Report Overview:
Total Clips (67)
Accounting (1)
Aeronautics (1)
Alumni (8)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (7)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Technology (1)
Dining Services (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (2)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Higher Education (7)
History (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Stark (4)
KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Mathematics (1)
Pan-African Studies (2)
Political Science (2)
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) (1)
Students (11)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Health Services (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Accounting (1)
KENT STATE HOSTS 38TH ANNUAL MEONSKE ACCOUNTING CONFERENCE, APRIL 26-27 04/21/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, April 21 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Ohio Council of the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) will host its 38th Annual...


Aeronautics (1)
KSU Aviation Heritage Fair returns to fall date 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Alumni (8)
Ben Curtis, former British Open champion from Kent State wins Texas Open 04/22/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...a chance at his first tour win with four blown putts. Huh roared back with a 69, but the Mayakoba Classic winner fell just short. Curtis, a former Kent State star, now has four career PGA Tour wins. His victory didn't come easy. Holding off Matt Every and John Huh in a tense back-nine finish,...

Kent's Ben Curtis has emotional win at PGA's Texas Open 04/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

At the front of the pack 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Texas-sized victory 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Curtis holds lead at Texas Open heading into finale 04/22/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

SAN ANTONIO - Former Kent State University star Ben Curtis is still ahead at the Texas Open, leaving him just one round from his first PGA Tour victory since 2006 in what...

Kent State's Curtis leads Houston Open 04/22/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...victory since 2006 in what has been his most humbling year as a pro. But a pack of mostly non-winners could make redemption difficult. Curtis, a Kent State graduate, finally made his first stumbles at the Texas Open — once holding up a group playing six holes back when hacking the ball into...

Kent State's Ben Curtis wins Valero Texas Open 04/22/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Curtis wins for first time since 2006 SAN ANTONIO - Ben Curtis won on the Texas Open on Sunday for his first PGA Tour title since 2006, holding off...

Kent State alum Curtis wins Texas Open 04/23/2012 Fox Sports Net (FSN) Ohio Text Attachment Email


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (7)
Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) 04/21/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND (AP) — Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting. The...

Pop Up Rockwell will rock what's possible for Cleveland's downtown streets (Jurca) 04/20/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Avenue into a testing ground for two-way bicycle lanes, sidewalk benches that filter runoff and public art. It's the latest "Pop Up City" event from Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and a range of partners. The KSU collaborative creates temporary, startling uses of...

Kent State planners mount bike-friendly event in Cleveland 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) 04/21/2012 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND (AP) -- Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting. Urban...

Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) 04/21/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND -- Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting. Urban...

Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) 04/23/2012 Dayton Daily News Text Attachment Email

Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) 04/21/2012 Associated Press (AP) - Columbus Bureau Text Email

CLEVELAND_Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting. Urban...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Specialty Spotlight: Are You Psyched for Psychiatric Nursing? (Drew) 04/21/2012 NurseZone Text Attachment Email

...Drew, Ph.D., APRN, BC, is the former president of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association and an associate professor in the College of Nursing at Kent State University, in Kent, Ohio. What do you enjoy most about psychiatric nursing? I most enjoy the interpersonal connection with clients...


College of Technology (1)
Cafaro Foundation donates $25,000 to KSU scholarship (Graham) 04/21/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Published: Sat, April 21, 2012 @ 12:00 a.m. Staff report The Cafaro Foundation is donating $25,000 to endow a new scholarship at Kent State University. The William and Alyce Cafaro Innovation Scholarship will be awarded to worthy students in the university's College of Applied...


Dining Services (1)
Sixth annual 'Who's Your Mama' festival cooks up vegan menus for Earth Day 04/22/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Parks and Recreation Department, kicks off its second day of events at noon with Vegan Iron Chef IV. The fourth-annual competition is being held in the Kent State University Student Center's second floor dining loction and is in cooperation with KSU Dining Services, The University of Akron and...


Fashion Design (1)
Library Events - Teens can make recycled fashions 04/22/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...boxes and old T-shirts. On April 22 at 3 p.m., the library teen room will kick off this fashion event with a demonstration of materials and techniques by Kent State University School of Fashion students. Participants will then have three months to produce their own eco-outfit to wear in a runway show...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (2)
KSU's fashion school opens a retail store (Stanforth) 04/21/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising announces the opening of its new retail space,...

KENT STATE'S FASHION SCHOOL OPENED A BRAND-NEW STORE. 04/20/2012 Good Morning Cleveland - WEWS-TV Text Email

KENT STATE'S FASHION SCHOOL OPENED A BRAND-NEW STORE. THEY'RE MANAGING THE STORE AND SHOWCASING THEIR DESIGNS AND THE SCHOOL IS HOSTING THE ANNUAL...


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Celebrations: Education 04/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email


Higher Education (7)
Hike in tuition OK'd at Ohio University 04/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

ATHENS, Ohio -- Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year. The school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5 percent increase...

Ohio University increases tuition and room rates 04/21/2012 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

ATHENS, Ohio Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year. The school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5-percent increase...

Ohio University approves increases for in-state students 04/20/2012 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...over the last two months. School officials said they had no choice. The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget. Kent State and the University of Cincinnati have also approved tuition increases. Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students 04/20/2012 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

ATHENS, Ohio (AP) - Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year. The Columbus Dispatch reports ( http://bit.ly/I0Niua ) that the school's...

Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students 04/20/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

ATHENS, Ohio -- Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year. The Columbus Dispatch reports that the school's board of trustees on...

Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students 04/20/2012 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

ATHENS, Ohio (AP) -- Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year. The Columbus Dispatch reports (http://bit.ly/I0Niua) that the school's...

Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students 04/20/2012 Associated Press (AP) - Columbus Bureau Text Email

ATHENS, Ohio_Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year. The Columbus Dispatch reports (http://bit.ly/I0Niua) that the school's...


History (1)
PORTAGE PATHWAYS: KSU students' gift of gab 'put Kent on the map' 50 years ago 04/22/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

John Schecter, a Kent State University freshman, certainly got his money's worth when he dropped a dime into a pay telephone at Lake Hall on April 3, 1962. The...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Pilot hopes to land in all of Ohio's 88 counties (Murray) 04/21/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...fly his 1946 Piper J3 Cub a bit further than the Wright brothers' first 12-second flight of 120 feet. Joe Murray, a pilot and journalism professor at Kent State University, hopes to set his own record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all...

Pilot charts record-making route (Murray) 04/22/2012 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...fly his 1946 Piper J3 Cub a bit further than the Wright brothers' first 12-second flight of 120 feet. Joe Murray, a pilot and journalism professor at Kent State University, hopes to set his own record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all...


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
The institute on the knoll 04/22/2012 Star-Beacon Text Email

...Seminary, a famous Lincoln impersonator and numerous prominent attorneys, educators and lecturers. The New Lyme Institute even came close to becoming the Kent State main campus of Ashtabula County. In 1910, the institute was a candidate for the Ohio State Normal College, a preparatory school for teachers....


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Improvement project good decision for city 04/22/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...receive $1 million worth of beautification to the downtown. The bulk of the money will come via a grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation. Kent State is putting up $150,000, and private donorship is nearly $112,000. Basically, it was a move that would have been hard to pass up. ...

Practicing what they've learned (Rose) 04/22/2012 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - Despite the chilly, rainy conditions Saturday afternoon, a group of students from the East Liverpool campus of Kent State University presented a special event honoring local military families in Thompson Park. The students of Dr. Lydia Rose and her Introduction...


KSU at Stark (4)
Earth Day Activities 04/21/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...for the Earth begins at 9 a.m. at the zoo. For more information, 216-281-6468 or www.earthdaycoalition.org . Earth Day Celebration - 1 to 4 p.m. at Kent State University's Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Crafts, exhibits, games, demonstrations, nature walks. 330-499-9600 or...

'All eyes on Andrew' -- 28-year-old art model says gig is easy money 04/23/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...his head back and forth to work the kinks out of his neck. Art professor Chad Hansen slammed the door shut on room 134 of the Fine Arts building at Kent State University's Stark campus. The dozen students in Hansen's evening Drawing I and II classes formed a semi-circle around him as Rihn warmed...

Earth Day turns 42: Focus on fracking at KSU Stark - Canton, OH - CantonRep.com 04/23/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...want to fill up his mailbox. It's Earth Day. It seems appropriate," said Eric Vaughan of Canton. He and his wife, Kristine Vaughan, participated in Kent State University Stark Campus' annual Earth Day Celebration as part of the organization called Food and Water Watch. Their hope, they said,...

Earth Day turns 42: Focus on fracking at KSU Stark 04/23/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...want to fill up his mailbox. It's Earth Day. It seems appropriate," said Eric Vaughan of Canton. He and his wife, Kristine Vaughan, participated in Kent State University Stark Campus' annual Earth Day Celebration as part of the organization called Food and Water Watch. Their hope, they said,...


KSU at Tuscarawas (4)
Barbershoppers prepare to hit the campaign trail 04/20/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...April 28. Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus will present its annual show, “The Harmony Party,” at 3 p.m. April 28 in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. The show will feature chorus members deciding to run a barbershopper for president of...

Cooking for a good cause 04/20/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA - The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will feature a performance of a different kind May 5 when Community Hospice  presents Culinary...

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Rarity in Peril reptile show 04/20/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Rainforest Reptile Shows will present Rarity in Peril at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 20 at the Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center. The program includes a presentation of endangered reptiles and amphibians from around the world,...

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Rarity in Peril reptile show 04/20/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Rainforest Reptile Shows will present Rarity in Peril at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 20 at the Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center. The program includes a presentation of endangered reptiles and amphibians from around the world,...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
WIPO PUBLISHES PATENT OF KENT STATE UNIVERSITY 04/20/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

Title of the invention: "A LIQUID CRYSTAL COMPOSITION CONTAINING CHIRAL DOPANT, DEVICE THEREOF, AND METHODS THEREOF." Applicants: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (US). Inventors: Quan Li (US), Yannian Li (US) and Ji Ma (US). According to the abstract posted by the World Intellectual...


Mathematics (1)
KSU delegation visits Senior High to see Algebra Project work (Brown, McEwan) 04/22/2012 Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

MANSFIELD -- A delegation from Kent State University watched this week as Mansfield Senior High School math teacher Amanda Clawson led her Algebra Project junior class in analyzing...


Pan-African Studies (2)
Department of Pan-African Studies Holds "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World" Conference 04/21/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Department of Pan-African Studies Holds "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World" Conference Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies is hosting the conference "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World"...

DEPARTMENT OF PAN-AFRICAN STUDIES HOLDS CONFERENCE 04/21/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies is hosting the conference "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World"...


Political Science (2)
Egypt's dire economy looms over elections (Stacher) 04/20/2012 Christian Science Monitor Text Email

...strident in warnings about antidemocratic machinations from the men in uniform. The military has also been expanding its role in the economy, says Kent State Political Scientist Josh Stacher, who recently completed a paper on "Egypt's Generals and International Capital" with Shana Marshall. The...

Egypt's dire economy looms over elections (Stacher) 04/20/2012 Axcess News Text Attachment Email

...strident in warnings about antidemocratic machinations from the men in uniform. The military has also been expanding its role in the economy, says Kent State Political Scientist Josh Stacher, who recently completed a paper on “Egypt's Generals and International Capital” with Shana Marshall. The...


Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) (1)
WhiteHot 5K race slated at KSU April 29 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Students (11)
Order restored in Kent as police break up gathering of students at College Fest 04/22/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...MATT UNGER, DAILY KENT STATER A Hudson police officer fires a non-lethal riot-control device at party-goers gathered on East College Avenue, near the Kent State campus. The annual College Fest event was broken up after reports of violence. Students tweeted that police were using tear gas, pepper...

Kent Police break up large College Fest crowds after reports of violence 04/21/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...about their response to the scene but students report they were trying to clear the crowd of more than 3,000 with tear gas and flash-bang devices. The Kent State student media website, KentWired.com, reported that some students were injured and that participants were throwing beer bottles at police....

Region briefs -- Party turns unruly 04/23/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: A block party Saturday night near Kent State University resulted in 33 arrests after police from several departments were called to break up a crowd that threw bricks and bottles at...

Kent State students found businesses through TECHudson 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Police use pepper gas to put end to Kent College Fest near KSU 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Pepper balls used to bring early end to College Fest near Kent State; crowd estimated at 3,000 04/22/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Police used pepper balls and flash-bang devices to disperse thousands of college students and bring an early end to CollegeFest in Kent Saturday evening....

VIDEO: 'College Fest' Ends in Tear Gas (Vincent) 04/23/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Several police departments respond to riots at annual Kent State 'College Fest' 04/23/2012 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Police in Riot Gear Shut Down College Fest 04/23/2012 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

VIDEO: Kent: Police break up 'College Fest' crowds, 34 arrests (Vincent) 04/23/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University students due in court after weekend riots 04/23/2012 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email


Theatre and Dance (1)
'Spring Awakening' opens Saturday at The Auricle 04/20/2012 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Breathing" fame, alternates lyrical, haunting ballads with driving rock anthems, a couple with titles that aren't printable here. A musical theater major at Kent State University, Carder says, "Usually, I'm cast in the dancer-type roles. It's awesome to get to rock out. Moritz is a great role that I didn't...


Town-Gown (1)
OUR VIEW: Roundabout plan in Kent fuels doubts 04/23/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


University Health Services (1)
Suicide prevention event to include memorial in honor of Natalie Weber 04/22/2012 Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT -- A mental health awareness/suicide prevention event and memorial in honor of Natalie Weber, a Kent State student who recently passed away, is scheduled to be held April 24 at Kent State University. Consider the following: • 121...


University Press (1)
What's new in Books 04/21/2012 Louisville Courier-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

"The Complete Funky Winkerbean" Volume 1 (1972-1974), by Tom Batiuk, Kent State University, 485 pp., $45 Batiuk's "Funky Winkerbean" comic strip has chronicled the exploits at Westview High for (gulp) 40 years, and...


News Headline: KENT STATE HOSTS 38TH ANNUAL MEONSKE ACCOUNTING CONFERENCE, APRIL 26-27 | Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, April 21 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Ohio Council of the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) will host its 38th Annual Meonske Accounting Professional Development Conference and Workshop on April 26-27 at Kent State University.

"Our conference this year is going to be outstanding as usual," said Norman Meonske, Ph.D., professor emeritus at Kent State University and national online instructor for the Becker CPA Review Course.Meonske, conference namesake, said, "We are going to have two days packed full of high-quality practical training for members of the accounting and financial community, and we encourage registrants to take advantage of the group discounts because we expect a sellout."

The pre-conference workshop on Thursday will feature keynote addresses, including "Automating the Last Mile - Improving Reporting Processes and Controls" by Mike Willis, partner, Pricewaterhouse Coopers, and chairman emeritus, XBRL International; "Implementing Analytics-based Enterprise Performance Management Methodologies - Pitfalls and Speed-bumps" by Gary Cokins, principal, SAS Global Business Advisory Services; and "The Truth and Consequences of Ethical Behavior" by Meonske.There also will be breakout sessions during the conference that review Ohio Professional Standards and Ethics, Fair Value Measurement and Accounting, and Sustainability and the Accountant's Role.

The Friday financial reporting panel features Dennis R.Beresford, Ernst & Young executive professor of accounting, University of Georgia; Mark M.Bielstein, partner, KPMG LLP; Daryl E.Buck, member, Financial Accounting Standards Board; James L.Kroeker, chief accountant, Office of the Chief Accountant, U.S.Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); and Carlo D.Pippolo, partner Ernst & Young LLP.The panel will address SEC proposed rules, issues arising from the review of SEC registrant filings, and other key projects, such as the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) standard updates.

Also on Friday, the keynote luncheon address "Fierce Competition in the Accounting Industry - Are you Kidding?" will be delivered by Jeffery C.Thomson, president and CEO, Institute of Management Accountants.

Afternoon sessions include "As One (Collective Leadership Power)" by James H.Quigley, CEO, Deloitte Touche Tohmastu Limited, and co-author of The New York Times best seller "As One," and "Mobile Technology Best Practices for Increasing Executive Productivity" by Donald R.Tomoff, partner, Thornhill Financial Inc.

This year's conference is dedicated to the memory of Kent State alumnus Newton D.Becker, '52, founder of the Becker CPA Review that began as an in-house course in Pricewaterhouse Coopers' Cleveland office.Becker is responsible for more than 400,000 accountants passing the CPA exam.

Attendees on both days will earn 16 hours of CPE.Friday attendees will get a free copy of the best-selling book "As One" and the opportunity to win a new Apple iPad.

For more information or to register, contact the Kent State University Conference Bureau at 330-672-3161 or go to www.ohioima.org For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: KSU Aviation Heritage Fair returns to fall date | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The date for the annual Kent State University Aviation Heritage Fair has taken flight again.

Traditionally, the event occurs in the fall at the KSU Airport on S.R. 59 in Stow.

But last year, it was announced that the fair would be April 21 this year, to accommodate KSU alumni activities.

However, the event has been pushed back to Sept. 15, according to Emily Vincent, director of university media relations at KSU.

"The Aviation Heritage Fair was moved to April to be in conjunction with the Vision 21 Banquet held by Kent State University's College of Technology to allow our alumni that were in town for the banquet to enjoy the fair as well, but the banquet has been canceled," Vincent said April 4.

"Other factors also contributed to moving the fair back to September, including that the Yankee Air Force Museum doesn't open until May, so we wouldn't be able to pay for a historical aircraft for the event," she said.

The last Aviation Heritage Fair took place Sept. 11, 2010. The day features activities for both the flight enthusiast and casual fan, including a pancake breakfast, airplane rides, music and entertainment, as well as a chance to meet aviation scholars, enthusiasts and industry professionals.

Admission and parking are free; there is a cost for airplane rides.

The fair, originally conceived by a Kent State student aviation club, is now run by the faculty, staff and students of the university's Aeronautics Program with help from the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club.

For more information on KSU's College of Technology, visit www.kent.edu/technology.

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News Headline: Ben Curtis, former British Open champion from Kent State wins Texas Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Plain Dealer staff and wire reports
News OCR Text: SAN ANTONIO, Texas -- Ben Curtis won the Texas Open on Sunday for his first PGA Tour title since 2006, holding off Matt Every and John Huh in a tense back-nine finish for a two-stroke victory.

Curtis birdied the par-5 18th for an even-par 72 and 9-under total. It was a redeeming and emotional win for the 2003 British Open winner who had only limited tour status after a long slump.

After the round, Curtis fought back tears while saying: "It's been a tough couple of years."

Every had a 71 and lost a chance at his first tour win with four blown putts. Huh roared back with a 69, but the Mayakoba Classic winner fell just short.

Curtis, a former Kent State star, now has four career PGA Tour wins.
His victory didn't come easy.

Holding off Matt Every and John Huh in a tense back-nine finish, Curtis finished with flourish by holing a 12-footer for birdie on the par-5 18th, sealing a two-stroke victory and his fourth PGA Tour title. His even-par 72 put him at 9 under and triggered a wave of emotions that Curtis said he didn't know were in him.

Curtis won $1,116,000 and a two-year tour exemption — a more meaningful reward after being relegated to a status so low that this victory came in just the fourth PGA Tour event he managed to get into this year.

“You think you're just staying positive and not worried about it, but I think deep down, you realize all the hard work you put in that, you know, finally paid off,” Curtis said.

It was 2003 when Curtis kissed the Claret Jug at Royal St. George's with a square jawline and closely cropped black hair. This time, he was handed a pair of cowboy boots, smiling with a rounder face and a better appreciation of the journey.

“When you come out here and win one, well, if I win one every year I have a great career. That would be true,” Curtis said. “But, you know, to get to three, four, five wins — you're a solid player. I just feel like you get yourself into contention and just have that belief, and anything can happen.”

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News Headline: Kent's Ben Curtis has emotional win at PGA's Texas Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Six years later, Kent resident and former Kent State University standout Ben Curtis is a PGA Tour champion again.

His victory Sunday in the Texas Open didn't come easy. Neither did his words describing the redemption of nearly a decade spent falling from British Open champion to, this year, waiting by the phone simply for a chance to play.

His voice quivered, and his eyes welled up.

“It's been a tough couple years just fighting through it,” Curtis said.

Holding off Matt Every and John Huh in a tense back-nine finish, Curtis finished with flourish by holing a 12-footer for birdie on the par-5 18th, sealing a two-stroke victory and his fourth PGA Tour title. His even-par 72 put him at 9 under and triggered a wave of emotions that Curtis said he didn't know were in him.

Curtis won $1,116,000 and a two-year tour exemption — a more meaningful reward after being relegated to a status so low that this victory came in just the fourth PGA Tour event he managed to get into this year.

“You think you're just staying positive and not worried about it, but I think deep down, you realize all the hard work you put in that, you know, finally paid off,” Curtis said.

It was 2003 when Curtis kissed the Claret Jug at Royal St. George's with a square jawline and closely cropped black hair. This time, he was handed a pair of cowboy boots, smiling with a rounder face and a better appreciation of the journey.

“When you come out here and win one, well, if I win one every year I have a great career. That would be true,” Curtis said. “But, you know, to get to three, four, five wins — you're a solid player. I just feel like you get yourself into contention and just have that belief, and anything can happen.”

Every had a 71 and lost a chance at his first tour win with a shaky putter. Huh roared back with a 69, but the Mayakoba Classic winner fell just short of completing what would have been a remarkable comeback.

Huh nearly withdrew Thursday when he plunged to 5 over through only his first three holes and finished with a 77. But he rebounded with rounds of 68 and 67 to give Curtis and Every another player to worry about Sunday.

“I didn't really expect too much, final round,” Huh said.

While Huh's first round was ultimately too big of a hole to overcome, Every couldn't close the deal after starting the tournament with a course-record 63. Four blown putts from 9 feet or closer — including a 6-footer for birdie — kept Every a stroke back until Curtis birdied No. 18.

It was nonetheless a validating week for the 28-year-old Floridian, whose only name recognition in three winless years on the tour was a misdemeanor marijuana arrest as a rookie in 2010. That earned a PGA Tour suspension, and even now, Every's official biography lists regaining his tour privileges as his biggest achievement.

“A little bummed out,” Every said. “Kind of a pillow fight there for a while between the three of us.”

If missing one badly needed putt after another was a learning experience, Every didn't want to hear it.

“Been hearing that for about 15 years,” Every said. “But I don't know, man. I mean they got to go in sometimes and it didn't today, but maybe it will one day. Saving for something bigger, maybe.”

Defending champion Brendan Steele, a distant afterthought for three rounds, made himself known again at TPC San Antonio with a bogey-free 67 to finish an impressive weekend climb from 56th. He tied for fourth with Bob Estes (69), Brian Gay (70), and Charlie Wi (71) at 5 under.

Curtis wasn't the only emotional player on No. 18. Scott Piercy walked to the final hole tied for fourth at 5 under but walked off snapping his putter in half with two furious strikes over his knee. That was after the tour journeyman quadruple-bogeyed in a meltdown that started with a penalty stroke and ended with him tossing his glove in disgust after two-putting.

Piercy finished the round at par and eight back. Matt Kuchar, the tournament's top-ranked player at No. 15, had a 73 to finish at 2 under.

Legends of Golf

David Frost and Michael Allen won the Champions Tour's Legends of Golf, shooting a 10-under 62 for a one-stroke victory over John Cook and Joey Sindelar in the better-ball event in Savannah, Ga.

Front and Allen, coming off a victory last week at TPC Tampa Bay, finished at 29-under 187 at The Club at Savannah Harbor. Cook and Sindelar, former Ohio State teammates, closed with a 61.

Andy Bean and Chien Soon Lu (62), Jeff Sluman and Brad Faxon (63), and Tom Purtzer and Brad Bryant (64) tied for third at 27 under.

China Open

Branden Grace won the China Open for his third European Tour victory of the year, closing with a 3-under 69 to hold off 2011 winner Nicolas Colsaerts by three strokes in Tianjin, China.

The 23-year-old Grace, from South Africa, finished at 21-under 267 at Binhai Lake. He won the Joburg Open and Volvo Champions in consecutive weeks in South Africa in January.

Colsaerts, the winner last year at Luxehills, also shot a 69.

The event also was sanctioned by the OneAsia Tour and China Golf Association.

Indonesian Masters

Third-ranked Lee Westwood successfully defended his Indonesian Masters title, shooting a 2-over 74 for a two-stroke victory over Thailand's Thaworn Wiratchant in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Westwood played 32 holes Sunday, finishing off a 65 in the rain-delayed third round. He had a 16-under 272 total. Thaworn finished with a 67 in the Asian Tour event.

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News Headline: At the front of the pack | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU legend Ben Curtis wins first PGA
event since ‘06, takes Texas Open title

SAN ANTONIO — Former Kent
State standout Ben Curtis won the
Texas Open on Sunday for his first
PGA Tour title since 2006, holding off
Matt Every and John Huh in a tense
back-nine finish for a two-stroke victory.
Curtis birdied the par-5 18th for an
even-par 72 and 9-under total. It was
a redeeming and emotional win for
the 2003 British Open winner whose
long slump relegated him to status so
low that the victory came in only the
fourth PGA Tour event that he managed
to get into this year.
Curtis calmly hugged his caddie
after coolly sinking the clinching 12-
footer, but then fought back tears
just moments later while being interviewed.
“It's been a tough couple years just
fighting through it,” Curtis said softly
and haltingly, after pausing for a few
seconds to compose himself.
Every had a 71 and lost a chance at
his first tour win with a shaky putter.
Huh roared back with a 69, but the
Mayakoba Classic winner fell just
short of completing what would have
been a remarkable comeback.
Huh nearly withdrew Thursday
when he plunged to 5 over through
only his first three holes and finished
with a 77. But he rebounded
with rounds of 68 and 67 to give Curtis
and Every another player to worry
about Sunday.

“I didn't really expect too
much, final round,” Huh
said.
While Huh's first round
was ultimately too big of
a hole to overcome, Every
couldn't close the deal after
starting the tournament
with a course-record 63. Four
blown putts from 9 feet or
closer — including a 6-footer
for birdie — kept Every a
stroke back until Curtis birdied
No. 18.
It was nonetheless a validating
week for the 28-yearold
Floridian, whose only
name recognition in three
winless years on the tour
was a misdemeanor marijuana
arrest as a rookie in 2010.
That earned a PGA Tour
suspension, and even now,
Every's official biography
lists regaining his tour privileges
as his biggest achievement.
Defending champion
Brendan Steele, a distant afterthought
for three rounds,
made himself known again
at TPC San Antonio with a
bogey-free 67 to finish an impressive
weekend climb from
56th. He tied for fourth with
Bob Estes (69), Brian Gay
(70), and Charlie Wi (71) at
5 under.
Curtis wasn't the only
emotional player on No. 18.
Scott Piercy walked to the
final hole tied for fourth at 5
under but walked off snapping
his putter in half with
two furious strikes over his
knee. That was after the tour
journeyman quadruple-bogeyed
in a meltdown that
started with a penalty stroke
and ended with him tossing
his glove in disgust after
two-putting.
Piercy finished the round
at par and eight back. Matt
Kuchar, the tournament's
top-ranked player at No. 15,
had a 73 to finish at 2 under.

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News Headline: Texas-sized victory | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ex-KSU star Curtis grabs first PGA title since '06

Ben Curtis, right, hugs his caddie after winning the the Texas Open
golf tournament Sunday in San Antonio. Curtis, an alumnus of the
Kent State University golf program, finished at 9 under par. It was
his first PGA Tour title since 2006.

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News Headline: Curtis holds lead at Texas Open heading into finale | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SAN ANTONIO - Former Kent State University star Ben Curtis is still ahead at the Texas Open, leaving him just one round from his first PGA Tour victory since 2006 in what has been his most humbling year as a pro.

But a pack of mostly non-winners could make redemption difficult.

Curtis finally made his first stumbles at the Texas Open - once holding up a group playing six holes back when hacking the ball into the neighboring fairway was his only escape from under a tree - but his 1-over 73 was enough to stay atop the leaderboard at 9-under Saturday.

Matt Every was grateful to end a long day in the same position where he started - three strokes behind the former British Open champion. Every shot a 73 after waking early to finish his suspended second round, but it's his course-record 63 from Thursday that still has him in contention.

Mayakoba winner John Huh (67), Seung-Yui Noh (68) and Charlie Wi (71) were five strokes back at 4-under.

Aside from Huh, no one within five strokes of Curtis has won on the tour. Despite six years passing since his last victory, Curtis said he knows how to handle the final round: Simply worry about himself.

"In the past when I've played in these circumstances, that's what I did: I just focused on my game and if at the end of 18 holes it's good enough to win, great," Curtis said. "If not, I have to shake the guy's hand that won and move forward."

The Texas Open is only the fourth PGA Tour stop this year for Curtis, whose tournament invitations are no longer a sure thing after his status plummeted near the bottom rungs of the tour.

Curtis preserved his lead despite two double bogeys, including a wayward drive on the par-5 8th that left the 2003 British Open champion hitting twice from the adjacent fairway. Curtis said he and his caddie decided there was no other choice after his tee shot veered left and landed under a mesquite tree, surrounded by cactus and with no clear path back toward the hole.

"We were joking that we were on the second hole for 50 minutes today," Curtis said.

Curtis has some history on his side: Since 2000, eight third-round leaders at the Texas Open have held on to win.

Every called his round "scrappy" after he started the week with a course record at TPC San Antonio, where he showed up just two weeks removed from ditching his swing instructor and a new laid-back stance on practice - which sometimes means not practicing at all.

He had three bogeys Saturday but was saved by a couple birdies, including a 10-footer set up by a dead-on tee shot on the par-3 3rd.

"Overall, not bad," Every said. "I have a chance to win."

Matt Kuchar, the tournament's top-ranked player at No. 15, pulled back into contention with a 67 that was only marred by a bogey on the par-4 11th when the wind rolled his approach off the green to 21 feet on the fringe.

"I put myself in position," Kuchar said. "Maybe a long shot, but at least a chance."

Kuchar was tied for sixth at 3 under along with Greg Chalmers (69), Brian Gay (71), Cameron Tringale (76) and David Mathis (77).

Mathis' tumble was particularly swift. After starting the day two strokes off the lead, Mathis sank three birdies and walked to No. 15 in third place. But he bogeyed the hole and then made matters worse on the par-3 16th when his tee shot sailing into a crowded grandstand of ducking spectators.

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News Headline: Kent State's Curtis leads Houston Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ben Curtis is still ahead at the Texas Open, leaving him just one round from his first PGA Tour victory since 2006 in what has been his most humbling year as a pro.

But a pack of mostly non-winners could make redemption difficult.

Curtis, a Kent State graduate, finally made his first stumbles at the Texas Open — once holding up a group playing six holes back when hacking the ball into the neighboring fairway was his only escape from under a tree — but his 1-over 73 was enough to stay atop the leaderboard at 9 under Saturday.

Matt Every was grateful to end a long day in the same position where he started — three strokes behind the former British Open champion. Every shot a 73 after waking early to finish his suspended second round, but it's his course-record 63 from Thursday that still has him in contention.

Mayakoba winner John Huh (67), Seung-Yui Noh (68) and Charlie Wi (71) were five strokes back at 4 under.

Aside from Huh, no one within five strokes of Curtis has won on the tour. Despite six years passing since his last victory, Curtis said he knows how to handle the final round: Simply worry about himself.

“In the past when I've played in these circumstances, that's what I did: I just focused on my game and if at the end of 18 holes it's good enough to win, great,” Curtis said. “If not, I have to shake the guy's hand that won and move forward.”

The Texas Open is only the fourth PGA Tour stop this year for Curtis, whose tournament invitations are no longer a sure thing after his status plummeted near the bottom rungs of the tour.

Curtis preserved his lead despite two double bogeys, including a wayward drive on the par-5 8th that left the 2003 British Open champion hitting twice from the adjacent fairway.

© 2012 Vindy.com.

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News Headline: Kent State's Ben Curtis wins Valero Texas Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Curtis wins for first time since 2006

SAN ANTONIO - Ben Curtis won on the Texas Open on Sunday for his first PGA Tour title since 2006, holding off Matt Every and John Huh in a tense back-nine finish for a two-stroke victory.

Curtis birdied the par-5 18th for an even-par 72 and 9-under total. It was a redeeming and emotional win for the 2003 British Open winner who had only limited tour status after a long slump.

After the round, Curtis fought back tears while saying: "It's been a tough couple of years."

Every had a 71 and lost a chance at his first tour win with four blown putts. Huh roared back with a 69, but the Mayakoba Classic winner fell just short.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: Kent State alum Curtis wins Texas Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Fox Sports Net (FSN) Ohio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SAN ANTONIO (AP) -- Ben Curtis won the Texas Open on Sunday for his first PGA Tour title since 2006, holding off Matt Every and John Huh in a tense back-nine finish for a two-stroke victory.

Curtis birdied the par-5 18th for an even-par 72 and 9-under total. It was a redeeming and emotional win for the 2003 British Open winner whose long slump relegated him to status so low that the victory came in only the fourth PGA Tour event that he managed to get into this year.

Curtis calmly hugged his caddie after coolly sinking the clinching 12-footer, but then fought back tears just moments later while being interviewed.

"It's been a tough couple years just fighting through it," Curtis said softly and haltingly, after pausing for a few seconds to compose himself.

Every had a 71 and lost a chance at his first tour win with a shaky putter. Huh roared back with a 69, but the Mayakoba Classic winner fell just short of completing what would have been a remarkable comeback.

Huh nearly withdrew Thursday when he plunged to 5 over through only his first three holes and finished with a 77. But he rebounded with rounds of 68 and 67 to give Curtis and Every another player to worry about Sunday.

"I didn't really expect too much, final round," Huh said.

While Huh's first round was ultimately too big of a hole to overcome, Every couldn't close the deal after starting the tournament with a course-record 63. Four blown putts from 9 feet or closer -- including a 6-footer for birdie -- kept Every a stroke back until Curtis birdied No. 18.

It was nonetheless a validating week for the 28-year-old Floridian, whose only name recognition in three winless years on the tour was a misdemeanor marijuana arrest as a rookie in 2010. That earned a PGA Tour suspension, and even now, Every's official biography lists regaining his tour privileges as his biggest achievement.

Defending champion Brendan Steele, a distant afterthought for three rounds, made himself known again at TPC San Antonio with a bogey-free 67 to finish an impressive weekend climb from 56th. He tied for fourth with Bob Estes (69), Brian Gay (70), and Charlie Wi (71) at 5 under.

Curtis wasn't the only emotional player on No. 18. Scott Piercy walked to the final hole tied for fourth at 5 under but walked off snapping his putter in half with two furious strikes over his knee. That was after the tour journeyman quadruple-bogeyed in a meltdown that started with a penalty stroke and ended with him tossing his glove in disgust after two-putting.

Piercy finished the round at par and eight back. Matt Kuchar, the tournament's top-ranked player at No. 15, had a 73 to finish at 2 under.

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News Headline: Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND (AP) — Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting.

The latest "Pop Up City" event from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and partners aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground. The event, which begins Saturday evening, will include two-way bicycle tracks, dozens of public artwork, and eco-friendly sidewalk benches that filter runoff from rain.

David Jurca, a senior urban designer at Kent State, told The Plain Dealer (http://bit.ly/HYrY9F ) that the event gives city officials and advocacy groups a chance to experience some of these proposals in three dimensions.

"We can test these things out ... before a lot of political or financial investment is made," Jurca said.

The cost, estimated at $35,000, was covered by grants.

Other "pop-up" events transformed a pedestrian bridge in the Tremont neighborhood into a star-gazing perch and converted a downtown parking deck into a live theater.

Landmarks that flank one-way Rockwell Avenue include the Cleveland Public Library, the Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse, the mall park area, Key Tower bank headquarters and the Old Stone Church. Nearby are a convention center and medical mart under construction. The Public Square transit hub, a casino opening in May, and the Warehouse nightclub and restaurant district are also close.

The city's Group Plan Commission envisions Rockwell Avenue as a key link in a part of a downtown area that lacks connections. The commission appointed by Mayor Frank Jackson has recommended $90 million in improvements to the malls, surrounding streets and Public Square.

"We want to animate the street," said Jurca, who's directing six graduate students on the project. "It makes the street memorable and gives it an identity."

The design team will also use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity.

The temporary art installations will remain on view through next Friday.

Information from: The Plain Dealer, http://www.cleveland.com

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News Headline: Pop Up Rockwell will rock what's possible for Cleveland's downtown streets (Jurca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This rendering shows how a two-lane bicycle path will look on Rockwell Avenue in downtown Cleveland.

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A stretch of urban back road will become a green, kicky showcase for what's possible in the downtown street grid.

Starting Saturday, Pop Up Rockwell will transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground for two-way bicycle lanes, sidewalk benches that filter runoff and public art.

It's the latest "Pop Up City" event from Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and a range of partners.

The KSU collaborative creates temporary, startling uses of gritty landscapes to stir the sense of what's possible.

One pop-up transformed a pedestrian bridge in Tremont into a cozy, star-gazing perch. Another one converted a downtown parking deck into a live theater.

Two forces drive the Rockwell Pop Up -- a desire to model the city's new "complete and green streets" law and to enliven the links between downtown attractions, new and old.

The effort "gives the public, city officials and advocacy groups an opportunity to experience some of these proposals in three dimensions," said David Jurca, a senior urban designer at the KSU's collaborative. "We can test these things out ... before a lot of political or financial investment is made."

The experiment rolls out Saturday on Rockwell between East Sixth Street and West Roadway (just east of John Q's Steakhouse on Public Square's northern border).

Landmarks that flank the one-way street include Cleveland Public Library, the Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse, the mall, Key Tower and the Old Stone Church.

Construction of the new medical mart and convention center is happening a block to the north. Rockwell empties into Public Square, which will soon welcome a lively, new tenant nearby with the Horseshoe Casino . The Warehouse District is a short walk to the west.

That's why many, including the city's Group Plan Commission , envision Rockwell as a distinctive link in a downtown suffering from a lack of connections.

The commission, appointed by Mayor Frank Jackson, has recommended $90 million in improvements to the malls, surrounding streets and Public Square.

The mayor has advocated closing streets that bisect Public Square , making it a grand, central park.

The pop-up features of Rockwell could be a model for, and a test of, that vision, as well as the city's "complete streets" law.

Passed last fall, the law requires that 20 percent of money spent on road projects, up to $1 million, should go to bike-only lanes, crosswalks, energy-efficient lighting and other eco-friendly treatments.

Rockwell will showcase a two-way bicycle path on the street's south side. It will be separated from traffic by long, 30-inch-wide strips of AstroTurf. Planters will be placed every 20 feet or so.

New street striping and signs will direct bicyclists and cars.

Sidewalks will have BiFi benches, with bio-filtration devices that sponge water from the street to plants in the benches.

Pinwheels of various size will accent the gusty corridor.

"We want to animate the street," said Jurca, who's directing six graduate students on the project. "It makes the street memorable and gives it an identity."

Inflatable art from local artist Jimmy Kuehnle will heighten the whimsy and draw people in. Jurca's graduate students will survey them on reactions to the street.

The design team will also use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity. An evaluation of what worked and what didn't will quickly follow the event, Jurca said.

"The goal is a useful document for decisions on the future of Rockwell or streets with similar characteristics," Jurca said.

Among the project partners is the GreenCityBlueLake Institute , a local think tank on environmentally conscious development.

Pop Up Rockwell "will introduce concepts that aren't currently being used in Northeast Ohio, and provide a great opportunity for city engineers and planners from around the region to see first-hand how complete and green streets concepts can be implemented," Brad Chase, a program manager for the institute, said in an email.

Other partners include the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District, the Downtown Cleveland Alliance, Bike Cleveland, The Bike Rack, the Group Plan Commission and Cleveland Public Library.

The event kicks off from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, with live music and food vendors. The temporary installations will remain through next Friday.

The George Gund Foundation and Cuyahoga Arts & Culture are helping pay for the event.

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News Headline: Kent State planners mount bike-friendly event in Cleveland | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND -- Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting.

Urban planner David Jurca says the project, which opened Saturday evening, can test ideas before a lot of money is invested.

The latest so-called "Pop Up City" event from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and partners aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground.

The event will include two-way bicycle tracks, dozens of public artwork, and eco-friendly sidewalk benches that filter runoff from rain.

The cost, estimated at $35,000, was covered by grants.

The design team will use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity.

The temporary art installations will remain on view through next Friday.

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News Headline: Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND (AP) -- Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting.

Urban planner David Jurca (jur-KAH') says the project opening Saturday evening can test ideas before a lot of money is invested.

The latest so-called "Pop Up City" event from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and partners aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground.

The event will include two-way bicycle tracks, dozens of public artwork, and eco-friendly sidewalk benches that filter runoff from rain.

The cost, estimated at $35,000, was covered by grants.

The design team will use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity.

The temporary art installations will remain on view through next Friday.

Read more http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/O/OH_URBAN_LAB_OHOL-?SITE=WAKR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

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News Headline: Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND -- Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting.

Urban planner David Jurca says the project opening Saturday evening can test ideas before a lot of money is invested.

The latest so-called "Pop Up City" event from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and partners aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground.

The event will include two-way bicycle tracks, dozens of public artwork, and eco-friendly sidewalk benches that filter runoff from rain.

The cost, estimated at $35,000, was covered by grants.

The design team will use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity. The temporary art installations will remain on view through next Friday.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND — Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting.

The latest "Pop Up City" event from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and partners aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground. The event, which begins Saturday evening, will include two-way bicycle tracks, dozens of public artwork, and eco-friendly sidewalk benches that filter runoff from rain.

David Jurca, a senior urban designer at Kent State, told The Plain Dealer (http://bit.ly/HYrY9F ) that the event gives city officials and advocacy groups a chance to experience some of these proposals in three dimensions.

"We can test these things out ... before a lot of political or financial investment is made," Jurca said.

The cost, estimated at $35,000, was covered by grants.

Other "pop-up" events transformed a pedestrian bridge in the Tremont neighborhood into a star-gazing perch and converted a downtown parking deck into a live theater.

Landmarks that flank one-way Rockwell Avenue include the Cleveland Public Library, the Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse, the mall park area, Key Tower bank headquarters and the Old Stone Church. Nearby are a convention center and medical mart under construction. The Public Square transit hub, a casino opening in May, and the Warehouse nightclub and restaurant district are also close.

The city's Group Plan Commission envisions Rockwell Avenue as a key link in a part of a downtown area that lacks connections. The commission appointed by Mayor Frank Jackson has recommended $90 million in improvements to the malls, surrounding streets and Public Square.

"We want to animate the street," said Jurca, who's directing six graduate students on the project. "It makes the street memorable and gives it an identity."

The design team will also use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity.

The temporary art installations will remain on view through next Friday.

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News Headline: Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland (Jurca) | Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Associated Press (AP) - Columbus Bureau
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND_Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting.

Urban planner David Jurca (jur-KAH') says the project opening Saturday evening can test ideas before a lot of money is invested.

The latest so-called "Pop Up City" event from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and partners aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground.

The event will include two-way bicycle tracks, dozens of public artwork, and eco-friendly sidewalk benches that filter runoff from rain.

The cost, estimated at $35,000, was covered by grants.

The design team will use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity.

The temporary art installations will remain on view through next Friday.

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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News Headline: Specialty Spotlight: Are You Psyched for Psychiatric Nursing? (Drew) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: NurseZone
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Specialty Spotlight: Are You Psyched for Psychiatric Nursing?

Barbara Drew, Ph.D., APRN, BC, is the former president of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association and an associate professor in the College of Nursing at Kent State University, in Kent, Ohio.

What do you enjoy most about psychiatric nursing?

I most enjoy the interpersonal connection with clients and their families. I like the challenge of using my knowledge about the multiple influences on mental health to help a client explore ways of coping with their symptoms and life circumstances.

What can a new nurse in the psychiatric/mental health specialty expect in the first few months on the job?

Many new nurses are persuaded to not begin their nursing career in specialty areas like psychiatric nursing. It is suggested that they need to practice their “skills” (usually referring to tasks like IV insertion, dressing changes, etc.) first. This notion is based on at least two faulty assumptions: One, new grads will not be working with medically compromised clients in a psychiatric setting. However, RN staff in most psychiatric settings care for clients with very complex healthcare needs. And two, interpersonal skills, which are indeed the primary tools of psychiatric nursing, come naturally and do not need to be practiced. While some of us were accomplished communicators when we came to nursing, most are not. Caring for people whose illness often results in impaired communication requires careful listening, self-awareness, conveyance of empathy and respect and integration of knowledge about mental illness and attention to clients' life stories. Learning from our clients, observing and modeling after experienced, effective clinicians, and reading the scientific literature will increase confidence in interpersonal skills. Some nurses forget that therapeutic communication is fundamental to all of nursing.

Within the first few months on the job, new nurses may find themselves justifying their choice to become a psychiatric nurse. (My grandmother said I was not a “real” nurse because I did not wear a uniform.) They will, though, find rewarding challenges in providing holistic care to people with mental illness while being reminded that there really is not such thing as a pure “mental” illness or a pure “physical” illness; strengthening their therapeutic communication skills; leading therapeutic groups; assessing effectiveness of treatments, including psychotropic medications; and keeping the environment safe and health-promoting.

What is the most challenging thing about being a new psychiatric nurse?

Because we are nurses we tend to feel compelled to “do for” and “do to” a client. It is pretty difficult, and generally more time consuming, to guide the client toward self-care, discovery of solutions for problems, and making choices. This is particularly the case when the illness and/or family experiences result in lack of motivation, indecision, apathy or inability to see oneself as capable.

Another challenge I faced as a new grad going into psychiatry was the realization that if I was going to expect my clients to be introspective and self-reflective, I had to do the same myself. That was sort of shocking, since I did not learn how to do that as I was growing up. The good news is that this is an ongoing process that can be facilitated over time by co-workers, loving friends and family, and sometimes therapy, a process that can accelerate self-knowing.

Finally, it is particularly draining to allow yourself to hear the stories of your clients. A disproportionate number of people with mental illness have had experiences of neglect as children, physical and/or sexual abuse, or exposure to other horrifying events during their lifetime. In addition, they may regularly experience discrimination because of the stigma attached to mental illness or substance abuse. When I first began working on a psychiatric unit, I would come home every day with a headache and great fatigue. It took some time and awareness of my need to separate my work from the rest of my life before I left work headache-free.

What advice can you offer a student nurse or new graduate looking for a job in psychiatric nursing? How can they prepare for their new career?

First of all, power on! Become a psychiatric nurse. Do not let others dissuade you. Find a mentor who is a psychiatric nurse who will support your decision. I have always been a psychiatric nurse (for 36 years) and I have never regretted it.

Second, when looking for a job, realize that experience in a psychiatric setting would be valued by the nurse manager and your potential co-workers. Consider working as a student or arrange an extra clinical, if possible, in a psychiatric setting. Word of mouth, as with any other job, is important. Talk with people who work where you want to work.

Three, look for a setting that emphasizes multidisciplinary teamwork, provides supervision of staff, has opportunities for RNs to conduct groups, values one-to-one nurse-patient interactions, has a strong culture of professionalism (emphasizes evidence-based practice, involvement in professional organizations, continuing education, etc.) and of course, has good staff-to-patient ratios.

Four, join the American Psychiatric Nurses Association. We are the only organization in the United States that represents all psychiatric nurses. See our Web site for more information about APNA. Look particularly for information about Janssen Scholarships for students who are interested in psychiatric nursing.

© 2011. AMN Healthcare, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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News Headline: Cafaro Foundation donates $25,000 to KSU scholarship (Graham) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: Sat, April 21, 2012 @ 12:00 a.m.

Staff report
The Cafaro Foundation is donating $25,000 to endow a new scholarship at Kent State University.

The William and Alyce Cafaro Innovation Scholarship will be awarded to worthy students in the university's College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

The first scholarship, worth $1,250, is scheduled to be awarded in 2017.

This annual award will be granted on the basis of merit and financial need.

“We are extremely grateful to the Cafaro Foundation for this wonderful award,” said Jack Graham, Dean of the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

“Innovation is foremost in our thoughts as we expand and enhance our future curriculum. The future School of Sustainability and Innovation will provide our students with the background to be productive members of a new and enhanced global energy economy, and this scholarship will certainly be of great benefit to our student body,” Graham said.

The mission of the College of Technology is to enhance technological literacy, education and training essential to the knowledge of economy, socioeconomic well-being and to the work-force development of the state of Ohio in general and Northeast Ohio in particular.

The college's curricula lead to various certificates in emerging/high- technology areas and to a seamless articulation with technical associate, bachelor's and master's degree programs with global perspectives for careers in business, industry, education and government sectors.

The mission of the Cafaro Foundation is rooted in the generosity of William M. Cafaro, the founder of the real-estate development and management company that bears his name in Youngstown.

For more than a half century, Cafaro and his wife, Alyce, enthusiastically, but quietly, supported churches, schools, hospitals and other charitable causes.

After his wife's death in 1996, Cafaro formed his foundation to perpetuate her memory and the legacy of good works they shared. He died in 1998.

His descendants now direct the efforts of his foundation, striving to improve the quality of life in the region they call home.

The Cafaro Foundation has bestowed millions of dollars in gifts to worthy causes.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

© 2012 Vindy.com

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News Headline: Sixth annual 'Who's Your Mama' festival cooks up vegan menus for Earth Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Who's Your Mama," the week-long festival sponsored by Standing Rock Cultural Arts in partnership with the City of Kent and Kent Parks and Recreation Department, kicks off its second day of events at noon with Vegan Iron Chef IV.

The fourth-annual competition is being held in the Kent State University Student Center's second floor dining loction and is in cooperation with KSU Dining Services, The University of Akron and The Mustard Seed Cafe.

In addition to vegan samples, there is a silent auction to benefit Kent Social Services and the festival, a fruit and vegetable carving display and ice sculpture.

Events during the week-long festival will include workshops on environmentally friendly living, poetry readings, live performances, film screenings and more.

Events are free of charge and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

n Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday: Vegan Iron Chef IV Competition. Kent State University Student Center, second floor dining location.

n 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Film screening of "Greenhorns." Discussion and Q&A moderated by Lucky Penny Farm and Creamery owner Abbe Turner. Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St.

n 7 p.m. April 26: Film screening of "Journey of the Universe." A film which examines our humble planet earth from the big bang to the mapping of the human genome. Wine Tasting. FJ Kluth Gallery, 300 N. Water St.

n 5 p.m. to midnight April 27: Environmental Film Festival and Local Foods Reception. Kent State University Student Center, Kiva Auditorium. Films, speakers and food. Risman Drive, KSU. $7 Adults. $5 Student Admission. Updates soon on www.whosyourmama.org .

n 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 28: Main Street Block Party. Main Street will be closed in downtown Kent between DePeyster and Water streets. Music, dance performances, eco vendors, alternative energy displays, parade and poetry readings.

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News Headline: Library Events - Teens can make recycled fashions | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Teens can celebrate Earth Day by creating high fashion out of recycled items that would otherwise be thrown away, such as bubble wrap, juice boxes and old T-shirts. On April 22 at 3 p.m., the library teen room will kick off this fashion event with a demonstration of materials and techniques by Kent State University School of Fashion students. Participants will then have three months to produce their own eco-outfit to wear in a runway show July 21.

Registration is required. For more information, call 330-653-6658, ext. 1032.

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News Headline: KSU's fashion school opens a retail store (Stanforth) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising announces the opening of its new retail space, The Fashion School Store.

Located in downtown Kent, in the newly revitalized retail area known as Acorn Alley II, the store had its public grand opening Wednesday.

Guests were to have the opportunity to view the new space, purchase merchandise and enjoy light refreshments.

The Fashion School Store provides an opportunity for the fashion merchandising students of Kent State to practice classroom concepts through a real-world business.

All aspects of running a store will be managed by students, with junior merchandising major Scott Bunner of Parma Heights, Ohio, serving as the store manager and Nancy Stanforth, Ph.D., associate professor of fashion merchandising overseeing as the faculty adviser of the store.

“The store is about the merchandising students and putting their classwork into action,” Stanforth said. “They will be involved in buying and merchandising of the store plus the general operation. We hope that they learn how to run a business and make it profitable.”

The Fashion School Store provides a unique outlet for Kent State fashion students, faculty and alumni to sell their designs. Items for sale include clothing, casual wear, outerwear, accessories, as well as computer bags, T-shirts, pillows and tote bags with The Fashion School logo. Prices range from $10 to $300.

While students gain experience running a business, the school's faculty provides their designs to financially benefit The Fashion School, while also experimenting with business strategies through academia.

“Faculty [members] hope at some point to be able to conduct research for publication, which might include pricing strategies, customer service and merchandise selections and store ambiance,” Stanforth said. “However, that is a bit in the future.”

Regular store hours for The Fashion School Store are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. To contact the store, call 330-677-2419.

For information about Kent State's Fashion School, visit www.kent.edu/artscollege/fashion.

© 2012 Vindy.com.

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News Headline: KENT STATE'S FASHION SCHOOL OPENED A BRAND-NEW STORE. | Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Good Morning Cleveland - WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE'S FASHION SCHOOL OPENED A BRAND-NEW STORE. THEY'RE MANAGING THE STORE AND SHOWCASING THEIR DESIGNS AND THE SCHOOL IS HOSTING THE ANNUAL FASHION SHOW TOMORROW. THE SHOW WILL BE PRESENTED TWICE TOMORROW AT 2:00 PMAND 8:00 PMIT WILL BE HELD AT KENT'S MUSIC AND SPEECH CENTER. YOU NEED TICKETS TO ATTEND. SO BE PREPARED FOR THAT.

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News Headline: Celebrations: Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State freshman Natalie Sullinger received the $5,000 Jo-Ann Stores Inc. First Generation Scholarship for Fashion Design and Merchandising. Sullinger was selected for the inaugural award because of academic achievement and her avocation of making quilts for cancer patients.

Joanna Trzeciak, an assistant professor of modern and classical languages at Kent State University, has won $10,000 as one of seven finalists of the Griffin Poetry Prize sponsored by the Griffin Trust for Excellence in Canada. She translated Polish poems written by Tadeusz Rozewicz that were published by W.W. Norton and Co.

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News Headline: Hike in tuition OK'd at Ohio University | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio -- Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year.

The school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students at the Athens campus. That's roughly a $345 increase that drives the school's tuition and fees above the $10,000 mark for the first time.

Trustees also backed a 3.5 percent increase in room rates and a 1.5 percent hike in board rates, for a $255 increase.

Students have protested the hikes over the last two months. School officials said they had no choice.

The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget.

Kent State and the University of Cincinnati have also approved tuition increases.

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News Headline: Ohio University increases tuition and room rates | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio

Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year.

The school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5-percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students at the Athens campus. That's roughly a $345 increase that drives the school's tuition and fees above the $10,000 mark for the first time.

Trustees also backed a 3.5- percent increase in room rates and a 1.5-percent hike in board rates, for a $255 increase.

The Columbus Dispatch reports students have protested the hikes over the past two months. School officials said they had no choice.

The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget.

Kent State University and the University of Cincinnati also have approved tuition increases for this fall.

© 2012 Vindy.com.

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News Headline: Ohio University approves increases for in-state students | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio - Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports ( http://bit.ly/I0Niua ) that the school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students at the Athens campus. That's roughly a $345 increase that drives the school's tuition and fees above the $10,000 mark for the first time.

Trustees also backed a 3.5 percent increase in room rates and a 1.5 percent hike in board rates, for a $255 increase.

The newspaper reports students have protested the hikes over the last two months. School officials said they had no choice.

The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget.

Kent State and the University of Cincinnati have also approved tuition increases.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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News Headline: Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio (AP) - Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports ( http://bit.ly/I0Niua ) that the school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5% increase in tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students at the Athens campus. That's roughly a $345 increase that drives the school's tuition and fees above the $10,000 mark for the first time.

Trustees also backed a 3.5% increase in room rates and a 1.5% hike in board rates, for a $255 increase.

The newspaper reports students have protested the hikes over the last two months. School officials said they had no choice.

The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget.

Kent State and the University of Cincinnati have also approved tuition increases.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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News Headline: Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio -- Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that the school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students at the Athens campus.

That's roughly a $345 increase that drives the school's tuition and fees above the $10,000 mark for the first time. Trustees also backed a 3.5 percent increase in room rates and a 1.5 percent hike in board rates, for a $255 increase.

The newspaper reports students have protested the hikes over the last two months. School officials said they had no choice. The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget.

Kent State and the University of Cincinnati have also approved tuition increases.

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News Headline: Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio (AP) -- Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports (http://bit.ly/I0Niua) that the school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students at the Athens campus. That's roughly a $345 increase that drives the school's tuition and fees above the $10,000 mark for the first time.

Trustees also backed a 3.5 percent increase in room rates and a 1.5 percent hike in board rates, for a $255 increase.

The newspaper reports students have protested the hikes over the last two months. School officials said they had no choice.

The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget.

Kent State and the University of Cincinnati have also approved tuition increases.

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News Headline: Ohio U. approves increases for in-state students | Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Associated Press (AP) - Columbus Bureau
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ohio_Ohio University students who live on campus will pay more next school year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports (http://bit.ly/I0Niua) that the school's board of trustees on Friday approved a 3.5 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students at the Athens campus. That's roughly a $345 increase that drives the school's tuition and fees above the $10,000 mark for the first time.

Trustees also backed a 3.5 percent increase in room rates and a 1.5 percent hike in board rates, for a $255 increase.

The newspaper reports students have protested the hikes over the last two months. School officials said they had no choice.

The tuition boost is expected to add $5.7 million to the university's budget.

Kent State and the University of Cincinnati have also approved tuition increases.

Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press.

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News Headline: PORTAGE PATHWAYS: KSU students' gift of gab 'put Kent on the map' 50 years ago | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: John Schecter, a Kent State University freshman, certainly got his money's worth when he dropped a dime into a pay telephone at Lake Hall on April 3, 1962.

The phone call he began with a resident of the women's dormitory at Dunbar Hall didn't end until more than 500 hours later.

Schecter and the Dunbar "coed," whose name appears lost to history, didn't actually carry on a conversation by themselves for more than three weeks. They had a lot of help.

By the time Lake Hall resident Ronald Miller and Dunbar Hall resident Mary McMenemey hung up the same call on April 25, 1962, 300 Kent State students had talked continuously for 528 hours.

It was, as Record-Courier reporter John deGroot put it, a conversation carried on "on two pay telephones for one dime and without interruption."

And they claimed a world record in the process.

The idea of a "talkathon" that would "put Kent on the map" was the brainchild of John Ivanko, a freshman from Detroit, who was a transfer student from the University of Michigan. His plan was for Kent State to eclipse Michigan, which had set the "Midwestern record" for telephone talk with a conversation that continued for 14 days.

The marathon conversation brought together 150 men living in Lake Hall and 75 women living in Dunbar Hall. The students signed up initially for one-hour shifts that had to be maintained around-the-clock.

Students were recruited in both dormitories - "You may meet your future wife" was a sales pitch for the men of Lake Hall - and a bit of extra effort was needed for those who had to carry on the conversation in the wee hours. Some ended up holding the line for double shifts.

The students talked "about everything from classes to romance," deGroot reported.

The stunt did more than set a record. It drew national attention and set off an uproar that involved two state legislators and even drew KSU President George Bowman into the conversational fray.

A few days after it began, State Rep. James Thorpe of Alliance criticized Kent State for allowing the talkathon. "They should devote more time to studies, not child's play," he said.

State Rep. Robert Stockdale of Kent defended the students. The marathon conversation was "merely a harmless type of student release valve," he said, adding, "I'd prefer a student talkathon to a Bowling Green University riot anytime."

The Daily Kent Stater weighed in with a defense of the students and the school administration. So did President Bowman, with reservations.

"While I think this is a silly performance," Bowman said, "I can think of worse things that might provide an outlet for energies which had accumulated during the long winter months."

At the same time, however, Bowman added that the bid to set a telephone talk record "doesn't add anything to the stature of the university."

As the students neared the end of their first week on the telephone, they set a new goal: To surpass the 21-day national talk record set by students at California Polytechnical Institute.

That brought an added challenge. In order to claim the national record, the students would have to sustain the conversation through the Easter break. An effort was made to enlist out-of-state students remaining on the campus during the holiday to take over for those who were going home.

On April 18, the talkathon topped the 14-day record set by the University of Michigan when the conversation John Schecter's dime began passed the 336-hour mark.

Easter came and went and the students talked on. "Telephone talkathons are the Charleston marathons of the Atomic Age," observed deGroot, a future Pulitzer Prize winner.

The conversation finally came to a close shortly after 1:15 p.m. on April 25 when the talkathon surpassed the national record and Ronald Miller and Mary McMenemey ended their conversation.

"The lines went dead. History had been made. The students had talked for 528 hours," deGroot reported. "No record was kept of what was said. Like the lost chord, these words will go unknown."

Does Kent State still hold the telephone talk record? Fifty years later, in an era in which virtually every college student has a cell phone and pay phones are a rarity, that's unclear.

In 1962, however, the students at Kent State were more than pleased to claim the bragging rights they had earned with the success of John Ivanko's bid to "put Kent on the map."

There was another winner, too, as deGroot pointed out: "Ohio Bell may openly brag about having the lowest telephone rates on pay phones in the world. After all, where can you talk for 528 hours on one dime?"

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News Headline: Pilot hopes to land in all of Ohio's 88 counties (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two brothers from Dayton made history more than 100 years ago by flying their homemade flying machine for the first time.

On May 13, a Hudson man hopes to join Wilbur and Orville Wright in the record books as he attempts to fly his 1946 Piper J3 Cub a bit further than the Wright brothers' first 12-second flight of 120 feet.

Joe Murray, a pilot and journalism professor at Kent State University, hopes to set his own record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of Ohio in an antique aircraft."

"We made it up - seeing as how it appears no one has ever attempted it before," Murray said. "There is probably a good reason for this."

Murray will fly 1,670 miles across Ohio, landing in all 88 counties, after taking off from KSU's Andrew W. Paton Airport in Stwo. He estimated the flight will cover about 26 hours in the air and take about a week to complete.

Ron Siwik, a retired radiologist and former military flight surgeon during the Vietnam War, will make the flight alongside Murray in an identical bright yellow Piper Cub.

"I'm kind of the wing man," said Siwik, a Chagrin Falls resident. "It was Joe's idea and I just kind of invited myself along."

The flight will be certified through Recordsetter.com, Murray said, which is the "home of some pretty strange world records."

Murray wants to see the state by air while giving homage to flight and the plane he will use.

"This year marks the 75th anniversary of the Piper Cub," Murray said. "It is an airplane that taught almost a half million pilots to fly."

The flight also will be part of a book Murray is writing about flying in Ohio.

"There are some remarkable people here I've never met," he said. "They probably live in those counties I've never been to, and I would like nothing better to meet them and see this state while flying low and slow in an old tube-and-fabric airplane."

During the flight, the door and window will be open, allowing Murray to take in the sights, sounds and aromas of the flight.

"Did you know you can actually smell all of that freshly cut hay in fields from a mile away?" he asked. "I've taken in the scent of a barbecue while passing over at 2,000 feet."

A small airplane provides a frame of reference on the world "that can't be experienced using Google Earth," Murray said.

"From the air, the things on the ground that separate us disappear," he added. "Unlike our maps, there are no borders; there are no real boundaries to divide communities. It is an amazing perspective that I hope to share in the book."

Murray has been flying since 1981. Through his flying, he has made a connection with people from all walks of life, with different stories, but sharing the same common interest - aviation.

"People need to understand that general aviation is different than the airlines," Murray said. "I would like the public to come to know some of the amazing people I have been privileged to meet, all because of a common connection to aviation. I believe airplanes were built to bring people together."

Murray is accepting donations for the flight at his website www.lostinoscarhotel.com . There will be a daily flight log and a documentary made of the flight.

Donations will help with research and production on the book and documentary, he said.

KSU students will help produce features for the online magazine, "Stories That Fly," which can be found at www.storiesthatfly.com , Murray said. The students will also help research, write, interview, and record video, audio and photographs.

"I will co-author the book with Gary Harwood, a dear friend and colleague and an award-winning photographer that I have known for most of my career," Murray said. "We worked together most recently on a documentary in Cuba."

Weather could delay but not cancel the flight, according to Murray.

He is hoping folks will come out to meet him as he lands in the various counties.

"If I am lucky, somewhere along the way I'll land in the grass of an old farm field," Murray said. "Maybe somebody will come out to offer me some iced tea and a nice conversation."

Aside from mechanical issues, there are a few things that could delay Murray's taking off right away from that imagined field.

"If they have peach pie and an old airplane in the barn, I'll likely stay all afternoon," Murray mused.

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News Headline: Pilot charts record-making route (Murray) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name: Tim Troglen
News OCR Text: Hudson -- Just over 100 years ago, two brothers from Dayton made history by flying their home-made flying machine for the first time.

On May 13, a Hudson man hopes to join Wilbur and Orville Wright in the record books as he attempts to fly his 1946 Piper J3 Cub a bit further than the Wright brothers' first 12-second flight of 120 feet.

Joe Murray, a pilot and journalism professor at Kent State University, hopes to set his own record by being "the first, longest, slowest and most peculiar flight to Wright Brothers Airport via all counties of Ohio in an antique aircraft."

"We made it up -- seeing as how it appears no one has ever attempted it before," Murray said. "There is probably a good reason for this."

Murray, the husband of Cuyahoga Falls News-Press reporter Ellin Walsh, will fly 1,670 miles across Ohio, landing in all 88 Ohio counties, after taking off from Kent State University's Andrew W. Paton Airport. He estimated the flight will cover about 26 hours in the air and take about a week to complete.

Ron Siwik, a retired radiologist and former military flight surgeon during the Vietnam war, will make the entire flight alongside Murray in an identical bright yellow Piper Cub.

"I'm kind of the wing man," said Siwik, a Chagrin Falls resident. "It was Joe's idea and I just kind of invited myself along."

Siwik said the trip should be "pretty routine."

In 2008, Siwik completed a solo flight around the world in a small plane.

"It was a personal achievement for me," Siwik said. "Flying a plane around the world, for a pilot, is like scaling Mount Everest. Actually more people have climbed Mount Everest than have flown around the world."

The flight will be certified through Recordsetter.com, Murray said, which is the "home of some pretty strange world records."

Murray, an Ohio native, has traveled across the world, visiting Cuba, South Africa and Antarctica.

"But I've never seen the Ohio River at our border with West Virginia and Kentucky," Murray said. "I've only been to a handful of Ohio's 88 counties."

Murray wants to see the state by air while giving homage to flight and the plane he will use.

"This year marks the 75th anniversary of the Piper Cub," Murray said. "It is an airplane that taught almost a half million pilots to fly."

The flight will also be part of a book Murray is writing about flying in Ohio.

"There are some remarkable people here I've never met," he said. "They probably live in those counties I've never been to, and I would like nothing better to meet them and see this state while flying low and slow in an old tube-and-fabric airplane."

During the flight, the door and window will be open, allowing Murray to take in the sights, sounds and aromas of the flight.

"Did you know you can actually smell all of that freshly cut hay in fields from a mile away?" he asked. "I've taken in the scent of a barbecue while passing over at 2,000 feet."

Murray has also watched from above as kids played ball on a neighborhood field.

"I've seen the kid sliding into second base and tracked the cloud of dust he kicked up as it disappeared over center field," Murray remembered.

A small airplane provides a frame of reference on the world "that can't be experienced using Google Earth," Murray said.

"From the air, the things on the ground that separate us disappear," he added. "Unlike our maps, there are no borders; there are no real boundaries to divide communities. It is an amazing perspective that I hope to share in the book."

Murray has been flying since 1981.

Through his flying, he has made a connection with people from all walks of life, with different stories, but sharing the same common interest -- aviation.

"People need to understand that general aviation is different than the airlines," Murray said. "I would like the public to come to know some of the amazing people I have been privileged to meet, all because of a common connection to aviation. I believe airplanes were built to bring people together."

Murray is accepting donations for the flight at his website www.lostinoscarhotel.com. There will also be a daily flight log and a documentary made of the flight.

Donations will help with research and production on the book and documentary, he said.

KSU students will also help produce features for the online magazine, "Stories That Fly," which can be found at www.storiesthatfly.com, Murray said. The students will also help research, write, interview, and record video, audio and photographs.

"I will co-author the book with Gary Harwood, a dear friend and colleague and an award-winning photographer that I have known for most of my career," Murray said. "We worked together most recently on a documentary in Cuba."

Weather could delay but not cancel the flight, according to Murray.

He is hoping folks will come out to meet him as he lands in the various counties.

"If I am lucky, somewhere along the way I'll land in the grass of an old farm field," Murray said. "Maybe somebody will come out to offer me some iced tea and a nice conversation."

Aside from mechanical issues, there are a few things that could delay Murray's taking off right away from that imagined field.

"If they have peach pie and an old airplane in the barn, I'll likely stay all afternoon," Murray mused.

Phone: 330-688-0088 ext. 3146

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News Headline: The institute on the knoll | Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon
Contact Name: Feather, Carl E.
News OCR Text: April 22--Its alumni include one of the first female judges in the United States, a scholar who worked on the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, the founder of Dallas Theological Seminary, a famous Lincoln impersonator and numerous prominent attorneys, educators and lecturers.

The New Lyme Institute even came close to becoming the Kent State main campus of Ashtabula County. In 1910, the institute was a candidate for the Ohio State Normal College, a preparatory school for teachers. Politics and inducements prevailed, however, and the institute lost out to Kent, where the normal college would be nurtured into a university.

Also known as the New Lyme Seminary, Northern Ohio Collegiate and Business Institute and the Deming School, the original section of the 117-year-old institution succumbed to fire in 1995. Driving through the sleepy crossroads where the school once stood, it difficult to imagine that 300 scholars once lived and studied here.

The school was the creation of Judge William S. Deming, a prominent New Lyme Township citizen who donated the land and $3,000 in matching funds to kick start the institution in 1878. Citizens convinced of the need for quality education in their community matched Deming's contribution.

When the Northern Ohio Collegiate and Business Institute was dedicated on Aug. 21, 1879, it included a recitation hall, boys dormitory and ladies hall. The institute enrolled more students than it had dormitory space to accommodate, and residents of the community opened their homes to the scholars. It was the pride of New Lyme.

"When the first commencement exercises were held, the hearts of New Lyme citizens glowed with triumph and pride over the completion of what eventually proved to be a famous school," noted Monia Large in her 1924 history of Ashtabula County.

A fire consumed the ladies hall several years after the school opened, and the institute alumni raised $20,000 to erect Tucker Memorial Hall, "affording comfort and pleasure to young ladies attending the school." The hall honored Jacob Tuckerman, who was the institute's first president.

Tuckerman was highly esteemed -- he earned $1,000 a year and was provided a new house for his residence.

A native of Connecticut, Tuckerman came to Ohio in 1836 and studied at Kingsville Academy and Oberlin. He was a county schools superintendent and principal of Orwell Academy.

Tuckerman became institute president in 1882 and remained in that position 15 years. His associate was M.L. Hubbard, principal of the commercial department and a teacher of expression. A strong faculty further helped establish the institute's reputation for providing quality education.

Summer school

The institute also was the home of the Christy Summer School of Pedagogy, which got its start with a generous gift from the estate of James Christy.

Christy's instructions were to use his fortune for educational purposes in Ashtabula County. Both Grand River Institute and New Lyme applied for the money, about $27,000. The decision was left to the County Teachers' Institute, which convened Aug. 9, 1888, and voted to create the summer school at New Lyme.

A 1924 history notes that "the buildings of New Lyme Institute were located in picturesque and highly elevated spot, facing Lebanon Creek, and a semicircle of stately maples, and the campus is one of rare beauty."

Beauty was not enough to ensure the school's success, however.

The institute began to wither after the failed attempt to bring the normal school to New Lyme. When Judge W.S. Deming died, he left $25,000, some land and six houses to the institute. The houses were in "Newtown," one of Ashtabula County's ghost towns. The cash established an endowment, but it was insufficient to maintain the institute in the ensuing years.

When Ohio's legislature mandated that each township provide a centralized school or pay the expense of sending its students to one in another township, the institute's trustees turned over its assets to the township. The New Lyme Institute thus became the Deming School in 1923.

The four-room building offered grades one through 11; students who wanted a "12th-grade education" had to go to Ashtabula.

Space was a constant issue at the building as centralization brought in additional students. The Works Progress Administration came to the rescue in the 1930s. A gymnasium and classroom annex was added to the west side of the original building at a cost of $50,000. The annex was first used during the 1939-40 school year.

By 1955 the school had an enrollment of 369 students who lived in New Lyme and Cherry Valley townships. Anticipating continued growth, the school board added another six rooms to Deming School. But efforts to consolidate the myriad school districts in the county were under way, and Deming became part of the Pymatuning Valley Local Schools. The last class to graduate from Deming was 1961.

Construction of new schools in the PV district brought about the end of Deming School in 1973. The community purchased the building in 1974. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

The community soon realized that the huge building was too large of an obligation for a small township and returned it to the school system. Another group was organized and attempted to save the building from private acquisition, but when it went on the auction block, Transportation Brokerage System purchased the building. It was eventually purchased by New Lyme resident Ray Kampf.

The old building caught on fire the morning of Oct. 7, 1995. Only the gymnasium and annex remained by the time firefighters completed their work.

Although it has been nearly 40 years since students attended Deming, annual reunions are still held for alumni who come back to New Lyme Township to reminisce.

Copyright © 2012 Star Beacon, Ashtabula, Ohio

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News Headline: Improvement project good decision for city | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: East Liverpool City Council did the right thing in passing the proposed $1 million improvement project for the downtown area.

We've brought council members to task on some subjects, but now is the time to praise them for approving this measure.

It's a win-win for the city- spend only $30,000 and receive $1 million worth of beautification to the downtown.

The bulk of the money will come via a grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation. Kent State is putting up $150,000, and private donorship is nearly $112,000.

Basically, it was a move that would have been hard to pass up.

What's happening is that the intersection of Broadway and Fourth is receiving a facelift of sorts. The project will include new sidewalks, curbing, lighting and landscaping. The stretch of Fourth Street from Broadway to Washington will receive the same treatment, as well as some repairs done to the brick roadway.

Prior to passage, area business leaders Steve Cooper, Charles Lang and Tom Snow all supported the project. We back their stance - that Kent already has done a tremendous job with maintaining and improving its buildings and land. One look at the area where the former Smith building stood should tell you that.

It says a lot that the university was willing to contribute $150,000. They are a tremendous asset to our city.

And to those private donors who will hand over the $112,000, we salute you as well.

We couldn't put it any better than councilman Sherrie Curtis, who said "obviously, there are a lot of people concerned with the betterment of our community."

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News Headline: Practicing what they've learned (Rose) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Despite the chilly, rainy conditions Saturday afternoon, a group of students from the East Liverpool campus of Kent State University presented a special event honoring local military families in Thompson Park.

The students of Dr. Lydia Rose and her Introduction to Sociology class at KSU-East Liverpool planned the free community event, called "Moving Youth 2 Youth," to coincide with the weekend of Global Youth Service Day, April 20-22 this year. It also served as the class' final course project and an end-of-the-semester celebration before preparing for final exams next week, according to Dr. Rose.

The opening ceremony included a welcome to attendees from the students, before turning the event over to members of the Tri-State Burial Group. The group led attendees in the Pledge of Allegiance before firing off a 21-gun salute to their fallen comrades. East Liverpool Mayor James Swoger said a few words, thanking the KSU students for organizing the picnic and saying how thankful we should always be for the sacrifices made by our veterans and their families.

Rose asked her students to think of a cause that interests them and then devise a program to address the issue with members of the community. She says the causes included bullying, childhood obesity and what became the central issue of the event, honoring military families.

Rose said that the event was entirely planned and organized by the students, including the choice cause that they wished to bring attention to, selecting and securing the venue for the event, and getting the word out to the public. The students also arranged the fundraising through a silent auction held March 31 to pay for the food that was served free of charge throughout the day, as well as soliciting donations for raffle prizes.

"We wanted something that would bring the community together and involve kids," said Pam Anthony, one of Rose's students who worked signing people in at the event. Her group collaborated with first-graders from LaCroft Elementary School to make patriotic picture frames, which were distributed free to attendees.

"They made this happen out of nothing," Rose said. "They did a lot of work this year in raising awareness of their social issue, as well as gaining support for today's picnic."

Events such as this help to put the skills her students learn into real-world practice, according to Rose. "It's one thing to learn the theory, to understand the data, to recognize it as a social issue, but what can you contribute?" she said. "This is their opportunity to take what they've learned in the class and apply it."

Enjoying the picnic was U.S. Army veteran John Henry Martin, a member of the Tri-State Burial Group, and his wife Bernita, from Wellsville. "I don't think you can thank the veterans enough for their sacrifices, and I think it's wonderful that the young people are honoring them now so that they'll grow up with this mindset of honoring veterans," she said. A Vietnam-era veteran who was stationed at Fort Eustis during the Cuban Missile Crisis, Martin is a retiree of Crucible Steel and a member of American Legion Post 70 in Wellsville.

Dr. Rose said this is the third such event that was planned by her sociology class. The first was held last year for Global Youth Service Day, also in Thompson Park, with childhood obesity as its issue. "They looked at the data, saw what the rates are, what the future projections are, and saw that this is a major social issue our nation is taking on," she said.

The second, this past fall, was in a similar vein. Called C.H.O.W. (Community Health Options and Wellness), youth health and fitness was the central theme. Students went to local schools and spoke about the importance of good nutrition, exercise and making good life choices, culminating in a health rally at Westgate Middle School in December. Rose hopes for a second-annual C.H.O.W. rally this December.

Rose said her students frequently enter into the class project with trepidation, but find that they learn a lot and a gain a sense of fulfillment along the way. "Whether they know it or not at the time, I think in the future, they will know that they are empowered to make change in their community," she said.

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News Headline: Earth Day Activities | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new solar array will be dedicated today as part of an Earth Day celebration at the Wilderness Center.

The solar-powered system will be dedicated at 1 p.m.

The project is being dedicated to Arnold Fritz, a retired professor of biology at Canton's Malone College and one of the founders of the center near Wilmot on the Stark-Wayne county line.

The system is expected to produce 84,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually, enough to power 80 percent of the center's interpretive building's electrical needs.

Northeast Ohio averages four hours of sunlight per day. The system also can produce some power on cloudy days.

Over 25 years, the solar voltaic system is expected to keep 1,574 tons of carbon dioxide out of the air. That's equal to planting 27 acres of trees or not driving 5.1 million miles.

The project was funded by a grant from the Daniel M. and Maureen O. Gunn Foundation.

Here is a list of other Earth Day events in the area:

Today

Akron Zoo's Party for the Planet - 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. with exhibitors and environmentally friendly vendors. River Valley Paper Co. will recycle papers and magazines at 500 Edgewood Ave., Akron. Admission is $10 for adults, $8.50 for senior citizens and $7 for children 2 to 14. Parking is $2. 330-375-2550 or www.akronzoo.org .

Akron canal cleanup - The Akron-based Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition and AECOM will be cleaning up the Towpath Trail along the Ohio & Erie Canal from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The cleanup will run between Summit Lake and the Richard Howe House, 47 W. Exchange St. Meet at the Howe House at 9 a.m. Lunch will be served to volunteers at noon. RSVP. Contact Sarah Gibbs at 330-374-5657 or sgibbs@ohioeriecanal.org .

Portage County Environmental Conservation Awards Celebration dinner - 6 to 9 p.m. at the Kent American Legion, 1945 Mogadore Road, Kent. Keynote speaker will be Gordon Ober, chair of the Robinson Memorial Hospital board of trustees. Seven individuals and groups will be honored. Tickets are $35. Proceeds will benefit the Portage Park District Foundation, the fundraising nonprofit for the Portage Park District. For more information, contact Chris Craycroft at 330-297-7728 or ccraycroft@portageparkdistrict.org .

Medina County's 16th annual Earth Day Festival -10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Buffalo Creek Retreat off Hubbard Valley Road in Guilford Township. Exhibits, fishing, kids' activities, food and more. Additional parking at Hubbard Valley Park with free shuttles to the event. 330-722-9364.

West Branch State Park Earth Day cleanup - 9 a.m. to noon. Meet at the park's west boat ramp on Rock Spring Road in Portage County's Edinburg Township. Volunteers will be assigned areas. Dress for the weather and bring work gloves. Hot dog cookout and potluck lunch will follow the cleanup. Bring a side dish or dessert. Participants will get packets of wildflower seeds. 330-296-3239.

The Wilderness Center's Earth Day Celebration - 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. with bird walk at 8 a.m., backpacking demonstrations from 9 a.m. to noon, invasive species removal from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Nature FotoFest from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., natural burial talk at 2 p.m., planetarium show on night skies at 2 p.m. and sky watch for meteors at 8:30 p.m. Bring old cell phone to be recycled. Free. It is at 9877 Alabama Ave. SW in Sugar Creek Township. 1-877-359-5235 or www.wildernesscenter.org .

Sunday

Earth Day green ideas open house - noon to 4 p.m. at the Seiberling Nature Realm, 1828 Smith Road, Akron, with activities and crafts. Sponsored by Metro Parks, Serving Summit County. You can make your own recycled bandana. Bring water bottles, 2-liter pop bottles, lids from milk and juice containers, buttons and beads for future crafts. You can recycle paper, cell phones and accessories. 330-865-8065.

Earth Day cleanup - 1 to 4 p.m. in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. The locations will be disclosed when you register. 330-657-2299 or www.conservancyforcvnp.org .

Cleveland's 23rd annual EarthFest - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Cleveland Metroparks' Zoo. Sponsored by the Earth Day Coalition and the zoo. More than 175 exhibitors, music with 32 acts in 14 venues, refreshments at 3900 Wildlife Way on Cleveland's West Side. Theme is Local and Sustainable Food. Admission is $8 for adults and $5 for kids 2 to 11. That includes zoo and event admission. The 6-mile Walk for the Earth begins at 9 a.m. at the zoo. For more information, 216-281-6468 or www.earthdaycoalition.org .

Earth Day Celebration - 1 to 4 p.m. at Kent State University's Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Crafts, exhibits, games, demonstrations, nature walks. 330-499-9600 or www.stark.kent.edu/earthday .

Quail Hollow State Park - 1 to 5 p.m. Learn about peregrine falcons at 1 p.m., wildflower walk at 2 p.m., nature crafts, photo display. The park is at 13480 Congress Lake Road NE near Hartville. 330-877-6652 or www.quailhollow.org .

Earth Day party - 2 to 4 p.m. at the University of Mount Union's John T. Huston-Dr. John D. Brumbaugh Nature Center. The center is on Dan Street off state Route 183, six miles south of Alliance in Washington Township. 330-823-7487.

Monday

Celebrate Earth Day hike - 10 a.m. at the Shady Hollow Pavilion in Sand Run Metro Park. That's off Sand Run Parkway in northwest Akron. Sponsored by Metro Parks, Serving Summit County. 330-865-8065.

Earth Day recycling drive - 5 to 7 p.m. at Firestone Metro Parks' Coventry Oaks Pavilion, 40 Axline Ave., Akron. Sponsored by Metro Parks, Serving Summit County. Recycle papers, electronic waste, phone books, magazines, books, batteries, radios, VCRs and more. No televisions, computer monitors or small appliances. 330-867-5511 or www.summit metroparks.org .

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News Headline: 'All eyes on Andrew' -- 28-year-old art model says gig is easy money | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: His beat up Asics running shoes tossed aside, a barefooted Andrew Rihn stretched his leg muscles and swiveled his head back and forth to work the kinks out of his neck.

Art professor Chad Hansen slammed the door shut on room 134 of the Fine Arts building at Kent State University's Stark campus. The dozen students in Hansen's evening Drawing I and II classes formed a semi-circle around him as Rihn warmed up at the head of the class.

"I want you to think of the structure of the body," the professor said. "Structural lines ... organizational lines. Andrew is going to be kind of in motion. There's going to be a lot of movement."

The same group had drawn a clothed Rihn (pronounced with a long "i") a week earlier. During this session, students had to create a series of gesture-style drawings of Rihn, who would pose nude.

Hansen drew a stick-figure human body for the class on an upright easel. For Rihn, the art model, posing nude can be an incredibly intimate experience, fraught with pangs of hyper-self consciousness. For students, drawing a naked man is, at times, mechanical and clinical.

Focus on proportions, Hansen said. He sketched perpendicular lines across the stick man. The chin is halfway between the top of the head and sternum. Navel midway between sternum and waist. Knees halfway between waist and feet. The human body is roughly seven heads tall.

•••

Students returned to their drawing horses, easels and chairs, scattered about the paint-splattered concrete floor. Six men and six women sitting in haphazard angles that resembled the aftermath of a rush-hour traffic accident. Each with their own unique view of the model.

Rihn removed his gray long johns shirt. He slipped out of black sweatpants. Standing naked on a white sheet, on top of a couple of yoga mats for padding, Rihn wringed his hands and breathed deeply. He leaned to his right, placed his left hand on his left thigh and right hand on his right knee.

"Go," Hansen told the class.

It was the first of 11 poses of his choosing Rihn "hit" in this two-and-a-half hour nude session. Short poses of only a few minutes apiece to begin, then gradually longer, until he ended with a 20-minute stance.

For two years Rihn has posed for art, and for money. All of $10 an hour for clothed sessions, $12 for nude ones. Just a small supplement to income from his real jobs as a writing tutor next door at Stark State College and at Hazel's Artisan Bakery in North Canton.

His beat up Asics running shoes tossed aside, a barefooted Andrew Rihn stretched his leg muscles and swiveled his head back and forth to work the kinks out of his neck.

Art professor Chad Hansen slammed the door shut on room 134 of the Fine Arts building at Kent State University's Stark campus. The dozen students in Hansen's evening Drawing I and II classes formed a semi-circle around him as Rihn warmed up at the head of the class.

"I want you to think of the structure of the body," the professor said. "Structural lines ... organizational lines. Andrew is going to be kind of in motion. There's going to be a lot of movement."

The same group had drawn a clothed Rihn (pronounced with a long "i") a week earlier. During this session, students had to create a series of gesture-style drawings of Rihn, who would pose nude.

Hansen drew a stick-figure human body for the class on an upright easel. For Rihn, the art model, posing nude can be an incredibly intimate experience, fraught with pangs of hyper-self consciousness. For students, drawing a naked man is, at times, mechanical and clinical.

Focus on proportions, Hansen said. He sketched perpendicular lines across the stick man. The chin is halfway between the top of the head and sternum. Navel midway between sternum and waist. Knees halfway between waist and feet. The human body is roughly seven heads tall.

•••

Students returned to their drawing horses, easels and chairs, scattered about the paint-splattered concrete floor. Six men and six women sitting in haphazard angles that resembled the aftermath of a rush-hour traffic accident. Each with their own unique view of the model.

Rihn removed his gray long johns shirt. He slipped out of black sweatpants. Standing naked on a white sheet, on top of a couple of yoga mats for padding, Rihn wringed his hands and breathed deeply. He leaned to his right, placed his left hand on his left thigh and right hand on his right knee.

"Go," Hansen told the class.

It was the first of 11 poses of his choosing Rihn "hit" in this two-and-a-half hour nude session. Short poses of only a few minutes apiece to begin, then gradually longer, until he ended with a 20-minute stance.

For two years Rihn has posed for art, and for money. All of $10 an hour for clothed sessions, $12 for nude ones. Just a small supplement to income from his real jobs as a writing tutor next door at Stark State College and at Hazel's Artisan Bakery in North Canton.

•••

"I sure wouldn't want to do it," Hansen admitted. "It's a pretty vulnerable position to be in."

The 28-year-old Rihn grew up in Jackson Township. He still lives there with his parents and grandmother. He's worked his fair share of fast-food and retail jobs. Art modeling, he said, is easy money.

"At those places, if you had time to lean, you had time to clean," he said. "With this, I get paid to lean."

Rihn doesn't sport an Adonis-like physique. He stands 5-foot-3. He weighs 125 pounds. He's in the best shape of his life, though. He's training for this summer's Canton Marathon.

"Every so often, I get this sense of how everyone is staring at me, and I might suck in my stomach," he said.

Friends laugh at his side gig.

He doesn't mind.

Rihn is a poet at heart. He loves all the arts. He takes his job as an art model quite seriously. A few weeks ago at the Cleveland Museum of Art, he even found himself discreetly posing alongside numerous nude sculptures - practicing new moves for his repertoire.

•••

Following a class bathroom break, Rihn began extended poses. Right leg out, he leaned forward on his left knee. He stared at the ground. His straight black hair separated at its part. A pair of 65-watt floodlights to his left and right illuminated and shaded his body, depending on the artist's viewpoint. An electric heater purred on the floor, inches from the stubble on his face and above his lip.

"Oh, boy that was stupid," he thought.

All his weight on one leg was a mistake. Cramps and limbs that fall asleep are his only real enemies. There was no turning back. His stomach moved in and out with each breath. The rest of his body was static. Rihn held the pose for five minutes to the sandpaper-like scratching sound of a dozen charcoal pencils drawing in unison on 18-by-24-inch paper.

Students intermittently held their pencils in front of their eyes, to plumb bob Rihn's naked body. They measured the distance from one body part to the next, examining every inch of him in the process.

Except for an occasional yawn or an itch that had to be scratched, Rihn remained statue-like.

On pose number 10, a 15-minute stance, he sat on a sheet-covered wooden platform. His left arm on his left knee. Right wrist on right knee. An old broom handle, served as a prop, at a 45-degree angle, extended from the floor in front of him, beneath his left arm and over his shoulder.

"With this pose, there's going to be a lot of foreshortening going on," Hansen alerted his students. That meant only that Rihn's position made his body appear compressed and certain body parts distorted.

•••

"I am so hungry," he thought over and over during his poses.

"French baguette, mmm ... Irish cheese ... yum."

After class, Rihn planned to visit a female friend. He'd take the bread, cheese and a movie with him. She'd cook dinner, a surprise dish.

During every class bathroom break, Rihn slipped back into his clothes. A female student came up to apologize during one. Her drawings, she said, looked nothing like him. Not a problem, he told her.

"Bigger biceps; when in doubt always add bigger biceps and six-pack abs," he said with a grin.

For his final pose, Rihn positioned the wooden handle behind the back of his neck. His outstretched hands rested on top of it. His left leg forward, foot on a pillow. His right leg straight down.

As the minutes ticked, he felt his arms fall asleep.

Hansen, the professor, spoke to student Melissa Stark about her drawing. He made suggestions. She stepped back for a longer view. She alternately eyeballed Rihn and her drawing. Perhaps it's the incessant odor of paint thinner that hovers in the room. Or maybe it's that students tend to get punchy by the end of the night. She busted out in laughter.

"I made adorable little munchkin legs on him," she announced.

Even Rihn couldn't hold back a laugh.

Five minutes later the class ended. Rihn dressed.

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News Headline: Earth Day turns 42: Focus on fracking at KSU Stark - Canton, OH - CantonRep.com | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -

Earth Day to Sen. Oelslager: How do you feel about a moratorium to end fracking?

State Sen. Scott Oelslager, R-Canton, may have received an unusual amount of voicemails for a Sunday, as local environmental groups provided a cellphone, and even dialed it, so those against hydraulic fracturing could leave a message for him.

"We want to fill up his mailbox. It's Earth Day. It seems appropriate," said Eric Vaughan of Canton.

He and his wife, Kristine Vaughan, participated in Kent State University Stark Campus' annual Earth Day Celebration as part of the organization called Food and Water Watch.

Their hope, they said, was to persuade Oelslager to support Ohio Senate Bill 213, a moratorium on horizontal fracking by the oil and gas industry.

The Vaughans' table was sponsored by TASK (Take Action Spread Knowledge), represented by Kristen Kolar of Akron and Tonya Higgins of Canton.

"We work on a variety of issues. We're focusing on fracking because it is happening right now in our own backyard," Kolar said.

Their third table at the event covered the H.W. Hoover Initiative at Kent, which hosts a class on environmental media. Students create a media presentation of clean water and challenges facing the local watershed.

The Earth Day Celebration is the school's fifth, said Jenny Huth, special events coordinator at Kent Stark.

Each year since the dedication of the school's pond and wetlands, the school has planted a new tree on Earth Day. This year, Greg Walker planted a Black Tupelo, also known as a black gum.

Huth was happy to welcome new participants, including Canton Country Day School and the Canton Museum of Art.

M.J. and Pat Albacete helped children create GeoArt with cardboard pieces and lots of tape.

"Look, the kids are having fun, and they don't even realize they are being educated," Pat said.

Some families watched storyteller Tess Shimko who presented, "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle," and educational show about recycling, that included singing and audience participation.

Cathy Burns and Kate McCallum were on hand with the Green Apple Project, teaching people how to save energy and change habits.

"College kids are the key," said McCallum who explained that if she can persuade that age group to develop new energy-saving habits, as they become the leaders, the world will follow suit.

At the end of the Kent lot was Ryan Cockrill from the Stark County Health Department, who said, with a laugh "I'm showing the programs we have, like water well and septic testing. But mostly trying to stay warm and not freeze to death."

Earth Day to Sen. Oelslager: How do you feel about a moratorium to end fracking?

State Sen. Scott Oelslager, R-Canton, may have received an unusual amount of voicemails for a Sunday, as local environmental groups provided a cellphone, and even dialed it, so those against hydraulic fracturing could leave a message for him.

"We want to fill up his mailbox. It's Earth Day. It seems appropriate," said Eric Vaughan of Canton.

He and his wife, Kristine Vaughan, participated in Kent State University Stark Campus' annual Earth Day Celebration as part of the organization called Food and Water Watch.

Their hope, they said, was to persuade Oelslager to support Ohio Senate Bill 213, a moratorium on horizontal fracking by the oil and gas industry.

The Vaughans' table was sponsored by TASK (Take Action Spread Knowledge), represented by Kristen Kolar of Akron and Tonya Higgins of Canton.

"We work on a variety of issues. We're focusing on fracking because it is happening right now in our own backyard," Kolar said.

Their third table at the event covered the H.W. Hoover Initiative at Kent, which hosts a class on environmental media. Students create a media presentation of clean water and challenges facing the local watershed.

The Earth Day Celebration is the school's fifth, said Jenny Huth, special events coordinator at Kent Stark.

Each year since the dedication of the school's pond and wetlands, the school has planted a new tree on Earth Day. This year, Greg Walker planted a Black Tupelo, also known as a black gum.

Huth was happy to welcome new participants, including Canton Country Day School and the Canton Museum of Art.

M.J. and Pat Albacete helped children create GeoArt with cardboard pieces and lots of tape.

"Look, the kids are having fun, and they don't even realize they are being educated," Pat said.

Some families watched storyteller Tess Shimko who presented, "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle," and educational show about recycling, that included singing and audience participation.

Cathy Burns and Kate McCallum were on hand with the Green Apple Project, teaching people how to save energy and change habits.

"College kids are the key," said McCallum who explained that if she can persuade that age group to develop new energy-saving habits, as they become the leaders, the world will follow suit.

At the end of the Kent lot was Ryan Cockrill from the Stark County Health Department, who said, with a laugh "I'm showing the programs we have, like water well and septic testing. But mostly trying to stay warm and not freeze to death."

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News Headline: Earth Day turns 42: Focus on fracking at KSU Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TWP. -

Earth Day to Sen. Oelslager: How do you feel about a moratorium to end fracking?

State Sen. Scott Oelslager, R-Canton, may have received an unusual amount of voicemails for a Sunday, as local environmental groups provided a cellphone, and even dialed it, so those against hydraulic fracturing could leave a message for him.

"We want to fill up his mailbox. It's Earth Day. It seems appropriate," said Eric Vaughan of Canton.

He and his wife, Kristine Vaughan, participated in Kent State University Stark Campus' annual Earth Day Celebration as part of the organization called Food and Water Watch.

Their hope, they said, was to persuade Oelslager to support Ohio Senate Bill 213, a moratorium on horizontal fracking by the oil and gas industry.

The Vaughans' table was sponsored by TASK (Take Action Spread Knowledge), represented by Kristen Kolar of Akron and Tonya Higgins of Canton.

"We work on a variety of issues. We're focusing on fracking because it is happening right now in our own backyard," Kolar said.

Their third table at the event covered the H.W. Hoover Initiative at Kent, which hosts a class on environmental media. Students create a media presentation of clean water and challenges facing the local watershed.

The Earth Day Celebration is the school's fifth, said Jenny Huth, special events coordinator at Kent Stark.

Each year since the dedication of the school's pond and wetlands, the school has planted a new tree on Earth Day. This year, Greg Walker planted a Black Tupelo, also known as a black gum.

Huth was happy to welcome new participants, including Canton Country Day School and the Canton Museum of Art.

M.J. and Pat Albacete helped children create GeoArt with cardboard pieces and lots of tape.

"Look, the kids are having fun, and they don't even realize they are being educated," Pat said.

Some families watched storyteller Tess Shimko who presented, "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle," and educational show about recycling, that included singing and audience participation.

Cathy Burns and Kate McCallum were on hand with the Green Apple Project, teaching people how to save energy and change habits.

"College kids are the key," said McCallum who explained that if she can persuade that age group to develop new energy-saving habits, as they become the leaders, the world will follow suit.

At the end of the Kent lot was Ryan Cockrill from the Stark County Health Department, who said, with a laugh "I'm showing the programs we have, like water well and septic testing. But mostly trying to stay warm and not freeze to death."

Earth Day to Sen. Oelslager: How do you feel about a moratorium to end fracking?

State Sen. Scott Oelslager, R-Canton, may have received an unusual amount of voicemails for a Sunday, as local environmental groups provided a cellphone, and even dialed it, so those against hydraulic fracturing could leave a message for him.

"We want to fill up his mailbox. It's Earth Day. It seems appropriate," said Eric Vaughan of Canton.

He and his wife, Kristine Vaughan, participated in Kent State University Stark Campus' annual Earth Day Celebration as part of the organization called Food and Water Watch.

Their hope, they said, was to persuade Oelslager to support Ohio Senate Bill 213, a moratorium on horizontal fracking by the oil and gas industry.

The Vaughans' table was sponsored by TASK (Take Action Spread Knowledge), represented by Kristen Kolar of Akron and Tonya Higgins of Canton.

"We work on a variety of issues. We're focusing on fracking because it is happening right now in our own backyard," Kolar said.

Their third table at the event covered the H.W. Hoover Initiative at Kent, which hosts a class on environmental media. Students create a media presentation of clean water and challenges facing the local watershed.

The Earth Day Celebration is the school's fifth, said Jenny Huth, special events coordinator at Kent Stark.

Each year since the dedication of the school's pond and wetlands, the school has planted a new tree on Earth Day. This year, Greg Walker planted a Black Tupelo, also known as a black gum.

Huth was happy to welcome new participants, including Canton Country Day School and the Canton Museum of Art.

M.J. and Pat Albacete helped children create GeoArt with cardboard pieces and lots of tape.

"Look, the kids are having fun, and they don't even realize they are being educated," Pat said.

Some families watched storyteller Tess Shimko who presented, "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle," and educational show about recycling, that included singing and audience participation.

Cathy Burns and Kate McCallum were on hand with the Green Apple Project, teaching people how to save energy and change habits.

"College kids are the key," said McCallum who explained that if she can persuade that age group to develop new energy-saving habits, as they become the leaders, the world will follow suit.

At the end of the Kent lot was Ryan Cockrill from the Stark County Health Department, who said, with a laugh "I'm showing the programs we have, like water well and septic testing. But mostly trying to stay warm and not freeze to death."

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News Headline: Barbershoppers prepare to hit the campaign trail | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Photo provided by George Telle Bob Wallace (left), Walt Linder, Merle King, Craig Carnes and Earl Littlefield will join other members of the Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus for the group's show April 28.

Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus will present its annual show, “The Harmony Party,” at 3 p.m. April 28 in the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia.

The show will feature chorus members deciding to run a barbershopper for president of the United States.

Parodies written by director Robert Wallace will be featured when the chorus members hold a nominating convention, with the Dover High drum line assisting.

Scott Robinson will appear as a TV network anchor.

The show's second half will feature guest quartets The Allies and Maverick. The Allies placed first and Maverick second in the recent Johnny Appleseed District quartet contest. They now are qualified to participate in the Barbershop International Contest which will be held in Portland, Ore., in July.

Schoenbrunn's VLQ (Very Large Quartet) also will perform.

Tickets are $12.50 for adults, $11 for seniors age 60 and older, $6 for students (of any age) and $10 for groups of 10 or more.

Tickets for the afterglow party to be held in the student union at the conclusion of the show are $9. Tickets for groups must be purchased in advance.

Tickets can be purchased at the Performing Arts Center box office, by calling 330-308-6400 or online at ww.kent.edu/pac.

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News Headline: Cooking for a good cause | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA -

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia will feature a performance of a different kind May 5 when Community Hospice  presents Culinary Capers.

The evening will begin with a social hour from 6 to 7 p.m. featuring an array of appetizers.

A cash bar will be available.

Dinner music will be provided by Jerome James and members of Dover High's Key Club will assist as guides and servers. Each chef will receive a Culinary Capers apron donated by Helbling's Supply and embroidered by Deb Collins.

Professional chefs who will participate are:
Bob Giannetti, general manager of Union Country Club.
Bob Lolli, chef at Union Country Club.
Patrick Pretorius, chef at Antonioes Restaurant in Zoar.
Matthew Ridgway, chef at Hennis Care Centre in Bolivar.
Brian Sarty, chef at Hennis Care Center in Dover.
Kent Welsh, owner and chef at The Table restaurant in Millersburg.

Also participating will be Joy and Dave Dawson, Cyl Krocker and Deb Collins, Allison Roberts and Scott Bowman, Willi and Jerry Marlowe, Jeff and Heidi Ross, Calvin and Barbara Schwartz, C.J. and Trish Shamp, Suzanna Strauss and Trent and Michelle Yoder.

A live auction will be conducted by Steve Cronebaugh and will feature a variety of unique dinners and other items.

Tickets are $50 and are available at the Community Hospice office at 716 Commercial Ave. SW, New Philadelphia, or by calling the office at  330-343-7605. All proceeds from Culinary Capers are used to benefit patient care.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Rarity in Peril reptile show | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Rainforest Reptile Shows will present Rarity in Peril at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 20 at the Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center.

The program includes a presentation of endangered reptiles and amphibians from around the world, such as a rare white alligator and artifact displays from herpetologists.

Audience members will also have an opportunity to ask reptile and amphibian experts questions.

Tickets are $10 and can be purchased online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pacor or by visiting the Performing Arts Center Box Office, 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-7473.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Rarity in Peril reptile show | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Matt Alpert
News OCR Text: Rainforest Reptile Shows will present Rarity in Peril at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 20 at the Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center.

The program includes a presentation of endangered reptiles and amphibians from around the world, such as a rare white alligator and artifact displays from herpetologists.

Audience members will also have an opportunity to ask reptile and amphibian experts questions.

Tickets are $10 and can be purchased online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pacor or by visiting the Performing Arts Center Box Office, 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-7473.

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News Headline: WIPO PUBLISHES PATENT OF KENT STATE UNIVERSITY | Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Title of the invention: "A LIQUID CRYSTAL COMPOSITION CONTAINING CHIRAL DOPANT, DEVICE THEREOF, AND METHODS THEREOF."

Applicants: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (US).

Inventors: Quan Li (US), Yannian Li (US) and Ji Ma (US).

According to the abstract posted by the World Intellectual Property Organization: "The invention provides a liquid crystal composition comprising at least a liquid crystal host and at least a chiral dopant.The composition can exhibit a stationary reflection of at least red, green, and blue colors.The composition exhibits reversible color change, faster phototuning time, lower concentration of chiral dopant, and wider color spectrum, among others.The invention also provides a LC device, a method of controlling the stationary reflection of the liquid crystal composition, and a method of processing information."

The patent was filed on Oct.11, 2011 under Application No.PCT/US2011/055661.

For further information please visit: http://www.wipo.int/patentscope/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2012051127

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: KSU delegation visits Senior High to see Algebra Project work (Brown, McEwan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online
Contact Name: Larry Gibbs Special to the News Journal
News OCR Text: MANSFIELD -- A delegation from Kent State University watched this week as Mansfield Senior High School math teacher Amanda Clawson led her Algebra Project junior class in analyzing two equations.

"How are they different? How are they the same?" Clawson asked.

Hands were raised at five tables where groups of three students worked together. The 15 students, identified as at-risk for passing math as freshmen, have been with Clawson for three years. The program is part of a partnership among Mansfield City Schools, The Ohio State University at Mansfield and The Algebra Project, a national, nonprofit math initiative.

"We're here to learn more about how you are utilizing The Algebra Project. This is a fact-finding visit for us," said Alfreda Brown, Kent State vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion. "Potentially, Kent State University could be involved in implementing The Algebra Project in the Cleveland Metropolitan Schools and other districts."

Joining Clawson in the classroom were two members of the OSU-Mansfield faculty: Lee McEwan, professor of mathematics, and Terri Bucci, associate professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning.

"The reason for Kent State's interest in The Algebra Project is straight-forward. The university takes many students from the Cleveland area and they are interested in programs that may help kids from that region," said McEwan, who has been involved with the program here since its inception.

In September, Senior High started a second Algebra Project class, a group of at-risk freshmen taught by Candee Morris. Like Clawson's class, Morris' group meets for back-to-back periods five days a week. They will remain together throughout high school.

Older Algebra Project students participate in a companion program, the Young Peoples Project, in which they receive a minimum hourly wage to provide after-school math tutoring to elementary students.

After meeting privately with Clawson and Morris, the Kent State party traveled to Sherman Elementary School to watch the tutoring in action.

Superintendent Dan Freund and Principal Brian Garverick welcomed the Kent State administrators.

"We are glad to share our success with The Algebra Project," Freund said. "In addition to directly helping at-risk high school students, we are incorporating algebraic thinking into our math-teaching strategies in the elementary and intermediate grades. These new classroom strategies, in conjunction with coaching from Ohio State University-Mansfield, directly address the Ohio Department of Education's revised common core standards."

William Crombie, The Algebra Project's national director for professional development, participated in two recent two-day workshops for district math teachers.

In addition to Brown, the Kent State delegation included:

» Fashaad Crawford, associated vice president, planning, assessment and research management.

» Andrew Tonge, chairperson, mathematical science.

» Richard Day, director, corporate and foundation relations.

» Angela Sass, senior corporate and foundation relations officer.

Larry Gibbs, a spokesman for Mansfield City Schools, can be reached at lgibbs@mansfield.k12.oh.us.

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News Headline: Department of Pan-African Studies Holds "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World" Conference | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Department of Pan-African Studies Holds "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World" Conference

Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies is hosting the conference "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World" on April 27, from 8 a.m. " 6 p.m., at Ritchie Hall on the university's main campus. There will be eight open sessions and the keynote address presented by Sylviane Diouf, Ph.D. After the conference, Reggae Night with Akron's Rhodes Street Rude Boys will be held in the Kent Student Center's Rathskeller. For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/CAS/PAS/conference/index.cfm.

Cost: $20. Students and faculty are eligible to have the fee waived.

Contact: Wendy Wilson-Fall, 330-672-0142, wwilson1@kent.edu

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News Headline: DEPARTMENT OF PAN-AFRICAN STUDIES HOLDS CONFERENCE | Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies is hosting the conference "Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World" on April 26 and 27 at Ritchie Hall.

The keynote speaker is Sylviane Diouf, Ph.D., author of the renowned book "Dreams of Africa in Alabama," which won the 2009 James F.Sulzby Award of the Alabama Historical Association, was a 2008 Finalist Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and won the 2007 Wesley-Logan Prize of the American Historical Association.She is also author of the acclaimed book "Servants of Allah: African Muslims Enslaved in the Americas." Diouf is currently curator at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.Her address is titled "Deconstructing and Reconstructing Africans' Identities During Slavery."

April 26's events are from 3 p.m.to 7 p.m., which are a faculty workshop and reception.Events on April 27 include eight open sessions (see below) and the keynote address, lasting from 8 a.m to 6 p.m.

After the conference, Reggae Night with Akron's Rhodes Street Rude Boys will be held in the Kent Student Center's Rathskeller.

Conference registration is $20.Students and faculty are eligible to have the fee waived.

For more information on the conference, please visit www.kent.edu/CAS/PAS/conference/index.cfm.For general information about the Department of Pan-African Studies at Kent State, please visit www.kent.edu/cas/pas.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Egypt's dire economy looms over elections (Stacher) | Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Christian Science Monitor
Contact Name: Murphy, Dan
News OCR Text: Egypt's unfinished revolution has ushered in an era of political uncertainty like nothing the country has seen since the 1950s, when Gamal Abdel Nasser mobilized millions of his countrymen and millions more across the region in support of pan-Arab nationalism and defiance of the region's old colonial powers.

Egypt's politics are once again rolling along, with the backroom machinations of generals, Islamists, and the surviving old guard from the Mubarak era punctuated by street protests and howls of complaint over opaque election rules and interference with efforts to write a new constitution. The country now heads towards a presidential election scheduled for May 23 with every thing to play for, and much uncertainty about the outcome and its eventual meaning.

But amid all this, one thing is certain: The Egyptian economy is in dire shape, and not due to get better any time soon, the promises of presidential hopefuls like Amr Moussa notwithstanding. This week, the International Monetary Fund (which usually skews its predictions in a positive direction) predicted anemic Egyptian economic growth of 1.5 percent this year, 9.5 percent inflation, and 1 million new workers added to the ranks of the unemployed.

Egypt's economic problems are a threat to a transition to a new, stable, and democratic system. Politicians are making promises, and many hopeful Egyptians will take them at their word. But if politicians fail to deliver on what is a daunting task, new rounds of upheaval could well follow, uglier and more strident than the joyous crowds that filled Cairo's Tahrir Square and public spaces across the country last year.

And with Egypt the Arab world's largest country, which still casts a long shadow over regional politics and trends, that could have broader implications. Monarchs and other autocrats, who argue that stability is far more valuable than risky democratic change, would be bolstered. Influential external actors like the US, whose support for political change in the region has been tepid and uneven, could back off even further.

How bad is the situation? Egyptian government finances have been devastated in the past year. Rich Egyptians have stashed ever more of their cash outside of their country, tourism has plunged (down 32 percent in the last quarter of 2012) and foreign investment has collapsed (down 72 percent in the third quarter of last year).

Egypt's military junta currently has a request in with the IMF for a $3.2 billion loan. IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde told reporters before the start of IMF and World Bank meetings in Washington this morning that even if the loan goes through "it will not be sufficient. And everybody knows that." She says Egypt will need aid from other sources.

The problem is that Egypt's foreign reserves have tumbled to $15 billion from $36 billion before protests erupted against Mubarak in January 2011. Foreign currency reserves are used by central banks to manage the value of their domestic currencies, among other things. The Egyptian pound is now a knife's edge.

Belt-tightening elsewhere doesn't seem to be much of an option. The financial needs of Egypt are growing, with millions relying on government food subsidies to get by. About 40 percent of Egypt's 80 million people live on $2 a day. Political change may have come, but the investment climate remains as bureaucratic and corrupt as ever. By some accounts, it's getting worse.

Egyptian pound steady - for nowStrapped finances and corrupt business dealings are going to be economic facts of life challenging whatever constellation of powers guides Egypt in the coming years. Through the turmoil of the past year, the Egyptian pound has held surprisingly firm, now trading at about 6 pounds to the dollar. But currency pressure is likely to grow.

In September, the Bank for International settlements reported that $6.4 billion in Egyptian banks was moved offshore in the previous quarter, a 26 percent increase. Investors of all stripes hate uncertainty, and a major increase in investment is hard to imagine until some kind of stable and predictable order emerges. This affects everything from billion-dollar factory investments to local entrepreneurs thinking of shaking lose a little extra capital to expand.

Take Mohamed Rashed, general manager of Club Aldo, an Egyptian shoe retailer with 28 national branches. He says the firm was expanding by about 10 percent a year before the revolution, and was opening about two new branches a year. During the revolution, several of its stores were looted and burned. Since, there's been no growth or expansion.

"You need safety, you need a good environment to grow businesses," he says. "We are waiting to see if things are going to get better or worse. Everyone is waiting for a new government and a new president. Everyone is afraid to bring money from outside."

Growing tensions between military, Muslim BrotherhoodIndeed, Egypt's messy political transition has gotten messier. In recent weeks, a court dissolved the body appointed by parliament to write a new constitution, the ruling generals suggested they'd disqualify an Islamist frontrunner, and the Islamist-dominated parliament, in turn, started to maneuver to block the candidacy of Omar Suleiman, a retired general and former confidante of Mr. Mubarak.

Rumors, accusations, and dire warnings have been flying back and forth, with tension rising between the Muslim Brotherhood, who won the lion's share of seats in the parliamentary election, and a military establishment trying to shield its historic financial and legal privilege.

Where this is all ends is impossible to predict. The military gives every indication that it won't quietly cede authority over its affairs to civilians, not least its sprawling, opaque, and expanding network of commercial interests. The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), in turn, is growing edgy over the military's political muscle-flexing, and has been increasingly strident in warnings about antidemocratic machinations from the men in uniform.

The military has also been expanding its role in the economy, says Kent State Political Scientist Josh Stacher, who recently completed a paper on "Egypt's Generals and International Capital" with Shana Marshall. The military has done this by moving against other powers in the private sector, particularly those who had been close to the former president and his son, Gamal.

The military, Prof. Stacher says, likes the profit part of capitalism just fine, but not the competition part. Senior generals have set themselves up as major gate-keepers for investment, which will add to costs and corruption going forward, he argues.

"The uprising gave [the military] a chance to eliminate rivals," says Stacher, who says the military's crackdown on corruption appears to be selective. "This is terrible for competitiveness, access to capital is now even more dependent on [the military]. They're interested in neoliberal profits, not neoliberal GDP growth. "

Dissension over emergency IMF loanEgypt's military-led government is currently negotiating an emergency loan of $3.2 billion with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), but that will only prove a stopgap for the constant, grinding need to pay for Egypt's subsidized bread and fuel.

The cash could be released before the start of Egypt's new fiscal year on June 30. But the IMF is demanding unspecified "reforms" and buy-in from all of Egypt's major political players before signing on the dotted line.

And the Muslim Brotherhood, for the moment, is balking at giving the military carte blanche. "We told them [the government], you have two choices: Either postpone this issue of borrowing and come up with any other way of dealing with it without our approval, or speed up the formation of a government," Khairat al-Shater, the Muslim Brotherhood's principal presidential candidate, told Reuters in early April.

Mr. Shater is fighting a challenge against his eligibility to run for president. The successful businessman and Brotherhood strategist served four years in prison for his political activism in the waning years of the Mubarak regime and was only released a year ago, which could be used to disqualify him from running for office.

He's been pressing the point that the military doesn't have the standing to negotiate important deals on behalf of Egypt, since it is due to be replaced by a new president by the end of June. "It is not logical.... I have to agree to a loan, somebody else gets to spend it, then I have to pay it back? That is unjust."

Magda Kandil, executive director of the Egyptian Center for Economic Studies, says Egypt needs the IMF's cash, fast. "In the absence of resumption of natural sources of foreign income and containment of the outflow of capital.... I think the only hope is to strike a deal with the IMF to get a badly needed cushion." An IMF loan might also encourage other lenders and investors to return, she says.

While it's easy to talk about cutting spending in times of financial crisis, Egypt has very little wiggle room.

The Egyptian government is the largest wheat buyer in the world, spending $3 billion on it last year, and government fuel subsidies are projected to cost $16 billion this year, though that could easily rise depending on the global market. All told, government subsidies each year are equal to about 10 percent of GDP.

While international economists have long argued that the fuel subsidy, in particular, leads to inefficient consumption and should be replaced with measures that target Egypt's neediest, the cost of fuel – used to transport food from farm to market – affects the cost of everything. A sharp increase in gasoline costs would stoke inflation, while unemployment remains high, raising the likelihood of major social unrest.

Copyright © 2012 The Christian Science Monitor

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News Headline: Egypt's dire economy looms over elections (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Axcess News
Contact Name: Dan Murphy
News OCR Text: Egypt's unfinished revolution has ushered in an era of political uncertainty like nothing the country has seen since the 1950s, when Gamal Abdel Nasser mobilized millions of his countrymen and millions more across the region in support of pan-Arab nationalism and defiance of the region's old colonial powers.

Egypt's politics are once again rolling along, with the backroom machinations of generals, Islamists, and the surviving old guard from the Mubarak era punctuated by street protests and howls of complaint over opaque election rules and interference with efforts to write a new constitution. The country now heads towards a presidential election scheduled for May 23 with every thing to play for, and much uncertainty about the outcome and its eventual meaning.

But amid all this, one thing is certain: The Egyptian economy is in dire shape, and not due to get better any time soon, the promises of presidential hopefuls like Amr Moussa notwithstanding. This week, the International Monetary Fund (which usually skews its predictions in a positive direction) predicted anemic Egyptian economic growth of 1.5 percent this year, 9.5 percent inflation, and 1 million new workers added to the ranks of the unemployed.

Egypt's economic problems are a threat to a transition to a new, stable, and democratic system. Politicians are making promises, and many hopeful Egyptians will take them at their word. But if politicians fail to deliver on what is a daunting task, new rounds of upheaval could well follow, uglier and more strident than the joyous crowds that filled Cairo's Tahrir Square and public spaces across the country last year.

And with Egypt the Arab world's largest country, which still casts a long shadow over regional politics and trends, that could have broader implications. Monarchs and other autocrats, who argue that stability is far more valuable than risky democratic change, would be bolstered. Influential external actors like the US, whose support for political change in the region has been tepid and uneven, could back off even further.

How bad is the situation? Egyptian government finances have been devastated in the past year. Rich Egyptians have stashed ever more of their cash outside of their country, tourism has plunged (down 32 percent in the last quarter of 2012) and foreign investment has collapsed (down 72 percent in the third quarter of last year).

Egypt's military junta currently has a request in with the IMF for a $3.2 billion loan. IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde told reporters before the start of IMF and World Bank meetings in Washington this morning that even if the loan goes through "it will not be sufficient. And everybody knows that." She says Egypt will need aid from other sources.

The problem is that Egypt's foreign reserves have tumbled to $15 billion from $36 billion before protests erupted against Mubarak in January 2011. Foreign currency reserves are used by central banks to manage the value of their domestic currencies, among other things. The Egyptian pound is now a knife's edge.

Belt-tightening elsewhere doesn't seem to be much of an option. The financial needs of Egypt are growing, with millions relying on government food subsidies to get by. About 40 percent of Egypt's 80 million people live on $2 a day. Political change may have come, but the investment climate remains as bureaucratic and corrupt as ever. By some accounts, it's getting worse.

Egyptian pound steady - for now

Strapped finances and corrupt business dealings are going to be economic facts of life challenging whatever constellation of powers guides Egypt in the coming years. Through the turmoil of the past year, the Egyptian pound has held surprisingly firm, now trading at about 6 pounds to the dollar. But currency pressure is likely to grow.

In September, the Bank for International settlements reported that $6.4 billion in Egyptian banks was moved offshore in the previous quarter, a 26 percent increase. Investors of all stripes hate uncertainty, and a major increase in investment is hard to imagine until some kind of stable and predictable order emerges. This affects everything from billion-dollar factory investments to local entrepreneurs thinking of shaking lose a little extra capital to expand.

Take Mohamed Rashed, general manager of Club Aldo, an Egyptian shoe retailer with 28 national branches. He says the firm was expanding by about 10 percent a year before the revolution, and was opening about two new branches a year. During the revolution, several of its stores were looted and burned.

Since, there's been no growth or expansion.

“You need safety, you need a good environment to grow businesses,” he says. “We are waiting to see if things are going to get better or worse. Everyone is waiting for a new government and a new president. Everyone is afraid to bring money from outside.”

Growing tensions between military, Muslim Brotherhood

Indeed, Egypt's messy political transition has gotten messier. In recent weeks, a court dissolved the body appointed by parliament to write a new constitution, the ruling generals suggested they'd disqualify an Islamist frontrunner, and the Islamist-dominated parliament, in turn, started to maneuver to block the candidacy of Omar Suleiman, a retired general and former confidante of Mr. Mubarak.

Rumors, accusations, and dire warnings have been flying back and forth, with tension rising between the Muslim Brotherhood, who won the lion's share of seats in the parliamentary election, and a military establishment trying to shield its historic financial and legal privilege.

Where this is all ends is impossible to predict. The military gives every indication that it won't quietly cede authority over its affairs to civilians, not least its sprawling, opaque, and expanding network of commercial interests. The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), in turn, is growing edgy over the military's political muscle-flexing, and has been increasingly strident in warnings about antidemocratic machinations from the men in uniform.

The military has also been expanding its role in the economy, says Kent State Political Scientist Josh Stacher, who recently completed a paper on “Egypt's Generals and International Capital” with Shana Marshall. The military has done this by moving against other powers in the private sector, particularly those who had been close to the former president and his son, Gamal.

The military, Prof. Stacher says, likes the profit part of capitalism just fine, but not the competition part. Senior generals have set themselves up as major gate-keepers for investment, which will add to costs and corruption going forward, he argues.

“The uprising gave [the military] a chance to eliminate rivals,” says Stacher, who says the military's crackdown on corruption appears to be selective. “This is terrible for competitiveness, access to capital is now even more dependent on [the military]. They're interested in neoliberal profits, not neoliberal GDP growth. “

Dissension over emergency IMF loan

Egypt's military-led government is currently negotiating an emergency loan of $3.2 billion with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), but that will only prove a stopgap for the constant, grinding need to pay for Egypt's subsidized bread and fuel.

The cash could be released before the start of Egypt's new fiscal year on June 30. But the IMF is demanding unspecified “reforms” and buy-in from all of Egypt's major political players before signing on the dotted line.

And the Muslim Brotherhood, for the moment, is balking at giving the military carte blanche. “We told them [the government], you have two choices: Either postpone this issue of borrowing and come up with any other way of dealing with it without our approval, or speed up the formation of a government,” Khairat al-Shater, the Muslim Brotherhood's principal presidential candidate, told Reuters in early April.

Mr. Shater is fighting a challenge against his eligibility to run for president. The successful businessman and Brotherhood strategist served four years in prison for his political activism in the waning years of the Mubarak regime and was only released a year ago, which could be used to disqualify him from running for office.

He's been pressing the point that the military doesn't have the standing to negotiate important deals on behalf of Egypt, since it is due to be replaced by a new president by the end of June. “It is not logical.... I have to agree to a loan, somebody else gets to spend it, then I have to pay it back? That is unjust.”

Magda Kandil, executive director of the Egyptian Center for Economic Studies, says Egypt needs the IMF's cash, fast. “In the absence of resumption of natural sources of foreign income and containment of the outflow of capital.... I think the only hope is to strike a deal with the IMF to get a badly needed cushion.” An IMF loan might also encourage other lenders and investors to return, she says.

While it's easy to talk about cutting spending in times of financial crisis, Egypt has very little wiggle room.

The Egyptian government is the largest wheat buyer in the world, spending $3 billion on it last year, and government fuel subsidies are projected to cost $16 billion this year, though that could easily rise depending on the global market. All told, government subsidies each year are equal to about 10 percent of GDP.

While international economists have long argued that the fuel subsidy, in particular, leads to inefficient consumption and should be replaced with measures that target Egypt's neediest, the cost of fuel - used to transport food from farm to market - affects the cost of everything. A sharp increase in gasoline costs would stoke inflation, while unemployment remains high, raising the likelihood of major social unrest.

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News Headline: WhiteHot 5K race slated at KSU April 29 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LT Ashley White-Stumpf, an Army ROTC cadet and Kent State University graduate who was killed last year while serving in Afghanistan, will be honored during the first WhiteHot 5K on April 29.

Proceeds from the race will go into a scholarship fund in White-Stumpf's name to aid future cadets in the KSU ROTC program.

Each registered participant will receive a bib, t-shirt and post-race refreshments. Bibs and t-shirts can be picked up on race day between 7 and 7:45 a.m. at Terrace Hall on campus. The race will begin at 8:30 a.m.

Register online at www.zapevent.com/ListActivities.aspx?eventid=2145

For more information about the race, e-mail jabate1@kent.kent.edu.

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News Headline: Order restored in Kent as police break up gathering of students at College Fest | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: MATT HAFLEY, DAILY KENT STATER A College Fest party-goer gestures to police as they clear College Avenue Saturday night.

KENT, Ohio -- Kent police worked to disperse thousands of college students partying at an annual event dubbed College Fest on Saturday night after beer bottles started flying, fights broke out and couches were set on fire.

Kent police refused to comment on whether arrests were made or if anybody was hurt. But videos and photos online appear to show arrests being made and party-goers with injuries.

The department, along with other area law enforcement and SWAT, was keeping an eye on the block-party event, which in the past has resulted in riots and caused property damage.

Jacob Byk, Daily Kent Stater A Kent police officer escorts an injured party-goer Saturday after a fight broke out at College Fest in Kent.

In 2009, more than 65 students were arrested during the festival.

Students flooded social media Web sites Saturday with photos and videos of a crowd of thousands in the College Avenue neighborhood near campus shortly after 7 p.m.

Students spilled out of houses onto front lawns and into the street. Some perched on roofs and watched as police, outfitted in riot gear, formed lines and leveled non-lethal weapons at the crowd.

MATT UNGER, DAILY KENT STATER A Hudson police officer fires a non-lethal riot-control device at party-goers gathered on East College Avenue, near the Kent State campus. The annual College Fest event was broken up after reports of violence.

Students tweeted that police were using tear gas, pepper balls, rubber bullets and flash-bang devices to break up the party, though that could not be confirmed. They also said ambulances were in the area to take away injured students and that fire fighters were extinguishing couch fires. Some also reported beer bottles being launched at police.

Kent State student journalists covered the event on their Web site KentWired.com , reporting that by 9 p.m. only stragglers were left on East College Street and police told them to "take it inside or leave."

Several streets that had been closed or blocked with police vehicles were also reopened.

A university spokeswoman put out the following message via twitter: "The university is closely monitoring today's events & supports the city in its efforts to keep celebrations safe for everyone involved."

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News Headline: Kent Police break up large College Fest crowds after reports of violence | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Rachel Dissell
News OCR Text: Police in Kent are dispersing large crowds near campus, after fights broke out an at annual event called College Fest. Students attending the large party have tweeted that beer bottles were being thrown and ambulances were dispatched to the scene.

Kent Police refused to answer any questions about their response to the scene but students report they were trying to clear the crowd of more than 3,000 with tear gas and flash-bang devices.

The Kent State student media website, KentWired.com, reported that some students were injured and that participants were throwing beer bottles at police.

Kent State police are assisting the Kent police department but could not release any information.

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News Headline: Region briefs -- Party turns unruly | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: A block party Saturday night near Kent State University resulted in 33 arrests after police from several departments were called to break up a crowd that threw bricks and bottles at officers and others.

Most of the arrests were for failing to disperse, but some were charged with underage drinking and assault, a Kent city police dispatcher said.

Most of the people arrested were processed at the Kent Police Department and released, although several were still being held late Sunday afternoon because they hadn't posted bond.

Another six people were issued citations with a date to appear in court for lesser charges, such as having an open container of alcohol.

The off-campus block party is an annual event that police had been monitoring throughout the day. But by 6:45 p.m., the crowd at East College Avenue between Depeyster and South Lincoln streets had become large and unruly, with several fights and assaults, according to police.

Officers from the Kent Police Department, Portage County Sheriff's Office, Brimfield Police Department and Metro SWAT arrived to break up the crowd.

Police described tactics as a "measured response to the violent and riotous behavior of the crowd," but did not provide details.

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News Headline: Kent State students found businesses through TECHudson | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Brothers Gary Nunley Jr. and David Nunley recently
founded SGM Games to create mobile game applications
at TECHudson. David is a student of Kent
State University, where he is majoring in computer
technology and plans to graduate in 2013.
The duo took their creativity to the mobile game
format using the idea of airport security.
“We want it to be controversial and push the envelope,”
David said. “We take things in the news
and create something funny.”
Their game Checkpoint Madness simulates airport
security with Officer Friskie and a cast of characters.
“It's fast paced,” Gary said. “If security is breached
or too many threats are missed, the player has to
start over.”
The release date is set for April 30 once testing
is completed.
Meanwhile, another KSU student, Ryan Golphin,
recently started G&G Games with his partner and
friend Chester Gregory.
G&G, which specializes in fun and educational
games for all ages, found success with the mobile
game UnWord, launched in October 2011.
In the game, the player in 60 seconds must find all
possible words using the letters from a single word.

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News Headline: Police use pepper gas to put end to Kent College Fest near KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Police Department dispersed a crowd of more than 3,000 at the annual College Fest block party early Saturday night after multiple fights, thrown bottles and reports of a man with a gun led police to end the gathering.

The department, backed up by multiple law enforcement agencies including Metro SWAT and the Portage County Sheriff's Office, began ordering people to leave East College Avenue around 7 p.m, later using smoke bombs, flash bang grenades and pepper gas to force the crowd toward South Lincoln Street.

Kent Police Chief Michelle Lee said the unsanctioned event, which began early Saturday morning on East College Avenue between Kent State University's west campus and downtown Kent, had become too dangerous to continue after multiple party attendees were transported to area hospitals because of injuries sustained in fights.

“There's been a lot of bottle throwing and a lot of people were getting hurt,” Lee said. “We had several large fights and assaults.”

As she spoke, bottles whizzed through the air and shattered on the street, which is lined by many student rental houses.

Lee also said the department also received reports of a man with a gun walking around at the event.

“We had a description, but we didn't find anybody,” Lee said about the man allegedly carrying a firearm.

Lee said she authorized her department to use smoke bombs, flash bang grenades and PepperBall projectiles, which release a cloud of gas when fired.

After the gas was released, students began dispersing, some with tears running down their faces from the gas. Others chanted “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!” and yelled obscenities at the police.

By 8 p.m., the authorities had cleared East College Avenue of nearly all of the partygoers.

The party, which usually extends from where East College Avenue meets Haymaker Parkway to South Lincoln Street, was confined to a one-block stretch of houses between Haymaker Parkway and South Willow Street this year.

Multiple Kent State Students said the cold temperatures, around 40 degrees most of the day, and intermittent rain kept the party from getting as large as in years past.

Even with the cold weather, a dispatcher for the Kent Police Department said the crowd topped 3,000 by 6 p.m. She said there had not been any major disturbances by that time, adding that the police force was working on containing the partygoers.

“We're trying to control it as much as possible,” she said.

Shortly after 6 p.m., multiple large fights were reported that resulted in injuries.

Lee said she believed at least four people were taken to area hospitals as a result of the fights.

College Fest ended with 13 arrests last year, a low for the party in recent years, down from 65 arrests in 2010. Police officers broke up the event last year around 11:30 p.m. after partygoers threw beer cans and bottles at them.

This year the police also reported beer bottles and cans being thrown at them throughout the day.

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News Headline: Pepper balls used to bring early end to College Fest near Kent State; crowd estimated at 3,000 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Police used pepper balls and flash-bang devices to disperse thousands of college students and bring an early end to CollegeFest in Kent Saturday evening.

A large crowd of students was reported partying in the College Avenue neighborhood between Willow and DePeyster streets.

Police estimated the crowd at more than 3,000.

Several people were reported injured and police were making arrests shortly after 7 p.m.

Police were closing down streets near the neighborhood. The Portage County Sheriff's Office also was on the scene.

For more on this story, see Sunday's Record-Courier.

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News Headline: VIDEO: 'College Fest' Ends in Tear Gas (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Annual block party pits partiers against police

Editor's note: amateur video of Saturday's events, attached to this article, contains foul language. Viewer discretion is advised.

The annual block party known as "College Fest" held to celebrate the end of the school year at Kent State University ended in a cloud of tear gas Saturday night.

Kent Police, with support from area police departments, tried to disperse a crowd of thousands of people who gathered on East College Avenue between 7 and 9 p.m. with messages of "The party is over" broadcast over megaphones followed by blasts of tear gas canisters.

Some in the crowd responded by throwing bottles at the police.

KentWired reported that police tried to disperse the crowd after several violent fights broke out. Firefighters also had to respond to a fire set on University Drive, according to police radio traffic.

Fox 8 news reported that 3,000 people swarmed the block for the unnofficial party.

Police closed off portions of Lincoln Street, College Avenue and Haymaker Parkway as part of the effort to quell the activity.

The university issued a statement, with Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent telling KentWired that the university "is closely monitoring today's events and supports the city in its efforts to keep celebrations safe for everyone involved."

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News Headline: Several police departments respond to riots at annual Kent State 'College Fest' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -
College Fest, an annual block party that Kent State students hold near the end of the school year, got quite out of hand Saturday, leading to 33 arrests.

According to a news release from Kent police, officers from the Kent Police Department, Portage County Sheriff's Office, Brimfield Police Department and Metro SWAT responded to East College Avenue between South Depeyster Street and South Lincoln Street due to a large and unruly crowd.

The release said that despite the police presence throughout the day, crowds continue to grow and become disorderly.

Several fights led to also needing medical response teams at the scene.

Police said the crowds became so defiant that they began to throw bricks and bottles at officers and each other.

Kent police said they used a “measured response” against the violent and riotous people so order could be restored.

Kent State University responded to the non sanctioned event via twitter:
@ksunews: "The university is closely monitoring today's events & supports the city in its efforts to keep celebrations safe for everyone involved."

Kent police arrested 33 people. Of those arrests, eight were for failure to disperse, three OVI and seven juveniles for curfew and underage drinking.

Photos of the event were provided to NewsChannel5 by Philip Botta. He also posted this video, which contains profanity:

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News Headline: Police in Riot Gear Shut Down College Fest | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Kent Police were called to disperse unruly crowds at College Fest Saturday evening.

Police in riot gear used pepper balls and flash-bang devices to clear more than 3,000 students from the festival. College Street and neighboring streets were shut down after police received reports of the widespread fighting and rioting.

Police say rioting began after some students began hitting one another with alcohol bottles and throwing beer at police. Firefighters also responded to what witnesses say was a couch lit on fire on University Drive.

Injured students and College Fest attendees were transported to the nearest hospital. The number of those injured are unknown.

Kent Police say 34 arrests in all were made, ranging from simple assault, disorderly conduct and public intoxication.

Police also say minor vandalism was made to various buildings on East College Avenue.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH VIDEO: http://fox8.com/2012/04/21/police-in-riot-gear-shut-down-college-fest/

Kent State University released the following statement on the rioting on Twitter:

“The University is closely monitoring today's events & supports the city in its efforts to keep celebrations safe for everyone involved.”

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent: Police break up 'College Fest' crowds, 34 arrests (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- Police from Kent, Kent State University, Portage County Sheriff's Office, Brimfield Police, Metro SWAT and Hudson worked to disperse large crowds of students throwing beer bottles after fights broke out during the annual "College Fest" near the KSU campus early Saturday evening in downtown Kent.

Police say some of the nearly 3,000 students and revelers threw beer bottles at police and continued their unruly behavior.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://www.wkyc.com/news/article/242393/45/Kent-Police-in-riot-gear-break-up-College-Fest-crowds

Police were attired in riot gear and, according to students who tweeted from the scene and the website kentwired.com, using tear gas and "flash-bang" devices to disperse the crowd.

Twitter was flooded with tweets with the hashtag CollegeFest.

The Kent Fire Department was sent to University Drive after a couch was set on fire near the roadway.

Emily Vincent, the director of KSU media relations, said that Kent State "is closely monitoring today's events and supports the city in its efforts to keep celebrations safe for everyone involved."

Vincent said the problems were not occuring on the campus but near College Avenue in downtown Kent.

Police tell Channel 3 that at least 30 people have been arrested as of Sunday morning. People continue to be processed and booked in.

To deal with all the cases, court hearings are being spread throughout the week. Crews were out Sunday morning cleaning up the aftermath of what some are calling a "riot."

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News Headline: Kent State University students due in court after weekend riots | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University students are due in court today after riots broke out on campus this weekend.

Nearly three dozen people were arrested on Saturday night after riots broke out during the annual Spring College Fest.

Kent State Police, Portage County Sheriff's Office, Brimfield Police and Metro SWAT responded to E. College Avenue Saturday night for an unruly crowd.

CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO & PHOTOS: http://www.woio.com/story/17651770/dozens-arrested-in-kent-after-riot-breaks-out

Despite officer presence earlier in the day, crowds grew larger and more out of control. Medical attention was needed for those involved in numerous fights throughout the day.

The crowd then started throwing bricks and bottles at authorities.

Students turned to social networking sites to report that police were shooting rubber bullets and tear gas into the crowds.

At least 34 people were arrested.

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News Headline: 'Spring Awakening' opens Saturday at The Auricle | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/20/2012
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A bold and provocative rock musical about teenage sexuality, "Spring Awakening" swept Broadway's Tony Awards in 2007, with eight wins including best musical.

While set in Germany in the late 19th century, the show touches on issues - teen pregnancy, abortion, homosexuality, rape, child abuse, academic pressure, parental disapproval, suicide - that are timeless.

This weekend, "Spring Awakening" arrives in town in a North Canton Playhouse production that is being staged at The Auricle, a concert club in downtown Canton.

"It's a show about all the things you struggled with growing up as a teenager," says Jeremy Clarke, 19, who is playing the rebellious male lead Melchior. "It's about trying to find your own journey, and not listening to others tell you how to live your life."

Compared to other Broadway musicals, "it's more raw and more earthy," says Stephen Carder, 20, who plays the angst-ridden Moritz, with notably towering hair and a rock 'n' roll attitude.

"It's a hard show to take on, but I have such a passion for it. It's very controversial," says director Marci Saling Lesho, referring to the profanity, frank sexuality and brief semi-nudity in "Spring Awakening." "We're definitely not pulling any punches. Everything in the Broadway production will be in ours."

ROCK-SHOW FEEL

The Auricle, which has a small, low stage, will put audience members in unusually close proximity to the actors. "The audience will become part of the show. It will be super intimate and even intimidating." The five-piece band - guitar, bass, drums, violin and keyboards - will be visible throughout.

Lesho, who directed productions of "Rent" and "Sweeney Todd" at the Palace Theatre, chose The Auricle for "Spring Awakening" because "I wanted a gritty, underground warehouse type of feel," she says. "The show is gritty and it evokes such depths of emotion."

The show's pop-rock score, composed by Duncan Sheik of "Barely Breathing" fame, alternates lyrical, haunting ballads with driving rock anthems, a couple with titles that aren't printable here.

A musical theater major at Kent State University, Carder says, "Usually, I'm cast in the dancer-type roles. It's awesome to get to rock out. Moritz is a great role that I didn't expect to be getting, to be quite honest. He feels like so much a part of me now."

About his role as Melchior, Clarke says, "It's been a challenge but an exciting one. I view Melchior as a radical. He's at this reform school where everything has to be on point, and he doesn't want to live that life. Act 2 is all about his journey, and the awakening of his inner soul."

A diehard "Spring Awakening" fan, Mackenzie Leskovec, 19, is portraying Wendla, the show's naive, hopeful and ultimately tragic female lead. "She doesn't really know what's going on in the world," the actress says. "She's going through puberty and her feelings for Melchior are completely new to her. She loves her mother but doesn't know any other love."  

FINDING THE CAST

To director Lesho's delight, almost 100 people from around Northeast Ohio turned out for "Spring Awakening" auditions. "Everyone who came in the door would have given their left arm to be in this show. They are that impassioned about it," she says. "It made for fantastic energy, but it also made casting difficult."

The "Spring Awakening" cast she assembled ranges in age from 18 to 30. "They are the tightest cast I have ever worked with," Lesho says. "(Rehearsing) this show has been kind of a roller-coaster ride, but throughout, the constant has been their support for each other. The chemistry is gorgeous. The cast really believes in the message and vision of the show."

The director brims with enthusiasm about her leading players. "Stephen (Carder) is electric as the depressed rock star," she says. "Jeremy (Clarke) has an amazing amount of charm and confidence onstage and his voice is fabulous for the part. Plus, he's a 19-year-old trying to find himself in real life. When Mackenzie (Leskovec) is onstage, there's this amazing light behind her eyes. She has so much stage presence I can hardly contain myself!"

"People need to go into the audience with an open mind," says Leskovec. "And be ready to see an awesome, beautiful production with so many different emotions."

As for the up-close-and-personal setting at The Auricle, Clarke says, "The closeness is the icing on the cake. They will feel what we're feeling. It has to be real, you can't be 'acting,' because they can see every move."

On stage

WHAT: "Spring Awakening," presented by the North Canton Playhouse.

WHEN: At 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, and 8 p.m. Sunday, through April 29.

WHERE: The Auricle, 601 Cleveland Ave. NW, downtown Canton.

TICKETS: $23 at the door, which opens one hour before showtime. There will be a live-music preshow, and the bar will be open.

NOTE: Due to profanity and sexual content, the show is recommended for mature audiences.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Roundabout plan in Kent fuels doubts | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CONCERNS ABOUT IMPACT ON FIRE
RESPONSE TIME MUST BE ADDRESSED

KENT CITY COUNCIL'S NARROW
approval of dual traffic roundabouts
on East Summit Street
near the Kent State University campus
seems to reflect questions and concerns
raised by the plan.
Council's 5-4 vote
gave a green light to
City Engineer Jim
Bowling's recommendation
that the city go
foeward with plans for
roundabouts on Summit Street at the intersection
of Campus Center and Risman
drives near the Kent Student Center and
at Ted Boyd Drive near the Student Recreation
and Wellness Center.
In doing so, council's one-vote majority
overrode the objections of Fire Chief
James Williams, who opposed the plan
because of concerns that it will adversely
impact response time for emergency
vehicles, such as fire department ladder
trucks, because of roundabouts' built-in
“slowing” factor.
Summit Street, especially the area that
serves as Kent's State's main entrance, is
one of the most heavily traveled streets
in the city, which is one of the reasons a
remedy for congestion is being proposed.
Williams estimated that one-third of the
Kent Fire Department's responses include
travel in the area, making any changes to
the traffic pattern a concern for the department.
Councilman Robin Turner, who voted
in favor of the roundabout plan, urged the
city administration to take the fire chief's
concerns into consideration as the project
moves into the design and construction
stages. That's a prudent suggestion.
Roundabouts are an unknown quantity
in Kent. Having two of them located
in such proximity on a heavily used
street only adds to concerns about their
impact.
The nearest roundabout is located in
Tallmadge, where drivers already are accustomed
to dealing with the peculiar
driving patterns created by the landmark
Circle. The Tallmadge roundabout, which
is relatively new, appears to be effective
but its location is substantially different
from the area near the Kent State campus.
For one thing, unlike the Summit
Street site, the Tallmadge roundabout is
located in an area with relatively little pedestrian
traffic.
We don't question the need for addressing
congestion on Summit Street; in fact,
it's likely to increase with the completion
of The Province of Kent, the massive student
housing complex being built in the
area. At the same time, however, we also
can see why a near-majority of City Council
has serious reservations about the remedy
being proposed.
The concerns raised by the city's fire
chief can't help but add to the questions
about the plan. They must be addressed.

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News Headline: Suicide prevention event to include memorial in honor of Natalie Weber | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2012
Outlet Full Name: Daily Jeffersonian - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- A mental health awareness/suicide prevention event and memorial in honor of Natalie Weber, a Kent State student who recently passed away, is scheduled to be held April 24 at Kent State University.

Consider the following:

• 121 million people worldwide suffer from depression.

• 18 million of these cases are happening in the United States.

• 2/3 of those suffering from depression never seek treatment.

• Untreated depression is the number one cause of suicide, and is the third leading cause of death for young people 15 to 24 years of age.

The event will begin with a Red Flag event from noon to 5 p.m. in Risman Plaza. Markers will be provided for folks to write on flag a message of hope, a name of someone you'd like to remember, etc. A red flag will be placed in the grass every 15 minutes representing how often someone dies from suicide in the United States.

The main event will take place from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. in Room 137 (Lecture Hall) - Bowman, and will have speakers, resources for awareness and prevention and more. Speakers are Dr. Jayita Datta and Dr. John Schell, psychologists from University Health Services.

"We believe that rescue is possible, and are committed to communicating hope to others who know the daily struggle of living in a broken world," said organizers.

There will then be a memorial for Weber, and there will be open time for those to come honor and remember her, as well as if anyone would like to speak.

The event is hosted by the To Write Love On Her Arms Chapter & the Active Minds chapter at Kent State University.

For information on To Write Love On Her Arms, visit www.twloha.com. For information on Active Minds, go to www.activeminds.org.

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News Headline: What's new in Books | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/21/2012
Outlet Full Name: Louisville Courier-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "The Complete Funky Winkerbean"

Volume 1 (1972-1974), by Tom Batiuk, Kent State University, 485 pp., $45

Batiuk's "Funky Winkerbean" comic strip has chronicled the exploits at Westview High for (gulp) 40 years, and it is only fitting that Funky and friends get this deluxe treatment. This is a great primer for those of us who came to the party a little late, featuring the first appearances of all our favorite characters: Crazy Harry, Holly, Les, Bull, Mr. Dinkle and more. This compendium of the first three years shows the progression of Batiuk's crisp illustrations as each character comes into his own. Successive volumes are to be published annually, each covering another three years in this funny and often touching series.

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