Report Overview:
Total Clips (37)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
Computer Science; Research (1)
Fashion Design; Students (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (4)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (12)
May 4 (3)
Office of the Provost (2)
Pan-African Studies (1)
Research (2)
Students (2)
Town-Gown (2)
Tuition (1)
University Press (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (2)
Cleveland street goes "green" in urban experiment 04/25/2012 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Closings/Cancellations - click for details Cleveland street goes "green" in urban experiment 10:37 AM, Apr 25, 2012 Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland CLEVELAND -- A downtown street is turning green and it's not Saint Patrick's Day. It's called...

The Akron Legal News 04/26/2012 Akron Legal News - Online Text Attachment Email

Login | April 26, 2012 Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland Graduate student Antonia Marinucci installs pinwheels as public art along a downtown Cleveland...


Computer Science; Research (1)
KSU gets $1.25 million grant to help Bangladesh 04/26/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email


Fashion Design; Students (2)
Kent State University students organize first fashion week 04/25/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Not many fashion-week organizers hold bake sales to cover costs, but the fashion students at Kent State University were determined to host a three-day event that included all 42 of their collections. "We're one big family after spending...

Student work to be shown at Fashion Week 04/26/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (4)
Journalism Students Answer My Call to Uncover Political Ad Data 04/25/2012 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

I was very pleased to find this video in my inbox this morning. Two intrepid journalism students from Kent State -- Megan Closser and Shanice Dunning -- took me up on my challenge to visit their local TV stations and uncover data behind the political...

Public Files? Not On A Student Budget 04/25/2012 ProPublica Text Attachment Email

...currently requires the files to be public, the only way to access them now is to physically visit the stations. As a broadcast journalism class at Kent State University demonstrated, it's sometimes not the smoothest process. Of four Cleveland stations the students visited, only one would allow...

Public access to political ad files? Not on a student budget. 04/25/2012 AlaskaDispatch.com Text Attachment Email

...currently requires the files to be public, the only way to access them now is to physically visit the stations. As a broadcast journalism class at Kent State University demonstrated, it's sometimes not the smoothest process. Of four Cleveland stations the students visited, only one would allow...

Local TV Stations Don't React Well When You Turn the Tables and Try to Film Them 04/25/2012 Scene - Online Text Attachment Email

Students in a broadcast journalism class at Kent State visited the four local TV stations in Cleveland (3, 5, 8, and 19) with one goal: to access the political ad data that each organization...


KSU at Stark (1)
Letter to the Editor: The Divine Divas serve their community 04/25/2012 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...women who have collaborated to raise funds for charitable organizations through their annual style show. Their outstanding event was conducted at The Kent State Stark Campus Conference Center on April 19. The proceeds from the Fashiontini 2012 fundraiser will go directly to assisting Community...


KSU at Tuscarawas (12)
Kent State Tuscarawas establishes performing arts center memberships (Andrews, Flood) 04/25/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas establishes performing arts center memberships By James Lovett Correspondent Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 03:33 PM NEW...

Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center to present 'In the Heights' 04/25/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center to present 'In the Heights' By Timothy Petropoulos Correspondent Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 05:33...

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Culinary Capers event 04/25/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Culinary Capers event By Matt Alpert Correspondent Posted Apr 24, 2012 @ 04:33 PM NEW PHILADELPHIA - ...

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop chorus show 04/25/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop chorus show By Matt Alpert Correspondent Posted Apr 24, 2012 @ 04:33 PM NEW...

Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'The Pirates of Penzance' 04/25/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'The Pirates of Penzance' By Matt Alpert Correspondent Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 05:33 PM NEW PHILADELPHIA...

Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'Carmina Burana' 04/25/2012 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'Carmina Burana' By Timothy Petropoulos Correspondent Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 05:33 PM NEW PHILADELPHIA...

Kent State Tuscarawas establishes performing arts center memberships (Andrews, Flood) 04/25/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas has established a new membership recognition program to acknowledge and reward its patrons. Gregg L. Andrews,...

Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center to present 'In the Heights' 04/25/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

The Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center will present the musical "In the Heights" at 7:30 p.m. May 13. The Tony Award-winning musical follows...

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Culinary Capers event 04/25/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will hold Culinary Capers from 6-10 p.m. May 5 at the Performing Arts Center. The event will include gourmet food samples...

Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop chorus show 04/25/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will present the Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus' annual show from 3-7 p.m. Saturday, April 28 at the Performing Arts Center...

Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'The Pirates of Penzance' 04/25/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas will present "The Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10 p.m. Thursday, April 26. The comedic musical tells the story of a band...

Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'Carmina Burana' 04/25/2012 Wicked Local Text Attachment Email

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas will host a performance of "Carmina Burana" from 7:30-9:30 p.m. May 12. The Tuscarawas Philharmonic will perform the cantata,...


May 4 (3)
Decision not to reopen May 4 probe no surprise 04/26/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

WKSU News: Morning news headlines for April 25, 2012 04/25/2012 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...products. Justice Dept. closes Kent shootings investigation The U.S. Justice Department announced this week it will not reopen the investigation of the Kent State shootings 42 years ago. Four students were killed and nine were wounded. One of the victims Allen Canfora had asked two years ago for a...

iPads fuel project, discussions at Lancaster High School | Lancaster Eagle Gazette | lancastereaglegazette.com 04/25/2012 Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...community memorial service at 6 p.m. May 3 at the Walnut Street United Methodist Church sanctuary. NEWS / Local News Justice Department won't reopen Kent State shootings case CLEVELAND -- The U.S. Justice Department, citing "insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers," won't reopen its investigation...


Office of the Provost (2)
UNCW selects provost finalists 04/25/2012 Wilmington Star-News - Online Text Attachment Email

...finalists for the university's provost and vice president of academic affairs position. The finalists are: Timothy Chandler, senior associate provost at Kent State University; Cameron Hackney, special assistant to the provost at West Virginia University; and Denise Battles, geology professor...

ONLY ON 3: Controversy surrounds UNCW Provost finalist (Chandler) 04/26/2012 WWAY-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Georgia, but declined to take the job after work he had done earlier in his career caused a stir. Dr. Chandler currently serves as an Associate Provost at Kent State University, but when he was being considered for the Provost position last year in Georgia, a paper he co-wrote with a colleague caused...


Pan-African Studies (1)
Loudin Letters to be program topic 04/25/2012 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Christina McVay, assistant professor of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, will present a program on the Loudin Letters at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Portage County Historical Society in the reference room....


Research (2)
Ohio Third Frontier Commission awards about $450,000 in grants in NE Ohio 04/25/2012 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...universities and startups in Northeast Ohio. Case Western Reserve University was awarded $50,000 to develop software designed to improve drug development. Kent State University received two grants, each totaling about $50,000. One project plans to determine whether a method of making flexible electronics...

State awards money for Northeast Ohio ventures 04/26/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Publishing Co. Ohio awarded $948,109 in grants aimed at commercializing technologies developed at state institutions of higher education, including the University of Akron and Kent State University. The money was awarded through Ohio's Third Frontier Fund Technology Validation and Start-up...


Students (2)
More parties planned in Kent 04/26/2012 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Sheriff's Office, Brimfield police and the SWAT team to sweep the street, tear-gas partiers and close down the revelry. Thirty-three people - 11 of them Kent State students - were charged with underage drinking, littering, disorderly conduct, possession of marijuana and resisting arrest, among other...

'College Fest' Cost Estimated at $26,000 for Emergency Personnel 04/26/2012 Text Email


Town-Gown (2)
KENT DELEGATION MEETS WITH, THANKS U.S. GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS 04/25/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, April 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Six representatives of the Kent Central Gateway project, which includes the City of Kent,...

KENT'S 'WHO'S YOUR MAMA?' ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL TAKES PLACE ON APRIL 27 04/25/2012 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, April 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Standing Rock Cultural Arts, with the support of Kent State University, the City...


Tuition (1)
Rethink unfair credit-hour fees being imposed at Kent State and other Ohio public universities: editorial 04/26/2012 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

By The Plain Dealer Editorial Board SmithGroupJJRConstruction has begun on a new student green at the heart of the Kent State University campus. Kent State University's decision to impose higher fees on students who take a larger-than-normal class load...


University Press (1)
News---$1,000 Hubbell Award Given To J. David Hacker For 720,000 Estimate of Civil War Dead Essay 04/25/2012 Civil War Librarian Text Attachment Email

...Interdisciplinary History, Historical Methods, and the Journal of Southern History, among other publications. Awarded annually and funded by a donor through The Kent State University Press, the John T. Hubbell Prize recognizes the extraordinary contribution to the field of its namesake, who served as editor...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
Poets of all ages at Kent State 04/26/2012 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email


News Headline: Cleveland street goes "green" in urban experiment | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Closings/Cancellations - click for details

Cleveland street goes "green" in urban experiment
10:37 AM, Apr 25, 2012

Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland

CLEVELAND -- A downtown street is turning green and it's not Saint Patrick's Day.

It's called Pop Up Rockwell.

The week long experiment focuses on Cleveland's Rockwell Avenue between West Roadway and East 6th street.

The idea is to explore a future vision of Cleveland that is pedestrian and bicyclist friendly in a three dimensional environment. The green street will have a two-lane cycle track, storm water bio-filtration benches, enhanced transit stops and wind animated art.

Graduate students from Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative designed, built and installed the project that lasts until April 27th, 2012.

For more information go to PopUpRockwell.com

WKYC-TV

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News Headline: The Akron Legal News | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Legal News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Login | April 26, 2012

Kent State mounts bike-friendly event in Cleveland

Graduate student Antonia Marinucci installs pinwheels as public art along a downtown Cleveland street Friday, April 20, 2012. The "Pop Up City" event from Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground. It will include two-way bicycle lanes, sidewalk benches that filter runoff and public art. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Published: April 26, 2012

CLEVELAND (AP) - Urban planners at Kent State University are using five blocks in the heart of Cleveland as a laboratory for ideas on making cities more lively and inviting.

The latest "Pop Up City" event from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and partners aims to transform five blocks of Rockwell Avenue into a testing ground. The event, which began Saturday evening, includes two-way bicycle tracks, dozens of public artwork, and eco-friendly sidewalk benches that filter runoff from rain.

David Jurca, a senior urban designer at Kent State, told The Plain Dealer that the event gives city officials and advocacy groups a chance to experience some of these proposals in three dimensions.

"We can test these things out ... before a lot of political or financial investment is made," Jurca said.

The cost, estimated at $35,000, was covered by grants.

Other "pop-up" events transformed a pedestrian bridge in the Tremont neighborhood into a star-gazing perch and converted a downtown parking deck into a live theater.

Landmarks that flank one-way Rockwell Avenue include the Cleveland Public Library, the Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse, the mall park area, Key Tower bank headquarters and the Old Stone Church. Nearby are a convention center and medical mart under construction. The Public Square transit hub, a casino opening in May, and the Warehouse nightclub and restaurant district are also close.

The city's Group Plan Commission envisions Rockwell Avenue as a key link in a part of a downtown area that lacks connections. The commission appointed by Mayor Frank Jackson has recommended $90 million in improvements to the malls, surrounding streets and Public Square.

"We want to animate the street," said Jurca, who's directing six graduate students on the project. "It makes the street memorable and gives it an identity."

The design team will also use time-lapse photography and bike counts to track activity.

The temporary art installations will remain on view through Friday.

[Back]

The Akron Legal News • 60 South Summit St. • Akron, Ohio 44308 • Phone: 330-376-0917 • Fax: 330-376-7001

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News Headline: KSU gets $1.25 million grant to help Bangladesh | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kyle McDonald
about 6 hours ago

RECORD-COURIER STAFF REPORT

Kent State University will receive $1.25 million over the next three years to provide technical expertise and planning to help build the Bangladesh Research and Education Network, which is being financed by the World Bank.

The Ohio Academic Resource Network and Ireland's National Research and Education Network will provide input along side KSU in the project, which funded by the World Bank and is part of a larger initiative to eventually connect universities across the world via ultra-speed networks.

The project is intended to broaden collaboration and access to advanced research tools for researchers in Bangladesh.

KSU Department of Computer Science professor Javed Khan, Ph.D., an expert in advanced networking, will lead the project as the principal investigator.

"It is our dream to get the universities of the world connected so scholars, researchers and students can communicate with colleagues in every country with the best possible communication media," Khan said in a statement. "Research and education networks, originally inspired by US Internet2, are among the most functionally advanced networks in the world, but they also serve as a type of live research lab to test future technologies."

Bangladesh is experiencing rapid modernization and capacity expansion of its higher education infrastructure.

"The success of this initiative shows that our researchers are second to none and are making an impact internationally," said KSU Vice President for Research Grant McGimpsey in a statement.

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News Headline: Kent State University students organize first fashion week | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Emily Hamlin Smith, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Not many fashion-week organizers hold bake sales to cover costs, but the fashion students at Kent State University were determined to host a three-day event that included all 42 of their collections.

"We're one big family after spending 24/7 in the studio all year working on these collections," says David Siedlarczyk, a senior at Kent and one of the organizers of the school's first student-run fashion week. "We pour our blood, sweat and tears into our work and we wanted the opportunity to display it all."

Each student will have 30 minutes to showcase his or her work in presentation-style shows 6-10 p.m. Thursday through Saturday at 157 Restaurant & Lounge, 157 S. Water St. in Kent, which donated its space for the event. Instead of models walking a runway, guests will mill about the space and view the clothes much like they might paintings on a gallery wall, Siedlarczyk says.

Admission is free and open to the public.

Collections cover menswear, womens wear and children's clothes, and were created from a wide range of inspirations -- everything from earthquakes and origami to Gypsies and Vikings.

"It's like the final chapter of a book to us," Siedlarczyk says. "This is something we wanted to do for ourselves."

Click here or go to facebook.com and search for "Kent Fashion Week."

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News Headline: Student work to be shown at Fashion Week | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By CONNER HOWARD | STAFF WRITER

IF YOU GO
WHAT: Kent Fashion Week
WHERE: 157 Lounge, 157 S.
Water St., Kent
WHEN: 6 to 10 p.m. tonight
through Saturday
FOR INFORMATION: Call 330-
678-1577

Senior fashion
students at
Kent State University
will display
the results
of a semester of
work tonight at
157 Lounge at
157 South Water
St. in Kent.
The first ever
Kent Fashion
Week will showcase
the senior projects of more than 50 students
over the course of three nights. Showcases
are from 6 to 10 p.m. today through
Saturday
Each display is scheduled to take 30 minutes,
punctuated by five minute intermissions.
A full schedule of the showcase, including
names of participants, can be found at http://
thefashionlist.com/2012/03/kent-fashion-week/

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News Headline: Journalism Students Answer My Call to Uncover Political Ad Data | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name: Bill Moyers
News OCR Text: I was very pleased to find this video in my inbox this morning. Two intrepid journalism students from Kent State -- Megan Closser and Shanice Dunning -- took me up on my challenge to visit their local TV stations and uncover data behind the political ads they run.

Naturally, they took their cameras, but faced a surprising amount of resistance to using them, as you can see in their full report. (I'll be showing a clip at the top of my show this weekend.)

The FCC is expected to vote this Friday on a proposal that will require broadcasters to post their ad data online, so students like these -- as well as you -- won't have to play detective to find out how loudly money talks on TV. I invite you to visit the Campaign Ad Watch area on BillMoyers.com to learn more.

Moyers & Company airs weeklyon public television. Learn more at BillMoyers.com

Bill Moyers Journal

Moyers on Democracy

Follow Bill Moyers on Twitter: www.twitter.com/BillMoyers

FOLLOW POLITICS

125k

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News Headline: Public Files? Not On A Student Budget | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: ProPublica
Contact Name: Daniel Victor
News OCR Text: ProPublica, April 25, 2012, 10:31 a.m.

On Friday, the Federal Communications Commission will vote on a proposal that would require broadcasters to post political ad data online. While law currently requires the files to be public, the only way to access them now is to physically visit the stations.

As a broadcast journalism class at Kent State University demonstrated, it's sometimes not the smoothest process.

Of four Cleveland stations the students visited, only one would allow them to take footage, they reported, and only one official commented when asked if the files should be posted online. The stations also said copying the documents would cost 50 cents per page (over four times what FedEx Office charges), so the students couldn't afford to copy them all.

Diana Pollock, the WKYC Channel 3 (NBC) research director who showed the students the files, said she objected to the students filming her in the lobby and hallway, but they did not ask to take footage of the files. Sam Rosenwasser, vice president and general manager at WEWS Channel 5 (ABC), said "we don't allow anybody to bring cameras into the station," and that the students would have to seek comment from Scripps Howard, which owns the station. Suzy Gigante, an executive assistant at WJW Channel 8 (FOX) who dealt with the students, declined to comment, and Station Manager Greg Easterly was unavailable for comment Tuesday.

The files, which must be accessible to the public during business hours, reveal who bought political advertisements, how much they cost, and at what times the ads aired. Since we started our Free the Files project in March, almost 300 people have signed up to visit their local stations and help us post the files online. We've worked with news organizations (Wisconsin State Journal, Cincinnati Enquirer), universities (Northwestern) and everyday citizens to make the data more accessible. See more examples below, or sign up here if you'd like to contribute in your city.

Karl Idsvoog, the Kent State journalism professor who assigned his students to visit the Cleveland stations, contacted ProPublica after hearing Bill Moyers talk about our Free the Files project on Moyers & Company.

Several other organizations and individual contributors have jumped onboard the effort. Some new arrivals:

Pennsylvania: Taryn Luna, a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter, grabbed ad buy records from Restore Our Future from WTAE and WPGH. Ed Mahon from the York Daily Record got files from each station in the York-Harrisburg-Lancaster market, while Jenny DeHuff of The (Norristown) Times-Herald visited Fox 29 in Philadelphia.

Public Source, a nonprofit news site dedicated to investigative journalism in western Pennsylvania, made copies of the files from Erie. Reporter Halle Stockton visited four stations in her hometown, and said the station employees were consistently friendly and helpful. The visits took about 15 minutes apiece, and each station charged her 25 cents per copy.

"I left the stations really wondering what the big deal would be if they had just posted the orders online so they would save some paper and everyone a trip," she said.

Each of the contributors found similar results: An initial burst of spending from Mitt Romney and the Romney-supporting super PAC Restore Our Future, then a quick retreat from the airwaves after Rick Santorum dropped out of the race.

Wisconsin: Students in Herbert Lowe's class at Marquette University gathered pre-primary files from Milwaukee. Thanks to Tessa Fox, Heather Ronaldson, Diana Voigt, Eric Oliver, Benjamin Sheehan, Mark Strotman, Caroline Campbell, Erin Caughey, Kelly White, Allison Kruschke, and Sara Torres.

New York: Katrina Tulloch of The (Syracuse) Post-Standard found two super PACs that have advertised in the market. She also discovered that YNN, a cable channel, already has its political file online. (Cable TV channels also have to keep political files, but won't be subject to the FCC's proposal requiring them to be posted.)

Please sign up here if you'd like to contribute. You do not need to be part of an organization or university to participate. Here's what the process consists of.

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News Headline: Public access to political ad files? Not on a student budget. | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: AlaskaDispatch.com
Contact Name: Daniel Victor
News OCR Text: On Friday, the Federal Communications Commission will vote on a proposal that would require broadcasters to post political ad data online. While law currently requires the files to be public, the only way to access them now is to physically visit the stations.

As a broadcast journalism class at Kent State University demonstrated, it's sometimes not the smoothest process.

Of four Cleveland stations the students visited, only one would allow them to take footage, they reported, and only one official commented when asked if the files should be posted online. The stations also said copying the documents would cost 50 cents per page (over four times what FedEx Office charges), so the students couldn't afford to copy them all.

Diana Pollock, the WKYC Channel 3 (NBC) research director who showed the students the files, said she objected to the students filming her in the lobby and hallway, but they did not ask to take footage of the files. Sam Rosenwasser, vice president and general manager at WEWS Channel 5 (ABC), said "we don't allow anybody to bring cameras into the station," and that the students would have to seek comment from Scripps Howard, which owns the station. Suzy Gigante, an executive assistant at WJW Channel 8 (FOX) who dealt with the students, declined to comment, and Station Manager Greg Easterly was unavailable for comment Tuesday.

The files, which must be accessible to the public during business hours, reveal who bought political advertisements, how much they cost, and at what times the ads aired. Since we started our Free the Files project in March, almost 300 people have signed up to visit their local stations and help us post the files online. We've worked with news organizations (Wisconsin State Journal, Cincinnati Enquirer), universities (Northwestern) and everyday citizens to make the data more accessible. See more examples below, or sign up here if you'd like to contribute in your city.

Karl Idsvoog, the Kent State journalism professor who assigned his students to visit the Cleveland stations, contacted ProPublica after hearing Bill Moyers talk about our Free the Files project on Moyers & Company.

Several other organizations and individual contributors have jumped onboard the effort. Some new arrivals:

Pennsylvania: Taryn Luna, a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter, grabbed ad buy records from Restore Our Future from WTAE and WPGH. Ed Mahon from the York Daily Record got files from each station in the York-Harrisburg-Lancaster market, while Jenny DeHuff of The (Norristown) Times-Herald visited Fox 29 in Philadelphia.

Public Source, a nonprofit news site dedicated to investigative journalism in western Pennsylvania, made copies of the files from Erie. Reporter Halle Stockton visited four stations in her hometown, and said the station employees were consistently friendly and helpful. The visits took about 15 minutes apiece, and each station charged her 25 cents per copy.

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News Headline: Local TV Stations Don't React Well When You Turn the Tables and Try to Film Them | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Scene - Online
Contact Name: Vince Grzegorek
News OCR Text: Students in a broadcast journalism class at Kent State visited the four local TV stations in Cleveland (3, 5, 8, and 19) with one goal: to access the political ad data that each organization must make available to the public. This week, the FCC will vote on whether stations must put these numbers — what candidates, groups, etc. bought ad time and for how much — online; currently, it's only in hard-copy form and you have to go get it.

Simple enough request, right?…

[ Read more ]
[ Subscribe to the comments on this story ]

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News Headline: Letter to the Editor: The Divine Divas serve their community | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Letter to the Editor: The Divine Divas serve their community

By Anonymous

Letter to the Editor

Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 12:00 PM

We want to express our sincere thanks to The Divine Divas for selecting Community Hospice of Stark as the recipient of the funds they raised from Fashiontini 2012. The Divas are a group of seven women who have collaborated to raise funds for charitable organizations through their annual style show. Their outstanding event was conducted at The Kent State Stark Campus Conference Center on April 19.

The proceeds from the Fashiontini 2012 fundraiser will go directly to assisting Community Hospice of Stark with patient care.

What a wonderful ministry these seven women and their supporters have for organizations in our community and those we serve.

Bob Phipps,

Director of Development Community Hospice of Stark County

We want to express our sincere thanks to The Divine Divas for selecting Community Hospice of Stark as the recipient of the funds they raised from Fashiontini 2012. The Divas are a group of seven women who have collaborated to raise funds for charitable organizations through their annual style show. Their outstanding event was conducted at The Kent State Stark Campus Conference Center on April 19.

The proceeds from the Fashiontini 2012 fundraiser will go directly to assisting Community Hospice of Stark with patient care.

What a wonderful ministry these seven women and their supporters have for organizations in our community and those we serve.

Bob Phipps,

Director of Development Community Hospice of Stark County

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas establishes performing arts center memberships (Andrews, Flood) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas establishes performing arts center memberships

By James Lovett

Correspondent

Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 03:33 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas has established a new membership recognition program to acknowledge and reward its patrons.

Gregg L. Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of the university, said there are six levels of membership ranging from $30 to $1,500.

"The levels have been developed to accommodate affordability for students, friends, patrons, sustaining patrons, dean's circle and corporate partners," Andrews said in a press release from the center's box office. "A portion of every membership is a donation to the Performing Arts Center Endowment, which is tax-deductible."

Memberships last 12 months and include a membership card, access to pre-sale ticket opportunities, promotional items and an entry into a meet and greet lottery.

"For each show with a meet and greet, we will identify all of the members who have purchased tickets and then randomly select two to four of them to be invited backstage," box office manager Tom Flood said in the release. "Until now, the only way to take part in such an event was to be a guest of a corporate sponsor."

Since it first opened in November 2010, the center has hosted more than 50 performances, including 18 sellouts, according to the release.

A breakdown of membership prices and reward levels is available at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/membership.

For more information, call the Performing Arts Center's box office at 330-308-6400.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas has established a new membership recognition program to acknowledge and reward its patrons.

Gregg L. Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of the university, said there are six levels of membership ranging from $30 to $1,500.

"The levels have been developed to accommodate affordability for students, friends, patrons, sustaining patrons, dean's circle and corporate partners," Andrews said in a press release from the center's box office. "A portion of every membership is a donation to the Performing Arts Center Endowment, which is tax-deductible."

Memberships last 12 months and include a membership card, access to pre-sale ticket opportunities, promotional items and an entry into a meet and greet lottery.

"For each show with a meet and greet, we will identify all of the members who have purchased tickets and then randomly select two to four of them to be invited backstage," box office manager Tom Flood said in the release. "Until now, the only way to take part in such an event was to be a guest of a corporate sponsor."

Since it first opened in November 2010, the center has hosted more than 50 performances, including 18 sellouts, according to the release.

A breakdown of membership prices and reward levels is available at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/membership.

For more information, call the Performing Arts Center's box office at 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center to present 'In the Heights' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center to present 'In the Heights'

By Timothy Petropoulos

Correspondent

Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 05:33 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

The Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center will present the musical "In the Heights" at 7:30 p.m. May 13.

The Tony Award-winning musical follows a community of immigrants seeking a better life in Manhattan.

Tickets cost $45.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., New Philadelphia

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

The Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center will present the musical "In the Heights" at 7:30 p.m. May 13.

The Tony Award-winning musical follows a community of immigrants seeking a better life in Manhattan.

Tickets cost $45.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., New Philadelphia

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Culinary Capers event | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Culinary Capers event

By Matt Alpert

Correspondent

Posted Apr 24, 2012 @ 04:33 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

Kent State Tuscarawas will hold Culinary Capers from 6-10 p.m. May 5 at the Performing Arts Center.

The event will include gourmet food samples provided by friends of the Community Hospice, appetizers from local restaurants, a cash bar and an auction.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-343-7605.

Kent State Tuscarawas will hold Culinary Capers from 6-10 p.m. May 5 at the Performing Arts Center.

The event will include gourmet food samples provided by friends of the Community Hospice, appetizers from local restaurants, a cash bar and an auction.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-343-7605.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop chorus show | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop chorus show

By Matt Alpert

Correspondent

Posted Apr 24, 2012 @ 04:33 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

Kent State Tuscarawas will present the Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus' annual show from 3-7 p.m. Saturday, April 28 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400 or visit www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/event-listing.cfm.

Kent State Tuscarawas will present the Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus' annual show from 3-7 p.m. Saturday, April 28 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400 or visit www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/event-listing.cfm.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'The Pirates of Penzance' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'The Pirates of Penzance'

By Matt Alpert

Correspondent

Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 05:33 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

Kent State Tuscarawas will present "The Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10 p.m. Thursday, April 26.

The comedic musical tells the story of a band of pirates and their young apprentice Frederic.

Tickets are $37 to $54, depending on seating availability.

Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400.

Kent State Tuscarawas will present "The Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10 p.m. Thursday, April 26.

The comedic musical tells the story of a band of pirates and their young apprentice Frederic.

Tickets are $37 to $54, depending on seating availability.

Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'Carmina Burana' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'Carmina Burana'

By Timothy Petropoulos

Correspondent

Posted Apr 25, 2012 @ 05:33 PM

NEW PHILADELPHIA -

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas will host a performance of "Carmina Burana" from 7:30-9:30 p.m. May 12.

The Tuscarawas Philharmonic will perform the cantata, which was composed by Carl Orff. The libretto is from 13th century poetry about fortune, wealth and love.

Tickets range from $9 to $32.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas will host a performance of "Carmina Burana" from 7:30-9:30 p.m. May 12.

The Tuscarawas Philharmonic will perform the cantata, which was composed by Carl Orff. The libretto is from 13th century poetry about fortune, wealth and love.

Tickets range from $9 to $32.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas establishes performing arts center memberships (Andrews, Flood) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: James Lovett
News OCR Text: The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas has established a new membership recognition program to acknowledge and reward its patrons.

Gregg L. Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of the university, said there are six levels of membership ranging from $30 to $1,500.

"The levels have been developed to accommodate affordability for students, friends, patrons, sustaining patrons, dean's circle and corporate partners," Andrews said in a press release from the center's box office. "A portion of every membership is a donation to the Performing Arts Center Endowment, which is tax-deductible."

Memberships last 12 months and include a membership card, access to pre-sale ticket opportunities, promotional items and an entry into a meet and greet lottery.

"For each show with a meet and greet, we will identify all of the members who have purchased tickets and then randomly select two to four of them to be invited backstage," box office manager Tom Flood said in the release. "Until now, the only way to take part in such an event was to be a guest of a corporate sponsor."

Since it first opened in November 2010, the center has hosted more than 50 performances, including 18 sellouts, according to the release.

A breakdown of membership prices and reward levels is available at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/membership.

For more information, call the Performing Arts Center's box office at 330-308-6400.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas has established a new membership recognition program to acknowledge and reward its patrons.

Gregg L. Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of the university, said there are six levels of membership ranging from $30 to $1,500.

"The levels have been developed to accommodate affordability for students, friends, patrons, sustaining patrons, dean's circle and corporate partners," Andrews said in a press release from the center's box office. "A portion of every membership is a donation to the Performing Arts Center Endowment, which is tax-deductible."

Memberships last 12 months and include a membership card, access to pre-sale ticket opportunities, promotional items and an entry into a meet and greet lottery.

"For each show with a meet and greet, we will identify all of the members who have purchased tickets and then randomly select two to four of them to be invited backstage," box office manager Tom Flood said in the release. "Until now, the only way to take part in such an event was to be a guest of a corporate sponsor."

Since it first opened in November 2010, the center has hosted more than 50 performances, including 18 sellouts, according to the release.

A breakdown of membership prices and reward levels is available at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/membership.

For more information, call the Performing Arts Center's box office at 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center to present 'In the Heights' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Timothy Petropoulos
News OCR Text: The Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center will present the musical "In the Heights" at 7:30 p.m. May 13.

The Tony Award-winning musical follows a community of immigrants seeking a better life in Manhattan.

Tickets cost $45.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., New Philadelphia

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

The Kent State Tuscarawas Performing Arts Center will present the musical "In the Heights" at 7:30 p.m. May 13.

The Tony Award-winning musical follows a community of immigrants seeking a better life in Manhattan.

Tickets cost $45.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., New Philadelphia

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Culinary Capers event | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Matt Alpert
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will hold Culinary Capers from 6-10 p.m. May 5 at the Performing Arts Center.

The event will include gourmet food samples provided by friends of the Community Hospice, appetizers from local restaurants, a cash bar and an auction.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-343-7605.

Kent State Tuscarawas will hold Culinary Capers from 6-10 p.m. May 5 at the Performing Arts Center.

The event will include gourmet food samples provided by friends of the Community Hospice, appetizers from local restaurants, a cash bar and an auction.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-343-7605.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to hold Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop chorus show | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Matt Alpert
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will present the Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus' annual show from 3-7 p.m. Saturday, April 28 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400 or visit www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/event-listing.cfm.

Kent State Tuscarawas will present the Schoenbrunn Valley Barbershop Chorus' annual show from 3-7 p.m. Saturday, April 28 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400 or visit www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/event-listing.cfm.

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News Headline: Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'The Pirates of Penzance' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Matt Alpert
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas will present "The Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10 p.m. Thursday, April 26.

The comedic musical tells the story of a band of pirates and their young apprentice Frederic.

Tickets are $37 to $54, depending on seating availability.

Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400.

Kent State Tuscarawas will present "The Pirates of Penzance" from 7:30-10 p.m. Thursday, April 26.

The comedic musical tells the story of a band of pirates and their young apprentice Frederic.

Tickets are $37 to $54, depending on seating availability.

Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For tickets or more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas to present 'Carmina Burana' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wicked Local
Contact Name: Timothy Petropoulos
News OCR Text: The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas will host a performance of "Carmina Burana" from 7:30-9:30 p.m. May 12.

The Tuscarawas Philharmonic will perform the cantata, which was composed by Carl Orff. The libretto is from 13th century poetry about fortune, wealth and love.

Tickets range from $9 to $32.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas will host a performance of "Carmina Burana" from 7:30-9:30 p.m. May 12.

The Tuscarawas Philharmonic will perform the cantata, which was composed by Carl Orff. The libretto is from 13th century poetry about fortune, wealth and love.

Tickets range from $9 to $32.

The Performing Arts Center is located at 330 University Drive N.E., in New Philadelphia.

For more information, call 330-308-6400.

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News Headline: Decision not to reopen May 4 probe no surprise | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PASSING OF 42 YEARS TAKES TOLL;
KSU SHOOTINGS NOW PART OF HISTORY

A DECISION BY THE U.S. DEPARTment
of Justice not to reopen its
investigation of the events of May
4, 1970 at Kent State University is understandable,
given the passage of more than
four decades since that tragedy.
The department cited
“insurmountable
legal and evidentiary
barriers” in announcing
its decision Tuesday,
10 days before the
42nd anniversary of the shootings, which
took the lives of four KSU students and
saw the wounding of nine others.
One of the wounded students, Alan
Canfora, had appealed for the federal government
to take another look at the circumstances
leading up to the Ohio National
Guard firing on an antiwar protest.
Canfora made the request after coming
across a copy of an audio tape in 2007
that appears to include an order to the
Guard to fire on the students. Another
sound, which might be a revolver firing,
also is audible.
Assistant Attorney General Thomas
Perez, in a response to Canfora, said that
an analysis of the tape showed “no military-
like voice commands to fire” and
added that what appears to be a revolver
firing was, in fact, ambient noise from
the dormitory room where the tape was
made.
The events of May 4, 1970, viewed from
the perspective of history, were a turning
point for this nation. What happened in
Kent on that Monday afternoon nearly
42 years ago marked a turning point in
the anti-war movement, fueling a nationwide
wave of protest on college campuses
against the Vietnam War. And, of course,
there is no question that the events that
day changed the course of history for Kent
State and the Kent community.
Questions about the events leading up
to the shootings probably won't ever be
fully answered. The passing of four decades
has removed many of the key players,
such as Gov. James A. Rhodes, KSU
President Robert I. White and decisionmakers
at the local level, who might have
been able to shed light on what happened
on May 4.
May 4, 1970 is history now, without
question. It appears that any future investigation
of the events surrounding it
will be left to scholars rather than federal
authorities.

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News Headline: WKSU News: Morning news headlines for April 25, 2012 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Lake Erie draw bill clears committee

Election law repeal moves ahead

Crime-prone Youngstown church grounbreaking

Exotic animal rules clears hurdle

Unusual twists in Gov. Kasich's minor car crash

Gov. Kasich was coming back from a ceremony in Zanesville in his state-owned SUV, which was being driven by a trooper. Kasich was reportedly fine and doesn't plan to cancel any events, but he'll be checked out by his doctor just in case. Interestingly, the traffic officer assigned to the crash was familiar to Kasich. "You ever been stopped by a police officer who was an idiot?" That would be Officer Robert Barrett, who had pulled Kasich over in 2008 and earned the epithet in a speech to state workers last year. Kasich later apologized. And the vehicle that started that chain reaction that hit the governor, who famously advised supporters once he was elected to get on the bus or get run over by the bus? It was a charter bus.

Planned Parenthood funding restored in budget

Troopers are in as law enforcers at Ohio's newly privatized state prisons and limits on Planned Parenthood funding are out, as state lawmakers finalize dozens of changes to Gov. John Kasich's sweeping midterm budget bill. The amendments came Tuesday and House passage is likely today. The committee pulled a controversial proposal that placed Planned Parenthood at the back of the line for federal funding. The panel also voted to maintain language assigning the Ohio State Highway Patrol to protect privately owned prisons, rejecting requests by police groups to remove the measure from the bill.

DNA from 17-year-old murder not from an Akron man

Test results show that DNA recovered from a 17-year old Ohio murder didn't come from an Akron man who is serving a life sentence for the crime. Dewey Jones, who has always maintained his innocence, was convicted in 1995 for robbing and killing 71-year old Goodyear retiree Neal Rankin two years earlier. Tests of DNA from the crime scene did not match that of the 50-year old Jones. The attorney representing Jones from the Ohio Innocence Project has filed motions based on the results asking that the conviction be overturned or he be granted a new trial.

Timken Co. posts earnings boost

A day after breaking ground on a huge plant expansion, Canton-based Timken Co. said its first-quarter earnings jumped 38 percent. The specialty steel maker says net income was a record $155 million, up from $112 million a year ago. Sales rose to $1.42 billion on increased demand for its products.

Justice Dept. closes Kent shootings investigation

The U.S. Justice Department announced this week it will not reopen the investigation of the Kent State shootings 42 years ago. Four students were killed and nine were wounded. One of the victims Allen Canfora had asked two years ago for a further review of what caused Ohio National Guard troops to open fire. That followed discovery of a copy of a tape that seemed to include pistol shots and an order to fire. The Guard has maintained that there was no such order. Dean Kahler is one of the nine students wounded. He says he is disappointed in the Justice Department's decision but not surprised. According to the Plain Dealer, the Justice Department says the copy of the audio tape is inconclusive and there are too many "legal and evidentiary barriers" to reopen the case.

Lake Erie draw bill clears committee

Proposed rules on how much water farms and factories in Ohio can draw from Lake Erie have cleared a House committee. The Ohio House Agriculture Committee voted along party lines to approve the deal and it's expected to clear the House floor today. Gov. John Kasich vetoed the first bill after other states and two former Ohio Republican governors raised concerns that it allowed too much of a draw with too little oversight. The bill cuts in half the amount of water that can be taken from Lake Erie to 2.5 million gallons without a permit. But most environmental activists say the Ohio proposal doesn't do enough to safeguard the tributaries and streams that run into Lake Erie.

Election law repeal moves ahead

The full Ohio House is expected to vote to repeal a new election law that shrinks the state's early voting period. If enacted, would leave in place the old rules governing Ohio elections before the overhaul law was passed by lawmakers last summer. Democrats say the bill, which heads next to the governor, goes beyond a simple repeal because it reinstates elements to the state election law they say are harmful to voters.

Crime-prone Youngstown church grounbreaking

Groundbreaking is set for a $1.3 million parish hall for a Youngstown church that had two members killed in separate crimes two years ago. St. Dominic Roman Catholic Church became a focus of crime-fighting issues after two elderly men were killed outside the church in 2010. The church has worked with elected officials, including the last two Ohio attorneys general, on safety issues.

Exotic animal rules clears hurdle

An Ohio Senate committee has accepted a slew of changes to a measure aimed at regulating exotic animals in the state. The Senate's agriculture panel agreed to revisions Tuesday that include easing rules for snake ownership and exempting certain service monkeys who helped the disabled. Exoctic pet owners would have to get a permit by 2014.

Sounds like 'Big Brother' at work to me! Sure, perhaps rules and regulations governing exotic animal ownership of animals that absolutely do not belong in the private sector; animal species with a reputation for being dangerous or lethal. To group all exotic animals into one category is the lazy man's out and too imposing on people, in general. Where is the line going to be drawn between our rights as citizens in the United States and the Government dictating our every whim with consequences? Not fair; and, I don't like it at all; and, neither should you. If people do not unite and take a stand to protect themselves against Government enactments, we, the people of the United States will eventually become victims of a dictatorship, our Government. The Government cannot even control themselves; so, why allow them to get into our business? I feel the same way about State Governments. We are allowing the Governments to herd us around like sheep, and doing nothing to stop their interference in our rights as citizens in what is suppose to be a free Country. Agreed and accepted, regulations of animals that plainly do not belong in a private home should be scrutinized; but again, to lump all exotic species under one big umbrella is just plain stupid! All the Government is doing is making its' citizens go underground to get away from its' control, because if someone wants an illegal pet, they're going to do whatever it takes to have what they want. There has to be a compromise between the entities of you and me. Use your brains people! Fight for your rights.

Posted by: GEMO (Chesapeake, VA) on April 25, 2012 3:04AM

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News Headline: iPads fuel project, discussions at Lancaster High School | Lancaster Eagle Gazette | lancastereaglegazette.com | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: sponsored by

Top Local News News

NEWS /

Local News

Latest Huntington cuts will not involve layoffs

CHILLICOTHE -- The Huntington Board of Education improved its financial outlook Tuesday while managing to avoid layoffs.

NEWS /

Local News

COLUMBUS -- A Circleville businessman will be sworn in today as the newly appointed state representative for the 85th district, which includes Ross County.

NEWS /

Local News

Exotic animal bill heads to Ohio Senate for vote

COLUMBUS (AP) -- A proposal to regulate ownership of lions, tigers and other exotic animals in Ohio has cleared a legislative panel and is headed for a full Senate vote.

NEWS /

Local News

COLUMBUS -- An ex-Ohio doctor charged with illegally distributing prescription painkillers plans to change her not guilty plea.

NEWS /

Local News

Kenworth's parent co. sees soaring profits

BELLEVUE, Wash. -- Slightly less than two weeks after Kenworth Truck Co. in Chillicothe announced a 10 percent work force reduction, its parent company, Paccar Inc., said Tuesday that first-quarter profit rose 69 percent on higher sales of trucks in North America and parts.

NEWS /

Local News

Annual memorial service aims to offer strength to grieving families

CHILLICOTHE -- Finding strength from others who have experienced loss is part of the purpose behind an annual community memorial service at 6 p.m. May 3 at the Walnut Street United Methodist Church sanctuary.

NEWS /

Local News

Justice Department won't reopen Kent State shootings case

CLEVELAND -- The U.S. Justice Department, citing "insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers," won't reopen its investigation into the deadly 1970 shootings by Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at Kent State University.

NEWS /

Local News

Parties face off in court over Ohio legislative maps

COLUMBUS -- Justices asked difficult questions of both sides Tuesday as they weighed a case that seeks to scrap Ohio's newly drawn legislative map on the premise it was gerrymandered to favor Republicans.

NEWS /

Local News

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News Headline: UNCW selects provost finalists | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Wilmington Star-News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wilmington | University of North Carolina Wilmington officials this week announced three finalists for the university's provost and vice president of academic affairs position.

The finalists are: Timothy Chandler, senior associate provost at Kent State University; Cameron Hackney, special assistant to the provost at West Virginia University; and Denise Battles, geology professor at the University of Northern Colorado.

Each candidate will make a presentation and answer questions during upcoming receptions at the university. All presentations and receptions are open to the public. Chandler's presentation is April 30; Hackney's is May 3; and Battles' is May 7.

Provost Cathy Barlow announced in January that she would retire in June. She came to UNCW in 2000 as the dean of the Watson School of Education and served as interim provost in 2009, a position that became permanent in 2010.

For more information on the search, visit uncw.edu/provostsearch.

StarNewsOnline.comApril 25, 2012 6:37 PM

Wilmington | University of North Carolina Wilmington officials this week announced three finalists for the university's provost and vice president of academic affairs position.

The finalists are: Timothy Chandler, senior associate provost at Kent State University; Cameron Hackney, special assistant to the provost at West Virginia University; and Denise Battles, geology professor at the University of Northern Colorado.

Each candidate will make a presentation and answer questions during upcoming receptions at the university. All presentations and receptions are open to the public. Chandler's presentation is April 30; Hackney's is May 3; and Battles' is May 7.

Provost Cathy Barlow announced in January that she would retire in June. She came to UNCW in 2000 as the dean of the Watson School of Education and served as interim provost in 2009, a position that became permanent in 2010.

For more information on the search, visit uncw.edu/provostsearch.

– Pressley Baird

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News Headline: ONLY ON 3: Controversy surrounds UNCW Provost finalist (Chandler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: WWAY-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ONLY ON 3: Controversy surrounds UNCW Provost finalist

WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- One of the three finalists to become UNCW's next Provost is no stranger to controversy.

Doctor Timothy Chandler was up for a similar position last year at Kennesaw State University in Georgia, but declined to take the job after work he had done earlier in his career caused a stir.

Dr. Chandler currently serves as an Associate Provost at Kent State University, but when he was being considered for the Provost position last year in Georgia, a paper he co-wrote with a colleague caused some people there to get worried about his leadership and viewpoints.

The paper, which was published in 1998, focuses on the way a university should be governed.

After chandler was offered the Provost position, newspapers in Georgia reported that the paper Chandler wrote allegedly had an anti-American, Marxist slant.

The coverage and controversy was so intense, Chandler turned down the position and stayed at Kent State.

He was quoted on a website saying "if it had just been me and it hadn't been my family and everything else, I might have been tempted to go down and take on the world."

Chandler also says he wrote the paper in a pre-September 11th world and thinks the opinions of the general public was much different before the tragedy.

Chandler is now being considered with two others as a finalist for the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs position at UNCW. The position description specifically calls for leadership and vision in relation to academic studies at the university.

But, could this paper cause problems for Chandler again?

You may remember UNCW professor Mike Adams sued the school for denying him tenure because of his conservative political position and writings on his website.

Adams's standpoint has been the topic of discussion from the classroom to the courtroom and has still not been settled. So, if conservative views upset the system, will a supposedly socialist standpoint cause a scene?

The university acknowledged that they reviewed all of doctor Chandler's work.

In a statement they said:

"The UNCW Provost search committee, comprised of faculty, staff, administrators and students, has selected Dr. Chandler as one of three candidates to interview on campus based on his administrative and communication skills, commitment to higher education and his ability to provide leadership and vision."

UNCW did not specifically comment on the controversy.

Chandler is scheduled to on campus Monday for an open presentation to the school as part of the interview process.

Disclaimer: Comments posted on this, or any story are opinions of those people posting them, and not the views or opinions

of WWAY NewsChannel 3, its management or employees. You can view our comment policy here.

>>

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News Headline: Loudin Letters to be program topic | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Christina McVay, assistant professor of Pan African Studies at Kent State University, will present a program on the Loudin Letters at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Portage County Historical Society in the reference room.

McVay, who has been doing research on Frederick Loudin & the Jubilee Singers for 12 years, will share letters she recently transcribed belonging to Pat (Proctor) Balazs, a relative of the Loudins.

The letters were written by Loudin's wife, Harriet, and his niece, Leota Henson, mostly while they were on tour in Australia and New Zealand in the late 19th century.

The letters, some written in great detail, reveal the Loudins as people, not just professionals. Background information and a sampling of the Loudin Letters will be read, with an opportunity for questions and dialogue.

Frederick Loudin was born in Charlestown Township in 1835. He moved to Ravenna circa 1850 to get a high school education. In the 1870s, he joined the Fisk/Jubilee Singers, a group that had been formed from a university in Nashville, Tenn.

Later Loudin reorganized the group under his direction and mentorship. The African-American singing group toured the world, singing before some of the best known names of their time.

The program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served and the museum will be open after the program. The historical society is located at 6549 N. Chestnut St., in Ravenna.

Due to the popularity of the program, those attending should arrive 30 minutes early to secure parking and seating. For more information, call Wayne Enders at 330-310-7421.

(photo)

A program on the Loudin Letters will be presented at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Portage County Historical Society in Ravenna. Frederick Loudin and his wife, Harriet, toured the world with the Jubilee Singers in the late 19th century.

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News Headline: Ohio Third Frontier Commission awards about $450,000 in grants in NE Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2:24 pm, April 25, 2012

The state of Ohio has awarded about $950,000 in grants designed to help companies and colleges throughout the state turn university technologies into high-tech products.

The Ohio Third Frontier Commission, which oversees an economic development program aimed at stimulating Ohio's economy through investments in technology, awarded seven grants worth a total of about $450,000 to universities and startups in Northeast Ohio.

Case Western Reserve University was awarded $50,000 to develop software designed to improve drug development.

Kent State University received two grants, each totaling about $50,000. One project plans to determine whether a method of making flexible electronics is commercially viable. The other is focused on completing a system meant to make sure patients in clinical trials and those with chronic diseases comply with doctors' orders.

The commission awarded two $50,000 grants to the University of Akron. One will help the university develop both an elastomeric coating that will serve as a flexible glue designed to help wounds heal. The university will use the other to develop a prototype device that would harvest waste heat by converting it to mechanical energy, using metal alloys that change shape.

Two $100,000 awards went to Northeast Ohio companies commercializing university technologies.

Design Flux Technologies LLC of Aurora aims to develop an algorithm that would be used to manage energy flow in batteries. The company plans to license the core technology from the University of Akron.

Likewise, GraphSQL LLC of Aurora aims to license technology from Kent State. The company then plans to develop and test software that would be used to analyze information in large databases.

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News Headline: State awards money for Northeast Ohio ventures | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: State awards money for Northeast Ohio ventures

Beacon Journal staff report
Published: April 25, 2012 - 09:54 PM | Updated: April 25, 2012 - 11:00 PM
State awards money for Northeast Ohio ventures April 26,2012 03:00 AM GMT

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

Ohio awarded $948,109 in grants aimed at commercializing technologies developed at state institutions of higher education, including the University of Akron and Kent State University.

The money was awarded through Ohio's Third Frontier Fund Technology Validation and Start-up Fund.

A total of about $450,000 was awarded to Northeast Ohio ventures.

Here are the ventures and grants they received:

• Design Flux Technologies LLC, of Aurora, $100,000 to develop prototypes to be tested by battery manufacturers that will extend the life of rechargeable batteries. Design Flux will license technology developed at the University of Akron.

• GraphSQL LLC, of Streetsboro, $100,000 to develop and demonstrate a software system supporting graph data analysis for massive relational databases. Technology will be licensed from Kent State University.

Kent State University, $50,000 to complete a system for managing patient compliance in clinical trials and the treatment of chronic diseases.

Kent State University, $48,109 to demonstrate commercial viability of a manufacturing method for use in producing flexible electronics.

• University of Akron, $50,000 to develop an elastomeric coating that would heal wounds.

• University of Akron, $50,000 to develop a prototype device that harvests waste heat energy by converting it to mechanical motion through a shape memory alloy device.

Also in Northeast Ohio, Case Western Reserve University was awarded $50,000 to develop software designed to aid in drug development and approval process.

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News Headline: More parties planned in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Beacon Journal staff writer
Published: April 25, 2012 - 10:31 PM | Updated: April 25, 2012 - 10:57 PM

More parties planned in Kent April 26,2012 02:57 AM GMT

Carol Biliczky

Beacon Journal Publishing Co.

Kent police are gearing up for another round of parties at the Kent Fest II event on Saturday.

Capt. Paul Canfield said officers are "prepared to act accordingly" if there is more turmoil on College Street, just west of campus on the weekend before spring final exams.

"We'll be enlisting the same [police agencies], starting a little earlier, being a little more vigorous about parties as they develop," he said.

By mid-afternoon Wednesday, 2,293 people responded to the Facebook Kent Fest II page that they would attend the 12-hour party, which begins at 9 a.m.

The page advises attendees to respect the police and avoid fighting so that "the cops will not shut the party down early."

That's what happened last Saturday, when about 3,000 partiers converged on College Street for the annual unsanctioned, daylong party.

"The crowd began throwing bricks and bottles at officers and others in the crowd," Kent city police reported on its website.

That included medical personnel trying to help the injured, Canfield said.

That prompted Kent police to call in the Portage County Sheriff's Office, Brimfield police and the SWAT team to sweep the street, tear-gas partiers and close down the revelry.

Thirty-three people - 11 of them Kent State students - were charged with underage drinking, littering, disorderly conduct, possession of marijuana and resisting arrest, among other offenses.

Much of the event - from dancing, to drinking and singing, to fleeing from authorities wielding tear gas - was captured in photos and in videos posted to Facebook.

On its website Tuesday, KSU asked for the public to help identify those who may have committed crimes. The university asked those with information to contact Kent police at 330-673-7732. One student did so Wednesday morning, Canfield said.

KSU spokeswoman Emily Vincent said the university tried to ward off problems by walking door to door with student leaders to remind residents of the "need to act responsibly and safely."

"We emphasize the need of being good neighbors and discuss the negative impacts and dangers of excessive drinking," she said.

Any student charged with a College Fest infraction in Portage County Municipal Court will face a hearing through the KSU Office of Student Conduct and could be placed on probation, suspended or dismissed from the university, she said.

Last weekend's ruckus was the worst since 2009, when partiers lighted a bonfire in the street and about 50 people were arrested.

A College Street cleanup party at noon Sunday now is being advertised on Facebook. "Show some class and pick up some glass," the invitation reads.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

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News Headline: 'College Fest' Cost Estimated at $26,000 for Emergency Personnel | Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name:
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Police preparing for a repeat this weekend of last weekend's melee

By Matt Fredmonsky
Email the author
5:58 am

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News Headline: KENT DELEGATION MEETS WITH, THANKS U.S. GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS | Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, April 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Six representatives of the Kent Central Gateway project, which includes the City of Kent, the Portage Area Regional Transit (PARTA) and Kent State University, visited Washington, D.C., on April 16 and 17 and met with Ohio members of Congress and officials at the Federal Transit Administration.The goals of the Kent delegation's visit were to thank those in Washington who had supported the efforts to secure funding for the Kent Central Gateway multimodal facility as well as to update officials on the progress of the downtown Kent's economic development project.

The delegation included Kent's Mayor Jerry Fiala, Economic Development Director Dan Smith and Superintendent of Engineering/Deputy Service Director James Bowling; PARTA's Bryan Smith, director of planning; and Kent State's Iris Harvey, vice president for University Relations, and Tom Euclide, associate vice president for Facilities Planning and Operations.

The delegation was pleased to meet with Brian Farber, associate administrator for Communications and Congressional Affairs of the Federal Transit Administration at the U.S.Department of Transportation, and Congressman Tim Ryan.Additionally, the delegation visited the offices of Sen.Sherrod Brown, Sen.Rob Portman and Congressman Steven LaTourette and met with their economic development legislative aids.

"This was a wonderful opportunity for our partnership of the city, PARTA and the university to showcase the great things that are happening Kent, Ohio, as we redevelop the downtown area," Fiala said."Through this collaboration and our public-private partnerships, we are creating a better and more beautiful downtown, creating jobs and creating a great quality of life for our community to be enjoyed by our residents, students, employees and visitors."

Major areas of discussion during the delegation's meetings included:

* The downtown Kent project, one of Northeast Ohio's shining examples of public-private partnerships.To date, more than $100 million has been invested by the City of Kent, PARTA, the Burbick Foundation, the Kent State University Foundation, Fairmount Properties and Kent State University to redevelopment the downtown area.This is a five-to-one leverage of the $20 million Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program that was awarded by the U.S.Department of Transportation and funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for the Kent Central Gateway multimodal facility.

* Nearly 1,000 construction jobs created and more than 700 permanent jobs committed.

* A ribbon-cutting ceremony scheduled for August when the Davey Tree Resource Group and Ametek, Inc.take residence in their new buildings in downtown Kent.

* A planned memorial dedicated to all Portage County veterans to be designed and erected at the entrance to the new Kent Central Gateway multimodal facility.

Invitations were personally extended to congressional members and Peter Rogoff, administrator of the Federal Transit Administration, to attend the August ribbon-cutting event marking Davey Tree and Ametek moving into their new downtown Kent buildings.

For more information on the Kent Central Gateway, visit www.kentcentralgateway.com For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: KENT'S 'WHO'S YOUR MAMA?' ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL TAKES PLACE ON APRIL 27 | Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, April 25 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Standing Rock Cultural Arts, with the support of Kent State University, the City of Kent and Kent Parks and Recreation, will host the 6th annual "Who's Your Mama?" Environmental Film Festival and Local Foods Reception on Friday, April 27 at the Kent Student Center Kiva.

The festival will feature screenings of rarely seen short films, animated shorts and documentaries from a variety of producers.The event begins at 6 p.m.with a local foods reception featuring appetizers and fruit and cheese pairings, and the screening of "Where the Whales Sing," a film based on the Humpback Whale Research Project in Bermuda.

Local environmental films from the Portage Area Regional Transit Authority, Kent Environmental Council, Kent Parks and Recreation and the Portage Park District will be shown beginning at 6:30 p.m.Animated shorts for kids, including "Banjo Frogs," will begin at 7 p.m., followed at 8 p.m.by "Amazon Alive Part 1: Jungle of the Mind" and "Alternative Landscapes: Environmental Shorts."

Tickets for the film festival are $7 for adults and $5 for students and can be purchased at the door.

The festival is part of a weeklong series of Earth Day activities sponsored by Standing Rock Cultural Arts.The series concludes on Saturday, April 28, with the Main Street Block Party, featuring music and dance performances, alternative energy displays, ecological vendors and more.Main Street in downtown Kent will be closed between Depeyster and Water streets for the free event, which runs from 11 a.m.till 5 p.m.

For more information on the "Who's Your Mama" Environmental Film Festival, visit www.whosyourmama.org.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2012 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Rethink unfair credit-hour fees being imposed at Kent State and other Ohio public universities: editorial | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By The Plain Dealer Editorial Board

SmithGroupJJRConstruction has begun on a new student green at the heart of the Kent State University campus.

Kent State University's decision to impose higher fees on students who take a larger-than-normal class load is part of an unfortunate trend among public universities in Ohio that could clip the wings of the state's most ambitious students -- or send them elsewhere.

Only Ohio State University and Miami University don't charge additional credit-hour fees for students who take extra classes, according to Kent State.

Next fall, Kent State students on the main campus who take more than 17 credit hours, or more than 16 credit hours in 2013, will pay $440 per extra credit hour. That's on the high end for the state.

Kent State officials argue that nose-to-the-grindstone students make more use of buildings and professors than other students.

Really?

About our editorials

Plain Dealer editorials express the view of The Plain Dealer's editorial board -- the publisher, editor and editorial-writing staff. As is traditional, editorials are unsigned and intended to be seen as the voice of the newspaper.

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Students who take an abundance of classes do not take them on their own. And they're but a small percentage of the student population. Last year, just 12.6 percent of Kent students took bigger class loads, according to Kent State's records.

A Kent State spokeswoman said the new fees next year, along with higher tuition fees, will pay for a $170 million projectto replace aging buildings and take care of long-deferred maintenance.

But that means the most diligent and ambitious students effectively are subsidizing others through higher fees in lieu of even higher tuition for all or other approaches. Kent State and other universities should rethink these fees.

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News Headline: News---$1,000 Hubbell Award Given To J. David Hacker For 720,000 Estimate of Civil War Dead Essay | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/25/2012
Outlet Full Name: Civil War Librarian
Contact Name: Rea Andrew Redd
News OCR Text: J. David Hacker has won the John T. Hubbell Prize for the best article published in Civil War History during 2011. His study, “A Census Based Count of the Civil War Dead,” Civil War History (December 2011), was selected by the journal's editorial advisory board. The prize earns the recipient a $1,000 award. Hacker's article challenges the long-accepted, although not well-supported, estimate of 620,000 soldier deaths. Using recently released microdata samples from nineteenth-century censuses to reassess this number, he compares male survival rates between 1860 and 1870 with male survival rates in surrounding censuses. He concludes that the traditional statistic understates the number of actual Civil War deaths by approximately 20 percent.

In his estimation, the most probable number of deaths attributable to the Civil War is 752,000, although the upper bounds of his data could be as many as 851,000 deaths. These results have far-reaching consequences, encouraging historians to rethink assumptions not only about the war's human cost, but the ways in which we try to measure and comprehend the size of that cost. J. David Hacker is associate professor of history at Binghamton University, SUNY. His research focuses on the demographic history of the United States before 1940.

He has published articles on trends and determinants in mortality, economic and anthropometric correlates of first marriage, the onset of long-term fertility decline, the impact of parental religiosity on fertility, and the effect of the Civil War on southern marriage patterns. His previous work has appeared in the Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Historical Methods, and the Journal of Southern History, among other publications. Awarded annually and funded by a donor through The Kent State University Press, the John T. Hubbell Prize recognizes the extraordinary contribution to the field of its namesake, who served as editor of Civil War History for thirty-five years.

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News Headline: Poets of all ages at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/26/2012
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EDITOR'S NOTE
Roger Di Paolo

I don't remember writing a great deal of poetry
when I was in elementary school. What little I
did write was done under duress, following “rules”
that demanded a flair for rhyme.
Not so with the work of the young poets of Holden
Elementary and Longcoy Elementary in Kent
and Field's Falcon Academy, who were among the
performers at Giving Voice, a program sponsored
by the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State.
The third- and fourth-graders were among
those whose work was showcased at the program,
which drew an audience of about 500 this week at
the Kent Student Center Ballroom. The poems
they shared were quite sophisticated, not only in
terms of vocabulary but in imagery as well.
Also taking part were students from Theodore
Roosevelt High School in Kent, Maplewood Career
Center in Ravenna, the Poetry Alive! program
of Family & Community Services and Miller South
School for the Performing Arts in Akron.
The work of medical personnel from Summa
Health System and Akron Children's Hospital
also was featured along with Warriors Journey
Home, a veterans' writing circle, and four seniors
from Judson Manor in Cleveland.
All of the poets joined in a closing song, “Bloomin'
Ohio,” written by Kent's Hal Walker, which
was based on one of the third-graders' poems.
It was an entertaining and inspiring evening.

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