Report Overview:
Total Clips (43)
Aeronautics (2)
Alumni; Students (2)
Career Services Center (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry (2)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
College of Technology (1)
Communication Studies (2)
Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
Geology; Students (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Music; Theatre and Dance (5)
Political Science (2)
Sociology (1)
Student Involvement, Center for; Students (1)
Students (5)
Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Town-Gown (1)
Tuition (2)
University Libraries (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics (2)
Aviation Heritage Fair Moved Back to September (Vincent) 04/16/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State's Aviation Heritage Fair returns to fall schedule (Vincent) 04/15/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

The date for the annual Kent State University Aviation Heritage Fair has taken flight again. Traditionally, the event occurs in the fall at the KSU Airport on Route 59...


Alumni; Students (2)
Portage County's "Real Heroes' honored Saturday by Red Cross 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kentites Honored for Heroic Deeds 04/16/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Career Services Center (1)
Job prospects might be on rise for new college graduates (McNaughton) 04/14/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...companies have touched base at Hiram, a small campus in Portage County. That's huge, considering that no employers were calling three years ago. At Kent State, the 110 employers showing up at the spring job fair was a "phenomenal number, considering that a few years ago it was in the 80s," career...


Chemistry and Biochemistry (2)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? 04/16/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Connecticut (April 13) 04/13/2012 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State University, Stanford Junior University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., April 13 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, and Stanford...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Kent State Food Drive Nets 4,500 Items for Kent Social Services (Kenne) 04/16/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


College of Technology (1)
Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? 04/16/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Communication Studies (2)
In environmental disasters, families respond with conflict, denial, silence 04/14/2012 EurekAlert! Text Attachment Email

...Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Funding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Co-authors with Orom are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer...

Better Understanding of Psychosocial Consequences of Disasters Needed, Report Says 04/13/2012 Homeland Security Today - Online Text Attachment Email

...instances where families rejected the legitimacy of the illness and estranged the person who was ill." Orom's co-authors are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer...


Corporate and Professional Development (1)
Industrial roundtable set April 24 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
FRIDAY s the 13th. 04/13/2012 Channel 3 News Midday - WKYC-TV Text Email

YOU KNOW YOU DON'T HAVE TO TRAVEL TO NEW YORK CITY FOR FASHION WEEK. YOU CAN GET A TASTE OF IT RIGHT HERE AT HOME AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. JOINING ME IS DAVID TO TELL US MORE. THANKS FOR BEING HERE TODAY. THANK YOU FOR HAVING ME. YOU'RE A SENIOR FASHION STUDENT....


Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
What Business Needs from Business Schools (Kretovics) 04/14/2012 Strategy + Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...dean at Colorado State University's College of Business and currently assistant professor of higher education administration and student personnel in Kent State University's Department of Teaching Leadership and Curriculum Studies, provides striking findings. The study, which assessed 12 skill areas,...


Geology; Students (1)
Future geologists earn on-site drilling experience at Cal U. 04/15/2012 Observer-Reporter - Online Text Attachment Email

...geologists at the site noted that had been their own experience after college. About 40 students, from California, Indiana, Slippery Rock, Robert Morris, Kent State, West Virginia and the University of Pittsburgh, watched as two types of drilling rigs operated. The workshop was held at the 95-acre Student...


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Project will bring historic district into modern world 04/15/2012 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...presents to pedestrians especially students and to drivers. For a municipality, $30,000 is a minimal investment for maximum return. We commend Kent State University, the Ohio Department of Transportation and the private donors who have stepped up and provided funding for this project and...

Conference examines environment 04/13/2012 Weirton Daily Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio - Kent State University East Liverpool will hold its seventh annual Environmental Justice Conference from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 21 at the Slak Shak...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
The future of textbooks? (Guerrieri) 04/15/2012 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...students may soon be downloading their books more often than lugging them home from the bookstore. Joel Hughes, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University-Main Campus, incorporates e-textbooks into his psychology curriculum. "I teach a distance learning psychology course where...


KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Small-business class offered at Phila library (Schillig) 04/14/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Public Library will host a free, Small Business Start-Up Class from 6 to 8 p.m.  April 23 in conjunction with the Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The library is at 121 Fair Ave. NW. The class will cover financing, business planning, chances of success...

Officials mull phase two of drilling boom 04/13/2012 Newark Advocate - Online Text Attachment Email

...of employees to the area, Skowrunski said. About 30 people signed up to be part of the seminar facilitated by the Small Business Development Center Kent State University-Tuscarawas. Skowrunski also said the Community Development Council is setting the Utica Shale Task Force and will use $4,000...

Officials mull phase two of drilling boom 04/13/2012 Coshocton Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...of employees to the area, Skowrunski said. About 30 people signed up to be part of the seminar facilitated by the Small Business Development Center Kent State University-Tuscarawas. Skowrunski also said the Community Development Council is setting the Utica Shale Task Force and will use $4,000...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Ravenna guidance counselor to be honored 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Music; Theatre and Dance (5)
Kent State Opera to Perform Double Feature "There's No Opera Like Soap Opera" 04/14/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Opera to Perform Double Feature "There's No Opera Like Soap Opera" Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas...

'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera 04/15/2012 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m....

'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera 04/15/2012 Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m....

'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera 04/15/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m....

'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera 04/15/2012 Tallmadge Express - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m....


Political Science (2)
Middle Eastern journalist s work to be discussed in library program: Global Village (Stacher) 04/14/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...16, reportedly from an asthma attack. "We were all tremendously saddened by his loss," Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, said in a statement. "Shadid was simply the best journalist working in the Middle East in a generation." The library is...

Egyptian Revolution: Mubarak's Old Guard Still Enjoys Key Positions of Power (Stacher) 04/14/2012 International Business Times Text Attachment Email

...year's parliamentary elections: "The people who run the country are never on the ballot,” said Joshua Stacher, an expert on Middle Eastern politics at Kent State University. “We have clean elections, the elections just don't matter." But some Egyptians are trying to break the hold of the old guard...


Sociology (1)
KENT STATE PROFESSOR EXAMINES LINK BETWEEN PARENTAL TIME PRESSURE AND DEPRESSION (Roxburgh) 04/13/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

A recently published paper by Kent State University Associate Professor Susan Roxburgh examines the association between depression and parental time pressures among employed married...


Student Involvement, Center for; Students (1)
Snapshot: Frat Marks Philanthropy Week 04/16/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email


Students (5)
Local news briefs - April 14 04/16/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State student's death ruled a suicide (Vincent) 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

UPDATE: Death Ruled Suicide at Kent State Dorm 04/16/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Student found dead in Kent State dorm room identified (Vincent) 04/16/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Coroner: KSU student death a suicide 04/16/2012 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email


Sustainability; University Facilities Management (1)
New KSU fountains track water bottles saved from landfills (Winkler, Knowles) 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Kenneth Cushner's kite flyer wins the grand prize (Cushner) 04/16/2012 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email


Town-Gown (1)
Community Dinner to resume after winter break 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Tuition (2)
Degrees of debt 04/16/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KSU's credit hour surcharge is state's highest (Diacon) 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Libraries (2)
Local author Julie Anne Lindsey debuts as novelist 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Libraries Dean Jim Bracken speaks 04/16/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Aviation Heritage Fair Moved Back to September (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The event has been pushed back from April to Sept. 15.

The Kent State University Aviation Heritage Fair at the airport in Stow is back to its original Sept. 15 date.

Last year, the date for air show was switched to April to coincide with an alumni event at the university, but since the Vision 21 Banquet (held by the university's college of technology) was recently canceled, the date for the heritage fair has been switched back to September, according to Media Relations Director Emily Vincent.

"Other factors also contributed to moving the fair back to September, including that the Yankee Air Force Museum doesn't open until May, so we wouldn't be able to pay for a historical aircraft for the event," Vincent added.

The Aviation Heritage Fair features activities for both the flight enthusiast and casual fan. Event admission and parking are free. There is a cost for airplane rides.

It's an all-day event of aviation activities with a pancake breakfast, airplane rides, music and entertainment, as well as an opportunity to meet aviation scholars, enthusiasts and industry professionals.

The event is run by the faculty, staff and students of the university's Aeronautics Program with help from the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club.

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News Headline: Kent State's Aviation Heritage Fair returns to fall schedule (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name: MARSHA MCKENNA
News OCR Text: The date for the annual Kent State University Aviation Heritage Fair has taken flight again.

Traditionally, the event occurs in the fall at the KSU Airport on Route 59 in Stow. But last year, it was announced that the fair would be April 21 this year, to accommodate KSU alumni activities.

However, the event has been pushed back to Sept. 15, according to Emily Vincent, director of university media relations at KSU.

"The Aviation Heritage Fair was moved to April to be in conjunction with the Vision 21 Banquet held by Kent State University's College of Technology to allow our alumni that were in town for the banquet to enjoy the fair as well, but the banquet has been canceled," Vincent said April 4. "Other factors also contributed to moving the fair back to September, including that the Yankee Air Force Museum doesn't open until May, so we wouldn't be able to pay for a historical aircraft for the event."

The last Aviation Heritage Fair took place Sept. 11, 2010. The day features activities for both the flight enthusiast and casual fan, including a pancake breakfast, airplane rides, music and entertainment, as well as a chance to meet aviation scholars, enthusiasts and industry professionals. Admission and parking are free; there is a cost for airplane rides.

For more information on Kent State's College of Technology, visit www.kent.edu/technology.

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News Headline: Portage County's "Real Heroes' honored Saturday by Red Cross | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Each year, the American Red Cross of Summit and Portage Counties presents Real Heroes awards to residents of Portage County who have acted courageously and selflessly in a time of emergency.

This year's honorees include college students and police officers, nurses and ordinary folks who, often at great risk to their own personal safety, have acted courageously in times of greatest need.

This year, 10 people were honored Saturday at the Bertram Hotel and Conference Center in Aurora as Real Heroes to their community.

Also, the inaugural presentation of the Robinson Memorial Hospital Portage Paragon Award went to local businessman Neil Wilson Mann Jr., president and CEO of Allen Aircraft in Ravenna.

The American Red Cross of Summit and Portage Counties created the Robinson Memorial Hospital Portage Paragon Award in association with the hospital to honor exceptional Portage County citizens who have demonstrated active support of the lifesaving missions of both the American Red Cross and Robinson Memorial.

Those honored Saturday were:

• College students Paul Marschik of The University of Akron and Jared Atkins of Kent State University, who rescued Constance Mellott, a professor emeritus at KSU, from her burning home in October.

• Eric Johnston, another KSU student, was honored for rescuing a young girl who fell into the Cuyahoga River in downtown Kent. After seeing the girl fall into the rushing water, Johnston waded out and managed to catch her as she was swept along.

• Kent Police Officer James Ennemoser was honored for another river rescue, this one of a 16-year-old boy who'd gone into the Cuyahoga River for a swim on a hot day in late spring.

Ennemoser, a K9 handler, flipped a dog harness out toward the teen, who managed to catch it. Ennemoser pulled the youth to shore.

• Jane Ladd, a registered nurse from Ravenna, saved her brother-in-law's life when he suffered a seizure at home. Ladd was called by her sister, who was panicked that something was wrong with her husband. Arriving at her sister's house, Ladd found her brother-in-law unresponsive and with a slow pulse. Just then he was hit by another seizure. Ladd got him onto the floor and started CPR until paramedics arrived.

• Mark Meyer of Aurora and Aurora Police Officer Dale Riley were honored for their rescue of a driver trapped in a burning minivan.

Meyer and his wife, Lara, heard the minivan crash into a ditch on a snowy February morning. Seeing flames, Meyer raced out with a fire extinguisher. After finding the driver slumped over in the smoke-filled van, Meyer was trying to get the door open when he was joined by Officer Riley. Together, they dragged the driver out of the car and away from the burning vehicle.

• Alexander Melomed, a dispatcher for the Streetsboro Police Department, was honored for his life-saving instructions to a man whose mother was choking. Melomed dispatched paramedics and instructed the man how to perform the Heimlich maneuver and, when that didn't work, how to keep performing abdominal thrusts. The woman was breathing again when paramedics arrived.

• Ravenna Police Officer Jason Burrell was honored for his actions to catch two armed robbers fleeing from a Rootstown holdup. Burrell spotted a suspicious car. The driver opened fire on Burrell's cruiser and then slammed his vehicle into the front of the police cruiser. Burrell pursued the suspects after they fled at high speed, until the suspects abandoned their vehicle and jumped a fence into Camp Ravenna, the former Ravenna Arsenal. The two men were caught within hours after an extensive manhunt.

• Sara Newpher, a dispatcher with the Streetsboro Police Department, was honored for her actions in November, aiding a woman whose boyfriend was suffering a seizure.

• Zane Lutz, a Ravenna High School senior, was honored for his service to the community.

A blood services volunteer for the American Red Cross, Zane oversees the two blood drives the school conducts each year. Under his direction, the school's latest blood drive resulted in more than 90 donations from the student body.

Zane also will reach the one-gallon milestone with his next donation, which he plans sometime in May.

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News Headline: Kentites Honored for Heroic Deeds | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Police officer, Kent State students recognized for bravery by American Red Cross

Three Kent men were honored Saturday by the American Red Cross as Real Heroes.

Kent Police Officer James Ennemoser, along with Kent State University students Eric Johnston and Jared Atkins, along with University of Akron student Paul Marschik, are among the 2012 Real Heroes award recipients being recognized in Aurora at the American Red Cross of Summit and Portage Counties annual award ceremony.

The men are being honored for their heroic deeds performed in Kent in 2011, which included:

Parents Grateful for Student who Saved Daughter from Drowning
Heroes Honored for Saving Professor from Fire
Kent Cop Has a Knack for River Rescues
The Red Cross retells the stories of the men's heroic deeds below:

Students Save Professor from Fire

It was late October and already well after dark when long-time high school and college buddies, Jared Atkins and Paul Marschik, dropped some friends off at their residence on the corner of Depeyster and Columbus Streets near Kent State University after an evening at the movies. Jared headed for his car parked nearby as Paul slowly backed his own car out of the driveway and headed for home – or so he thought. As Paul eased his car along the quiet street, a strange light in the front window of a nearby house caught his attention. A graduate of The University of Akron with an associate degree in fire protection, Paul immediately recognized that the interior of the house was on fire even though no flames were as yet visible. Quickly, Paul put his car in reverse and headed backwards down the street to where Jared was just getting into his car. “That house is on fire,” called out Paul to his friend as he pointed down the street. Parking their cars, the two friends ran to the house as Paul called 911 on his cell phone. By now flames were obvious along the front of the house. When Paul remained on the phone providing the location of the fire to the Kent Fire Department, Jared immediately began investigating the house alarmed by the fact that someone might still be inside. Within moments, he heard cries for help. He quickly located a side door up a short flight of stairs. Although the door was unlocked, it appeared to be partially blocked and Jared could only open it a few inches. But that was enough for him to see an elderly woman lying on the floor pleading for help. Smoke was quickly filling up the room. Jared called for Paul and the two strained with all their might to open the door wide enough for Paul to reach in and take hold of the woman's outstretched arm. Jared used his body to brace the door open just enough to allow Paul to pull the woman outside to safety. As the heat, flames and smoke began to overwhelm the house, Paul and Jared carried the woman down the stairs and across the street. Jared ran back to their friends' house to obtain some blankets to keep the woman warm against the cold autumn air and to help prevent her from going into shock after her ordeal. As Jared returned with the blankets, police and fire units arrived but the house was already completely swallowed up by flames. An ambulance arrived and took the woman to Children's Hospital's burn unit because of her injuries – the two friends would later learn that the woman whose life they had just saved was Constance Mellott, a professor emeritus from Kent State University. It was only then that Paul glanced at his watch. It had been a mere five minutes from the time he had noticed the “strange light” until the house was fully engulfed. A little luck and an act of courage by the two friends was the difference between life and death that night.

Student Pulls Girl from Cuyahoga River

Sometimes being a hero just means being in the right place at the right time. AND doing the right thing. Eric Johnston, a Senior Music Major at Kent State University, was enjoying a break between classes with some friends on a warm, sunny day in May. They had wandered into Kent's downtown area and then along the Cuyahoga River. As the group walked along the riverfront, Eric noticed a father playing with his young son and daughter along the river's edge. Eric watched horrified as the little girl climbed upon some rocks, slipped and plunged backwards into the river. Normally, the river flowed placidly along this stretch. But today the river was raging swollen by recent heavy rains. Although her father immediately waded in after her, the swift-moving current was rapidly carrying her away from him. Wasting no time, Eric ran to the river's edge as he yelled back to his friends to call 911. Eric waded into the water down river from where the girl was. He felt the sting of the frigid water and its power as it tried to push him off his feet. But he waded on against the surging current – fortunately here, the water was not too deep. He pushed on until he was alongside the terror-stricken little girl – close enough to where he was able to reach out and grab her as she was swept by in the torrent. Step by step, Eric forced his way back to the shore clutching the little girl in his arms. The water was more shallow now and he was joined by his friends who had waded out to helped the pair back to shore. There, Eric was met by the girl's frantic, but relieved father. Tearfully, lovingly, he cradled his daughter in his arms while he quietly thanked the Real Hero who had saved her life.

Cop Saves Boy from Drowning

It was an unusually hot day for late spring. Kent City Police Officer James Ennemoser was on patrol with his partner, Aiko, a trained German Shepherd police dog. Officer Ennemoser was monitoring radio traffic when he heard a rescue call from the Kent City Fire Department. A 16-year-old male had entered the Cuyahoga River near downtown Kent for a swim, but the river's swift current – bolstered by recent heavy rains – had swept him downriver. Officer Ennemoser immediately headed for the nearby Kramer Ball Fields which lay alongside the river. As he got out of his cruiser, Office Ennemoser heard people screaming and pointing upriver. He had arrived in the nick of time. But he had no water rescue equipment with him. Thinking quickly, he grabbed his K9 partner's lead and harness and ran towards the river. From the bank, he saw three people in the water, the teenager, who was struggling to keep his head above the water, and a man and a woman who had waded out hoping to help but were thwarted by the swiftly moving current. Officer Ennemoser knew he had but one chance before the teenager would be swept past him and into the rapids further downriver. He caught the teenager's eye and threw the K9's harness at the swimmer -- but just then, the fast moving current pulled the teenager underwater. His heart leaped into his throat as Officer Ennemoser feared the teen was lost and began to pull the harness back to shore. But wait! There was weight at the other end of the lead. Officer Ennemoser silently hoped that the teen had either succeeded in catching the harness or had become entangled in it. He continued to pull until the 16-year-old's head and then his shoulders emerged from the water. By now the teen had reached the slower water near the river's edge and was actually able to catch his footing and stand up. Officer Ennemoser took the teen's outstretched hand and pulled him onto shore where he immediately collapsed. A Kent paramedic arrived just at that moment and began to examine the teenager. Although exhausted and suffering from mild hypothermia, the teen was otherwise OK thanks to Officer Ennemoser's quick thinking and fast actions.

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News Headline: Job prospects might be on rise for new college graduates (McNaughton) | Email

News Date: 04/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Job prospects appear to be improving for college students who will graduate this spring.

More recruiters are visiting campuses, and studies say they'll be hiring more students than they did last year.

"It's looking better than it has over the last several years," said Kim Beyer, career services director at the University of Akron.

Employers have conducted 564 interviews on the UA campus so far this year, with weeks yet to go, compared to 491 for all of last year.

An annual survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers forecasts a 10.2 percent rise in job offers to college graduates this spring.

That's over the initial projection of 9.5 percent and the second consecutive year in which employers have adjusted their hiring expectations upward.

At Hiram College, that improved outlook already has translated into more job offers for new graduates, said Kathryn Craig, career services director.

About a half-dozen companies have touched base at Hiram, a small campus in Portage County. That's huge, considering that no employers were calling three years ago.

At Kent State, the 110 employers showing up at the spring job fair was a "phenomenal number, considering that a few years ago it was in the 80s," career counselor Ryan McNaughton said.

At the University of Akron, the number of employers attending career fairs has risen from 201 at the bottom of the recession in 2008-2009 to 276 so far this year -- a 37 percent increase.

For students who started college when the economy tanked, the improved prospect is a relief.

"I feel very lucky to have gotten a job," said Kyle Peters, an economics major from Cortland who will walk out of Hiram College into a job as an industry analyst at the Freedonia Group in suburban Cleveland.

Natalie Sheerer of Hudson has locked up a job doing inside sales and marketing for Summit Data Communications in Akron. She is an international business major at UA who plans to go to law school.

She said she considers herself one of the lucky ones. Many of her classmates are in "crunch time" as they face graduation with no paycheck in sight.

"Even with this improved job outlook, the competition will be fierce," Michigan State's College Employment Research Institute warned. "Employer demand falls short of the supply of graduating students."

More students appear to be chasing the jobs that exist. The number of applications per job posting rose from 21 last year to 33 this year, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

And 70 percent of employers are not going to increase their starting salaries, according to Michigan State's institute.

Prospects tied to majors

Engineering, accounting and computer science students are among those best situated to get offers, area career service officials say.

"Anything out of the professional schools, where there's not a direct, clear career path, they struggle," said Joe Protopapa, the UA associate director of career services.

Students in the liberal arts have to put in extra legwork to figure out where their skills fit, he added.

"Education majors are having a tough time of it," KSU's McNaughton said. "We're spitting out more, but there are fewer and fewer jobs."

Salina Dubose of Maple Heights is one of those seeking a job in education. The master's degree student in counseling at Kent State knew finding a job would be tough, especially as she wants to stay in Ohio. She has a backup plan -- retail -- if her hunt drags out.

For many other students, the backup plan is graduate school.

At Hiram College, about half of this year's 300 graduates are going to graduate school or will teach English overseas for a nonprofit, Craig said. At the College of Wooster, more than 20 percent are headed to graduate school.

But what's happening is still in flux, as there are still weeks to go until the semester ends and many students are on the edge waiting for job offers that might -- or might not -- come in.

Kara Kozlowski of Tallmadge hopes her internship in the tire and automotive industry will turn into a full-time job. But the UA marketing major worries her employer might prefer to hire interns instead of a full-timer.

"I'm keeping my fingers crossed," she said. "This is a tough economy."

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News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: John West, former vice president of research for the university, was named to a five-year term as trustees research professor.

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News Headline: U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Connecticut (April 13) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University, Stanford Junior University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., April 13 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, and Stanford Junior University, Palo Alto, Calif., have been assigned a patent (8,153,446) developed by five co-inventors for "fluorogenic compounds converted to fluorophores by photochemical or chemical means and their use in biological systems." The co-inventors are Robert J. Twieg, Kent, Ohio, William E. Moerner, Los Altos, Calif., Samuel J. Lord, Palo Alto, Calif., Na Liu, Bloomfield, Conn., and Reichel Samuel, Atlanta.

The abstract of the patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states: "Fluorophores derived from photoactivatable azide-pi-acceptor fluorogens or from a thermal reaction of an azide-pi-acceptor fluorogen with an alkene or alkyne are disclosed. Fluorophores derived from a thermal reaction of an alkyne-pi-acceptor fluorogen with an azide are also disclosed. The fluorophores can readily be activated by light and can be used to label a biomolecule and imaged on a single-molecule level in living cells." The patent application was filed on May 13, 2009 (12/454,273). The full-text of the patent can be found at http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8,153,446.PN.&OS=PN/8,153,446&RS=PN/8,153,446 Written by Shabnam Sheikh; edited by Jaya Anand.

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News Headline: Kent State Food Drive Nets 4,500 Items for Kent Social Services (Kenne) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Second food drive of March, run by Kent State health students, one of largest ever one-time pantry donations

The food pantry at Kent Social Services is filling up nicely thanks to a food drive organized and run by students at Kent State University.

The students in Deric Kenne's spring course in the College of Public Health performed one of their last acts Thursday in a semester-long project to raise food donations for Kent's food pantry.

With the help of volunteers, the students dropped off about 1,300 empty grocery bags on doorsteps around the city in March. Their goal was to get residents to fill the bags with donations, which the students then picked up a few days later.

Kenne said they initially wanted to drop 2,500 empty grocery bags throughout the city, but they were still pleased with the effort after only delivering about half that amount.

"The College of Public Health, the students and myself are especially excited to have been part of a project for a great cause with what is clearly a great agency," Kenne said.

All total, the project raised 4,562 items for the food pantry. Of those, 2,639 came directly from the bag drop, while 1,012 items came from faculty and staff members at Kent State who contributed and university residence halls accounted for 911 of the items donated. The items were loaded into a truck Thursday morning and taken to the food pantry.

Christie Anderson, the director of Kent Social Services, said the food pantry has received about 5,200 pounds of food donations so far this year. In all of 2011 the pantry received 6,000 pounds of donations.

"So with this donation we expect to go over that," Anderson said. "It's an incredible amount of food."

Anderson said the donation from the health college food drive is the single largest one-time donation made to the food pantry in her two years there.

The agency plans to weigh the donations from Kenne's class to find out just how many pounds the 4,500 items amount to.

The food drive was just one of two large efforts made this spring, as Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala and Ravenna Mayor Joe Bica competed to raise food for the neighboring cities' pantries.

Kenne said the success of this year's food drive at the health college will likely lead to a repeat performance.

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News Headline: Who's 'On the Move' in the Cleveland area? | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University: Shin-Min (Simon) Song was named dean of the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

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News Headline: In environmental disasters, families respond with conflict, denial, silence | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: EurekAlert!
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BUFFALO, N.Y. – Environmental disasters impact individuals and communities; they also affect how family members communicate with each other, sometimes in surprising ways, according to a paper published by a faculty member at the University at Buffalo in the Journal of Family Issues.

The study is the first systematic analysis of how families communicate when faced with serious health issues brought on by "slow moving technological disasters," like environmental disasters. The purpose was to identify how people in families communicate when they are facing these issues in order to better characterize the social costs of such disasters.

The findings were, in some ways, counterintuitive, says Heather Orom, PhD, assistant professor of community health and health behavior in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions and lead author on the paper.

"The casual observer might assume that when people become seriously ill and there are fatalities, that families would come together and support one another," says Orom. "But our research shows that often times, the opposite happens. That is because whether it's buried toxic waste, such as in Love Canal or contaminated drinking water in Woburn, Massachusetts, these slow moving technological disasters become such a divisive issue in communities. The family dynamics totally mirror what happens in the community."

Orom's research consisted of focus groups conducted with residents of Libby, Montana, who either had asbestos-releated disease, had family members with the disease or were not affected either way. Libby, Montana has significantly elevated incidences of several kinds of asbestos-related disease, such as pleural disease, asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.

For almost 70 years, asbestos-contaminated vermiculite, a mineral commonly used in insulation, construction and as an additive to potting soil, was mined and processed in Libby. As a result, asbestos-related diseases, which often are fatal, are common among former mine employees; family members may also have been affected by the asbestos carried home by workers on their clothes. Cases have been linked to day-to-day exposures among people residing in the town and surrounding area.

"We found that the people in these situations can be victimized twice," Orom continues. "They become ill and then may be stigmatized because some members of the community view illness claims as lacking credibility, as baseless attempts to get compensation that tarnish the reputation of the town."

According to Orom, what typically occurs is that with the news of contamination, properties are devalued and businesses start leaving the area. "Suddenly, you've got two disasters: an economic disaster and a medical disaster," she says. "It's not surprising that some families decide, 'let's stop talking about it.' Those who continue to bring it up are then labeled troublemakers. Those who are sick and are seen with their oxygen also get labeled. So, many people, especially those with symptoms, start to isolate themselves at home and that affects how and if they discuss their illness with family members." Orom adds that this behavior could prevent people from seeking the medical or psychological help they need; it also could prevent them from discussing important measures that other family members should take, such as screening to find out if they, too, have the disease.

Orom and her colleagues identified five communication patterns within the affected families, which they characterized as open/supportive; silent/supportive; open/conflictual; silent/conflictual and silent/denial. They speculated that the silent and conflictual types of communication could be barriers to attitudes and behaviors that would promote better health, such as screening for asbestos-related diseases, and could increase psychological distress in families.

"There is a reason why people don't like to discuss illness in general, anyway," says Orom. "With an environmental diasaster, there is an additional layer creating a propensity for silence. In our focus groups, we saw instances where families rejected the legitimacy of the illness and estranged the person who was ill."

Orom notes that the negative effects that come from these kinds of responses within families do have significance in the larger community and should be taken into account by policymakers.

"If there are real social and financial costs that result from these disasters and their effects on family relationships, for example, if divorces increase as a result, then maybe this kind of research can help move policies in a direction of being more protective of communities," she says.

The research was conducted as part of a larger communication project by the National Center for Vermiculate and Asbestos-Related Cancers at the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. Funding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Co-authors with Orom are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer Institute and John C. Ruckdeschel of Intermountain Healthcare.

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News Headline: Better Understanding of Psychosocial Consequences of Disasters Needed, Report Says | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Homeland Security Today - Online
Contact Name: Anthony Kimery
News OCR Text: A new study published in the Journal of Family Issues of a systematic analysis of how families communicate when faced with serious health issues brought on by ‘slow moving technological disasters' poses important issues for policymakers, according to the University at Buffalo (UB), The State University of New York. One of the university's professors, Heather Orom, was the lead author of the paper.

Assistant professor of community health and health behavior at the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions, Orom said the paper, A Typology of Communication Dynamics in Families Living a Slow-Motion Technological Disaster, explores the negative effects of environmental disasters within families. Those effects have significance in the larger community and should be taken into account by policymakers.

"If there are real social and financial costs that result from … disasters and their effects on family relationships, for example, if divorces increase as a result, then maybe this kind of research can help move policies in a direction of being more protective of communities," Orom said.

Orom and five colleagues who conducted the study contend environmental disasters impact individuals and communities and affect how family members communicate with each other, sometimes in surprising ways.

“The purpose [of the study] was to identify how people in families communicate when they are facing these issues in order to better characterize the social costs of such disasters,” said a release from the university announcing the study's results.

The findings were, in some ways, counterintuitive, said Orom, adding “the casual observer might assume that when people become seriously ill and there are fatalities, that families would come together and support one another.”

“But,” Orom continued, “our research shows that often times, the opposite happens. That is because whether it's buried toxic waste, such as in Love Canal, or contaminated drinking water in Woburn, Mass., these slow moving technological disasters become such a divisive issue in communities. The family dynamics totally mirror what happens in the community."

“With increasing numbers of communities harmed by exposures to toxic substances, greater understanding of the psychosocial consequences of these technological disasters is needed,” the authors of the paper stated in their abstract.

“One community living the consequences of a slow-motion technological disaster is Libby, Mont., where for nearly 70 years amphibole asbestos-contaminated vermiculite was mined and processed,” the paper states. And today, “former mine employees and Libby area residents continue to cope with the health consequences of occupational and environmental asbestos exposure and with the psychosocial challenges accompanying chronic and often fatal asbestos-related diseases (ARD).”

Nine focus groups were conducted with Libby area residents and transcripts were analyzed to explore patterns of family communication about ARD. The following five patterns emerged, according to the study:

Open/Supportive;

Silent/Supportive;

Open/Conflictual;

Silent/Conflictual; and

Silent/Denial

The paper's authors said the “open/supportive communication included encouragement to be screened for ARD, information about ARD and related disaster topics, and emotional support for people with ARD. In contrast, communication patterns characterized by silence or conflict have the potential to hinder health-promoting communication and increase psychological distress."

"We found that the people in these situations can be victimized twice," Orom said, noting that “they become ill and then may be stigmatized because some members of the community view illness claims as lacking credibility, as baseless attempts to get compensation that tarnish the reputation of the town."

According to Orom, “suddenly, you've got two disasters: an economic disaster and a medical disaster. It's not surprising that some families decide, 'let's stop talking about it.' Those who continue to bring it up are then labeled troublemakers. Those who are sick and are seen with their oxygen also get labeled. So, many people, especially those with symptoms, start to isolate themselves at home and that affects how and if they discuss their illness with family members."

Orom says this behavior could prevent people from seeking the medical or psychological help they need and could prevent them from discussing important measures that other family members should take.

"There is a reason why people don't like to discuss illness in general, anyway," Orom said.

But “with an environmental diasaster, there is an additional layer creating a propensity for silence. In our focus groups, we saw instances where families rejected the legitimacy of the illness and estranged the person who was ill."

Orom's co-authors are Rebecca J.W. Cline of Kent State University; Tanis Hernandez of the Center for Asbestos-Related Disease; Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Ann G. Schwartz of the Karmanos Cancer Institute, and John C. Ruckdeschel of Intermountain Healthcare.

Follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/anthonykimery

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News Headline: Industrial roundtable set April 24 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Nearly 20 years ago, when
Sy Thompson headed Portage
County's economic development
efforts, he used to
host an “industrial round table”
for businesses to share
their concerns.
At the urging of the
chamber of commerce
in Streetsboro, the town
Thompson once led as its
mayor, the event has been revived
in Portage County.
The Industrial Round Table
will be held from 7:30 a.m.
to 9 a.m. April 24 at the Maplewood
Career Center. It is
sponsored by the Portage
Development Board, with cooperation
from the Brimfield,
Kent, Mantua-Shalersvile,
Rootstown and Streetsboro
chambers of commerce, and
the governments of Ravenna,
Streetsboro Kent and Brimfield.
Pre-registration is due
by Tuesday by calling the
Portage Development Board
at 330-297-3470. Cost is $10
per person, or $12 at the door,
and includes a continental
breakfast.
“We are kind of re-enacting
what was going on in
the county years ago,” said
Kerry Macomber, economic
development director for
Ravenna.
She said Brad Ehrhart of
the Portage Development
Board decided to put the
event together after hearing
employers complain that it
is difficult to find employees
with the proper training.
The event will feature several
speakers on training programs
and incentives, including
Tim Beckner and Brian
Boykin of Portage Workforce
Connection, Randy Griffith
of Maplewood Career Center;
Michael Hinton of Fortis
College, Greg Farabee of
Kent State University's center
for corporate and professional
development and
Matthew Falter, northeast
regional workforce director
for Jobs Ohio.
Checks should be made to
the Portage Development
Board and mailed to 217 S.
Chestnut St., Ravenna.

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News Headline: FRIDAY s the 13th. | Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Channel 3 News Midday - WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: YOU KNOW YOU DON'T HAVE TO TRAVEL TO NEW YORK CITY FOR FASHION WEEK. YOU CAN GET A TASTE OF IT RIGHT HERE AT HOME AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY. JOINING ME IS DAVID TO TELL US MORE. THANKS FOR BEING HERE TODAY. THANK YOU FOR HAVING ME. YOU'RE A SENIOR FASHION STUDENT. THAT'S CORRECT. YOU HAVE BEEN WORKING ON THESE PROJECTS ALL WEEK LONG. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO SHOW THIS OFF FOR EVERYONE. WELL, IT'S A PLATFORM THAT WE WANTED TO DO, PRESENTATION STYLE. WE'LL HAVE TWO DESIGNERS EVERY 30 MINUTES. I REALLY THINK THAT THIS IS MORE FOR THE DESIGNERS AND WE GET A CHANCE TO ACTUALLY SHOW OUR THINGS FOR A LONGER PERIOD OF TIME RATHER THAN JUST TWO MINUTES ON A RUN WAY. WE'VE SEEN PROJECT RUN WAY AND THOSE KINDS OF SHOWS AND THEY'RE SO CUT THROAT. WHY IS YOUR SHOW DIFFERENT. BECAUSE WITH BEING IN THE STUDIO PRETTY MUCH 24/7 WITH ALL THE SENIOR DESIGNERS, WE ARE WE'RE LIKE A BIG FAMILY. WE ALWAYS HELP EACH OTHER OUT. THIS HAS MOLDED TOGETHER AND BECOME A BIG PRODUCTION, FOR US, AT LEAST ON TOP OF OUR SCHOOL WORK. SURE. IT'S BEEN FUN. NOW, YOU HAVE A GREAT FASHION PROGRAM. YEAH. WHY IS IT SO NOTABLE. WELL, THE THING IS WE START FROM THE EARLY CONCEPTUAL MARKET RESEARCH AND ALL THE WAY TO THE FINAL PRODUCTION IN OUR SENIOR COLLECTION. WE RECENTLY GOT A NEW DIRECTOR AND HE IS RESTRUCTURING MAKING THE SUCCESS RATE BECAUSE IT IS A TOUGH MAJOR, UP HIGHER AND ALSO WE HAVE MANY OUT LETS TO GO OUTSIDE OF OHIO. WE HAVE PLACES TO GO LIKE FLORENCE AND WE HAVE PLACES TO GO. A STUDIO IN NEW YORK CITY. NO OTHER SCHOOL HAS THAT THAT'S OUTSIDE OF NEW YORK AND WE HAVE HONG KONG, LONDON, PARIS, WE REALLY DO, THE SCHOOL REALLY TRIES TO PUSH US OUT INTO THE WORLD. SO THEY'RE SOME OF THE BEST OF THE BEST HERE AND WE WANT TO GET THE INFORMATION ON THE SCREEN SO YOU CAN KNOW MORE IF YOU WANT TO SEE THE FASHIONS. FASHION WEEK IS ON YOUR SCENE APRIL 26TH THROUGH THE 28TH. 6:00 TO 10:00. YOU CAN GET MORE INFORMATION ON WKYC. COM. BUT EVERYBODY HAS A THEME. YOUR SHIRT GOES ALONG WITH THAT THEME. YOUR THEME IS AUTO DESTRUCTION. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE OTHER THEMES WE CAN EXPECT. YOU HAVE JAPAN, THE FINISHED VIKINGS, YOU HAVE EVERYTHING. VERY COOL. THANKS FOR HAVING HERE. HAVE SO MUCH FUN AND GOOD LUCK WITH THE WEEK.

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News Headline: What Business Needs from Business Schools (Kretovics) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Strategy + Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cookie-cutter programs are producing look-alike MBAs. Contemporary companies want creative, collaborative thinkers and leaders.

When John Reed, longtime chairman of Citicorp, accepted the Academy of Management's Distinguished Executive of the Year award in 1999, he ended his acceptance speech by challenging his audience of elite academics. "The business community knows full well that business schools perform a useful function [in] sorting potential hires," he said. "The schools sort out from the general population those who are more ambitious, more energetic, more willing to subject themselves to two years without income…. But the real question is: Do you give these students a set of skills that is going to serve them well over their careers?"

As executives struggle with decisions that depend as much on their leadership abilities as on their skills as strategic thinkers; as they guide teams comprising people from diverse backgrounds and work with for-profit, nonprofit, and government institutions; as they face crises stemming from communications conflicts among different cultures, they find themselves asking the same question Mr. Reed did. His answer, in 1999, was: "On average, clearly the answer is yes." In his view, business schools were doing a reasonable job preparing their students for fulfilling careers.

But in 2003 our answer is: "On average" is not good enough anymore.

Whether your company is a bank, a consultancy, a manufacturer, or any other sort of business enterprise, the current MBA education offered at most U.S. graduate business schools does not, in our view, adequately prepare people - even those attending the top schools - for the tougher-than-average challenges they will face when they start careers at leading corporations. Companies today demand good collaborative thinkers who cooperate to solve problems. Too often, schools deliver good analysts who compete to apply business-school formulas. Furthermore, companies demand specialized knowledge useful to particular professions. Schools, however, are more likely to deliver generalists who have trouble digging into special fields that can distinguish them and their employers. Companies demand leaders who can powerfully articulate ideas, orally and in writing, to motivate and guide their people. But schools tend to train people to simply assert their ideas; they don't sensitize them to the critical value of being an excellent communicator.

As consultants who, along with our peers in other professional-services businesses, attract and hire students from the world's most prestigious business schools - 38 percent of the students in Harvard Business School's class of 2002 went into consulting - we would like to make a case for curriculum reform.

We are not advocating a radical overhaul: There is a middle road, in which business schools preserve the strengths they have today, especially in teaching quantitative and strategic skills, but reconsider curricula and teaching methods. Equally important, schools and companies should compare notes more often; ultimately, the gap between employers' expectations and the skills of the typical MBA is one that business-school deans and business executives can close together.

The Big Gap

By how much does today's MBA education fall short? A 1999 study of MBA graduates conducted by Mark Kretovics, then assistant dean at Colorado State University's College of Business and currently assistant professor of higher education administration and student personnel in Kent State University's Department of Teaching Leadership and Curriculum Studies, provides striking findings. The study, which assessed 12 skill areas, showed MBA graduates were significantly better than a control group of university graduates not enrolled in a business program in seven categories: action, goal setting, information analysis, information gathering, quantitative skills, theory, and technology. But the MBAs did not outpace the nonbusiness group in five other equally critical areas: helping others, initiative, leadership, relationship, and sense making.

Evidence suggests these competency deficiencies are widespread among MBAs. In a 2002 poll by Canada's Financial Post, 141 CEOs and senior executives rated non-business-school graduates as better - sometimes much better - than MBAs in commitment to hard work, oral communication, written communication, understanding the details of an industry, interpersonal skills, and even skills in marketing and sales.

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News Headline: Future geologists earn on-site drilling experience at Cal U. | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Observer-Reporter - Online
Contact Name: Christie Campbell
News OCR Text: CALIFORNIA - Geology students from seven universities got an idea Saturday what to expect when they arrive on their first drilling job.

The students spent the day watching an on-site drilling demonstration by industry professionals. Steve Pesch, a geologist with KU Resources of Duquesne, said the event was important for students because too often they never see a drill operate until their first day on the job. He and other geologists at the site noted that had been their own experience after college.

About 40 students, from California, Indiana, Slippery Rock, Robert Morris, Kent State, West Virginia and the University of Pittsburgh, watched as two types of drilling rigs operated. The workshop was held at the 95-acre Student Association Farm off West Malden Drive.

In addition to drilling procedures, students were shown how to conduct soil sampling, test for environmental contamination and decontaminate equipment and were provided health and safety tips.

Five years ago when Dr. Kyle Frederick, associate professor for Cal U.'s Department of Earth Sciences, arrived on campus, the geology department was in decline. Today, thanks to local jobs in the oil and gas industry, that trend has reversed.

The number of students majoring in geology at Cal U., whether it's a straight geology major or earth sciences major with an emphasis in environmental studies, has doubled in five years. Frederick is no longer asked by parents if their child will be able to find a job once they graduate.

"Our students, for the most part, stay in the area. They're getting jobs in the area," Frederick said.

Demonstrations included direct push technology and hollow stem auger drilling. In both cases, the rigs drilled about a 7-foot-deep hole before hitting shale. Cylindrical sleeves were pulled out and students were given the opportunity to sample the soil. They also tested the well with a peristaltic pump to gauge where water was located.

Even though the drills are smaller than what would be seen on a Marcellus Shale natural gas well site, Pesch said the operation is similar.

"Everything is the same, just on a much bigger scale," he said.

The event has been sponsored for eight years by the Pittsburgh Geological Society and previously was held at Slippery Rock University. This is the first time it has been held at Cal U.

In addition to the drilling techniques, the contractors explained to students how to work with drilling teams and carry enough equipment to be prepared for any contingency.

"You never know what you're going to find, so take a little bit of everything," Pesch advised.

No URLs.

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News Headline: Project will bring historic district into modern world | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The city of East Liverpool has been down, financially, for some time after the closing of Crucible Steel and slow-down of the pottery industry, but down has never meant out for the river city.

Primarily, East Liverpool has survived due to a dedicated core of team players who have always stepped up to the plate and brought to fruition dreams that otherwise would have been outside the financial means of the city's budget.

For instance, the Alumni Clock Tower was made possible by a group of volunteers who designed it, raised money for it and built it, allowing it to stand as a landmark to the city's proud Potter heritage.

Every five years, the All-School Reunion after which others around the country are modeled is held, again due to the dedication of Frank Dawson and other volunteers.

The Broadway Wharf is kept up by volunteers, and Mayor Jim Swoger has taken it upon himself to keep the municipal pool operating, with little or no tax dollars involved.

Now, the city has an opportunity to again bank on the generosity of others with a proposal that will mean more than $1 million in improvements to the downtown with only a $30,000 commitment from City Council.

Not only will the project result in a more aesthetic look to the Broadway and Fourth Street area, but it will alleviate some of the danger that the wide intersection now presents to pedestrians especially students and to drivers.

For a municipality, $30,000 is a minimal investment for maximum return.

We commend Kent State University, the Ohio Department of Transportation and the private donors who have stepped up and provided funding for this project and now urge City Council to do its part by approving the city's $30,000 commitment.

That said, we also urge council to look at one part of the project that could use some tweaking: repairing the brick pavement of Fourth Street to the intersection of Washington Street.

Due to budget limitations, the funding available for the project cannot support redoing the entire street, meaning the washboard from Washington to Market will unfortunately remain.

The city is not permitted to blacktop over the bricks due to the "historic district" designation under which it falls.

We encourage council to consider petitioning the state to end that designation, although many will argue against that.

Over the years, the designation has gained nothing for the city of East Liverpool but has tied officials' hands many times by dictating how projects must be done, most often more expensively.

For instance, the windows in City Hall are badly in need of replacement, but due to the historic district designation, they must be replaced with historically correct frames which are much more expensive than others which could be just as attractive and energy efficient.

No historic designation on paper can make this river city any more historical than it is, and eliminating that designation will certainly not detract from its history. It could, however, allow officials to pave over a brick street that has, for years, been an eyesore and detrimental to drivers' vehicles.

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News Headline: Conference examines environment | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Weirton Daily Times - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio - Kent State University East Liverpool will hold its seventh annual Environmental Justice Conference from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 21 at the Slak Shak in the Main Campus Building located at 400 E. Fourth St.

Helene Moncman, Dr. S. Thomas Bond and Frances Graham will be the speakers.

Moncman is an American Cancer Society community research navigator and will speak at 10:30 a.m. about the Cancer Prevention Study, a long-term study by the American Cancer Society, Salem Community Hospital, Crestview Local Schools and East Liverpool City Hospital. The study is a nation-wide study.

Bond, an inorganic chemist and farmer, will speak at 1:30 p.m. about fracking and environmental impact, including looking at water tables, air and legislation.

Bond, who is a life-long farmer, has a master's degree in science teaching from West Virginia University and a doctorate degree in inorganic chemistry from Kent State.

He has taught at Salem College and was with the Biological Warfare Unit at the U.S. Army Chemical Corps School.

Bond is a member of Guardians of West Fork, the West Virginia/Pennsylvania Monongahela Area Watershed Compact. He also consults with many other area water preservation groups in the immediate area.

Bond operates Locust Hill Farm, where he raises beef.

Graham will speak at 3:45 p.m., giving the presentation "Strategies of Seventies to the 21st Century," discussing energy-saving initiatives from the 1970s and featuring some of his own inventions.

Graham is a planetary scientist and Kent State professor emeritus.

He was the co-discoverer of the moon's tenuous atmosphere and developed monocopters. Graham founded the Tripoli Rocketry Association and authored "Classical Physic for Allied Health."

Student papers will be presented at 9 a.m., and student posters will be presented at 11:45 a.m.

Essay and poster contest winners will be announced at 1:15 p.m.

Those attending the conference will receive seedlings for planting. Lunch will be provided.

The conference is free and open to the public, who is encouraged to attend.

For information, contact pswartz@kent.edu .

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News Headline: The future of textbooks? (Guerrieri) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Could those days of standing in an endless line at the campus bookstore with a semester's worth of textbooks soon become a thing of the past? With the steady rise of e-readers and e-textbooks, students may soon be downloading their books more often than lugging them home from the bookstore.

Joel Hughes, associate professor of psychology at Kent State University-Main Campus, incorporates e-textbooks into his psychology curriculum.

"I teach a distance learning psychology course where I give my students an option of either purchasing the print textbook or the e-textbook," Hughes said. "The e-textbooks make more options available, and some are lower in cost for students. They make getting the book very convenient."

Jade Roth, vice president of digital strategy at Barnes and Noble College Booksellers Inc., said there has been a significant growth in e-textbooks in the past two years.

"We have been experiencing double-digit increases in sales of e-textbooks, but print textbooks still make up the majority of what we sell," Roth said.

Rose Guerrieri, library director at the Kent State University at Trumbull, said that e-books are more efficient and becoming more popular than print books.

"It's nice to carry an e-reader around than a backpack full of books," Guerrieri said. "In some cases, they are less expensive. Print books might have visual cues, but with e-books one can search for a topic, and it will search through every word in the book with a full text search."

Hughes said that e-textbooks embody useable features that are ideal for learning.

"There are many potential features that have yet to be exploited such as embedded videos and demonstrations, etc.," he said. "I don't think the science of learning has caught up with the technical capabilities, so right now most e-texts are a mere replica of a printed text. As the field develops, the e-texts will become less like printed books and more like multi-layered information delivery devices, using all the possible features."

Jeffrey Trimble, interim head information services, technical services and system librarian at William F. Maag Library at Youngstown State University, said the William F. Maag Library is examining the issue of e-textbooks on campus.

"We are looking at purchasing e-textbooks through the OhioLink consortium, which negotiates with publishers and vendors to implement an e-textbook program," Trimble said.

"The state of e-books is very liquid and everything is changing by leaps and bounds," he said. "I own a Kindle Fire, and, five years ago, I did not think I would love technology. In the fall of 2011, I was one of the first buyers of the Kindle Fire."

However, Trimble said that there are still some advantages print books have over e-textbooks.

"Electronic books aren't the panacea people think they are," Trimble said. "We all think they are convenient, but we cannot do certain things in e-textbooks that can be done in print textbooks. It is difficult to circle the text or make notes on the pages for reference or studying for a test."

Students seem to have mixed feelings on e-textbooks.

Trevon Wright, of Akron, a computer science student at YSU, said he was given the choice in a class either to download the e-textbook or purchase the print textbook.

"I prefer print textbooks," he said. "A lot of people I knew that used the e-textbook had technical difficulties, where it wouldn't start up. I don't carry around my laptop a lot. If I used the e-textbook I would have to bring my laptop to class every day."

Mike Bestic, of Boardman, a mechanical engineering major at YSU, agrees that there are advantages and disadvantages of e-textbooks.

"I just don't like e-textbooks," he said. "On a computer, I can't flip through the pages as I would with a print textbook. I learn much better through flipping through the pages. It hurts my eyes staring at the computer for a long period of time. However, the nice thing about e-textbooks are that students do not have to carry books around, and they cost less."

Trimble feels optimistic about the revolution of e-textbooks and e-books.

"It is exciting to see this technology develop so fast," he said. "Within five to 10 years, we may see advances in technology in libraries. Libraries will not be able to get rid of print books right away. However, they will store millions of print books until they are all reproduced in digital format."

Hughes said that e-textbooks are not taking over print textbooks as of today, but this trend will change in the future.

"When costs come down and acceptance of e-readers improves, adoption of e-texts will increase," Hughes said.

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News Headline: Small-business class offered at Phila library (Schillig) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Tuscarawas County Public Library will host a free, Small Business Start-Up Class from 6 to 8 p.m.  April 23 in conjunction with the Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The library is at 121 Fair Ave. NW.

The class will cover financing, business planning, chances of success and where to find the best resources.

“This informational session is for anyone who has ever considered owning a business or who may be in the early stages of starting a business,” SBDC District Dima--business class offered at Phila libraryrector Steve Schillig said.

The event is free, but space is limited. To register, call the library at 330-364-4474, ext. 101.

The Tuscarawas County Public Library will host a free, Small Business Start-Up Class from 6 to 8 p.m.  April 23 in conjunction with the Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

The library is at 121 Fair Ave. NW.

The class will cover financing, business planning, chances of success and where to find the best resources.

“This informational session is for anyone who has ever considered owning a business or who may be in the early stages of starting a business,” SBDC District Dima--business class offered at Phila libraryrector Steve Schillig said.

The event is free, but space is limited. To register, call the library at 330-364-4474, ext. 101.

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News Headline: Officials mull phase two of drilling boom | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Newark Advocate - Online
Contact Name: Kathie Dickerson
News OCR Text: Company meets with Port Authority on training for area work force

COSHOCTON -- Port Authority Executive Director Dorothy Skowrunski had an unexpected but fruitful meeting with Anadarko Energy and Petroleum Co. representatives this week.

The company expressed a willingness to help bring training to build on the Coshocton work force, Skowrunski told her Board of Directors Thursday at its regular monthly meeting.

They need welders and people with commercial driver's licenses, Skowrunski said.

Its representatives suggested SafeLandUSA, which is comprised of volunteers from independent operating companies to develop standards for minimum requirements in the U.S. onshore energy and petroleum industry. Anadarko is among its supporters, as well as ExxonMobile, Murphy Oil Corp. and Marathon Oil Co.

The company also is familiar with ShaleNET, a coalition among four community colleges in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and West Virginia, Skowrunski said. It's funded by a grant from the Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, with a mission to design a comprehensive recruitment, training, placement and retention program for high-priority occupations in the natural gas drilling and production industry.

Anadarko representatives also walked Skowrunski through a timeline that Coshocton County might experience in the next couple of years. Phase one, which already is under way, is the mineral rights research being done at the Coshocton County Auditor's Office. Dozens of independent contractors spend hours each day searching available oil and gas leases in the county.

In the next few months, test drilling might take place on Anadarko's permitted well in Linton Township. These exploratory drills will help determine whether Coshocton County has what the company called a "sweet spot," Skowrunski said.

It will take a year or two for the boom to really begin, and possibly as many as five years before Coshocton begins to feel what Carroll County is experiencing, she said.

Carroll County, about 60 miles northeast of Coshocton County, leads the state with 59 Utica Shale drilling permits issued, 27 since the first of the year and five wells currently producing. Nearby Tuscarawas County has four well permits issued; Muskingum County three permits; and Guernsey County seven well permits.

Meanwhile, Skowrunski and other business leaders are working to get the community ready. The Port Authority hosted an entrepreneur seminar today at Central Ohio Technical College Coshocton campus. The focus is on businesses that might benefit from the oil and gas boom if it comes -- not on potential employees of the oil and gas industry, but rather on service industry businesses that would benefit from the influx of employees to the area, Skowrunski said.

About 30 people signed up to be part of the seminar facilitated by the Small Business Development Center Kent State University-Tuscarawas.

Skowrunski also said the Community Development Council is setting the Utica Shale Task Force and will use $4,000 left over from Economic Development Task Force funding from several years ago. An educator from The Ohio State University Extension will facilitate the task force, she said.

Also, in anticipation of a boom in horizontal hydraulic fracturing, which requires millions of gallons of water, the city started installing a bulk water-fill station this week at the wastewater treatment plant on County Road 271. Coshocton entered an agreement for bulk water sales with Anadarko earlier this year. It can be used by other companies, but Anadarko has priority, city officials said.

Anadarko also made a recommendation to Skowrunski about how to improve cellphone service to the area. The company will need to have direct communication with Houston from its remote Linton Township location, she said.

"The Port Authority seems to be the organization through which all this information will be funneled," she said. "We're getting the information and sharing, and trying to put the pieces together."

kdickers@coshoctontribune.com; (740) 295-3442

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News Headline: Officials mull phase two of drilling boom | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Coshocton Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Kathie Dickerson
News OCR Text: Company meets with Port Authority on training for area work force

COSHOCTON -- Port Authority Executive Director Dorothy Skowrunski had an unexpected but fruitful meeting with Anadarko Energy and Petroleum Co. representatives this week.

The company expressed a willingness to help bring training to build on the Coshocton work force, Skowrunski told her Board of Directors Thursday at its regular monthly meeting.

They need welders and people with commercial driver's licenses, Skowrunski said.

Its representatives suggested SafeLandUSA, which is comprised of volunteers from independent operating companies to develop standards for minimum requirements in the U.S. onshore energy and petroleum industry. Anadarko is among its supporters, as well as ExxonMobile, Murphy Oil Corp. and Marathon Oil Co.

The company also is familiar with ShaleNET, a coalition among four community colleges in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and West Virginia, Skowrunski said. It's funded by a grant from the Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, with a mission to design a comprehensive recruitment, training, placement and retention program for high-priority occupations in the natural gas drilling and production industry.

Anadarko representatives also walked Skowrunski through a timeline that Coshocton County might experience in the next couple of years. Phase one, which already is under way, is the mineral rights research being done at the Coshocton County Auditor's Office. Dozens of independent contractors spend hours each day searching available oil and gas leases in the county.

In the next few months, test drilling might take place on Anadarko's permitted well in Linton Township. These exploratory drills will help determine whether Coshocton County has what the company called a "sweet spot," Skowrunski said.

It will take a year or two for the boom to really begin, and possibly as many as five years before Coshocton begins to feel what Carroll County is experiencing, she said.

Carroll County, about 60 miles northeast of Coshocton County, leads the state with 59 Utica Shale drilling permits issued, 27 since the first of the year and five wells currently producing. Nearby Tuscarawas County has four well permits issued; Muskingum County three permits; and Guernsey County seven well permits.

Meanwhile, Skowrunski and other business leaders are working to get the community ready. The Port Authority hosted an entrepreneur seminar today at Central Ohio Technical College Coshocton campus. The focus is on businesses that might benefit from the oil and gas boom if it comes -- not on potential employees of the oil and gas industry, but rather on service industry businesses that would benefit from the influx of employees to the area, Skowrunski said.

About 30 people signed up to be part of the seminar facilitated by the Small Business Development Center Kent State University-Tuscarawas.

Skowrunski also said the Community Development Council is setting the Utica Shale Task Force and will use $4,000 left over from Economic Development Task Force funding from several years ago. An educator from The Ohio State University Extension will facilitate the task force, she said.

Also, in anticipation of a boom in horizontal hydraulic fracturing, which requires millions of gallons of water, the city started installing a bulk water-fill station this week at the wastewater treatment plant on County Road 271. Coshocton entered an agreement for bulk water sales with Anadarko earlier this year. It can be used by other companies, but Anadarko has priority, city officials said.

Anadarko also made a recommendation to Skowrunski about how to improve cellphone service to the area. The company will need to have direct communication with Houston from its remote Linton Township location, she said.

"The Port Authority seems to be the organization through which all this information will be funneled," she said. "We're getting the information and sharing, and trying to put the pieces together."

kdickers@coshoctontribune.com; (740) 295-3442

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News Headline: Ravenna guidance counselor to be honored | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KIRBY TO LEAD BALLOON A-FAIR
PARADE; DINNER IS WEDNESDAY

Becky Kirby, a guidance
counselor at
Brown Middle School
in Ravenna, has always
loved the Balloon AFair
Grand Parade because
she recognized
so many of her former
students there.
When the parade
steps off on Sept. 15, Kirby will be the
grand marshal.
“It's something I can't even imagine,”
she said. “It's something I never
thought about ever. It was a complete
surprise.”
In fact, when Mark Short, parade cochairman,
and Jack Ferguson, president
of the Balloon A-Fair, came to the school
to tell her about the honor, she thought
she was being thanked for something
one of the children had done.
Kirby will be honored Wednesday at
Grand Marshal dinner, to be held at
the Ravenna Elks Club, with the social
half hour at 6:30 p.m. followed by
the dinner at 7 p.m.
The dinner is open to the public, and
Kirby's friends, family, co-workers and
students are encouraged to attend.
Reservations are due by Monday by
calling 330-296-3247.
Kirby was born in Ravenna and graduated
from Ravenna High School. She
started her career with the Ravenna
School District in 1972.
She said started as a teacher and
eventually became a guidance counselor.
She is now retired and works part time
at Brown, and teaches a class in school
counseling at Kent State University.
She also serves on the
board of the Skeels Matthews
Center.
“Becky has received numerous
awards and recognitions
for service ... over 40
years,” said Ferguson.
The 34th annual Balloon
A-Fair will take place Sept.
15 and 16 in Ravenna and
Sunbeau Valley Farm.
Kirby plans to share
the car ride with her husband,
Dave, and several
of their five grandchildren,
ranging in age from
2 to 7. She plans to accompany
her daughter to
China to adopt her third
child, who is expected to
be home by the time of
the parade.

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News Headline: Kent State Opera to Perform Double Feature "There's No Opera Like Soap Opera" | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Opera to Perform Double Feature "There's No Opera Like Soap Opera"

Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas at the Solon Center for the Arts on Friday, April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 22 at 3:00 p.m. with a reception following each performance. The Solon Center for the Arts is located at 6315 SOM Center Road, Solon, OH 44139. For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/artscollege/News/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=829289C8-FF33-56CF-7C36E61C935E37AB.

Cost: Adults $16; seniors $12; students $5

Contact: Effie Tsengas, 330.672.8398, etsengas@kent.edu

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News Headline: 'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 22 at 3 p.m. with a reception following each performance.

Solon Center for the Arts is at 6315 SOM Center Road.

The program features "Gallantry" by Douglas Moore and "The Medium" by Gian Carlo Menotti. Members of the Kent State University Orchestra will accompany 16 singers from the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, conducted by Kent State Associate Professor Kerry Glann. Katherine Perkowski directs both productions.

The casts include graduate students Natalie Reitz as Baba and Lindsey Sandham Leonard as Monica in "The Medium" and well-known Cleveland-area performer Darryl Lewis as Dr. Gregg in "Gallantry."

"Gallantry" is a spoof of 1950s-era soap operas, complete with live commercials just like the early years of television. The soap opera is set in a hospital, in which Dr. Gregg is in love with his nurse Lola, who is engaged to another hospital worker. Commercials for the two 'sponsors' of the show, Lochinvar soap and Billy Boy Wax, are interspersed in the action, providing additional context and humor.

Menotti's dramatic masterpiece "The Medium" follows the story of a woman who supports herself as a medium, performing fake séances in her home with her daughter and a mute boy. Her world turns to chaos when she believes an unidentified presence has touched her.

Both operas will be performed as one show, with an intermission in between.

This production represents a continued and developing collaboration between Solon Center for the Arts and Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

Tickets are $16 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $5 for students and can be reserved by calling Solon Center for the Arts at 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: 'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Cuyahoga Falls News-Press - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 22 at 3 p.m. with a reception following each performance.

Solon Center for the Arts is at 6315 SOM Center Road.

The program features "Gallantry" by Douglas Moore and "The Medium" by Gian Carlo Menotti. Members of the Kent State University Orchestra will accompany 16 singers from the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, conducted by Kent State Associate Professor Kerry Glann. Katherine Perkowski directs both productions.

The casts include graduate students Natalie Reitz as Baba and Lindsey Sandham Leonard as Monica in "The Medium" and well-known Cleveland-area performer Darryl Lewis as Dr. Gregg in "Gallantry."

"Gallantry" is a spoof of 1950s-era soap operas, complete with live commercials just like the early years of television. The soap opera is set in a hospital, in which Dr. Gregg is in love with his nurse Lola, who is engaged to another hospital worker. Commercials for the two 'sponsors' of the show, Lochinvar soap and Billy Boy Wax, are interspersed in the action, providing additional context and humor.

Menotti's dramatic masterpiece "The Medium" follows the story of a woman who supports herself as a medium, performing fake séances in her home with her daughter and a mute boy. Her world turns to chaos when she believes an unidentified presence has touched her.

Both operas will be performed as one show, with an intermission in between.

This production represents a continued and developing collaboration between Solon Center for the Arts and Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

Tickets are $16 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $5 for students and can be reserved by calling Solon Center for the Arts at 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: 'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 22 at 3 p.m. with a reception following each performance.

Solon Center for the Arts is at 6315 SOM Center Road.

The program features "Gallantry" by Douglas Moore and "The Medium" by Gian Carlo Menotti. Members of the Kent State University Orchestra will accompany 16 singers from the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, conducted by Kent State Associate Professor Kerry Glann. Katherine Perkowski directs both productions.

The casts include graduate students Natalie Reitz as Baba and Lindsey Sandham Leonard as Monica in "The Medium" and well-known Cleveland-area performer Darryl Lewis as Dr. Gregg in "Gallantry."

"Gallantry" is a spoof of 1950s-era soap operas, complete with live commercials just like the early years of television. The soap opera is set in a hospital, in which Dr. Gregg is in love with his nurse Lola, who is engaged to another hospital worker. Commercials for the two 'sponsors' of the show, Lochinvar soap and Billy Boy Wax, are interspersed in the action, providing additional context and humor.

Menotti's dramatic masterpiece "The Medium" follows the story of a woman who supports herself as a medium, performing fake séances in her home with her daughter and a mute boy. Her world turns to chaos when she believes an unidentified presence has touched her.

Both operas will be performed as one show, with an intermission in between.

This production represents a continued and developing collaboration between Solon Center for the Arts and Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

Tickets are $16 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $5 for students and can be reserved by calling Solon Center for the Arts at 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: 'Gallentry,' 'The Medium' staged by Kent State Opera | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/15/2012
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Opera presents two 20th-century American operas -- one comic, one tragic -- at the Solon Center for the Arts, on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 22 at 3 p.m. with a reception following each performance.

Solon Center for the Arts is at 6315 SOM Center Road.

The program features "Gallantry" by Douglas Moore and "The Medium" by Gian Carlo Menotti. Members of the Kent State University Orchestra will accompany 16 singers from the School of Music and the School of Theatre and Dance, conducted by Kent State Associate Professor Kerry Glann. Katherine Perkowski directs both productions.

The casts include graduate students Natalie Reitz as Baba and Lindsey Sandham Leonard as Monica in "The Medium" and well-known Cleveland-area performer Darryl Lewis as Dr. Gregg in "Gallantry."

"Gallantry" is a spoof of 1950s-era soap operas, complete with live commercials just like the early years of television. The soap opera is set in a hospital, in which Dr. Gregg is in love with his nurse Lola, who is engaged to another hospital worker. Commercials for the two 'sponsors' of the show, Lochinvar soap and Billy Boy Wax, are interspersed in the action, providing additional context and humor.

Menotti's dramatic masterpiece "The Medium" follows the story of a woman who supports herself as a medium, performing fake séances in her home with her daughter and a mute boy. Her world turns to chaos when she believes an unidentified presence has touched her.

Both operas will be performed as one show, with an intermission in between.

This production represents a continued and developing collaboration between Solon Center for the Arts and Kent State University's Hugh A. Glauser School of Music.

Tickets are $16 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $5 for students and can be reserved by calling Solon Center for the Arts at 440-337-1400.

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News Headline: Middle Eastern journalist s work to be discussed in library program: Global Village (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In honor of the life and work of journalist Anthony Shadid, who died in February while covering the conflict in Syria, a discussion of his writings will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Cuyahoga County Public Library in Beachwood.

The free program will focus on Shadid's latest book, "House of Stone," which tells the story of his two-year effort to restore a decaying estate built by his great-grandfather in South Lebanon.

Shadid, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for the New York Times, had been scheduled to come to Cleveland last month to speak about the Middle East.

He was on assignment in Syria for the New York Times when he died Feb. 16, reportedly from an asthma attack.

"We were all tremendously saddened by his loss," Joshua Stacher, assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, said in a statement. "Shadid was simply the best journalist working in the Middle East in a generation."

The library is at 25501 Shaker Blvd. For more information, contact Stacher at jstacher@kent.edu or at 330-672-2060.

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News Headline: Egyptian Revolution: Mubarak's Old Guard Still Enjoys Key Positions of Power (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2012
Outlet Full Name: International Business Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It's been 14 months since Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman took 30 seconds to announce on state television that 30 long years of rule by President Hosni Mubarak were coming to an end with his resignation.

The protestors who had occupied Cairo's Tahrir Square from January 25 had roundly defeated one of the world's most powerful and influential regimes. But over the next months, even as the Egyptians voted in their first free elections in decades, a sobering reality set in: Mubarak may have been ousted but a number of his top loyalists are still actively ruling the country. People like Faiza Abou el-Naga, the Minister of Planning and International Cooperation, and Hassan Ahmed Younis, the energy czar under Mubarak for 10 years who worked on building the nation's civilian nuclear program.

The persistent presence of these figures in Egyptian power circles, as well the continued outsized influence of many businessmen who survived the post-Mubarak anti-corruption purge, are testimony to the power of the military to prop up those that the generals trust the most. It's also evidence of the ongoing impotence of the general populace in modern Egypt.

"It wasn't a revolution but a coup," said Zack Gold, a Washington-based defense expert who focused on Egyptian politics at the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis. "Yes, the military protected the revolutionaries (during the original protests), but they were slow to protect the revolution itself."

The Western-educated el-Naga held a number of positions in the Mubarak regime, representing Egypt at the United Nations and the World Trade Organization and as an economic liaison between Egypt and other nations, a role she still plays. Because Abou el-Naga's job now and in the past has given her control over the billions of foreign aid money coming into the country, she is perhaps the most powerful woman in Egypt.

The wrong kind of attention was drawn toward el-Naga in February when Egypt detained 43 employees, including 19 Americans, from global NGOs, charging them with illegally funding democratic organizations after they failed to renew contracts they had originally signed with Mubarak. Members of the U.S. Senate Foreign Affairs Committee and some Western Egyptian experts claimed that el-Naga was the force behind the incident and, more importantly, behind the xenophobia and fear of foreign aid that precipitated it.

"She wants to go down as an Egyptian hero who fought against the United States and fought for Egyptian sovereignty," said Gold.

Although the situation eventually backfired on el-Naga when Egypt was forced by diplomatic pressure to release the NGO employees and she was criticized inside and outside of Egypt for stoking an unfortunate incident, her involvement laid bare the cronyism that is still at the heart of Egyptian politics.

"Mubarak is still ruling in some ways and is still blocking the emergence of a new regime in Egypt," Abdullah al-Ashaal, a former deputy foreign minister, told the Washington Post earlier this year. "Faiza Abou el-Naga is one of the tools in that."

In February 2011, few would have thought that Mubarak's former ministers would still be pulling the strings over a year later or that the country would be effectively ruled by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, or SCAF, which is itself headed by another Mubarak holdover, Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi. He has been defense minister since 1991.

Even fewer would believe that old friends of the president would be front-runners in the current presidential race, which concludes next month. Yet, several former Mubarak allies have made sufficiently smart political moves during the uprising that they are still popular enough today to run for high office. They include Amr Moussa, a former finance minister and diplomat who publicly supported the Tahrir Square protests, and Suleiman himself, who was Mubarak's intelligence chief and vice president during the final days of the regime.

The strength of the military, solidified over 14 months as the SCAF took total control of the economy, has ensured that these old regime figures are still around. El-Naga was close to Tantawi and the other generals years before Mubarak's resignation; her status as the gateway for $1.3 billion in military aid from the United States may have kept her in the SCAF's good graces.

Moreover, the ruling junta has so far been able to remain above scrutiny, even after last year's parliamentary elections: "The people who run the country are never on the ballot,” said Joshua Stacher, an expert on Middle Eastern politics at Kent State University. “We have clean elections, the elections just don't matter."

But some Egyptians are trying to break the hold of the old guard before next month's presidential elections.. The Muslim Brotherhood, the Egyptian Islamist political party, led a parliamentary initiative to ban high-ranking members of the old regime from running, which would disqualify Suleiman and Ahmad Shafik, a former Air Force commander and the last prime minister appointed by Mubarak. The amendment was passed on Thursday by the parliamentary assembly but may soon be challenged in court.

Additionally, on Friday, thousands of dissidents gathered in Tahrir Square for "Defending the Revolution" protests, which directly targeted the legitimacy of Suleiman's candidacy.

However, if Suleiman earns the endorsement and has the financial backing of the SCAF, which is likely, the opposition will be matched against a regime ready to defend itself. And now that the constitutional assembly has been disbanded following an official complaint that Islamists unfairly dominated it, presidential powers may not be fully set until well after the vote.

Which means that if Suleiman stays on the ballot and wins, he may, at least for some time, find himself with powers equal those of to his former boss Mubarak.

Follow @dantovrov

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News Headline: KENT STATE PROFESSOR EXAMINES LINK BETWEEN PARENTAL TIME PRESSURE AND DEPRESSION (Roxburgh) | Email

News Date: 04/13/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A recently published paper by Kent State University Associate Professor Susan Roxburgh examines the association between depression and parental time pressures among employed married parent.

Roxburgh is a sociologist who has been with Kent State since 1994.The Journal of Family Issues published her paper "Parental Time Pressures and Depression among Married Dual-Earner Parents" in its most recent issue (November, 2011).

In a telephone survey of 250 parents, Roxburgh finds that concerns about having enough time to spend with children are associated with higher depression among both fathers and mothers.Her research also reveals that job experiences play a role in influencing the link between parental time pressure and depression.Parents who report high job demands feel more parental time pressure, which in turn increases their depression.

"Even though other research shows that American parents are actually spending more time with their children than they were twenty years ago, the results of this survey shows that parents worry about the time they spend with their children and that these concerns are associated with higher depression," Roxburgh said."We have very high expectations for parents, and many people may worry that they are not living up to these expectations."

The study also finds that mothers who report high job control are less likely to be depressed by parental time pressures.This relationship is not observed among fathers, which suggests that good working conditions may be particularly important for employed mothers' well-being.

Roxburgh reports that social support from partners does not reduce the association between time pressure and depression among parents, but household income is a significant moderator of the depression-parental time pressure link.This means that irrespective of marital quality, parental time pressures are associated with higher depression, but that affluent mothers and fathers who report high parental time pressure experience less depression than low-income mothers and fathers.

Even as other studies show that American parents, particularly fathers, are spending more time with their children, the results of this study indicate that concerns about the amount and quality of time with children is a significant source of stress for working parents, especially those in low-paying, high-demand jobs.

"On the one hand, these findings are consistent with other studies that report that fathers expect to be actively involved in their fathering role," Roxburgh said."On the other hand, this study also suggests that there is growing pressure on parents to live up to this ideal of being a very engaged and involved parent and that this stress is associated with higher depression, especially among less well-off parents."

Roxburgh's paper can be viewed online at http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/11/08/0192513X11425324.abstract.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: Snapshot: Frat Marks Philanthropy Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Sigma Chi fraternity at Kent State University marked its philanthropy week recently with an event that included making live Disney characters in Risman Plaza outside the Kent State Student Center.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - April 14 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Suicide in KSU dorm

KENT: The body of a Kent State University sophomore was discovered Friday in a dormitory.

Authorities say a 19-year-old prefashion design major from Cambridge committed suicide. Her body was discovered at 11:40 a.m. by campus police in her Centennial Court C dorm.

A KSU spokeswoman said family members had requested a check of the student after they were unable to contact her.

It was not immediately clear when the woman died.

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News Headline: Kent State student's death ruled a suicide (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Portage County Coroner's Office has ruled Friday's death of a Kent State University student a suicide.

Natalie J. Weber, 19, a sophomore pre-fashion design and merchandising major from Cambridge, was found dead in Centennial C, a KSU residence hall, on Friday morning.

“The call was received by Kent State University police at 11:42 a.m.,” KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said. “The call was made by residence hall staff when they discovered her in her room after a wellness check.”

Vincent said the university notified Weber's family shortly before 2:30 p.m.

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News Headline: UPDATE: Death Ruled Suicide at Kent State Dorm | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Natalie J. Weber found in Centennial Court C residence hall Friday morning

Editor's note: this story was updated at 4:40 p.m.

The death of a Kent State University student has been ruled a suicide by the Portage County Coroner's Office.

Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent said the coroner's office ruled this afternoon that 19-year-old Natalie J. Weber, of Cambridge, OH, took her own life.

Vincent said residence hall staff discovered Weber's body following a wellness check at 11:42 a.m. The wellness check was conducted at the request of family members, who called asking university officials to look in on Weber after not hearing from her for a period of time.

For Kent State, this is the fourth tragic death of a student in the 2011-2012 school year.

In December, Katherine R. Iarussi, 20, of Ravenna, was killed in a weekend car crash about 18 miles east of the Kent State campus. In November, visual design major Martin Alvord committed suicide. In October, Pennsylvania native James Barnes was found dead in his campus dorm room.

Centennial Court, one of Kent's newest set of residence halls, is located on the northeast corner of campus and houses both freshman and upper division students. The co-ed halls opened in 2002 and the buildings feature four floors, according to the university.

Kent Patch will continue to update this story as information becomes available.

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News Headline: Student found dead in Kent State dorm room identified (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The body was a 19-year-old Kent State student was found in a residence hall late Friday morning.

Residence hall staff discovered the body of Natalie J. Weber, of Cambridge, in her room in Centennial Court C and called Kent State police at about 11:42 a.m., university spokeswoman Emily Vincent said.

The Portage County Coroner's Office ruled her death a suicide, Vincent said.

A family member had not heard from Weber and requested that university staff perform a wellness check.

Weber was a sophomore pre-fashion design and merchandising major.

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News Headline: Coroner: KSU student death a suicide | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Portage County Coroner's Office says the death of a Kent State student found in a residence hall is a suicide.

The 19-year-old female student from Cambridge was found in a Centennial Court residence hall on Friday after family members asked for a wellness check.

Resident hall staff found the body just before noon.

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News Headline: New KSU fountains track water bottles saved from landfills (Winkler, Knowles) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A series of new water fountains popping up around campus are doing more than dispensing water to the Kent State community.
The fountains, new to the university this spring semester, not only filter water but keep track of the number of plastic bottles saved by visiting a cooler instead of buying a disposable bottle. They are manufactured by Elkay, an Illinois-based company.
Bob Winkler, assistant director of university facilities management, said some of the first machines were installed in the Kent Student Center and the University Library at the beginning of the semester. Since then, machines have been installed in Harbourt, Bowman and Taylor halls and in the University Facilities Management office and supply warehouse.
Melanie Knowles, manager of sustainability at facilities planning and operations, said she's received a lot of positive feedback about the new water fountains. The university architect's office has and will continue to install the water fountains in any new renovation or project areas.
“I really do think it's fantastic when people bring their own reusable water bottles,” Knowles said. “It's healthier, it saves them money and its better for the environment to not be throwing away or even recycling plastic bottles.”
Each fountain has a traditional spigot as well as a taller space specially designed for filling bottles.
A new unit costs about $850, Winkler said, but most of the ones installed on campus have cost about half that because they've added only the filter and bottle filler to an existing cooler.
Knowles said the architects office would like to see more fountains installed, but it's a matter of finding funding for the project.
“We know it's something students like and use,” Knowles said.

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News Headline: Kenneth Cushner's kite flyer wins the grand prize (Cushner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kenneth Cushner has spent his professional life trying to bridge the global culture gap. Mission accomplished with his grand-prize-winning image, a photo of a beaming boy launching a kite at a park in Shanghai.

Cushner, a professor of education at Kent State University and director of the Consortium for Overseas Student Teaching, was in China last year teaching a class at Shanghai International Studies University. He spent much of his free time hanging out at nearby Lu Xun Park, which he describes as "a veritable carnival of Chinese culture."

"You walk in and there are literally thousands of people engaged in everything from group exercise to ballroom dancing to things I couldn't understand," he said. "Then you round the corner and there's some other wonderful experience to see" -- including, one sunny spring morning, a father and son flying a kite together.

The judges were unanimous in their praise of this image. "One of the things that photography does well is it freezes a moment in time," said judge Penny Rakoff. "It has definitely captured the essence of his joy."

Judge Thomas Ondrey concurred. "What's not to like? Seriously. The kid is happy, the colors are happy, the shapes are interesting."

Cushner of Cuyahoga Falls was a freshman at Kent State in 1970, the year the Ohio National Guard fired on protesting students, killing four. He credits that experience, in part, for his passion to travel. "That was my wake-up call," he said. "It set me on a path to want to understand other cultures and points of view."

He took his winning photo with a Sony A5-series digital SLR camera. He wins a seven-night Apple Vacation for two to Mexico's Riviera Maya region, courtesy of Apple Vacations and Barcelo Hotels & Resorts.

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News Headline: Community Dinner to resume after winter break | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After a winter break,
the Kent Community Dinners
are back for the spring
months. The next one, “A
Spring Fling, Get Connected
through Contra Dance,” will
be held at 5:30 p.m. April 21
at Trinity Lutheran Church,
600 S. Water St., Kent.
Carol Kopp will “call” the
dances and Jon Mosey and
David Rice will play music.
Those attending should
bring a dish to share.
Started as a traditional
potluck in the 1970s, the Dinners
were revitalized in 2005
by All Together Now, Inc.
Focused on celebrating the
diversity Kent State University
attracts to town, the
Dinners welcome a group of
all ages, walks of life, races
and religions, in a relaxed atmosphere.
The event is open to the
public. For more information,
call 330-678-8760.

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News Headline: Degrees of debt | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: What a perfect description - the "ambition penalty," the label Kent State students have applied to a new fee of $440 for taking more than 17 credits. Other state universities charge a similar fee, albeit not as much.

Actually, university leaders deserve some sympathy. If they must streamline their operations, they also know that no amount of efficiency can make up the state all but walking away in recent decades from its commitment to higher education, to keeping tuition and fees more affordable.

So students and families pile up debt to pay for what is increasingly essential, a college degree. The debt serves as an "ambition penalty" of another kind, students postponing graduation day or pursuing careers more about paying off their loans than fulfilling their dreams.

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News Headline: KSU's credit hour surcharge is state's highest (Diacon) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By instituting new fees for students who pack their schedules with classes, Kent State University will be adopting a practice used by the majority of universities in Ohio.

The amount of the fees at KSU, however, sets the school apart.

Students who schedule more than 17 credit hours will pay KSU $440 on top of tuition for each additional hour in the 2012-13 academic year, the highest such surcharge in the state. The threshold for additional fees will drop to 16 credit hours for the 2013-14 academic year.

The next highest surcharge in the state for students taking heavy course loads is $373 per hour at Cleveland State for students who take more than 16 hours.

KSU Provost Todd Diacon said the new fees would only affect 12.6 percent of students — the percentage of students who take more than 17 hours, according to the university's research. He said he believed the cost of attending KSU was still affordable when compared with other Ohio universities.

“Our tuition and fees are about $9,300 (per year), which puts us in the middle of the pack with Ohio public universities,” Diacon said.

KSU's current yearly in-state tuition and fees for undergraduates are less than the total costs at Ohio State University, the University of Cincinnati and Ohio University, which are all on quarters, not semesters like KSU.

The only public university in the state with a more expensive tuition rate that charges by semester is Miami University, which lists its tuition at more than $12,600 per year.

KSU's Board of Trustees also voted to raise tuition by 3.5 percent and room and board rates by 3.92 percent at its March meeting, the same meeting at which it approved the new fees.

Diacon said the fees are necessary to allow the university to pursue about $186 million in physical improvements to the campus. He said the state won't foot the majority of the bill for this series of renovations like they did the last time KSU saw a major construction overhaul in the 1960s.

“In the ‘60s, two-thirds of the budget and 100 percent of construction costs were funded by the state,” he said. “Fast forward to 2012 and about one-third of the budget and 10 percent of construction costs come from the state.”

Diacon has been meeting with students, many of whom are actively protesting the new fees, to discuss the cost of attending KSU.

KSU senior Tommy Walsh, a senior majoring in political science and philosophy, said he's helping lead protest and petition efforts against the new fees because they affect ambitious students.

“I think (the new fees are) sort of belittling the academic integrity of Kent State,” Walsh said. “Students try pushing themselves to the max. They try doing thesis projects and scholar programs and those are going to take extra credit hours.”

Nearly 100 students attended a protest of the credit hour fees Thursday afternoon in Risman Plaza, an event the protesters hope to repeat at the same time next week.

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News Headline: Local author Julie Anne Lindsey debuts as novelist | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Friends of the
Randolph Library will
host a visit with local
author Julie Anne Lindsey
from 7 to 8 p.m.
May 1 at the Randolph
Town Hall, 1639 S.R. 44
in Randolph. She will
read from her debut
novel, “Death by Chocolate,”
and sign copies
for purchase.
She will also share
some chocolate, discuss the path
to publication, and take questions
from the audience.
To register for this program, call
the Randolph Library at 330-325-
7003 or sign up online at www.
portagelibrary .org.
Lindsey will also visit the Kent
State University Library from 1 to 2
p.m. April 25 to read a passage from
“Death by Chocolate.”
Lindsey was born
in Canton and grew
up there, and she is a
graduate of KSU.
“Several of my books
debut this year,” she
said, “including a sweet
romance e-book series
titled Seeds of Love,
which centers on a
small fictitious Ohio
town. My romance
novellas will launch
a new imprint called Honey Creek
books with the Turquoise Morning
Press.”
She added that “Death by Chocolate”
is the first in a three-book Killer
Confections Saga she has contracted
with kNight Romance Publishing.
“I hope the Honey Creek stories
will bring awareness and appreciation
of our beautiful state and unique
Midwestern lifestyle,” she said.

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News Headline: Kent State University Libraries Dean Jim Bracken speaks | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Libraries Dean Jim Bracken speaks to a group attending a recent Business After Hours event at the library, sponsored by the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce. Bracken took the opportunity to show off renovations of the building to the KSU community, chamber members and others.

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