Report Overview:
Total Clips (10)
Computer Science; Research (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
May 4 (3)
Research (1)
Students (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Computer Science; Research (2)
Kent State awarded $1.25 million to help build fiber-optic network in Bangladesh (Khan, McGimpsey) 04/25/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE AWARDED $1.25 MILLION TO HELP BUILD RESEARCH AND EDUCATION NETWORK IN BANGLADESH (McGimpsey, Kumar, Khan) 04/24/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, April 24 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: An international partnership between Kent State University, the Ohio Academic Resource...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Three to retire from Kent State journalism (Schierhorn, Smith, Endres) 04/25/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


May 4 (3)
U.S. Justice Department won't reopen Kent State shootings case 04/25/2012 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Justice Dept. won't reopen May 4 probe 04/25/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

U.S. refuses request to probe 1970 Kent State shooting 04/25/2012 Reuters Text Attachment Email


Research (1)
Cleveland casino's approaching debut worries problem gamblers 04/24/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...them," Clegg said. "We need to have our doors open for people who need services." The state Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services has hired Kent State University researchers to determine which segments of the population and which areas of the state suffer most from gambling addiction,...


Students (3)
KSU students face discipline for College Fest 04/25/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State asks Students to Help ID 'College Fest' Offenders 04/25/2012 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College Fest Leads To Multiple Arrests, SWAT Team, Teargas (Vincent) 04/25/2012 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Kent State awarded $1.25 million to help build fiber-optic network in Bangladesh (Khan, McGimpsey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will receive a combined $1.25 million over the next three years from the World Bank to help lay the groundwork for a fiber-optic network in Bangladesh.

Javed Khan, a professor in Kent State's department of computer science, will serve as the principal investigator of the project, which is an international partnership between Kent State, the Ohio Academic Resource Network and Ireland's National Research and Education Network. The project originated from a concept paper Dr. Khan wrote in 2005.

“It is our dream to get the universities of the world connected so scholars, researchers and students can communicate with colleagues in every country with the best possible communication media,” Dr. Khan said in a news release. “That's the future we're envisioning.”

The project, which is part of a larger initiative to connect universities across the world over high-speed networks, is expected to broaden the research opportunities for Kent State's faculty.

“The success of this initiative shows that our researchers are second to none and are making an impact internationally,” said Grant McGimpsey, Kent State's vice president for research, in a news release. “We are currently putting together several coalitions to compete in other new and non-traditional areas.”

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News Headline: KENT STATE AWARDED $1.25 MILLION TO HELP BUILD RESEARCH AND EDUCATION NETWORK IN BANGLADESH (McGimpsey, Kumar, Khan) | Email

News Date: 04/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, April 24 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

An international partnership between Kent State University, the Ohio Academic Resource Network (OARnet) and Ireland's National Research and Education Network (HEAnet) has been selected to provide advanced technical expertise in building the Bangladesh Research and Education Network (BdREN) through an international competition.

Kent State recently finalized the agreement under which the university will receive $1.25 million over the next three years.Engineers and experts from both sides will collaborate extensively in planning the advanced network, which is being financed by the World Bank.

Javed Khan, Ph.D., professor of Kent State's Department of Computer Science and an expert in advanced networking, will lead the project as the principal investigator.

"Research and education networks, originally inspired by US Internet2, are among the most functionally advanced networks in the world, but they also serve as a type of live research lab to test future technologies," Khan said.

It is very difficult to lay conventional underground optical fiber networks in Bangladesh, so the network will be implemented using electrical power line-borne fiber.The multi-gigabyte network will gradually expand to provide full optical interconnect capability among all universities and research facilities of Bangladesh.It also will be connected regionally and globally to other higher education networks around the world via Trans-Eurasia Information Network.

The project is part of a larger initiative to eventually connect universities across the world via ultra-speed networks and linkages.The project will significantly broaden collaborative opportunities and access to advanced research tools and resources for researchers in Bangladesh.

During the construction of the network, Kent State representatives will share knowledge with partner universities in Bangladesh to modernize campus networks and information services.The collaboration also will provide Kent State researchers and their partners an opportunity to expand scientific and educational collaborations.

"The success of this initiative shows that our researchers are second to none and are making an impact internationally," said Kent State's Vice President for Research Grant McGimpsey." We are currently putting together several coalitions to compete in other new and non-traditional areas."

The BdREN network, with its state-of-the-art, high-performance links, will provide network connections to geographically dispersed academics, scientists and researchers."This will be an important milestone for the higher education system of Bangladesh since its independence in 1971," Khan said."It will also help in addressing the digital divide in higher education."

OARnet, created in 1987 by the Ohio Board of Regents, is one of the most sophisticated superscale networks in the country, consisting of more than 1,850 miles of fiber-optic backbone.The network provides connectivity to Ohio's colleges and universities, K-12 schools, public broadcasting stations and academic medical centers.

Ireland's HEAnet has been in operation since 1983 and provides internet connectivity and services to the country's schools and universities.HEAnet has significant experience in operating a power line-based overhead optical network similar to the one planned in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh is experiencing rapid modernization and capacity expansion of its higher education infrastructure.Its higher education system has approximately 100 engineering, medical and agricultural universities and colleges administered by the country's University Grants Commission (UGC).

The Bangladesh project originated from a concept paper prepared by Khan in 2005 and supported by U.S.Fulbright Senior Specialist funding.

Khan and Kent State's Associate Vice President for Research Satyendra Kumar conducted in-depth discussions and on-site negotiations with UGC representatives in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh."The negotiations were a real collective effort," Kumar said."Both sides worked very hard to successfully conclude the discussions conducted over three days."

The Kent State team included Sonia Alemagno, former interim vice president for research and current dean of the College of Public Health; Connie Hawke, associate counsel and associate vice president for government relations; and Lori Burchard, director of sponsored programs.

"Our team was on call around the clock to respond to our queries from Dhaka," Kumar said."Kent State negotiators and the Bangladesh team, led by UGC members Amena Begum, Tajul Islam, Muhibur Rahman and Project Director Kaniz Fatema, worked diligently till 1 a.m.on a Sunday morning to finalize this international contract."

The Kent State researchers and their partners are thinking big.

"It is our dream to get the universities of the world connected so scholars, researchers and students can communicate with colleagues in every country with the best possible communication media," Khan said."That's the future we're envisioning."

More information on the project will be available at Kent State's Media Communications and Networking Research Lab website at www.medianet.kent.edu.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: Three to retire from Kent State journalism (Schierhorn, Smith, Endres) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From Taylor Hall to the
third floor of Franklin, Fred
Endres, Carl Schierhorn
and Tim Smith have been
professional neighbors for
more than 20 years. These
three cornerstones of the
journalism sequence have
counseled hundreds of young
journalists as professors in
the School of Journalism and
Mass Communication. This
year, an era ends as they retire
from teaching.
CARL SCHIERHORN
Student after
student
sits with Carl
Schierhorn
in his office,
pouring over
copy edits,
each equally
invested in
the conversation.
Passers by can see
the nurtured learning, the
personalized lesson and interest
Schierhorn takes in
each student.
Joe Harper, a former director
of the School of Journalism
and Mass Communication
while in the College of
Fine and Professional Arts,
recruited Schierhorn from
his position of managing editor
at Gannett's Iowa City
Press-Citizen in1985.
Schierhorn came to KSU
on a freezing March day and
found the place to be better
than he expected. With Harper's
assurance of the professional
pedagogy of the School,
Schierhorn and his wife, Ann,
made the move to Ohio.
The graduate of Northwestern
University found a
different kind of student at
KSU than those at his alma
mater. “The joys are different,”
Schierhorn said.
Schierhorn has been a
central figure in the lives of
countless students. He has
taught the core news curriculum,
NewsWriting, Print
Beat Reporting and Copyediting
for most of his career.
He also created the
Nontraditional Journalism
course that focuses on narrative
techniques in magazine
and news, which Schierhorn
called his favorite.
Schierhorn has advised the
Daily Kent Stater since 1999
and said advising, “is by far
the most rewarding part of
my professional life. I really
love those kids; I really do.
They're not kids, and love is
not exactly the right word,
but I really love working with
them. I consider them some
of the best people and best
friends I've ever known.”
Tight bonds grow between
JMC faculty and students
from hours spent perfecting
their craft, the news. Schierhorn's
steady presence in
the newsroom is an image for
many JMC graduates. Many
students find their small
group, their personal fraternity,
in the newsroom. In fact,
Carl and Ann Schierhorn met
on the Daily Northwestern.
“I wanted to touch lives,”
Schierhorn explained. “And
I think I have. Both professionally
and to some extent
personally.”
“There have been times
when I've just been able to pull
a student aside when something
didn't seem right…I've
gone to bat for students to get
them that extra scholarship to
keep them in school.”
Schierhorn says that he is
“alternatingly excited and
scared about retiring.” He
will start by teaching just one
five-hour course. Although
he now jointly advises the
paper with Sue Zake, Schierhorn
plans to step back from
the paper and eventually do
some writing coaching.
“I have been at my job for
45 years. Now I've got to figure
out how to be me. It will
be an interesting journey.”
TIM SMITH
“Life isn't
fair.”
T h e s e
words have
been repeated
to each of
Tim Smith's
media law
classes each
s e m e s t e r
since the 1980s.
“Life isn't fair,” Smith said.
“I write that on the board
every semester. There's no
sense complaining about it.
Deal with it.”
Now, nearly 30 years later,
Smith is ready to put down
the chalk and pick up his
suitcase.
Smith began working at
KSU in 1983 as a part-time
lecturer after working as the
assistant managing editor
for the Akron Beacon Journal.
He said it was “time for a
change,” so three years later,
he started teaching.
“I found that I really enjoyed
it,” Smith said. “To
my surprise, the students
seemed to as well.”
He earned his bachelor's
and master's degrees from
Ohio State University and
his law degree from the University
of Akron.
Throughout the years,
Smith said his relationship
with the students has been
the most rewarding aspect
of his experience.
“What I'll take away mostly
are the friendships with
the students,” Smith said.
“Students are constantly impressing
me with their take
on how the world works.”
As graduate coordinator,
Smith has enjoyed recruiting
students, especially those
who have journeyed to Kent
State from abroad. He has
a particular interest in students
from China, a country
Smith has visited twice recently.
After he retires, Smith
hopes to continue helping
Kent State with recruitment
and build relationships with
Chinese students.
Smith decided to retire for
the same reason he decided
to be an educator: It was
time for a change in his life.
He would like to spend his
time traveling and learning
about cultures and languages
he is unfamiliar with.
For now, Smith is unsure
of the legacy he will leave
at KSU. He said he would
like to be remembered for
the knowledge he bestowed
upon his students.
“I'd like to have students
think well of me in terms of
what they learned,” Smith
said. “That they got something
worthwhile that benefitted
their career from me.
If they feel that way, then I
have been a success.
“I don't think I'm liable to
forget any of these experiences,”
he said. “They've been
marvelous. I've enjoyed myself
immensely here.”
FRED ENDRES
When Fred
Endres arrived
at KSU
in 1974, he
thought he'd
be here for 10
years. Now,
he not only
teaches full
time, but he
is also the founder of the colab,
a center in Franklin Hall
for collaborative online producing,
established in 2003.
Endres will retire this spring
but will return in August to
teach part time and work on
projects for the college.
After teaching for one year
in Western Illinois and one
year in Toledo, Endres returned
to professional journalism
for six years. While
finishing his Ph.D. and working,
Endres considered going
back into education. Originally
from Akron, he saw an
opportunity to come home in
an advertisement for journalism
professors at KSU.
More than 30 years later,
Endres has served as editor
of the school's website,
built journalism courses and
taught in print, multimedia
and online journalism.
“My former students are
my high points, the ones who
have really done well and
succeeded,” Endres said.
“I liked teaching Newswriting,”
Endres said. “I don't
know of many people who
do. I like to get the students
when they're young and just
starting out in their chosen
field … I like to see them two
years later to see how they've
developed, becoming editor of
the Stater or the The Burr.”
Endres went from a career
and 20 years of teaching
in print before he began exploring
multimedia. He will
move his office to the co-lab,
or geek central, as he calls it.
He's excited to learn more
about multimedia production
from the gurus of the
first floor of Franklin Hall.
When he does quit teaching,
Endres says he's “going
to miss working with good
students. I know I'm going
to miss the creativity.”

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News Headline: U.S. Justice Department won't reopen Kent State shootings case | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The U.S. Justice Department, citing “insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers,” won't reopen its investigation into the deadly 1970 shootings by Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at Kent State University.
Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez discussed the obstacles in a letter to Alan Canfora, a wounded student who requested that the investigation be reopened.
The Justice Department said Tuesday it would not comment beyond the letter.
Four Kent State students died and nine were hurt in the shootings that contributed to the change in the public's attitude toward the war.
Canfora, who now directs the Kent May 4 Center, said the government's decision is disappointing but not surprising.
The events of that chaotic day in Kent are still not fully understood, and interest in the case was reignited because of a recently enhanced audio recording.
A 2010 analysis of the recording concluded that someone might have ordered National Guard troops to prepare to fire on students during the campus protest. But Perez wrote to Canfora that a government review was inconclusive in determining whether the recording provided such evidence.
The original reel-to-reel audio recording was made by Terry Strubbe, a student who placed a microphone in a window sill of his dormitory that overlooked the anti-war rally. Canfora found a copy of the audio tape in a library archive in 2007.
The recording was enhanced and evaluated by Plainfield, N.J.-based audio experts Stuart Allen and Tom Owen at the request of the Plain Dealer in Cleveland. Both concluded that they hear someone shout, “Guard!” Seconds later, a voice yells, “All right, prepare to fire!”
“Get down!” someone shouts, presumably in the crowd. A voice then says, “Guard! ...” followed two seconds later by a booming volley of gunshots.
Allen removed extraneous noises — wind blowing across the microphone, for example — that obscured voices on the recording. His review also had uncovered four “thuds” more than a minute before the guardsmen opened fire, which he believed could have been the sound of a revolver firing.
In the letter, Perez said the sounds probably were Strubbe's door opening and closing. That conclusion is consistent with voices inside Strubbe's room, Perez said.
On the issue of a command to fire, Perez said the government's analyst showed “no military-like voice commands to fire or otherwise were heard; rather, many of the words heard were probably uttered by several different individuals located closer to the microphone.”
Canfora wrote a letter to Perez on Monday and shared it with the Associated Press. In it, Canfora wrote that he was disappointed but not surprised by the government's decision, and he renewed his call for an outside review.
“I request your further independent investigation utilizing more objective analysis of this crucial digital, forensic evidence,” Canfora said. Otherwise, Canfora said, he would proceed with his own investigation into a possible command to “fire.”
In 1974, eight guardsmen tried on federal civil rights charges were acquitted by a judge.

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News Headline: Justice Dept. won't reopen May 4 probe | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ‘INSURMOUNTABLE' BARRIERS CITED IN WOUNDED
STUDENT'S BID TO REVIEW 1970 KSU SHOOTINGS AGAIN

CLEVELAND — The U.S.
Justice Department, citing
“insurmountable legal and
evidentiary barriers,” won't
reopen its investigation into
the deadly 1970 shootings
by Ohio National Guardsmen
during a Vietnam War
protest at Kent State University.
Assistant Attorney General
Thomas Perez discussed
the obstacles in a letter to
Alan Canfora, a wounded
student who requested
that the investigation be reopened.
The Justice Department
said Tuesday it would
not comment beyond the
letter.
Four Kent State students
died, and nine were hurt in
the shootings, which contributed
to the change in
the public's attitude toward
the war.
Canfora, who now directs
the Kent May 4 Center, said
the government's decision is
disappointing but not surprising.
The events of that chaotic
day in Kent are still not fully
understood, and interest
in the case was reignited recently
because of a recently
enhanced audio recording.
A 2010 analysis of the recording
concluded that
someone may have ordered
National Guard troops to
prepare to fire on students
during the campus protest.
But Perez wrote to Canfora
that a government review
was inconclusive in determining
whether the recording
provided such evidence.
The original reel-to-reel
audio recording was made
by Terry Strubbe, a student
who placed a microphone
in a window sill of
his dormitory that overlooked
the anti-war rally.
Canfora found a copy of
the audio tape in a library
archive in 2007.
The recording was enhanced
and evaluated by
Plainfield, N.J.-based audio
experts Stuart Allen
and Tom Owen at the request
of The Plain Dealer
in Cleveland. Both concluded
that they heard
someone shout, “Guard!”
Seconds later, a voice
yells, “All right, prepare
to fire!”
“Get down!” someone
shouts, presumably in the
crowd. A voice then says,
“Guard! ...” followed two
seconds later by a booming
volley of gunshots.
Allen removed extraneous
noises — wind blowing
across the microphone, for
example — that obscured
voices on the recording.
Allen's review also had
uncovered four “thuds”
more than a minute before
the guardsmen opened fire,
which he believed could
have been the sound of a
revolver firing.
In the letter, Perez said
the sounds were likely
Strubbe's door opening
and closing. That conclusion
is consistent with voices
inside Strubbe's room,
Perez said.
On the issue of a command
to fire, Perez said
the government's analyst
showed “no military-like
voice commands to fire
or otherwise were heard;
rather, many of the words
heard were probably uttered
by several different
individuals located closer
to the microphone.”
Canfora wrote a letter
to Perez on Monday and
shared it with The Associated
Press. In it, Canfora
wrote that he was disappointed
but not surprised
by the government's decision,
and he renewed his
call for an outside review.
“I request your further
independent investigation
utilizing more objective
analysis of this crucial
digital, forensic evidence,”
Canfora said. Otherwise,
Canfora said he would proceed
with his own investigation
into a possible command
to “fire.”
In 1974, eight guardsmen
tried on federal civil
rights charges were acquitted
by a judge.

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News Headline: U.S. refuses request to probe 1970 Kent State shooting | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Reuters
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department refused to reopen an investigation into the deadly 1970 shooting of student protesters at Kent State University, one of the seminal moments of the anti-Vietnam war movement, saying new audio evidence of an order to fire was inconclusive.

Kent State students were protesting the war in Vietnam and the U.S.-led invasion of Cambodia when Ohio National Guard troops opened fire, killing four students and wounding nine others. Afterward, student strikes closed down schools across the nation, and divisiveness intensified over the war.

Assistant U.S. Attorney General Thomas Perez sent a letter to Alan Canfora, one of the wounded students and now the director of Kent May 4 Center, saying the department was "unable to re-prosecute this case."

Canfora requested the reinvestigation after discovering a copy of a 29-minute recording from Kent State student Terry Strubbe, who recorded the demonstration on a reel-to-reel machine from his dormitory room.

A digital enhancement of the recording appeared to reveal "a verbal command to fire," followed by 12.5 seconds of firing, Canfora said. The volleys were preceded by what sounded like four gunshots, possibly from a handgun, he said.

"This is the most significant discovery in the investigation. It has always been the central question: was there a command to shoot?" Canfora said in an interview on Tuesday.

"Only now through modern digital technology can we finally answer that question," he said.

Canfora asked the Justice Department in 2010 for a new investigation in light of the audio evidence.

Eight guardsmen were originally charged in October 1974 with depriving the students of their civil rights. But after the prosecution presented its case, U.S. District Judge Frank Battisti granted the defendants' motion for acquittal, ruling the government had not proven the charges.

In a letter to Canfora dated April 19, Perez wrote that there were too many legal hurdles to overcome to reopen the case. He said the legal bar against double jeopardy prevents a retrial of those who had already been acquitted, and the statute of limitations had run out on possible charges. Some of the guardsmen had passed away, he added.

As for Strubbe's tape, Perez said the government's analysis concluded the four thuds heard before the National Guard volleys were likely the dorm room door closing as people came and went, and it was impossible to discern the command amid the shouting.

"Examiners found the quality of the audio recordings to be poor and found that the distortion, frequency response, and low quality microphone used to make the recording rendered the audio quality insufficient for gunshot analysis," Perez's letter said.

Canfora said he was not looking to prosecute individual guardsmen but wanted instead "a historical pronouncement of truth about the massacre at Kent State." He said he upset it took two years to decide not to go forward.

"We have modern digital forensic science on our side," he said.

Six of the seven surviving victims of the Kent State shooting plan to announce on May 3, the day before the event's 42nd anniversary, an effort to move the case to an international court.

A Justice Department spokesman had no comment.

"If our Federal and State governments do not provide truth, justice, healing and reconciliation, you will be responsible for motivating our further actions in and out of courts, on the local, state, national and international levels," Canfora wrote in a response to Perez.

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News Headline: Cleveland casino's approaching debut worries problem gamblers | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/24/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Thomas Ott
News OCR Text: By Thomas Ott, The Plain Dealer

Joshua Gunter/The Plain DealerThe Horseshoe Casino Cleveland is approaching opening day, and some compulsive gamblers are worried about having table games and slot machines close at hand.

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Ohio's casino gambling era will dawn in a little more than two weeks, and the build-up has pushed some recovering gambling addicts to the brink.

Records for March show that calls to the state's problem-gambling help line expressing concerns about betting on casino slots or table games were triple the average for the previous eight months.

Experts say compulsive gamblers often repent early in the year, after burning through Christmas spending money and income-tax refunds. It's also possible that the Ohio Lottery's annual March campaign to raise awareness of problem gamblingfueled the increase.

But psychologist Heather Chapman, head of an inpatient gambling-treatment program for veterans at the Cleveland VA Medical Center, is certain the May 14 debut of the Horseshoe Casino Cleveland has something to do with the spike. Casino gambling is coming to her clients' doorsteps, and they're worried.

"As the date approaches, the anxiety has gone through the roof," she said.

While evidence is nascent, records show that among the calls to the state's hot line last month were 50 calls triggered by concerns about slots and 30 about table games. There could be some overlap because some reported multiple weaknesses.

Chapman, widely known for her work with compulsive gamblers, sees an average of 100 a year at the hospital and in her private practice. She said veterans tend to have more problems with gambling, often because it appeals to a side of them that thrives on thrills and is open to taking risks.

Some of her clients believe a new casino will magically change their luck, or they think treatment has steeled their resolve, allowing them to dabble in games without relapsing, she said.

The Horseshoe, which has prominently promoted the state's gambling line on its billboards, will be the first of four casinos allowed statewide under a constitutional amendment that voters approved in 2009.

In addition, legislators have authorized video slot machinesat horseracing tracks, with Scioto Downs in Columbus scheduled to be first out of the gate in June, A lawsuit filed in Franklin County challenges the legality of the decision to allow slots at tracks, and a decision is pending.

Ohio was safe haven for casino-gambling addicts before those changes broke down the doors. In fact, Chapman said some of her clients moved to Ohio because casino gambling was prohibited.

"What I've heard from a lot of people is, 'It's sure going to be handy, It's going to be convenient,' " said Chapman, repeating remarks that the recovering gamblers meant as sarcasm. "Bringing it closer makes it more compelling."

Las Vegas-based Caesars Entertainment is a minority partner in the Horseshoe Cleveland and will manage the casino for Rock Ohio Caesars, a joint venture led by Cavaliers majority owner Dan Gilbert.

Problem gambling is a "dysfunctional consequence of our business," Caesars chief executive Gary Loveman told Cleveland-area business men and women at a dinner last month. He characterized the number of people affected as small but added: "We take this responsibility very seriously."

The Cleveland casino's policies will include refusing to cash public-assistance or unemployment checks and letting gamblers voluntarily put their names on a list that bars them from playing. Caesars also is providing employees with training -- as it did over the weekend -- so they can spot problem gamblers and direct them to help.

According to Chapman, about 7 percent of the U.S. population has a gambling problem, and slightly more than 1 percent are so hooked it's pathological.

Ohio is outmatched in dealing with the illness. Though any counselor can listen to a gambler's troubles, only 10 in the entire state are expressly certified to deal with the addiction, according to the National Council on Problem Gambling.

More counselors are stepping up to fill the void, judging from a two-day seminar that Recovery Resources, a local agency that helps people fight addictions, conducted last week at Trinity Cathedral in Cleveland. More than 40 social workers and other professionals took part in the training, which can lead to the certification.

Money from the casinos could dramatically expand programs for Ohio's problem gamblers, said Jennifer Clegg, supervisor of Recovery Resources' gambling program.

The constitutional amendment requires that 2 percent of casino revenue go to programs aimed at gambling, alcohol and drug addiction. According to estimates, the amount will reach up to $14 million a year, compared with $335,000 that the Ohio Lottery Commission now provides for help with problem gambling.

"Thc casinos are coming, there's no way we can stop them," Clegg said. "We need to have our doors open for people who need services."

The state Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services has hired Kent State University researchers to determine which segments of the population and which areas of the state suffer most from gambling addiction, information that will help officials direct programming. Results are expected by the end of June.

United Way's First Call for Help operates Ohio's 24-hour problem-gambling help line. The number is 1-800-589-9966.

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News Headline: KSU students face discipline for College Fest | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University students
charged with crimes
following College Fest, the
annual, unsanctioned block
party that takes place on
East College Avenue, just
west of the Kent State University
campus, also will face
disciplinary action through
the university.
In a statement Tuesday,
KSU said any students
charged in Portage County
Municipal Court in Kent will
receive a hearing through
the Office of Student Conduct
and could face penalties,
including probation,
suspension and/or dismissal
from KSU.
“On Saturday, April 21,
College Fest 2012 activities
turned into a dangerous situation
for participants as
numerous fights broke out,
which also included bottle
throwing,” the university
said. “Many photos and
videos have been electronically
posted that show participants
throwing bottles
— sometimes full, unopened
bottles — at others, including
the police.”
A review of Kent Police
Department arrest and incident
reports show only
four of the 33 people arrested
were identified by police
as KSU students.
“This past weekend's activities
represented a small
number of students, however,
the impact of the actions
of a few reflects on all of us,”
the university said. “While
the university certainly understands
students' desire
to celebrate the end of the
school year, our primary concern
is for the safety and
well-being of participants,
the police and other emergency
personnel.”
“We support the city in its
efforts to keep celebrations
safe for everyone involved
and hope we can work together
to avoid this situation
in the future,” the university
said.
University officials asked
anyone who can identify a
person in photos posted online
— dozens were posted
on Kentwired.com, the student
media website, following
Saturday's events — who
is “creating a dangerous situation”
to call the Kent Police
Department at 330-673-
7732.
Arrests on Saturday
ranged from a felony drug
charge to underage drinking,
disorderly conduct and
failure to disperse. Twentyfour
of those arrested, and
their charges — all misdemeanors
except where noted
— and any resulting guilty
pleas were:
■ Michael R. Bohrer, 25, of Perry.
Possession of drug paraphernalia
and disorderly conduct by
intoxication.
■ Michael P. Campbell, 21, of
Columbia Station. Resisting arrest,
possession of marijuana and failure
to disperse. Campbell pleaded no
contest to all three charges Monday
in municipal court, was found
guilty by Judge Barbara Oswick
and sentenced to two days in the
Portage County jail starting May 4,
fined $500, ordered to complete 40
hours of community work service,
had his driver's license suspended
for six months and was ordered to
write a letter of apology to Kent police
Sgt. Michael Lewis.
■ Sebastian N. Campos, 18, of
Findlay. Underage drinking and littering.
Campos is a Findlay High
School student.
■ Matthew D. Estremera, 22, of
361 N. Mantua St., Kent. Disorderly
conduct by intoxication. Estremera,
a KSU student, pleaded guilty to the
charge Monday and was fined $140,
according to court records.
■ John P. Flanagan, 19, of North
Royalton. Underage drinking. He
pleaded guilty to the charge and
was sentenced by Oswick to two
days in the Portage County jail
starting May 18, fined $250 and
ordered to get a substance abuse
assessment.
■ Devon J. Foresha, 18, of Canton.
Underage drinking and possession
of marijuana.
■ Shane D. Gilbert, 30, of 482
Irma Ave., Kent. Resisting arrest, disorderly
conduct and failure to disperse.
Gilbert is a KSU student.
■ Lauren C. Hlavach, 21, of Walton
Hills. Two counts of operating
a vehicle under the influence. Her
blood alcohol content tested at 0.195,
more than two times the legal limit,
after she was stopped while driving
on East College Avenue, according
to Kent police.
■ Michelle L. Jones, 19, of Warren.
Underage drinking.
■ Timothy J. Kaelin, 25, of Lakewood.
Failure to disperse.
■ Zack P. Kinney, 19, of Medina.
Underage drinking and falsification.
■ Kyle T. Laffey, 21, of Timberlake.
Failure to disperse.
■ Nicholas A. Miele, 22, of Mineral
Ridge. Failure to disperse.
Miele is a KSU business management
major.
■ Jionni D. Nacci, 19, of Louisville.
Aggravated possession of drugs, a
fifth-degree felony, underage drinking,
having an open container. Nacci,
a Stark State Community College
student, also had capsules of acetaminophen
and the painkiller oxycodone
in his possession, according
to liquor control agents.
■ Nicholas R. Piks, 22, of Solon.
Operating a vehicle under the influence
and a stop sign violation.
Piks was stopped by police at East
Summit and Vine streets. He refused
a breath test, according to
Kent police.
■ Dominic S. Przela, 20, of Cleveland.
Underage drinking. He also had
a warrant for his arrest for failure
to appear in court on misdemeanor
charges filed by KSU police.
■ Steven M. Reese Jr., 19, of Chardon.
Underage drinking, resisting arrest
and failure to disperse.
■ Marissa J. Roach, 21, of North
Royalton. Failure to disperse.
■ Cory R. Sickafoose, 19, of Magnolia.
Underage drinking and failure
to disperse.
■ Zachary M. Stewart, 22, of Toronto,
Ohio. Assault, resisting arrest
and failure to disperse. Stewart allegedly
assaulted a 19-year-old man
at 308 E. College Ave.
■ Matthew C. Vielhaber, 19, Avon.
Underage drinking and littering. Vielhaber
told police he is a freshman
at the University of Toledo.
■ Olivia L. Wells, 20, of Warren,
Underage drinking. Wells is a
KSU student.
■ Nathaniel D. Wise, 21, of 211
E. Grant St., Kent. Disorderly conduct
by intoxication.

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News Headline: Kent State asks Students to Help ID 'College Fest' Offenders | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 11 students among 33 arrested during weekend block party that spiraled out of control

Officials at Kent State University are asking students and others who attended "College Fest" to help police identify those who broke the law or created "a dangerous situation."

The university posted a request for assistance on it's home page Thursday afternoon asking people who may be able to identify those shown in videos and photos posted online committing crimes to contact Kent Police.

"College Fest 2012 activities turned into a dangerous situation for participants as numerous fights broke out, which also included bottle throwing," the university's statement read. "Many photos and videos have been electronically posted that show participants throwing bottles — sometimes full, unopened bottles — at others, including the police. If you can identify anyone in the photos creating a dangerous situation, please contact the Kent Police Department at 330-673-7732."

Eleven of the 33 people arrested in connection with College Fest activities are students at Kent State, according to police and university officials. The students arrested will face a university hearing through the Kent State Office of Student Conduct following their charges in Portage County Municipal Court.

If found responsible, each individual student could face disciplinary probation, suspension and/or dismissal, according to the university.

Continuing in its statement, university officials said Thursday the behavior will not be tolerated.

"This past weekend's activities represented a small number of students, however, the impact of the actions of a few reflects on all of us," the statement reads. "While the university certainly understands students' desire to celebrate the end of the school year, our primary concern is for the safety and well-being of participants, the police and other emergency personnel. We support the city in its efforts to keep celebrations safe for everyone involved and hope we can work together to avoid this situation in the future."

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News Headline: Kent State University's College Fest Leads To Multiple Arrests, SWAT Team, Teargas (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Have you ever attended a party so wild a SWAT team had to break it up?

On April 21, 33 people were arrested after an annual block party to celebrate the end of the academic year at Kent State required several police departments, a SWAT team and medical professionals to disperse it.

After the authorities arrived, announcing on a loudspeaker "the party is over," some members of the 3,000 strong-crowd threw beer bottles back at law enforcement. Reportedly, flash-bang devices were also used. In response, police fired tear-gas into the crowd.

The Kent Stater reports at least nine of those arrested were Kent State students. Kent State spokesperson Emily Vincent told Patch the students will face a university hearing through the school's Office of Student Conduct following their charges in Portage County Municipal Court.

"If found responsible, each individual student could face disciplinary probation, suspension and/or dismissal," Vincent told Patch.

Kent Police Capt. Paul Canfield said they're still investigating who might be responsible for committing assaults and throwing items like bottles.

WATCH: Five videos from different advantage points as the SWAT team moved in to break up the crowds.

Warning: Some of the language heard in the videos is NSFW.

Please click on link for video:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/24/kent-state-college-fest-swat-arrests_n_1449420.html?ref=college

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