuesday of the month) at the American Red Cross Stark County Chapter, 408 Ninth St. N.W. in Canton.

New members are always welcome. Meetings of a recently created group in Alliance are held during the first Thursday of each month at the Red Cross training facility in Alliance near Arch Avenue and Broadway Street.

For more information, contact Seibert at 330-437-3742.

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News Headline: In Environmental Disasters, Families Respond With Conflict, Denial, Silence | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: ScienceDaily
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Environmental disasters impact individuals and communities; they also affect how family members communicate with each other, sometimes in surprising ways, according to a paper published by a faculty member at the University at Buffalo in the Journal of Family Issues.

The study is the first systematic analysis of how families communicate when faced with serious health issues brought on by "slow moving technological disasters," like environmental disasters. The purpose was to identify how people in families communicate when they are facing these issues in order to better characterize the social costs of such disasters.

The findings were, in some ways, counterintuitive, says Heather Orom, PhD, assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions and lead author on the paper.

"The casual observer might assume that when people become seriously ill and there are fatalities, that families would come together and support one another," Orom says. "But our research shows that often times, the opposite happens. That is because whether it's buried toxic waste, such as in Love Canal or contaminated drinking water in Woburn, Massachusetts, these slow moving technological disasters become such a divisive issue in communities. The family dynamics totally mirror what happens in the community."

Orom's research consisted of focus groups conducted with residents of Libby, Montana, who either had asbestos-related disease, had family members with the disease or were not affected either way. Libby, Montana has significantly elevated incidence of several kinds of asbestos-related disease, such as pleural disease, asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.

For almost 70 years, asbestos-contaminated vermiculite, a mineral commonly used in insulation, construction and as an additive to potting soil, was mined and processed in Libby. As a result, asbestos-related diseases, which often are fatal, are common among former mine employees; family members may also have been affected by the asbestos carried home by workers on their clothes. Cases also have been linked to day-to-day exposures among people residing in the town and surrounding area.

"We found that the people in these situations can be victimized twice," Orom continues. "They become ill and then may be stigmatized because some members of the community view illness claims as lacking credibility, as baseless attempts to get compensation that tarnish the reputation of the town."

According to Orom, what typically occurs is that with the news of contamination, properties are devalued and businesses start leaving the area. "Suddenly, you've got two disasters: an economic disaster and a medical disaster," she says. "It's not surprising that some families decide, 'let's stop talking about it.' Those who continue to bring it up are then labeled troublemakers. Those who are sick and are seen with their oxygen also get labeled. So, many people, especially those with symptoms, start to isolate themselves at home and that affects how and if they discuss their illness with family members." Orom adds that this behavior could prevent people from seeking the medical or psychological help they need; it also could prevent them from discussing important measures that other family members should take, such as screening to find out if they, too, have the disease.

Orom and her colleagues identified five communication patterns within the affected families, which they characterized as open/supportive; silent/supportive; open/conflictual; silent/conflictual and silent/denial. They speculated that the silent and conflictual types of communication could be barriers to attitudes and behaviors that would promote better health, such as screening for asbestos-related diseases, and could increase psychological distress in families.

"There is a reason why people don't like to discuss illness in general, anyway," says Orom. "With an environmental disaster, there is an additional layer creating a propensity for silence. In our focus groups, we saw instances where families rejected the legitimacy of the illness and estranged the person who was ill."

Orom notes that the negative effects that come from these kinds of responses within families do have significance in the larger community and should be taken into account by policymakers.

"If there are real social and financial costs that result from these disasters and their effects on family relationships, for example, if divorces increase as a result, then maybe this kind of research can help move policies in a direction of being more protective of communities," she says.

The research was conducted as part of a larger communication project by the National Center for Vermiculate and Asbestos-Related Cancers at the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Funding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Co-authors with Orom are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer Institute and John C. Ruckdeschel of Intermountain Healthcare.

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News Headline: Summit stresses the need for more workers (Goetsch) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Today's factory isn't the dark, dirty and dangerous place where fathers once toiled to earn money to send their children to college and a better life.

Manufacturing's transformation into a high-tech, clean and safer environment was one of the main themes that emerged Thursday from the packed Oh-Penn Interstate Region Manufacturing Workforce Summit at Kilcawley Center at Youngstown State University.

"We have to inform the work force, especially young kids, that there now is an alternative to college, going into the military service or a service sector job - and it's a pretty good alternative," said Bill Turner, work force administrator for the Warren Ohio Department of Job and Family Services office.

The other key message was bleaker - industrial employers can't find nearly enough qualified workers to meet growing demand, especially in the Marcellus and Utica shale natural gas industry booming in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania.

"The need and shortage (of workers) is horrible, and it's going to get worse in the next five years if we don't work together," said Andreas Foerster, president of Starr Manufacturing Inc. in Vienna, a maker of coal-extracting equipment, compressors and other industrial machinery.

Employers traced the work shortage to a host of problems, including some educators' lack of awareness of manufacturing's array of desirable jobs, and students' outdated view of manufacturing as low-tech and dirty, along with lack of emphasis on math and problems with drug use.

Trina Rauscher-Cooper, human resources director for steel pipe maker V&M Star in Youngstown, said the company has received 16,000 applications for the 350 jobs at the high-tech pipe mill it's building on Youngstown's North Side.

She said the company looks for applicants with skills, math knowledge and work ethic that enables them to learn additional skills, work together in teams, do the job and show up for work regularly. Dedicated workers sometimes can make a living better than workers in many other fields, she said.

Dale Deist, whose Deist Industries south of Meadville, Pa., makes rolloff containers, flat beds and other truck bodies, pointed out U.S. manufacturing itself is the world's eighth largest economy, and that it pays about 25 percent more than nonmanufacturing work.

"It's also the springboard to other careers," he said, noting the superintendent of a nearby school system started as a machinist.

Deist said workers don't need to know calculus or other higher forms of mathematics.

"It's knowing how many 8-inch tiles" fit into a room, he said. "We need to let students know how they can use that knowledge in the real world."

Former Youngstown Mayor Jay Williams, now the director of the Office of Recovery for Auto Communities, otherwise known as President Barack Obama's "car czar," said he was impressed with the crowd of about 400.

He said one message he will take from the session is the importance of stressing vocational training at earlier levels of school.

"Vocational was often looked at that you were good with your hands but not the brightest bulb in the class. That's not where we're at in manufacturing," he said. "I'm completely blown away by how clean, how modernized these manufacturing facilities are."

Speakers emphasized the need for educators to inform students about manufacturing to give them a choice of career. They said students as early as kindergarten, or even before, should be exposed to manufacturing.

The message helps get the word out about what the Trumbull Career and Technical Center and Kent State University at Trumbull already are doing, spokesmen said.

However, lack of information among employers and students is making it difficult to boost manufacturing education.

"From employers' perspective, educators aren't meeting the demand for skilled workers. From educators' perspective, we can't get students into out manufacturing program. They're not interested; they're not aware of the high-wage occupations," said Linda Goetsch, director of work force development and continuing studies at KSU at Trumbull in Champion.

Jessica Borza, executive director of the Mahoning Valley Manufacturing Coalition, which sponsored the event with the Industry Partnership of Lawrence and Mercer Counties, said a report of the event will be compiled in the next couple of weeks and posted to the group's website, www.mvmanufacturing.com

Group members then will meet to discuss the event in more detail, leading to an action plan in one to two months.

"We're done talking. Now, it's time to roll up our sleeves," she said.

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News Headline: Researchers from Kent State University Describe Findings in Medical Research | Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Research findings, "Librarian participation in expanding the pool of potential medical students," are discussed in a new report. According to the authors of a study from Warren, Ohio, "This article reports on the results of an exploratory survey to determine if librarians actively participate in medical school student recruiting programs. It looks specifically at what librarians are doing to assist with recruitment and what biomedical career resources their libraries offer."

"The survey link was e-mailed to all U.S. medical school library directors, who were asked to forward it to the appropriate librarian. Out of 113 medical schools, 68 (60%) responded to most questions. Forty-three (86%) of 50 item respondents do participate in such activities, and 29 (67%) of 43 item respondents have been doing so for more than five years," wrote R. Guerrieri and colleagues, Kent State University (see also ).

The researchers concluded: "Thirty-two (64%) of 50 item respondents provide resources on biomedical careers in the libraries."

Guerrieri and colleagues published the results of their research in Medical Reference Services Quarterly (Librarian participation in expanding the pool of potential medical students. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 2012;31(1):61-72).

For additional information, contact R. Guerrieri, Kent State University Trumbull Campus, 4314 Mahoning Avenue NW, Warren, OH 44483, United States.

The publisher of the journal Medical Reference Services Quarterly can be contacted at: The Haworth Press, Inc., Taylor & Francis Group Ltd, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxford OX14 4RN United Kingdom.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to host Safe Kids Day event | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will host Safe Kids Day beginning at 1 p.m. May 20.

The event will feature health educational exhibits and wil be held in conjunction with the Safe Kids office.

The university is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-602-0778.

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News Headline: Kent State University at Tuscarawas to present 'Pirates of Penzance' April 26 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players repertory ensemble will present "Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10:30 p.m. April 26 in the Performing Arts Center of Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The comic opera follows the exploits of Frederic, a pirate apprentice approaching the end of his apprenticeship.

Ticket prices range from $37 to $54.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400 or email tflood2@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to host Safe Kids Day event | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Austin Prickett
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will host Safe Kids Day beginning at 1 p.m. May 20.

The event will feature health educational exhibits and wil be held in conjunction with the Safe Kids office.

The university is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-602-0778.

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News Headline: Kent State University at Tuscarawas to present 'Pirates of Penzance' April 26 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Vivian Gomez
News OCR Text: The New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players repertory ensemble will present "Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10:30 p.m. April 26 in the Performing Arts Center of Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The comic opera follows the exploits of Frederic, a pirate apprentice approaching the end of his apprenticeship.

Ticket prices range from $37 to $54.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400 or email tflood2@kent.edu.

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News Headline: School Notes (Floyd) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/12/2012
Outlet Full Name: Aurora Advocate
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: $2.8 million KSU 'Green'

project gets under way

Kent State University began construction last week on the Student Green, a $2.8 million project to revamp the Summit Street entrance to campus located near the Kent Student Center.

The new Student Green will extend from the recently renovated Risman Plaza to the lawn area south, creating green space from the current student center plaza to Summit Street.

"This is the second phase of a project to create an attractive entrance to campus for our university family, university guests and prospective students considering enrollment at Kent State," said Gregg Floyd, KSU's senior vice president for finance and administration, in a press release.

"It also fulfills a promise to our students from President Lefton to provide attractive outdoor space dedicated to casual student use, as well as programmed student activities.

"Response to the Risman Plaza renovations has been very favorable, and the energized atmosphere produced by the heavy student use is great for the campus."

The Student Green project. with its expanded lawn area, will create a student-centered space at a major "front door" to campus.

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News Headline: Kent State's new tuition surcharge most costly in state (Diacon, Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State undergraduates will pay the highest premium in the state for credit hours beyond what the university deems as a full-time load.

No other tax-supported university charges anything approaching the $440 per credit hour that KSU will impose this fall for students on the main campus who take an overload of credit hours.

This is the “new normal,” university Provost Todd Diacon told the Kent State student media Kentwired this week.

“The state is not going to bear the cost of higher education but the users are,” Diacon is quoted as saying. “And you are the users.”

KSU trustees in March approved an overload fee of $440 for more than 17 credit hours next year and for more than 16 credit hours in 2013-2014.

The new fee set off a storm of complaints from students who see it as an “ambition penalty” for trying to get through college quickly or for pursuing double majors that require more credit hours. Various protests have been staged around campus.

Iris Harvey, vice president of university relations, told student media this week the surcharge is a way to keep “high-quality facilities for students.”

KSU officials are poised to refresh the Kent campus with new buildings and updates of current ones. Trustees have agreed to borrow $170 million.

In KSU's last big expansion in the 1960s, the state paid for virtually all of the cost of 60 new buildings, Diacon told the Beacon Journal on Thursday. This time around, the state will pay only 10 percent of the tab; the rest will come from the university's funding sources.

“We'll have to fashion our budget going forward to pay our construction debt,” he said.

Neither he nor KSU spokesman Tom Neumann knew how many overcharge hours students take each semester.

Last fall, 2,849 undergraduates on the Kent campus — 12.6 percent of students — took more than 17 hours, the university said.

Most other tax-supported universities in Ohio already do what Kent State wants to do: They charge a flat fee for a set number of credit hours and impose a surcharge on credit hours beyond that.

Most universities define a full-time load as 12 to 16 credit hours, while KSU and Ohio University say a full-time course load begins at 11 credit hours.

Other tax-supported universities charge overload rates that range from a low of $154 at Ohio University to $373 at Cleveland State. The University of Akron charges $333; Bowling Green, $200.

Three state universities still have no ceiling on credit-hour loads. Students enrolled at Ohio State, Cincinnati and Miami can take as many classes as they want without paying a surcharge. That is the way Kent State is now — and the way that protesting students want it to stay.

William Liptak III of Columbus was so upset about the new fee that he began organizing student protests with two other students.

An online Facebook petition has more than 3,700 signatures. More than 500 students attended a protest on campus Thursday.

The overload charge “is such an exorbitant amount,” said Liptak, a sophomore majoring in musical theater, who said he needs 159 credit hours to graduate.

He said he is taking 18 credit hours this semester and up to 22 in the fall to graduate in four years.

“This caused me to drop a second major,” a student named Erik wrote on the Facebook petition page. “It's a hell of a way to discourage learning and expansion of professional futures.”

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News Headline: Video: Kent State University students protest new credit-hour fee (with gallery, video) (Rashid, Burford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Chants of “K-E-N-T, we don't want your credit fee” and “Kent read, Kent write, Kent pay” filled Risman Plaza Thursday afternoon as a group nearing 100 students protested new fees approved recently by Kent State University's Board of Trustees.

The fees in question, which go into effect next school year, would not affect students who take 17 or fewer credit hours per semester. If a student went over that limit, however, they would pay a fee of up to $440 for each additional credit hour above 17.

By the 2013-14 school year, all students who schedule more than 16 credit hours would pay the additional fees.
Kent State senior Tommy Walsh, a double major in political science and philosophy and a minor in pre-law, said he often takes heavier than average courseloads and feels the fees are unfair to ambitious students.

“We all feel like we're sort of being punished in an academic sense for trying to challenge ourselves,” Walsh said.

Walsh said multiple students were collecting signatures on petitions against the fee increase to bring to Kent State's administration.

In addition to the new fees, Kent State's Board of Trustees also increased tuition for undergraduate and graduate students by 3.5 percent and approved a 3.92 percent increase to room and board rates at its March 14 meeting.

Annika Johnson, freshman aeronautics major, said she was protesting because she expected to take more than 16 or 17 credit hours in her college career in order to graduate on time.

“I just don't think it's fair to (pass) such a hike in fees that discourages education,” Johnson said.

Many of the students brought humorous signs to get their points about the fee change across.

One read, “No child Lefton behind,” referencing Kent State President Lester Lefton, and chants of “We could pay the credit fee with Lester Lefton's salary,” were shouted by the crowd.

One student carried a flattened Cap'N Crunch box reading, “I can't even afford a real sign.”
The protest began on the second floor of Kent State's library, near the entrance of Lefton's office, but quickly moved to the library's Risman Plaza entrance after KSU staff members requested the students take the protest outside.

Timeka Rashid, assistant dean for students at KSU, said the administration made the request in order to allow students and staff to continue to use the second floor, and also so the protesters would have “more visibility.”

Bob Burford, a spokesman for KSU, said Todd Diacon, who the school named as its new provost in February, has been and will continue to discuss the fee increase with students.

“As an institution of higher education, we support the right of our students to express themselves,” Burford said.

Protest organizers said they intended to return to Risman Plaza to continue their protests at the same time next week.

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News Headline: Snapshot: Students Crowd Plaza for Protest at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fee change at Kent State University criticized by students

A large group of students gathered in Risman Plaza outside the Kent State Student Center this afternoon to continue protests over a student fee change made last month.

Kent Patch talked to student and university leaders this afternoon. Look for full coverage of the protests tomorrow morning on Kent Patch.

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News Headline: Protestors Decry Kent State Student Fee Change (Diacon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University not considering review of fee change; appeal process available to students

Students protesting an increase in course fees at Kent State University waved signs and shouted outside administrative offices on campus Thursday.

Whether their message fell on deaf ears remains to be seen.

About 50 students stood on and around the sculpture just outside the Kent State Library in Risman Plaza for three hours protesting what's been called the "ambition penalty," which is a course fee applied to each credit hour for students enrolled in more than 17 credit hours in a semester.

Kent State Provost Todd Diacon said the fee, which university trustees voted to increase last month, is common at universities across Ohio and the nation.

"It's reflective of the costs of an education," Diacon said. "But most importantly, it's required to raise the revenues we need to build good buildings, to maintain buildings and to keep good faculty."

Starting next fall, students will be charged the individual credit-hour fee of $440 for all enrolled hours above 17 credit hours. The average Kent State student is enrolled in 13.5 credit hours per semester. During the 2013-2014 academic year, students who enroll in more than 16 credit hours per semester will be charged the standard credit-hour rate for each additional hour.

Diacon said part of his role as the new provost is to explain to students why the fees are necessary, and that discussion started Wednesday night when he met with a group of about 15 honors students.

"They understood my argument that we have to preserve the quality of a Kent State degree, and we have to enhance a Kent State degree through investments in infrastructure and by hiring good faculty," he said. "We don't have plans to reevaluate the fee."

Students circulated petitions against the fee during the protest, which attracted both upper-level administrators and Kent State police officers — both of which observed from a distance. The protestors' chants included a modified soccer chant with the word "oley" replaced with the words "won't pay" and the chant "M-O-N-E-Y, you ain't got no alibi, you're greedy!"

The protest was held in view of the administrative offices that includes the windows of Kent State President Lester Lefton's office.

Kent State spokesperson Tom Neumann said Lefton was not on campus during the three-hour protest.

One observer was Evan Gildenblatt, the incoming executive director of Kent State's Undergraduate Student Government.

Gildenblatt declined to share his personal views on the fee, but said his role is to serve as a facilitator of dialogue between students, administrators and state officials on the issue.

"And that's what I'm looking to do now, is to work proactively with the students, with the administration, with the board of trustees, with the state government to try to find acceptable solutions to make it so students can afford their education," he said. "Really my hope right now is that we can get students and university representatives sitting down at the table on the same page understanding each other's sides, being able to work together to figure out how we can mitigate the impact of the policy on our students."

He said he wants students to be aware that there is an appeal process available through the university ombudsman's office for issues they feel are beyond their control.

"I also would encourage every student to speak with the financial aid office and to see their advisor, because advising is key in this to make sure you get through on time with the proper courses so you're not paying overload fees," he said.

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News Headline: Video: Kent State students say no to $440 fee attached to school's new credit hour cap policy (Diacon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Kent State University students have planned a student-led protest in response to a new credit hour cap policy the school's administration is trying to implement.

Kent State student, William Liptak II, said they will convene in front of the Kent State University Library from 2-5 p.m. Thursday afternoon. He said the students were shocked when they learned the administration would be implementing a new "credit hour cap" policy.

Under the new policy, a student who takes over 17 credit hours a semester would be charged a $440 fee per credit hour rather than per class. Some view it as part of the evolutionary process for a university due to economic constraints. However, students see it otherwise.

In less than a week, the movement has garnered over 3500 signatures via an online petition. A physical petition on campus has also received over fifteen hundred signatures in three days. Liptak said the goal of the protest is to raise awareness and communicate their displeasure to the administration.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/oh_portage/kent-state-students-say-no-to-440-fee-attached-to-schools-new-credit-hour-cap-policy

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News Headline: Video: Kent students protest credit hour cap policy (Diacon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
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News OCR Text: KENT -- Kent State University students held a student-led protest in front of the KSU library in response to a new credit hour cap policy the school's administration is trying to implement.

Kent State student William Liptak II said students were shocked when they learned the administration would be implementing a new "credit hour cap" policy.

Under the new policy, a student who takes over 17 credit hours a semester would be charged a $440 fee per credit hour rather than per class.

Some view it as part of the evolutionary process for a university due to economic constraints.

Students gathered 3,500 signatures via an online petition. A physical petition on campus has also received over 1,500 signatures.

Please click on link to view video:
http://www.wkyc.com/news/regional/article/240891/6/Kent-students-protest-credit-hour-cap-policy

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News Headline: Tolerance, friendship themes of KSU's 'Nathan the Wise' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
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News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance will present "Nathan the Wise" through April 22 in the Wright-Curtis Theatre, Music and Speech Building.

Presented by the Roe Green Visiting Director Series, guest director Ami Dayan directs the new adaptation of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing's classic book.

"It is a thrill and honor to be a Roe Green Visiting Director at Kent State's School of Theatre and Dance -- doubled by the exciting opportunity to adapt a classic, rarely produced masterpiece for American viewers today," Dayan said. "'Nathan the Wise' challenges audiences to acknowledge and reflect upon the inherent prejudice and false beliefs that assemble within our minds from our unique cultural upbringing, and offers an articulate path towards greater consciousness of the common threads that weave humanity together."

First published in 1779, Nathan the Wise is set in Jerusalem during the Third Crusade and time of enlightenment. It follows Nathan, a wealthy Jewish merchant, the enlightened sultan Saladin and the Templars as they close the gaps between Judaism, Islam and Christianity. Major themes include tolerance and friendship.

"In experiencing Nathan the Wise, audiences will gain insights to the history and longevity of the tension between Islam, Christianity and Judaism," Dayan said. "They will also be exposed to a unique, enlightened approach to the source of human conflicts -- dispelling the mystery and opening the possibility of acceptance."

Shows run Tuesday through Saturday at 8 pm and Sunday at 2 pm. The box office is open weekdays from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour prior to each performance.

For tickets or more information call 330-672-2497. The box office accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, checks and cash. Tickets are $8 for students, $14 for faculty, staff and alumni association members, $12 for seniors and $16 for adults. Groups of 10 or more are $7 per person.

Dayan expresses his joy in working with the School of Theatre and Dance as well as his hope for how students and audiences will interpret the play.

While delivering a drama of the highest order, it dares to depict a world where women and men of all faiths can transform beyond primitive hostilities and biases, asking audiences -- why can't we?

It is my greatest hope that working on this world premier production will empower and inspire students to apply their talents and skills to new theatrical projects that address the social and political issues that they are passionate about. And if we manage to thoroughly entertain our audience as we illuminate, provide hope, and provoke thought -- I trust Nathan the Wise will be very well satisfied.

In addition to directing Nathan the Wise, Ami Dayan will also perform in A Tale of a Tiger at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 15 in the EZ Blackbox Theatre in the Music and Speech located at 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent, Ohio.

A Tale of a Tiger is an award-winning Israeli-American adaptation of an Italian Nobel Prize Laureate play, based on an ancient Chinese theatre folk tale, with roots in an Indian myth. It is a humorous tale of a soldier who is shot in the Himalayas and left to die. A tigress saves the soldier and when his life is regained, the soldier re-determines the personal and moral standards by which he is to live. It is a total theatrical experience blending physical theatre, buffoonery, circus arts, ancient storytelling and modern theatre, for anyone ages 5?105. This performance is made possible through generous support of the Jewish Foundation of Cleveland.

Playwright, director, performer, and theatre instructor, Dayan studied and worked professionally in the United States, Europe, and Israel. A two-time recipient of the America-Israel Cultural Foundation Grant, Dayan's work has recently been commissioned by The Denver Center Theatre Company, The Colorado Shakespeare Festival, and The Roe Green Foundation.

Dayan's latest production, Conviction, had its successful off Broadway debut in February 2010, and was developed into a film by director Steve Klein. His upcoming productions include A Happy End, by Iddo Netanyahu, and his new adaptation of Lessing's classic Nathan the Wise, opening on April 13 in Wright-Curtis Theatre in the Music and Speech building located at 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent, Ohio

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News Headline: Funky Winkerbean Celebrates 40th Anniversary on March 27 | Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When the Funky Winkerbean gang gathers at Montoni's to celebrate the pizzeria's 40 years in business, newspaper readers will have fun recalling key events in the history of the comic strip as Tom Batiuk's award-winning comic strip celebrates its 40th anniversary on the newspaper comics pages. The strip is syndicated internationally by King Features Syndicate to nearly 400 newspapers (see also ).

Ever since Funky Winkerbean first appeared on March 27, 1972, Batiuk has been treating his readers to an inside look at the lives of rich cast of quirky students at the fictitious Westview High School. From his initial gag-a-day format, the cartoonist moved his characters forward in their fictional lives as he himself matured through the years. Believing that the comic art form is capable of carrying weighty subject matter, Batiuk has continued to stretch the creative boundaries of narrative humor, introducing real-life issues such as dyslexia, teen suicide, guns in the classroom, racial discrimination, teen-dating abuse, alcoholism and post-traumatic stress disorder into Funky Winkerbean.

The Kent State University Press Publishes The Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1 On the 40th Anniversary

As part of the 40th Anniversary celebration, The Kent State University Press is publishing The Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 1 (March 27, 2012, $45), which encompasses the first three years' worth of strips. Subsequent volumes will be issued every year. Batiuk, who is a graduate of Kent State, donated a collection of his artwork to his alma mater, so it is particularly fitting that the University Press would undertake this massive publishing project to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of his strip with him.

With a Foreword by comics historian R.C. Harvey, the 486-page Volume 1 introduces Funky Winkerbean (whose name was suggested by Batiuk's students), along with his friends Crazy Harry Klinghorn, Bull Bushka, Livinia Swenson, Les Moore, Holly Bud and Roland Mathews. Principal Burch, counselor Fred Fairgood and band director Harry L. Dinkle also appear for the first time. In an autobiographical introduction, Batiuk reveals his early inspirations in his quest to become a cartoonist and discusses his teaching career and how it affected the genesis of the comic strip.

For more information, please visit http://www.kingfeatures.com. The official Funky Winkerbean website is at www.FunkyWinkerbean.com.

Copyright © 2012 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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